History Main / CutLexLuthorACheck

25th Jun '16 7:09:53 PM HelloLamppost
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** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to raise the money necessary for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes require. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an [[{{Ubermensch}} ubermensch,]] he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are [[WhereDoesHeGetAllThoseWonderfulToys how he is always able to raise the money necessary for the equipment and hired minions minions]] his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes require. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an [[{{Ubermensch}} ubermensch,]] he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
25th Jun '16 6:57:31 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money necessary for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes require. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, [[{{Ubermensch}} ubermensch,]] he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.



*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor [[HeelFaceTurn going straight]] in his old age and marketing his inventions, as well as becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]

to:

*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor [[HeelFaceTurn going straight]] in his old age and marketing his inventions, as well as becoming friends with Superman again [[UsedToBeASweetKid as they had been in their their]] [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
25th Jun '16 2:05:38 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor going straight in his old age and marketing his inventions, as well as becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor [[HeelFaceTurn going straight straight]] in his old age and marketing his inventions, as well as becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
25th Jun '16 2:04:10 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor going straight in his old age and becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor going straight in his old age and marketing his inventions, as well as becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
25th Jun '16 2:03:14 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually ''OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor going straight in his old age and becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually ''OlderThanTheyThink [[OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor going straight in his old age and becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
25th Jun '16 2:02:09 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
*** Also, although no one remembers it (a fact Maggin has lamented), the name "[=LexCorp=]" actually ''OlderThanTheyThink originated]] in Maggin's story "The Ghost Of Superman Future," a FlashForward that depicted Luthor going straight in his old age and becoming friends with Superman again as they had been in their [[Comicbook/{{Superboy}} youth.]]
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
25th Jun '16 1:44:01 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] novel novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
*** While Lex's side enterprises were never referenced in the comics themselves, Maggin's second novel, ''Literature/MiracleMonday,'' was definitely considered canon for introducing the character Kristen Wells, who went on to become Superwoman in the comics. So the above may or may not be official.
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
25th Jun '16 1:38:46 PM HelloLamppost
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Creator/ElliotSMaggin's [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] beautifully subverts this trope in his novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.

to:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin's Creator/ElliotSMaggin beautifully subverts this trope in his [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] beautifully subverts this trope in his novel novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
25th Jun '16 1:37:08 PM HelloLamppost
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Added DiffLines:

** Creator/ElliotSMaggin's [[TheBronzeAgeOfComicBooks Pre-Crisis]] beautifully subverts this trope in his novel ''Literature/LastSonOfKrypton, '' which asserts that Lex regularly maintains multiple false identities as prominent scientists, businessmen, and even artists; and that they are how he is always able to seemingly effortlessly raise the money for the equipment and hired minions his world-conquering and Superman-busting schemes. In other words, Lex is perfectly capable of playing the legitimate marketplace like a fiddle and ''regularly does so as a matter of course,'' but because he views himself as an {{Ubermensch}}, he considers the idea of just playing by society's rules and getting rich and famous to be ''beneath him.'' He only views the money thus earned as a means to an end -- that end being conquest of the world and the destruction of Superman, two things polite society frowns upon.
** A year or so before the ''CrisisOnInfiniteEarths,'' Marv Wolfman wanted to write a story where Luthor "goes legit" and becomes a respected businessman, in the process [[VillainWithGoodPublicity gaining the public's trust]] and therefore becoming a much harder opponent for Superman to fight. [[ExecutiveMeddling Editorial]] considered this [[StatusQuoIsGod too big a departure]] for Luthor and nixed the idea, so Wolfman rewrote the script with Comicbook/VandalSavage as the villain in question. The resultant story feels a little forced, as Superman seems to take the whole thing very personally, despite the fact that he and Savage didn't have anywhere near the history that he and Lex did. By Wolfman's own account, this is where the idea for Lex's Post-Crisis businessman persona originated.
24th Jun '16 7:57:09 AM KingZeal
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See Also: FakeRealTurn where a business that is serving as a front operation for a criminal activity or organization becomes so successful in its own right that characters decide to pursue it as a legitimate business. And YouCouldHaveUsedYourPowersForGood.

to:

See Also: FakeRealTurn where a business that is serving as a front operation for a criminal activity or organization becomes so successful in its own right that characters decide to pursue it as a legitimate business. And YouCouldHaveUsedYourPowersForGood.
YouCouldHaveUsedYourPowersForGood. See also MoralPragmatist.
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