History Main / DRM

29th Jul '16 11:30:30 AM REV6Pilot
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* Games For Windows Live was universally hated when it was in use, being seen as a poor attempt at competing Steam that only clogged the launching of the games it had under its banner, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and the Gamebryo ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games (''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout3}} 3]] and ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]]''). Add to that GFWL's restriction on running {{Game Mod}}s of any kind, and you'll hardly see a soul under the sun that doesn't go around it.

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* Games For Windows Live was universally hated when it was in use, being seen as a poor attempt at competing Steam that only clogged the launching of the games it had under its banner, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and the Gamebryo ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games (''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout3}} 3]] 3]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]]''). Add to that GFWL's restriction on running {{Game Mod}}s of any kind, and the prolific mod fanbase for both the ''GTA'' and ''Fallout'' series, and the end result is you'll hardly see a soul under the sun that doesn't go around it.GFWL.
29th Jul '16 11:29:28 AM REV6Pilot
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* Some arcade boards, such as Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS-2 hardware, have what are known as "suicide batteries" that are required for the hardware to run. When the batteries run out, the effects may vary from loss of sound or scrambled graphics to straight up preventing the game from running (usually since the ROM is encrypted and the battery is connected to the part of the hardware that decrypts it for use). It is presumed that these batteries exist to curb piracy or as a form of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence planned obsolescence]]. More info on suicide batteries can be found [[http://www.arcadecollecting.com/dead/dead.html here]].

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* Some arcade boards, such as Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS-2 hardware, have what are known as "suicide batteries" that are required for the hardware to run. When the batteries run out, the effects may vary from loss of sound or scrambled graphics to straight up preventing the game from running (usually since the ROM is encrypted and the battery is connected to the part of the hardware that decrypts it for use). It is presumed that these batteries exist to curb piracy or as a form of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence planned obsolescence]]. More info on suicide batteries can be found [[http://www.arcadecollecting.com/dead/dead.html here]].here]].
* Games For Windows Live was universally hated when it was in use, being seen as a poor attempt at competing Steam that only clogged the launching of the games it had under its banner, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and the Gamebryo ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games (''[[VideoGame/{{Fallout3}} 3]] and ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]]''). Add to that GFWL's restriction on running {{Game Mod}}s of any kind, and you'll hardly see a soul under the sun that doesn't go around it.
14th Jul '16 6:41:04 PM Saber15
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* Egosoft, the developers of the ''[[Videogame/{{X}} X-Universe]]'' series of space simulators, typically bundles the game with some form of DRM which is later removed, usually a year or two after release. ''X3: Reunion'' came with the infamous [=StarForce=] which was removed in the 2.0 update, and the same was repeated with the Tages DRM in ''X3: Terran Conflict''. ''Videogame/XRebirth'' was the first game to be UsefulNotes/{{STEAM}} exclusive and therefore lacks traditional DRM.
10th Jul '16 10:30:39 AM nombretomado
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** EA has been doing this too, most recently with the BioWare games Dragon Age and Mass Effect 2, which each come with a code for an extra party member if you buy them new (you must pay $15 for them if you buy it used). Mass Effect 2, however, has a little extra value with its Cerberus Network, which has various free bits of content, with more on the way, but you must either buy the game new or pay $15 for access to the network.

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** EA has been doing this too, most recently with the BioWare Creator/BioWare games Dragon Age and Mass Effect 2, which each come with a code for an extra party member if you buy them new (you must pay $15 for them if you buy it used). Mass Effect 2, however, has a little extra value with its Cerberus Network, which has various free bits of content, with more on the way, but you must either buy the game new or pay $15 for access to the network.



*** Ditto ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' with its release-date DLC that you had to pay to unlock. A vocal segment of the fanbase views this as a blatant cash-grab on the part of EA and BioWare[[note]]In fact, EA outright stated that the reason for this was because the game was finished well ahead of schedule, and the developers needed something to keep them busy until their next big project[[/note]].

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*** Ditto ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' with its release-date DLC that you had to pay to unlock. A vocal segment of the fanbase views this as a blatant cash-grab on the part of EA and BioWare[[note]]In Creator/BioWare[[note]]In fact, EA outright stated that the reason for this was because the game was finished well ahead of schedule, and the developers needed something to keep them busy until their next big project[[/note]].
21st May '16 9:16:31 PM nombretomado
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** ''RockBand 2'' is doing something similar -- the manual includes a code that can be used to download 20 additional free songs (beyond the game's 84 on-disc), but the difference is that using this code is the ''only'' way to get the songs. (Unfortunately, this also means there's no way to get them in the Playstation 2 version of the game, which doesn't support DLC.) The same exact code (NOT the DLC code recieved after submitting it to Harmonix, the 20-character code on the back of the manual) is also used to get most of the licensed [=RB2=] songs in Rock Band 3 (the ones from Harmonix-fronted bands were later released for free on the X360 and PS3)

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** ''RockBand 2'' is doing something similar -- the manual includes a code that can be used to download 20 additional free songs (beyond the game's 84 on-disc), but the difference is that using this code is the ''only'' way to get the songs. (Unfortunately, this also means there's no way to get them in the Playstation 2 version of the game, which doesn't support DLC.) The same exact code (NOT the DLC code recieved received after submitting it to Harmonix, the 20-character code on the back of the manual) is also used to get most of the licensed [=RB2=] songs in Rock Band 3 (the ones from Harmonix-fronted bands were later released for free on the X360 [=X360=] and PS3)[=PS3=])
1st May '16 1:33:19 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* Some arcade boards, such as Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS-2 hardware, have what are known as "suicide batteries" that are required for the hardware to run. When the batteries run out, the effects may vary from loss of sound or scrambled graphics to straight up hardware failure (usually since the ROM is encrypted and the battery is connected to the part of the hardware that decrypts it for use). It is presumed that these batteries exist to curb piracy or as a form of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence planned obsolescence]]. More info on suicide batteries can be found [[http://www.arcadecollecting.com/dead/dead.html here]].

to:

* Some arcade boards, such as Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS-2 hardware, have what are known as "suicide batteries" that are required for the hardware to run. When the batteries run out, the effects may vary from loss of sound or scrambled graphics to straight up hardware failure preventing the game from running (usually since the ROM is encrypted and the battery is connected to the part of the hardware that decrypts it for use). It is presumed that these batteries exist to curb piracy or as a form of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence planned obsolescence]]. More info on suicide batteries can be found [[http://www.arcadecollecting.com/dead/dead.html here]].
1st May '16 1:32:49 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* Some brand of printers are designed to accept ink cartridges that match the brand of the printer. Other printers go the extra mile by refusing to work if you try to refill the ink yourself since the manufacturer wants you to spend more money by purchasing a new ink cartridge when the old one runs low on ink. [[labelnote:Info]]It was also discovered that some HP brand ink cartridges have a microchip with an "expiration date" built in so that when said date rolls around, the cartridge no longer works no matter how much ink is left inside.[[/labelnote]]

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* Some brand of printers are designed to accept ink cartridges that match the brand of the printer. Other printers go the extra mile by refusing to work if you try to refill the ink yourself since the manufacturer wants you to spend more money by purchasing a new ink cartridge when the old one runs low on ink. [[labelnote:Info]]It was also discovered that some HP brand ink cartridges have a microchip with an "expiration date" built in so that when said date rolls around, the cartridge no longer works no matter how much ink is left inside.[[/labelnote]][[/labelnote]]
* Some arcade boards, such as Creator/{{Capcom}}'s CPS-2 hardware, have what are known as "suicide batteries" that are required for the hardware to run. When the batteries run out, the effects may vary from loss of sound or scrambled graphics to straight up hardware failure (usually since the ROM is encrypted and the battery is connected to the part of the hardware that decrypts it for use). It is presumed that these batteries exist to curb piracy or as a form of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planned_obsolescence planned obsolescence]]. More info on suicide batteries can be found [[http://www.arcadecollecting.com/dead/dead.html here]].
3rd Apr '16 2:22:43 PM RisefromYourGrave
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** ''ForzaMotorsport 3'' has an extra set of classic cars and test/benchmark circuits that you can download with the supplied code in the box.

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** ''ForzaMotorsport 3'' ''[[VideoGame/{{Forza}} Forza Motorsport 3]]'' has an extra set of classic cars and test/benchmark circuits that you can download with the supplied code in the box.
19th Dec '15 1:02:13 PM R1ck
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Digital Rights Management (sometimes referred to as "digital ''restrictions'' management" or "digital rights ''mangling''", especially among detractors, and usually abbreviated "DRM") is a general term for access control mechanisms implemented on digital media to limit what a user can and cannot do with it.

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Digital Rights Management (sometimes referred to as "digital ''restrictions'' management" or "digital rights ''mangling''", especially among by detractors, and usually abbreviated "DRM") is a general term for access control mechanisms implemented on digital media to limit what a user can and cannot do with it.
29th Oct '15 5:46:59 PM nombretomado
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*** Got ''GuitarHero World Tour'' or ''Guitar Hero Smash Hits'' used? There's a good chance you won't be able to get any songs from them in ''Guitar Hero 5'' (WITH all the new stuff added like Expert+ for GHWT drum charts) as a result of that, and you're guaranteed not to get them if you lack a manual. Oh, and you still have to pay for the re-licensing, but that's the least of the worries here.

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*** Got ''GuitarHero ''VideoGame/GuitarHero World Tour'' or ''Guitar Hero Smash Hits'' used? There's a good chance you won't be able to get any songs from them in ''Guitar Hero 5'' (WITH all the new stuff added like Expert+ for GHWT drum charts) as a result of that, and you're guaranteed not to get them if you lack a manual. Oh, and you still have to pay for the re-licensing, but that's the least of the worries here.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DRM