History Main / Cukoloris

24th Feb '15 11:46:17 PM JamaicanCastle
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* A short scene in ''Film/{{Tombstone}}'' involving a traveling show features a decidedly low-tech version, where the effect of flickering flame (symbolizing FireAndBrimstoneHell in a reading of Faust) is created by having a stagehand slosh a half-full bottle of whiskey in front of the light.
29th Dec '14 8:02:49 AM Micah
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* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure RuleOfCool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.

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* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure RuleOfCool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.
29th Dec '14 8:01:20 AM Micah
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* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure Rule of Cool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.

to:

* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure Rule of Cool, RuleOfCool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.
29th Dec '14 7:57:57 AM Micah
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* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure Rule of Cool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.first to evoke the trope with a projector and a computer display.

to:

* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure Rule of Cool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.first to evoke the trope with a projector and a computer display.
29th Dec '14 7:57:36 AM Micah
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%% commented out since no examples are good [[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'', first to evoke the trope with a projector and a computer display.

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%% commented out since no examples are good [[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'', Odyssey]]'' was the first movie to show computer monitors projecting their images onto the user's face. This is pure Rule of Cool, because in order to get this effect in real life you'd have to be staring straight into the bulb of a projector. There were 16mm projectors behind all the flatscreens on the sets, so all Kubrick had to do was take the screens off.first to evoke the trope with a projector and a computer display.



* In ''Film/CityOfTheDead'', inside the Raven's Inn, a pronounced "roaring fire" effect is applied to the walls.



* In the flashback scene of ''Film/FangsOfTheLivingDead'', weird patterns are projected on the walls of Malenka's laboratory.



%% commented out since no examples are good [[/folder]]

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%% commented out since no examples are good [[/folder]]



%% commented out as too general per HowToWriteAnExample * A "flickering light source" version is the Stargate in the ''Franchise/StargateVerse''. To avoid CGI costs, the open gate is in many shots offscreen but its flickering light -- produced by a stagehand warping a flexible mirror -- illuminates the rest of the scene, and sound effects do the rest.

to:

%% commented out as too general per HowToWriteAnExample * A "flickering light source" version is the Stargate in the ''Franchise/StargateVerse''. To avoid CGI costs, the open gate is in many shots offscreen but its flickering light -- produced by a stagehand warping a flexible mirror -- illuminates the rest of the scene, and sound effects do the rest.
29th Dec '14 1:57:42 AM NemuruMaeNi
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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'', first to evoke the trope with a projector and a computer display.
* ''Film/{{Alien}}''
* ''Film/BatmanAndRobin''
* Creator/DavidLynch's ''Literature/{{Dune}}''
* ''Film/DeathMachine''
* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''
* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}''
* ''Film/SuckerPunch''
* Creator/StevenSpielberg is fond of using these with underlighting to illuminate a character's face when seeing a reflective object. Particularly noteworthy as an effect used when Franchise/IndianaJones is uncovering a golden or glowing idol or artifact.
[[/folder]]

to:

%% commented out since no examples are good [[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''[[TwoThousandOne 2001: A Space Odyssey]]'', first to evoke the trope with a projector and a computer display.
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''Film/{{Alien}}''
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''Film/BatmanAndRobin''
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * Creator/DavidLynch's ''Literature/{{Dune}}''
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''Film/DeathMachine''
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''Film/{{Swordfish}}''
%% commented out as ZeroContextExample * ''Film/SuckerPunch''
%% commented out as too general per HowToWriteAnExample * Creator/StevenSpielberg is fond of using these with underlighting to illuminate a character's face when seeing a reflective object. Particularly noteworthy as an effect used when Franchise/IndianaJones is uncovering a golden or glowing idol or artifact.
%% commented out since no examples are good [[/folder]]



* A well known example of the "flickering light source" version is the Stargate in the Franchise/StargateVerse. To avoid CGI costs the open gate is in many shots offscreen but its flickering light -- produced by a stagehand warping a flexible mirror -- illuminates the rest of the scene, and sound effects do the rest.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'': Though not exactly "an opaque sheet with holes in it," shadows from devices like these were often used to suggest structural detail that's off camera (and so doesn't have to actually be built). Look in the "overhead" area of the ship's interiors, particularly where a corridor opens onto a larger junction.

to:

%% commented out as too general per HowToWriteAnExample * A well known example of the "flickering light source" version is the Stargate in the Franchise/StargateVerse. ''Franchise/StargateVerse''. To avoid CGI costs costs, the open gate is in many shots offscreen but its flickering light -- produced by a stagehand warping a flexible mirror -- illuminates the rest of the scene, and sound effects do the rest.
%% commented out as too general per HowToWriteAnExample * ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'': Though not exactly "an opaque sheet with holes in it," shadows from devices like these were often used to suggest structural detail that's off camera (and so doesn't have to actually be built). Look in the "overhead" area of the ship's interiors, particularly where a corridor opens onto a larger junction.
20th Aug '14 4:39:16 AM SuddenFrost
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* DavidLynch's ''{{Dune}}''
* ''Film/DeathMachine''


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* Creator/DavidLynch's ''Literature/{{Dune}}''
* ''Film/DeathMachine''
* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy''
29th Mar '14 4:24:47 PM AzureSeas
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* ''SuckerPunch''

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* ''SuckerPunch''''Film/SuckerPunch''
3rd Oct '13 9:39:13 PM nombretomado
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* A well known example of the "flickering light source" version is the Stargate in the StargateVerse. To avoid CGI costs the open gate is in many shots offscreen but its flickering light -- produced by a stagehand warping a flexible mirror -- illuminates the rest of the scene, and sound effects do the rest.

to:

* A well known example of the "flickering light source" version is the Stargate in the StargateVerse.Franchise/StargateVerse. To avoid CGI costs the open gate is in many shots offscreen but its flickering light -- produced by a stagehand warping a flexible mirror -- illuminates the rest of the scene, and sound effects do the rest.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Cukoloris