History Main / CulturalTranslation

16th Nov '17 1:06:54 PM Pichu-kun
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* Due to it being more common in Japan to refer to your sibling by a title than by their name, in the Japanese dub of ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' Ruby usually calls Yang "onee-chan". In the original English version she near exclusively calls Yang by her name.
7th Nov '17 11:23:22 AM ThomasProofreader
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*** Unless they are the stiff Prussian kind, in which case they usually speak in more or less standard German. However, Gert Fröbe dubbed himself in ''ThoseMagnificentMenInTheirFlyingMachines'' with his native Saxon dialect and the German dub of ''Series/HogansHeroes'' has Colonel Klink speaking in a Saxon and Corporal Schultz in a Bavarian accent.

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*** Unless they are the stiff Prussian kind, in which case they usually speak in more or less standard German. However, Gert Fröbe dubbed himself in ''ThoseMagnificentMenInTheirFlyingMachines'' ''Film/ThoseMagnificentMenInTheirFlyingMachines'' with his native Saxon dialect and the German dub of ''Series/HogansHeroes'' has Colonel Klink speaking in a Saxon and Corporal Schultz in a Bavarian accent.
14th Oct '17 11:09:30 AM ChronoLegion
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* ''Series/TheOrville'': One of the Russian dubs for the episode "Krill" changes the Krill deity's name from Avis (a car rental company no one in Russia would recognize) to Netflix.
10th Oct '17 11:14:58 AM WolfMattGrey
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** Wolfsbane of the New Mutants was similarly translated to "Félina". They actually considered a more literal translation like "Louva" [[note]]"louve" is French for "female wolf"[[/note]] but somehow considered it awkward-sounding.

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** Wolfsbane of the New Mutants was similarly translated to "Félina". They actually considered a more literal translation like "Louva" [[note]]"louve" is French for "female wolf"[[/note]] but somehow considered found it awkward-sounding.



** In Italy, an old translation of Marvel comics renamed Nightcrawler as "Lombrico" (Worm). Note that it's just the most offensive, but hardly the only one. Namor the Sub-Mariner lost his nickname for years, because no translation was fitting.
*** The funny thing is that "nightcrawler" is an American word for a type of worm, so it is actually not a cultural, but a literal translation.

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** In Italy, an old translation of Marvel comics renamed Nightcrawler as "Lombrico" (Worm). Note that it's just the most offensive, but hardly the only one. Namor the Sub-Mariner lost his nickname for years, because no translation was fitting.
***
The funny thing is that "nightcrawler" is an American word for a type of worm, so it is actually not a cultural, but a literal translation.(if somewhat offensive) translation. Namor the Sub-Mariner lost his nickname for years, because no translation was fitting.
10th Oct '17 6:26:45 AM WolfMattGrey
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* There was a French digest compiling several issues of various, mostly ComicBook/XMen-related [[MarvelUniverse Marvel]] comics (which bore the name ''Titans'' somewhat [[ComicBook/TeenTitans ironically]]) printed in the late-80s or early-90s, in which the names of American superheroes were a wide selection of direct translations, non-translations, and cultural translations. Nightcrawler, for instance, was still "Nightcrawler," but Phoenix became "Phénix" and Wolverine (this was well before the character became a household name) became "Serval."
** In most French translations, "Nightcrawler" is "Diablo". The exact translation of "wolverine" is "glouton", but it also means "big eater", not really appropriate for a super-hero. Wolverine retains his original name in most current French-language versions.

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* There was a French digest compiling several issues of various, mostly ComicBook/XMen-related [[MarvelUniverse Marvel]] comics (which bore the name ''Titans'' somewhat [[ComicBook/TeenTitans ironically]]) printed in from the late-80s or early-90s, late 70s to the early 90s, in which the names of American superheroes were a wide selection of direct translations, non-translations, and cultural translations. Nightcrawler, Colossus, for instance, was still "Nightcrawler," "Colossus," but Phoenix became "Phénix" and Wolverine (this was well before the character became a household name) became "Serval."
** In
" And in most French translations, "Nightcrawler" is "Diablo". "Diablo" (probably because of his demonic appearance).
**
The exact translation of "wolverine" is "glouton", but it which also means "big eater", not really appropriate for a super-hero. The editor also justified the Serval translation by saying servals were the only other animals whose sense of smell was comparable with that of a wolverine. "Serval" was eventually dropped and Wolverine retains switched back to his original name in most current French-language versions.versions.
** Wolfsbane of the New Mutants was similarly translated to "Félina". They actually considered a more literal translation like "Louva" [[note]]"louve" is French for "female wolf"[[/note]] but somehow considered it awkward-sounding.
7th Oct '17 4:33:32 PM jormis29
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* Before dubbing became the method of choice, early sound movies were sometimes produced in several versions simultaneously on the same sets. For instance Laurel and Hardy did a German and a French version of ''Pardon Us'', learning their texts phonetically and interacting with different supporting actors. In some cases this led to cultural translations as well, e. g. in the 1932 German film ''F. P. 1 antwortet nicht'' the main protagonist was cast and performed in a way that played to the expectations of the intended audiences of what a masculine hero should be. In the German version Hans Albers (aided by sidekick Peter Lorre) was brash and ebullient, in the French version ''I. F. 1 ne repond plus'' Charles Boyer was more suave, and in the English ''Floating Platform 1 Does Not Answer'' Conrad Veidt was cool and reserved.

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* Before dubbing became the method of choice, early sound movies were sometimes produced in several versions simultaneously on the same sets. For instance Laurel and Hardy did a German and a French version of ''Pardon Us'', learning their texts phonetically and interacting with different supporting actors. In some cases this led to cultural translations as well, e. g. in the 1932 German film ''F. P. 1 antwortet nicht'' the main protagonist was cast and performed in a way that played to the expectations of the intended audiences of what a masculine hero should be. In the German version Hans Albers (aided by sidekick Peter Lorre) was brash and ebullient, in the French version ''I. F. 1 ne repond plus'' Charles Boyer Creator/CharlesBoyer was more suave, and in the English ''Floating Platform 1 Does Not Answer'' Conrad Veidt was cool and reserved.
23rd Sep '17 8:41:18 PM nombretomado
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** On the other hand, some very Jew-related bits, like Fran's obsession with BarbraStreisand and the flashbacks from the kibbutz make absolutely no sense from an Italian standpoint.

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** On the other hand, some very Jew-related bits, like Fran's obsession with BarbraStreisand Music/BarbraStreisand and the flashbacks from the kibbutz make absolutely no sense from an Italian standpoint.
19th Sep '17 12:08:30 PM Naram-Sin
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* The Portuguese remake of the Spanish series ''Series/ElMinisterioDelTiempo'' is virtually identical in terms of characters, sets and plots to the original series, but [[CaptainObvious it changes the Ministry's location to Lisbon, makes it Portuguese, and all the missions related to preserving Spanish history are now about preserving Portuguese history.]] Most remade episodes take place around the same time as the original (e.g. the episode about ensuring that Lope de Vega boards the right ship in the Spanish Armada is now an episode about ensuring that Camoes boards the right ship in the India Armada), but some can depart centuries. The Pilot, instead of being set in the [[TheNapoleonicWars 1808-1814 Peninsular War]], is now set in the [[TheLateMiddleAges Portuguese Crisis of 1383-1385]]; and the two-parter about Julián being stranded in the [[SpanishAmericanWar Siege of Baler]] (1899) is now about his Portuguese alter-ego Tiago being stranded in 1975 Timor.
16th Sep '17 8:55:12 AM Sakubara
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* In the Japanese dub of ''WesternAnimation/RickAndMorty'', Morty and Summers' habit of calling Rick by his first name is dropped considering how Rick is their grandfather and referring to [[CallingParentsByTheirName older family figures in such a fashion]] is considered even more disrespectful than in the West even if we are talking about [[{{Jerkass}} Rick]] here, and works pretty well for Morty's character. Even Morty refers to Summer as "[[JapaneseSiblingTerminology onee-chan]]" instead of her name.
2nd Aug '17 9:25:23 AM TristanJeremiah
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TheOtherWiki has [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_translation a page on this]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CulturalTranslation