History Main / CulturalTranslation

26th Aug '16 4:51:07 PM jormis29
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** French actor Pierre Richard could well be considered the patron saint of this trope: He starred in ''The Tall Blond Man With One Black Shoe'' mentioned above but also in ''Le Jouet'' (The Toy) which was remade as ''The Toy'' starting Richard Pryor, and ''Le Jumeau'' (The Twin) remade as ''Two Much'' starring Antonio Banderas (though both screenplays were based on an American novel called ''Two Much''). With Gérard Depardieu he made ''Les Compères'' (Comdads) remade as ''Fathers' Day'' with Billy Crystal and Robin Williams, ''Les Fugitifs'' (The Fugitives) remade as ''Three Fugitives'' with Nick Nolte ans Martin Short and ''La Chèvre'' (The Goat) remade as ''Pure Luck'' with Danny Glover and Martin Short.

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** French actor Pierre Richard could well be considered the patron saint of this trope: He starred in ''The Tall Blond Man With One Black Shoe'' mentioned above but also in ''Le Jouet'' (The Toy) which was remade as ''The Toy'' starting Richard Pryor, and ''Le Jumeau'' (The Twin) remade as ''Two Much'' starring Antonio Banderas (though both screenplays were based on an American novel called ''Two Much''). With Gérard Depardieu he made ''Les Compères'' (Comdads) remade as ''Fathers' Day'' with Billy Crystal and Robin Williams, ''Les Fugitifs'' (The Fugitives) remade as ''Three Fugitives'' ''Film/ThreeFugitives'' with Nick Nolte ans Martin Short and ''La Chèvre'' (The Goat) remade as ''Pure Luck'' with Danny Glover and Martin Short.
20th Aug '16 9:54:04 AM louisXVI
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* In some foreign versions of ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'', the news anchorman is different. While most of the countries got a moose (named [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Peter Moosebridge]], with the real Peter Mansbridge voicing him in the English version), in the Chinese version he is replaced with a panda, in the Brazilian one with a jaguar, in the Australian one he's a koala, and in the Japanese version it's a raccoon dog (wearing a leaf on his head like the mythological {{Tanuki}}).

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* In some foreign versions of ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'', the news anchorman is different. While most of the countries got a moose (named [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Peter Moosebridge]], with the real real-life Canadian anchorman Peter Mansbridge voicing him in the English version), in the Chinese version he is replaced with a panda, in the Brazilian one with a jaguar, in the Australian one he's a koala, and in the Japanese version it's a raccoon dog (wearing a leaf on his head like the mythological {{Tanuki}}).
8th Aug '16 4:21:28 AM lakingsif
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** Conversely, the show wasn't changed for the British, and whilst the Jewish love for Streisand is easily understood, the lack of existence of the JewishMother trope except for in imported US media means that examples of it are accepted as MyBelovedSmother or MeddlingParents at the best of times, downright confusing at the worst.
8th Aug '16 4:15:11 AM lakingsif
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* There is an American version of the UK RealityTV genealogy show ''Series/WhoDoYouThinkYouAre''. The major difference between the two version is that all the Americans featured have Incredibly inspirational and history-altering ancestors. Whereas the British celebrities take what they're given.

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* There is an American version of the UK RealityTV genealogy show ''Series/WhoDoYouThinkYouAre''. The major difference between the two version is that all the Americans featured have Incredibly inspirational and history-altering ancestors. Whereas the British celebrities take what they're given.[[note]]FridgeLogic does support this: the genealogists can only realistically find out a few generations back from what the celebrities already know. For the British, who have likely just lived mundanely in the rough area of all their direct ancestors for several hundred years, there isn't much to find. However, most North Americans will have entered the country much later than that and so there's always something interesting, if not impressive. The higher number of impressive histories comes from the fact that with such a great population, many of the famous people in the US come from at least notable families or notable descent.[[/note]]
5th Aug '16 3:19:56 PM luiz4200
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** A three-part episode features the vencidad's residents on a vacation in Acapulco. When it was dubbed for Brazilian viewers, Acapulco became Guarujá for second and third parts but remained Acapulco for the first one.


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* ''Series/{{Snobs}}'': In Portuguese Language dubs, the Ferals are called "Ciganos" (Gypsies).
27th Jul '16 3:18:02 AM Tuomas
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** When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, most of the time the character names were translated literally if they had obvious Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") or Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").

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** When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, most of the time the character names were translated literally if they had obvious cool-sounding Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") or Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").
27th Jul '16 3:16:59 AM Tuomas
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** When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, the character names were translated literally in the cases where they had obvious Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") and Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").

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** When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, most of the time the character names were translated literally in the cases where if they had obvious Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") and or Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").
27th Jul '16 3:14:59 AM Tuomas
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Added DiffLines:

** When the X-Men comics were first published in Finland in the 1980s, the character names were translated literally in the cases where they had obvious Finnish equivalents, such as with Cyclops ("Kyklooppi") and Colossus ("Kolossi"). However, with some other names they came up with rather unusual localizations. Nightcrawler became "Painajainen" ("Nightmare"), possibly because the translator didn't know what a "nightcrawler" was, and thought it had something to do with nightmares. The name of the villain "Arcade" would literally translate to "game hall", which obviously isn't a good name for character... So he became, rather inexplicably, "Armoton" ("Merciless"), which has little do with the original English name, except that both words begin with ''Ar-''. As for the ComicBook/XFactor villain Apocalypse, the translator was under the impression that the word "apocalypse" translates to "The Book of Revelations", and he didn't want the villain to be called a "book", so he was given the much more generic name "Tuho" ("Destruction").
23rd Jul '16 2:48:26 PM nombretomado
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* In the Spanish translation of a ''CaptainUnderpants'' book, {{Cher}} is replaced with JulioIglesias.

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* In the Spanish translation of a ''CaptainUnderpants'' ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' book, {{Cher}} Music/{{Cher}} is replaced with JulioIglesias.Music/JulioIglesias.
22nd Jul '16 1:04:14 PM dmcreif
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* In foreign editions of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'', four points of Steve's list of things he missed while being frozen[[note]]More precisely, the ones that in the US version are covered as ''Series/ILoveLucy'', Creator/SteveJobs, Disco music and either the moon landing or the Berlin Wall, depending on the version[[/note]] are replaced with popular stuff from the country the dub comes from, chosen via polls on the various international Facebook pages. In the UK version, for example, the points are Music/TheBeatles, Creator/SeanConnery, ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' and the 1966 Football World Cup finals. Also, in the foreign versions of this list, ''Franchise/StarWars'' is not penned out like in the US version. Other countries' versions can be seen [[http://luciawestwick.tumblr.com/post/82010300995/do-you-remember-the-scene-where-steve-shows-page here]].
* In ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', Tony Stark at one point refers to the fact that Steve Rogers alias Captain America has been frozen for 70 years by calling him a "Capcicle", a pun on the superhero's name and either icicle or Popsicle (an American brand of ice pop that has become a generalized trademark). It seems that the creators of the German dub have chosen the latter interpretation, even though this brand is unknown in Germany. So, Tony calls Steve "Captain/Käptín Iglo" in the dub instead, after the mascot of a brand of frozen food. This is even serves as yet another one of those [[PopculturalOsmosisFailure pop-culture references which are going straight over Steve's head]], due to to Käpt'n Iglo having been introduced as late as 1985, as opposed to Popsicles, which have been existing by that name since TheTwenties.

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* In foreign editions of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'', four points of Steve's list of things he missed while being frozen[[note]]More precisely, the ones that in the US version are covered as ''Series/ILoveLucy'', Creator/SteveJobs, Disco music and either the moon landing or the Berlin Wall, depending on the version[[/note]] are replaced with popular stuff from the country the dub comes from, chosen via polls on the various international Facebook pages. In the UK version, for example, the points are Music/TheBeatles, Creator/SeanConnery, ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' ''Series/{{Sherlock}}''[[note]]which raises the question of who plays Sherlock and John in the MCU, since [[CelebrityParadox Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman both appear in the MCU]][[/note]] and the 1966 Football World Cup finals. Also, in the foreign versions of this list, ''Franchise/StarWars'' is not penned out like in the US version. Other countries' versions can be seen [[http://luciawestwick.tumblr.com/post/82010300995/do-you-remember-the-scene-where-steve-shows-page here]].
* In ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', Tony Stark at one point refers to the fact that Steve Rogers alias Captain America has been frozen for 70 years by calling him a "Capcicle", a pun on the superhero's name and either icicle or Popsicle (an American brand of ice pop that has become a generalized trademark). It seems that the creators of the German dub have chosen the latter interpretation, even though this brand is unknown in Germany. So, Tony calls Steve "Captain/Käptín Iglo" in the dub instead, after the mascot of a brand of frozen food. This is even serves as yet another one of those [[PopculturalOsmosisFailure pop-culture references which are going straight over Steve's head]], due to to Käpt'n Iglo having been introduced as late as 1985, as opposed to Popsicles, which have been existing by that name since TheTwenties.
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