History Main / DRM

5th Dec '16 5:33:52 AM Vinccool96
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** Need more proof the [=StarForce=] developers are pond scum? When Stardock Software, creators of

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** Need more proof the [=StarForce=] developers are pond scum? When Stardock Software, creators of ''{{Galactic Civilizations}}'' and {{Sins of a Solar Empire}}, posted an article on their website stating how they felt that using DRM was bad customer relations and how they intended to abstain from adding DRM to any of their titles, [=StarForce=] responded by publishing torrent links to Stardock's games. That's right, they ''actively aided people in pirating the games of a company who refused to use their product''. Whatever your feelings about piracy, to do something like that against a company who refuses to use your product ''out of a desire to please their customers'' just to teach some kind of [[{{Broken Aesop}}warped lesson]] smacks of pettiness.
***As if that wasn't enough, they threatened the first two parties that raised awareness of the damage [=StarForce=] can cause with a lawsuit, claiming that the FBI has already been notified. Because it's the FBI you usually call when somebody's defaming you.
***Even better, it's becoming an established (and even accepted) practice for people to torrent a game as a sort of informal demo, and fork over money if they like what they see. All [=StarForce=] has provided is [[{{Nice Job Fixing It Villain}} free advertising]].
21st Nov '16 10:01:33 AM BiffJr
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** However, Steam is also unforgiving if you forgot to activate "Offline Mode" before going somewhere where getting Internet access is a pain, since offline mode must be activated while the PC or laptop still has internet access. Steam does offer an option to activate offline mode if it's started without an Internet connection, but that button only causes Steam to quit immediately for some reason.



** ''RockBand 2'' is doing something similar -- the manual includes a code that can be used to download 20 additional free songs (beyond the game's 84 on-disc), but the difference is that using this code is the ''only'' way to get the songs. (Unfortunately, this also means there's no way to get them in the Playstation 2 version of the game, which doesn't support DLC.) The same exact code (NOT the DLC code received after submitting it to Harmonix, the 20-character code on the back of the manual) is also used to get most of the licensed [=RB2=] songs in Rock Band 3 (the ones from Harmonix-fronted bands were later released for free on the [=X360=] and [=PS3=])
*** Got ''VideoGame/GuitarHero World Tour'' or ''Guitar Hero Smash Hits'' used? There's a good chance you won't be able to get any songs from them in ''Guitar Hero 5'' (WITH all the new stuff added like Expert+ for GHWT drum charts) as a result of that, and you're guaranteed not to get them if you lack a manual. Oh, and you still have to pay for the re-licensing, but that's the least of the worries here.



** ''[[VideoGame/{{Forza}} Forza Motorsport 3]]'' has an extra set of classic cars and test/benchmark circuits that you can download with the supplied code in the box.
** ''SOCOM: U.S. Navy [=SEALs=] Fireteam Bravo 3'' is also a possible offender, depending on your point of view. Bought it used? Pay an extra '''$20''' to play online!
*** However, this could also be viewed as an attempt by the publisher to actually get some semblance of a profit from used games sales, since most used games purchased have all the profits going to the seller (eg. Gamestop) and none going to the people who made or published the game.
*** On the other hand, it could be argued they indirectly profit from used games because the original buyer wouldn't have spent $60 on a game if he didn't know he'd be able to sell it for $40 in a couple of months.
** EA has been doing this too, most recently with the Creator/BioWare games Dragon Age and Mass Effect 2, which each come with a code for an extra party member if you buy them new (you must pay $15 for them if you buy it used). Mass Effect 2, however, has a little extra value with its Cerberus Network, which has various free bits of content, with more on the way, but you must either buy the game new or pay $15 for access to the network.
** The WiiWare release of ''VideoGame/MegaMan10'' was hacked right after its release by dedicated fans, who discovered that several DLC packs (that constituted an extra character, returning bosses from previous games, and special stages) were already part of the coding (and that these DLC packs were already downloaded to your system when you bought the game). This meant that customers who bought the game had to pay an extra $10 to unlock content that was already made and on their systems. Naturally, this led to debates about the ethical nature of making customers pay for already-downloaded DLC.
*** Ditto ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' with its release-date DLC that you had to pay to unlock. A vocal segment of the fanbase views this as a blatant cash-grab on the part of EA and Creator/BioWare[[note]]In fact, EA outright stated that the reason for this was because the game was finished well ahead of schedule, and the developers needed something to keep them busy until their next big project[[/note]].



** Need more proof the [=StarForce=] developers are pond scum? When Stardock Software, creators of ''VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations'' and SinsOfASolarEmpire, posted an article on their website stating how they felt that using DRM was bad customer relations and how they intended to abstain from adding DRM to any of their titles, [=StarForce=] responded by publishing torrent links to Stardock's games. That's right, they ''actively aided people in pirating the games of a company who refused to use their product.'' Whatever your feelings about piracy, to do something like that against a company who refuses to use your product ''out of a desire to please their customers'' just to teach some kind of [[BrokenAesop warped lesson]] smacks of pettiness.
*** As if that wasn't enough, they threatened the first two parties that raised awareness of the damage [=StarForce=] can cause with a lawsuit, claiming that the FBI has already been notified. Because it's the FBI you usually call when somebody's defaming you.
*** Even better, it's becoming an established (and even accepted) practice for people to torrent a game as a sort of informal demo, and fork over money if they like what they see. All [=StarForce=] has provided is [[NiceJobFixingItVillain free advertising]].
* Egosoft, the developers of the ''[[Videogame/{{X}} X-Universe]]'' series of space simulators, typically bundles the game with some form of DRM which is later removed, usually a year or two after release. ''X3: Reunion'' came with the infamous [=StarForce=] which was removed in the 2.0 update, and the same was repeated with the Tages DRM in ''X3: Terran Conflict''. ''Videogame/XRebirth'' was the first game to be UsefulNotes/{{STEAM}} exclusive and therefore lacks traditional DRM.

to:

** Need more proof the [=StarForce=] developers are pond scum? When Stardock Software, creators of ''VideoGame/GalacticCivilizations'' and SinsOfASolarEmpire, posted an article on their website stating how they felt that using DRM was bad customer relations and how they intended to abstain from adding DRM to any of their titles, [=StarForce=] responded by publishing torrent links to Stardock's games. That's right, they ''actively aided people in pirating the games of a company who refused to use their product.'' Whatever your feelings about piracy, to do something like that against a company who refuses to use your product ''out of a desire to please their customers'' just to teach some kind of [[BrokenAesop warped lesson]] smacks of pettiness.
*** As if that wasn't enough, they threatened the first two parties that raised awareness of the damage [=StarForce=] can cause with a lawsuit, claiming that the FBI has already been notified. Because it's the FBI you usually call when somebody's defaming you.
*** Even better, it's becoming an established (and even accepted) practice for people to torrent a game as a sort of informal demo, and fork over money if they like what they see. All [=StarForce=] has provided is [[NiceJobFixingItVillain free advertising]].
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* Egosoft, the developers of the ''[[Videogame/{{X}} X-Universe]]'' series of space simulators, typically bundles the game with some form of DRM which is later removed, usually a year or two after release. ''X3: Reunion'' came with the infamous [=StarForce=] which was removed in the 2.0 update, and the same was repeated with the Tages DRM in ''X3: Terran Conflict''. ''Videogame/XRebirth'' was the first game to be UsefulNotes/{{STEAM}} exclusive and therefore lacks traditional DRM.
12th Nov '16 5:37:58 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* One of the earliest types of DRM is the infamous "What is word 20 on line 5 in page 30 of the instruction manual?" checks. If you lost the manual or obtained the game without one? You don't get to play! See the CopyProtection article for more information on these "feelies". If you have a copy of the manual's text that does not preserve the exact format of the original (i.e, a transcript instead of a scan of the original pages), then it will be a tedious trial and error ordeal to figure out which word it is.

to:

* One of the earliest types of DRM is the infamous "What is word 20 on line 5 in page 30 of the instruction manual?" checks. If you lost the manual or obtained the game without one? You don't get to play! See the CopyProtection article for more information on these "feelies". If you have a copy of the manual's text that does not preserve the exact format of the original (i.e, a transcript instead of a scan of the original pages), then it will be a tedious trial and error ordeal to figure out which word it is. This form of DRM fell out of favor with the advent of people just posting the required information on the Internet.
12th Nov '16 5:36:02 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experience.

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* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experience.experience, especially if you've made a lot of progress.
12th Nov '16 5:35:20 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Creator/{{SEGA}}'s All.net-enabled arcade games will [[SelfDestructMechanism brick themselves]] if they go too long without being connected to the network.

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* Creator/{{SEGA}}'s All.net-enabled arcade games such as ''VideoGame/HatsuneMikuProjectDIVA Arcade'' and ''VideoGame/{{maimai}}'' will [[SelfDestructMechanism brick themselves]] if they go too long without being connected to the network.
12th Nov '16 5:34:55 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Creator/{{SEGA}}'s modern arcade games will [[SelfDestructMechanism brick themselves]] if they go too long without being connected to the All.net service.

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* Creator/{{SEGA}}'s modern All.net-enabled arcade games will [[SelfDestructMechanism brick themselves]] if they go too long without being connected to the All.net service.network.
12th Nov '16 5:34:35 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experience.

to:

* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experience.experience.
* Creator/{{SEGA}}'s modern arcade games will [[SelfDestructMechanism brick themselves]] if they go too long without being connected to the All.net service.
12th Nov '16 5:32:56 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experiencee.

to:

* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experiencee.experience.
12th Nov '16 5:32:47 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start.

to:

* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start. Then again, given that many games with [=eAMUSEMENT=] connectivity give you a player file with unlocks, records, and the like, playing the game without a network connection and thus a way to access your data would be a particularly crippling experiencee.
12th Nov '16 5:31:27 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Games For Windows Live was universally hated when it was in use, being seen as a poor attempt at competing Steam that only clogged the launching of the games it had under its banner, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and the Gamebryo ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games (''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout3}} 3]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]]''). Add to that GFWL's restriction on running {{Game Mod}}s of any kind, and the prolific mod fanbase for both the ''GTA'' and ''Fallout'' series, and the end result is you'll hardly see a soul under the sun that doesn't go around GFWL.

to:

* Games For Windows Live was universally hated when it was in use, being seen as a poor attempt at competing Steam that only clogged the launching of the games it had under its banner, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and the Gamebryo ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games (''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout3}} 3]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]]''). Add to that GFWL's restriction on running {{Game Mod}}s of any kind, and the prolific mod fanbase for both the ''GTA'' and ''Fallout'' series, and the end result is you'll hardly see a soul under the sun that doesn't go around GFWL.GFWL.
* Arcade games running on Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation system must be connected to [=eAMUSEMENT=] servers upon bootup. If the hardware can't connect, the game will refuse to start.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DRM