History Main / CyberneticsEatYourSoul

25th Oct '17 7:12:05 PM livestockgeorge
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* In CordwainerSmith's famous debut short story, ''Literature/ScannersLiveInVain,'' this is a major theme. Due to a mysterious effect that interplanetary space has on the human body, causing physical agony and eventually a suicidal compulsion, anyone who goes into space must either be in [[HumanPopsicle cold sleep]], or have their sensory nerves severed so that they have no senses but the eyes, in which case their bodies must be regulated and monitored by implants. This is mostly done to "Habermen," convicts who have been sentenced to AFateWorseThanDeath[[note]]a running theme with Smith[[/note]], but because Habermen must be monitored, there is a small group of elite pilots, officers and engineers who undergo the same procedure, called the "Scanners." When a scientist discovers a way to travel safely in space without undergoing this procedure, the assembly of Scanners, whose cannot become hot-blooded or otherwise feel emotions viscerally, vote to assassinate him. Meanwhile, the hero, who is temporarily "cranched" (able to feel normal sensations) is outraged, declares the others to be "zombies," and vows to save the scientist. Part of the moral of the story is that the cold logic of the head must be regulated by the body.
14th Oct '17 9:28:19 AM Fuyumoto
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* ''Manga/{{Gintama}}'': Prof. Hayashi is willing to do pretty much anything for his dying daughter, including making talking toys, immortalizing her by converting her personality into data and transplanting it into a robot and ''converting his own personality into data and transplanting it into a robot'' in order to cope with the pain of finally [[OutlivingOnesOffspring seeing her die]]. Unfortunately, the robot housing the professor's soul swallows it completely and turns into a cold murder machine. [[spoiler: The professor gets to [[DyingAsYourself die as himself]] at the end though.]]
12th Oct '17 12:42:54 PM livestockgeorge
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* [[spoiler: Finn]] on ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' completely averts this. He currently [[spoiler: has a bionic arm]] and had his singing voice mechanically enhanced circa the beginning of the series by "swallowing a tiny computer," but his intermittent psychological troubles are handled very realistically, and none of them have all that much to do with cybernetics.
** Walking spoiler [[spoiler: Doctor Gross]] plays this completely straight, however. Zig-zagged with [[spoiler: Susan Strong,]] who does act ''really creepy'' when under the control of an old brain implant. [[spoiler: She gets better whenever it's inactive and when it's finally destroyed.]]
9th Oct '17 10:53:25 AM zealots
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* ComicBook/{{Cyborg}} (Victor Stone) of the Comicbook/TeenTitans played with this trope. While Victor is normally portrayed with a very forceful personality (he started out as an AngryBlackMan whose anger mostly stemmed from being a cyborg), he has been rebuilt and reinterpreted multiple times over the years. There have been versions of the character where it was implied that Cyborg was a full machine using what was left of Victor, but had no soul or personality; but these versions were very much the exception.

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* ComicBook/{{Cyborg}} (Victor Stone) Hank Henshaw, AKA Cyborg Franchise/{{Superman}}, looks like a straight example, but it's a bit more complicated. Originally part of a pastiche of the Comicbook/TeenTitans played ComicBook/FantasticFour GoneHorriblyWrong, he was turned into an energy being/ghost that could possess machinery after his body decayed away. It wasn't until he was rejected by his wife and wandered around space for a while that he became a hardcore villain (and even more hardcore DeathSeeker). So, this is more a case of [[{{Pun}} his soul eating cybernetics]].
** He eventually found himself in a clique
with this trope. While Victor is normally portrayed the [[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Anti-Monitor]] and [[ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis Superboy Prime]], both of whom had every intention of destroying everything that existed, including him. It didn't stick, much to his regret.
* The Guardians of the Universe got tired of the little issues that kept popping up with the ComicBook/GreenLanternCorps, and decided to "improve" upon them by inventing the Alpha Lanterns, elite volunteers converted into cyborgs via Manhunter tech. The big problem was that the connection to the Book of Oa the conversion hardwired into the volunteers turned them into puppets. The Guardians were so happy they could get what they thought was a Lantern's flexibility
with a very forceful personality (he started out as an AngryBlackMan whose anger mostly stemmed from Manhunter's zeal blinded them to the fact they were less than either due to their willpower being deadened by the programming. And that was before they were shown, ''forcefully'', that they weren't the only ones who could control said puppets...
** Then it got worse when Henshaw above found about the Alphas. He was tired of living, and realized the conversion process was similar to his own experience. So he decided to study them, commencing mass production to study the process, in hopes of eventually reversing his own state back to normal human.
* ''Comicbook/AllStarSquadron'''s Robotman, who in the main series struggles with maintaining his humanity while
being a cyborg), brain placed inside a robotic body, eventually loses his humanity after the war ended in ''[[ComicBook/TheGoldenAge JSA: The Golden Age]]''. In mainstream DC continuity, his brain was planted into the preserved body of his associate Chuck Grayson years later, making him human again.
* The ''ComicBook/DoomPatrol'''s Robotman is a different person with similar issues, who once checks himself into a mental hospital as a result. Despite this,
he has been rebuilt is often the sanest and reinterpreted multiple times over the years. There have been versions most level-headed member of the character where it was implied that Cyborg was a full machine using what was left of Victor, but had no soul or personality; but these versions were very much the exception.team.



* Dekko from ''ComicBook/{{Zot}}'' is a textbook example. Although cybernetics don't seem to be inherently bad in Zot's world, the trauma of having his terminally-ill body replaced a piece at a time turned him into a MadArtist. Of course, after a while he started to like it.
* Hart Whitcraft was afraid of this happening after receiving an artificial heart in the Acclaim version of ''ComicBook/MagnusRobotFighter''. [[spoiler: The series, and entire line, ends before we can find out.]]



* Played straight ''and'' subverted in the Archie ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehog series; the roboticization process used by Dr. Robotnik/Eggman normally results in a loss of free will, while the cybernetic enhancements of the Dark Legion actually ''don't'' result in a significant change of personality (though it's still considered by the mainstream public to be "unnatural"), and their status as "evil" is more from their methods of fighting for their right to continue their lifestyle, than the lifestyle itself.

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** Played straight in ''ComicBook/IronMan: Rapture'' mini-series that had Tony implanting himself with a new heart after his heart attack. [[spoiler: He ended up getting addicted to cyber enhancements and locked himself in his lab for a week. Before revealing himself as a cyberbeing named 'Stark 2.0''.]]
* Hart Whitcraft was afraid of this happening after receiving an artificial heart in the Acclaim version of ''ComicBook/MagnusRobotFighter''. [[spoiler: The series, and entire line, ends before we can find out.]]
* The Creator/MarvelComics superhero Deathlok got revived as a cyborg to be used as a soldier. He's now stuck with a computer linked to his brain that is constantly encouraging him to be a cold-blooded pragmatist instead of a decent human being, and it's a constant struggle of wills for him to override it.
** Deathlocket is a subversion. She usually has complete control, but technopaths are able to shut down her human half and control her via her cybernetics.
* In ''ComicBook/NobleCauses'', Rusty Noble's body was horribly mangled in an accident, and his brain was transferred into a robotic body. He struggled with his humanity for years, and eventually seemed to just give up; he started talking in a robotic monotone, without contractions, and with clipped, clinical sentences. [[spoiler:Turns out he was faking -- this happened not long after a couple of serious personal tragedies. He decided to hide his emotions by pretending he didn't have any, but on the inside he was feeling more depressed than ever. Ultimately a subversion, as Rusty never lost his ability to relate to human emotions, he just ''wished'' he had.]]
* ''ComicBook/RomSpaceknight'' subverts the trope, being an extremely human and noble character despite looking like a walking suit of armoróbut he ''fears'' this happening, and he [[BodyHorror loathes his metallic shell.]] Played with when his girlfriend Brandy becomes a Spaceknight as well -- at first her personality is unaffected, but when [[spoiler:[[DoomedHometown her entire home town is murdered by the Wraiths]]]], she succumbs to a state that Rom says he has seen in Spaceknights before: an overwhelming hatred that ''physically changes'' her armor to look more vicious, and she remains a cold-hearted killer until [[spoiler: she's removed from the armor and becomes human again.]]
* Played straight ''and'' subverted in the Archie ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehog ''ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehog'' series; the roboticization process used by Dr. Robotnik/Eggman normally results in a loss of free will, while the cybernetic enhancements of the Dark Legion actually ''don't'' result in a significant change of personality (though it's still considered by the mainstream public to be "unnatural"), and their status as "evil" is more from their methods of fighting for their right to continue their lifestyle, than the lifestyle itself.



* Hank Henshaw, AKA Cyborg Franchise/{{Superman}}, looks like a straight example, but it's a bit more complicated. Originally part of a pastiche of the ComicBook/FantasticFour GoneHorriblyWrong, he was turned into an energy being/ghost that could possess machinery after his body decayed away. It wasn't until he was rejected by his wife and wandered around space for a while that he became a hardcore villain (and even more hardcore DeathSeeker). So, this is more a case of [[{{Pun}} his soul eating cybernetics]].
** He eventually found himself in a clique with the [[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Anti-Monitor]] and [[ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis Superboy Prime]], both of whom had every intention of destroying everything that existed, including him. It didn't stick, much to his regret.
* The Guardians of the Universe got tired of the little issues that kept popping up with the Green Lantern Corps, and decided to "improve" upon them by inventing the Alpha Lanterns, elite volunteers converted into cyborgs via Manhunter tech. The big problem was that the connection to the Book of Oa the conversion hardwired into the volunteers turned them into puppets. The Guardians were so happy they could get what they thought was a Lantern's flexibility with a Manhunter's zeal blinded them to the fact they were less than either due to their willpower being deadened by the programming. And that was before they were shown, ''forcefully'', that they weren't the only ones who could control said puppets...
** Then it got worse when Henshaw above found about the Alphas. He was tired of living, and realized the conversion process was similar to his own experience. So he decided to study them, commencing mass production to study the process, in hopes of eventually reversing his own state back to normal human.

to:

* Hank Henshaw, AKA Cyborg Franchise/{{Superman}}, looks like a straight example, but it's a bit more complicated. Originally part of a pastiche Alistair Smythe, one of the ComicBook/FantasticFour GoneHorriblyWrong, he many ''Franchise/SpiderMan'' villains to build the Spider-Slayer robots, was turned into an energy being/ghost that could possess machinery after his body decayed away. It wasn't until at least a borderline case. After using cybernetics to become "the Ultimate Spider-Slayer" (as he was rejected by his wife and wandered around space for a while that called himself) he became a hardcore villain (and even megalomaniac with somewhat of a god complex. He was a little more hardcore DeathSeeker). So, lucid in subsequent appearances, but still somewhat mad, his desire for revenge against Spider-Man and J. Jonah Jameson becoming a dangerous obsession that [[spoiler:eventually leads to his death at the hands of Comicbook/SuperiorSpiderMan.]]
* ComicBook/{{Cyborg}} (Victor Stone) of the ''Comicbook/TeenTitans'' played with
this trope. While Victor is more normally portrayed with a case very forceful personality (he started out as an AngryBlackMan whose anger mostly stemmed from being a cyborg), he has been rebuilt and reinterpreted multiple times over the years. There have been versions of [[{{Pun}} his the character where it was implied that Cyborg was a full machine using what was left of Victor, but had no soul eating cybernetics]].
or personality; but these versions were very much the exception.
** He eventually found himself in a clique Played completely straight, however, with the [[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Anti-Monitor]] case of Grid, Cyborg's EvilCounterpart in the Crime Syndicate. When he first appeared in the ''ComicBook/ForeverEvil'' storyline he co-opted Cyborg's body and [[ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis Superboy Prime]], both of whom had every intention of destroying everything it was teased that existed, including him. It didn't stick, much to his regret.
* The Guardians of
he, like the Universe got tired of the little issues other Crime Syndicate members, was an evil alternate Vic. Later it was revealed that kept popping Grid was not only not an alternate Vic, but "he" was [[NotEvenHuman never even human]] at all.
* [[MeaningfulName Circuit Breaker]] from the original [[ComicBook/TheTransformers Marvel Transformers comics]] is this. Originally a humble, loyal, and cheerful woman, after a raid by the Decepticons leaves her crippled, she has cybernetic circuitry implanted onto her skin to allow her to walk, fly, and manipulate electricity. She also becomes a violent sociopath with no regard for the Transformers' factions or the actions of any individual Transformer, blaming all of them for her current state and believing that the best course of action is to KillEmAll. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero She actually ends
up helping the Decepticons more through her constant obsession with the Green Lantern Corps, violent destruction of all Transformers]], since the Decepticons take advantage of her predictable blind response and decided to "improve" upon them by inventing the Alpha Lanterns, elite volunteers converted into cyborgs via Manhunter tech. Autobots are a bit HonorBeforeReason in this instance. The big problem was that the connection to the Book point of Oa the conversion hardwired into the volunteers turned them into puppets. The Guardians were so happy they could get what they thought was a Lantern's flexibility with a Manhunter's zeal blinded them to the fact they were less than either due to their willpower being deadened by the programming. And that was whether her psychosis is stronger before they were shown, ''forcefully'', that they weren't the only ones who could control said puppets...
** Then it got worse when Henshaw above found about the Alphas. He was tired of living, and realized the conversion process was similar to his own experience. So he decided to study them, commencing mass production to study the process, in hopes of eventually reversing his own state back to normal human.
or after she goes through with her cybernetic implants is up for debate.



* Played straight in ''ComicBook/IronMan: Rapture'' mini-series that had Tony implanting himself with a new heart after his heart attack. [[spoiler: He ended up getting addicted to cyber enhancements and locked himself in his lab for a week. Before revealing himself as a cyberbeing named 'Stark 2.0''.]]
* ''ComicBook/RomSpaceknight'' subverts the trope, being an extremely human and noble character despite looking like a walking suit of armoróbut he ''fears'' this happening, and he [[BodyHorror loathes his metallic shell.]] Played with when his girlfriend Brandy becomes a Spaceknight as well -- at first her personality is unaffected, but when [[spoiler:[[DoomedHometown her entire home town is murdered by the Wraiths]]]], she succumbs to a state that Rom says he has seen in Spaceknights before: an overwhelming hatred that ''physically changes'' her armor to look more vicious, and she remains a cold-hearted killer until [[spoiler: she's removed from the armor and becomes human again.]]
* Alistair Smythe, one of many Franchise/SpiderMan villains to build the Spider-Slayer robots, was at least a borderline case. After using cybernetics to become "the Ultimate Spider-Slayer" (as he called himself) he became a megalomaniac with somewhat of a god complex. He was a little more lucid in subsequent appearances, but still somewhat mad, his desire for revenge against Spider-Man and J. Jonah Jameson becoming a dangerous obsession that [[spoiler:eventually leads to his death at the hands of Comicbook/SuperiorSpiderMan.]]
* [[MeaningfulName Circuit Breaker]] from the original [[ComicBook/TheTransformers Marvel Transformers comics]] is this. Originally a humble, loyal, and cheerful woman, after a raid by the Decepticons leaves her crippled, she has cybernetic circuitry implanted onto her skin to allow her to walk, fly, and manipulate electricity. She also becomes a violent sociopath with no regard for the Transformers' factions or the actions of any individual Transformer, blaming all of them for her current state and believing that the best course of action is to KillEmAll. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero She actually ends up helping the Decepticons more through her constant obsession with the violent destruction of all Transformers]], since the Decepticons take advantage of her predictable blind response and the Autobots are a bit HonorBeforeReason in this instance. The point of whether her psychosis is stronger before or after she goes through with her cybernetic implants is up for debate.
* ''Comicbook/AllStarSquadron'''s Robotman, who in the main series struggles with maintaining his humanity while being a brain placed inside a robotic body, eventually loses his humanity after the war ended in ''[[ComicBook/TheGoldenAge JSA: The Golden Age]]''. In mainstream DC continuity, his brain was planted into the preserved body of his associate Chuck Grayson years later, making him human again.



** Another ''X-Men'' example is brought to us by Donald Pierce and his Reavers, who play with the trope rather than playing it straight: Pierce is one of the first {{Cyborgs}} in ''X-Men'', and in early appearances had a BetaTestBaddie attitude, considering himself only "half a man" because of his cybernetic enhancements, but even before becoming a cyborg he was a bitter FantasticRacist and all-around terrible person; becoming a cyborg just gave Pierce the power to vent his rage on the mutants he hates so much. His subordinates, the Reavers, are similarly all some mixture of machine and man, but they're considerably saner than their boss, swinging between an elite mercenary unit and a QuirkyMinibossSquad DependingOnTheWriter.
* The ''ComicBook/DoomPatrol'''s Robotman is a different person with similar issues, who once checks himself into a mental hospital as a result. Despite this, he is often the sanest and most level-headed member of the team.
* In ''ComicBook/NobleCauses'', Rusty Noble's body was horribly mangled in an accident, and his brain was transferred into a robotic body. He struggled with his humanity for years, and eventually seemed to just give up; he started talking in a robotic monotone, without contractions, and with clipped, clinical sentences. [[spoiler:Turns out he was faking -- this happened not long after a couple of serious personal tragedies. He decided to hide his emotions by pretending he didn't have any, but on the inside he was feeling more depressed than ever. Ultimately a subversion, as Rusty never lost his ability to relate to human emotions, he just ''wished'' he had.]]
* Deathlok got revived as a cyborg to be used as a soldier. He's now stuck with a computer linked to his brain that is constantly encouraging him to be a cold-blooded pragmatist instead of a decent human being, and it's a constant struggle of wills for him to override it.
** Deathlocket is a subversion. She usually has complete control, but technopaths are able to shut down her human half and control her via her cybernetics.

to:

** Another ''X-Men'' example is brought to us by Donald Pierce and his Reavers, who play with the trope rather than playing it straight: Pierce is one of the first {{Cyborgs}} {{Cyborg}}s in ''X-Men'', and in early appearances had a BetaTestBaddie attitude, considering himself only "half a man" because of his cybernetic enhancements, but even before becoming a cyborg he was a bitter FantasticRacist and all-around terrible person; becoming a cyborg just gave Pierce the power to vent his rage on the mutants he hates so much. His subordinates, the Reavers, are similarly all some mixture of machine and man, but they're considerably saner than their boss, swinging between an elite mercenary unit and a QuirkyMinibossSquad DependingOnTheWriter.
* The ''ComicBook/DoomPatrol'''s Robotman is a different person ** This trope was initially subverted altogether with similar issues, Garrison Kane aka Weapon X (no, not [[ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} that one]]) of ''ComicBook/XForce'', who once checks himself into retained his heroic personality even after becoming a mental hospital as a result. Despite this, he is often the sanest quadruple amputee and most level-headed member subsequently receiving four artificial limbs courtesy of the team.
* In ''ComicBook/NobleCauses'', Rusty Noble's body was
Weapon X program. He ''did'' acquire a rather heated grudge against ComicBook/{{Cable}}, but that's somewhat understandable seeing as how Cable abandoned him on a mission which led to his becoming a quadruple amputee in the first place. Later, after his original creators departed and he lost his initial purpose as a heroic {{Foil}} to ComicBook/{{Deadpool}}, Kane played this trope horribly mangled straight, going to work for the Neverland mutant concentration camp in an accident, and what can only be described as pure unleaded CharacterDerailment. He was KilledOffForReal shortly after.
* Dekko from ''ComicBook/{{Zot}}'' is a textbook example. Although cybernetics don't seem to be inherently bad in Zot's world, the trauma of having
his brain was transferred terminally-ill body replaced a piece at a time turned him into a robotic body. He struggled with his humanity for years, and eventually seemed to just give up; MadArtist. Of course, after a while he started talking in a robotic monotone, without contractions, and with clipped, clinical sentences. [[spoiler:Turns out he was faking -- this happened not long after a couple of serious personal tragedies. He decided to hide his emotions by pretending he didn't have any, but on the inside he was feeling more depressed than ever. Ultimately a subversion, as Rusty never lost his ability to relate to human emotions, he just ''wished'' he had.]]
* Deathlok got revived as a cyborg to be used as a soldier. He's now stuck with a computer linked to his brain that is constantly encouraging him to be a cold-blooded pragmatist instead of a decent human being, and it's a constant struggle of wills for him to override it.
** Deathlocket is a subversion. She usually has complete control, but technopaths are able to shut down her human half and control her via her cybernetics.
like it.
9th Oct '17 10:29:51 AM zealots
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* The Prime Sentinels are like this. Something of a cybernetic ManchurianAgent, they are humans who have had {{Nanomachines}} introduced to their systems. When programming kicks in, they into armored beings with powerful weapons systems, and become, much like any other Sentinel, anti-mutant killing machines, with their former personalities are seemingly deleted. This was confirmed when ComicBook/Rogue tried to use her personality absorption power on one, only to find there was nothing left for her to drain. (However, Karima Shapandar was indeed cured, possibly because she was a prototype.)

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* The Prime Sentinels of ''Franchise/XMen'' are like this. Something While other types of Sentinels are stock MechaMooks, Primes are something of a cybernetic ManchurianAgent, as they are humans who have had {{Nanomachines}} introduced to integrated into their systems. bodies. When programming kicks in, they morph into armored beings with powerful weapons systems, and become, much like any other Sentinel, anti-mutant killing machines, with their former personalities are seemingly deleted. This was confirmed when ComicBook/Rogue ComicBook/{{Rogue}} tried to use her personality absorption power on one, only to find there was nothing left for her to drain. (However, Karima Shapandar was indeed cured, possibly because she was a prototype.))
** Another ''X-Men'' example is brought to us by Donald Pierce and his Reavers, who play with the trope rather than playing it straight: Pierce is one of the first {{Cyborgs}} in ''X-Men'', and in early appearances had a BetaTestBaddie attitude, considering himself only "half a man" because of his cybernetic enhancements, but even before becoming a cyborg he was a bitter FantasticRacist and all-around terrible person; becoming a cyborg just gave Pierce the power to vent his rage on the mutants he hates so much. His subordinates, the Reavers, are similarly all some mixture of machine and man, but they're considerably saner than their boss, swinging between an elite mercenary unit and a QuirkyMinibossSquad DependingOnTheWriter.
6th Oct '17 11:55:52 AM Abodos
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* Variation in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime 3: Corruption'': Ghor is already a cyborg (having only 6% of his original body left, in fact), but while he's usually a nice guy, his personality changes when fusing with any larger machine, becoming slightly more ruthless and aggressive, but still on your side. [[spoiler: Until he gets corrupted by [[TheCorruption Phazon]], at least.]]

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* Variation in ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime 3: Corruption'': ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'': Ghor is already a cyborg (having only 6% of his original body left, in fact), but while he's usually a nice guy, his personality changes when fusing with any larger machine, becoming slightly more ruthless and aggressive, but still on your side. [[spoiler: Until he gets corrupted by [[TheCorruption Phazon]], at least.]]
19th Sep '17 12:27:32 AM Doug86
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* Mostly averted in ''{{Pathfinder}}'' with a few exceptions : in a setting with technology, any character can get some "cybertech" implanted, and the only drawback is temporary Constitution damage every time an implantation is attempted, and in a more fantastic setting, lost limbs can be replaced by various prosthetics that range from a poor replacement to a direct upgrade, at no risk for the character. The only element that plays the trope straight is an archetype of the fighter class, the warmachine : becoming a warmachine involves replacing a large portion of the character's body with machinery, making them globally stronger and tougher but also permanently reducing one mental stat. Intelligence reduction means loss of memory and learning, Wisdom reduction means loss of sanity and general awareness, and Charisma reduction means loss of social skills and self-awareness.

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* Mostly averted in ''{{Pathfinder}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' with a few exceptions : exceptions: in a setting with technology, any character can get some "cybertech" implanted, and the only drawback is temporary Constitution damage every time an implantation is attempted, and in a more fantastic setting, lost limbs can be replaced by various prosthetics that range from a poor replacement to a direct upgrade, at no risk for the character. The only element that plays the trope straight is an archetype of the fighter class, the warmachine : becoming a warmachine involves replacing a large portion of the character's body with machinery, making them globally stronger and tougher but also permanently reducing one mental stat. Intelligence reduction means loss of memory and learning, Wisdom reduction means loss of sanity and general awareness, and Charisma reduction means loss of social skills and self-awareness.
17th Sep '17 4:32:41 AM Omegatron
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* ''VideoGame/{{Headlander}}'': [[spoiler:[[BigBad Methuselah]] believes that "something" is missing from him. He is unable to get it from his experiments on the [[BrainUploading brain uploaded]] citizens and believes that the only way to become whole is to merge with the player character.]]
10th Sep '17 2:30:59 PM Aiguille
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* {{Downplayed}} in ''Podcast/WithinTheWires'' in Cassette #4, when its revealed that people are possessed of a standard implant between ribs and hip that removes and stores memories, and is implied to manage instincts that include the impulse to violence. The {{Narrator}} of the cassettes attempts to use autogenic exercises to let a patient control their implant enough to restore some memories.

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* {{Downplayed}} in ''Podcast/WithinTheWires'' in Cassette #4, "Cassette #4: Sadness, Lungs," when its revealed that people are possessed of a standard implant between ribs and hip that removes and stores memories, and is implied to manage instincts that include the impulse to violence. The {{Narrator}} of the cassettes attempts to use autogenic exercises to let a patient control their implant enough to restore some memories.
9th Sep '17 8:22:35 AM Psyclone
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*** The ''Hong Kong'' campaign discusses this trope with two characters: Ten-Armed Ambrose had most of his body replaced by cybernetics to save his life and now runs a Street Doc clinic using machinery he's more or less permanently rigged into. He's on the verge of crossing the threshold and engages in a lot of social activity to keep his humanity in check. Meanwhile, Racter is a [[{{Transhumanism}} Transhumanist]] who has made it his life's mission to study the Essence Limit and is of the firm belief that it can be overcome, [[spoiler:a belief anchored in his own body being cybernetic from the waist down and having been implanted with some extremely experimental and volatile mind-affecting implants without them affecting him mentally. Racter attributes being able to go past the limit to the fact that he's a clinical sociopath, and thus also believes that people like him are the next step in human evolution.]]

to:

*** The ''Hong Kong'' campaign discusses this trope with two characters: Ten-Armed Ambrose had most of his body replaced by cybernetics to save his life and now runs a Street Doc clinic using machinery he's more or less permanently rigged into. He's on the verge of crossing the threshold and engages in a lot of social activity to keep his humanity in check. Meanwhile, Racter is a [[{{Transhumanism}} Transhumanist]] who has made it his life's mission to study the Essence Limit and is of the firm belief that it can be overcome, [[spoiler:a belief anchored in his own body being cybernetic from the waist down and having been implanted with some extremely experimental and volatile mind-affecting implants without them affecting him mentally. Racter attributes being able to go past get so close to the limit to the fact that he's a clinical sociopath, and thus also believes that people like him are the next step in human evolution.]]
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