History Main / CosmicDeadline

16th Jan '18 6:01:05 AM Vrahno
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* ''[[Franchise/{{Bionicle2015}} Bionicle: The Journey to One]]'' was likely planned to go on for another season or two before Company/{{Lego}} canceled it. So the final two episodes burn through a slew of ideas they had for the following year's arc: Umarak finds the scattered pieces of the Mask of Ultimate Power within the first few minutes, the concept of a Shadow Realm which swallowed up the capital city and its citizens is introduced, and [[AssPull suddenly there exists a prophecy that tells everyone what to do]], freeing them from the burden of having to figure things out.
5th Jan '18 2:51:05 PM Derkhan
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* Some of the books in Steven Erikson's ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' become veritable blood baths near the end as the story comes full circle and doomed characters are killed off. ''Literature/MidnightTides'', ''Literature/ReapersGale'' and ''Literature/TheCrippledGod'' are the most bloody examples.

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* Some All of the books in Steven Erikson's ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'', with the exception of ''Literature/GardensOfTheMoon'', become veritable blood baths near the end as the story comes full circle and doomed characters are killed off. ''Literature/MidnightTides'', ''Literature/ReapersGale'' and ''Literature/TheCrippledGod'' are the most bloody examples.off.
22nd Dec '17 8:01:27 PM nombretomado
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-->-- '''TheGrandListOfConsoleRPGCliches''', item [[ConsoleRPGCliches169To192 #182]] ("Compression of Time")

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-->-- '''TheGrandListOfConsoleRPGCliches''', '''Website/TheGrandListOfConsoleRPGCliches''', item [[ConsoleRPGCliches169To192 #182]] ("Compression of Time")
17th Nov '17 9:24:23 PM DustSnitch
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* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'': Dante has only nine lines left in ''Purgatorio'' to describe how he bathed in the river of good memories, so he admits that he doesn't have enough space to do the account justice and assures that the river is important for the next part of his journey, which will be covered in ''Paradiso''.

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* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'': Dante has There are only nine lines left in ''Purgatorio'' by the time Dante starts to describe how he bathed bathe in the river of good memories, so he Dante admits that he doesn't have enough space to do the account river justice and just assures that the river is reader it was important for the next part of his journey, which will be covered in ''Paradiso''.allowing him to get into Heaven.
17th Nov '17 9:21:59 PM DustSnitch
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* ''The Oracle's Queen'', the last book in the ''[[Literature/{{Nightrunner}} Tamír Trilogy]]'', ends so quickly after the FinalBattle that the MacGuffin doesn't even get a mention in the epilogue and is instead reduced to an author's note. (Although, to be fair, the MacGuffin was primarily buildup for a plotline that not only would happen hundreds of years later in-universe time, but ''[[{{Prequel}} had been published ten years earlier]]'' in real world time.)
* The last two books of ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' sped things up intensively, and characters ''finally'' got started on solving problems present from the third book. Interestingly, the last three books in that series were written shortly after Stephen King himself almost died (this fact became a plot point). Apparently, he suddenly realised he wouldn't live forever, and made an intense effort to finish the series before another car hit him. Among fans, the results are controversial.
* In many of his early novels (particularly the "juveniles"), Creator/RobertAHeinlein would wrap up the plot in a page or two, often leaving the story unresolved. This was probably due to word count/length limitations. Several blatant examples are ''Literature/BetweenPlanets'', ''Literature/SpaceCadet'', ''Literature/TheRollingStones'' and ''Literature/ThePuppetMasters''.
* Some of the books in Steven Erikson's ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' become veritable blood baths near the end as the story comes full circle and doomed characters are killed off. ''Literature/MidnightTides'', ''Literature/ReapersGale'' and ''Literature/TheCrippledGod'' are the most bloody examples.
* The whole ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series. We only learn what Horcruxes are in Book 6 (out of 7). As a result, while only two Horcruxes have been found and destroyed by the end of book 6, the heroes must find and destroy four of them over the course of ONE book. ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows Deathly Hallows]]'' then continues this trend: After too many pages detailing a camping trip and other hairsbreadth escapes, suddenly the Trio arrives at [[spoiler: Hogwarts]] and [[spoiler: Horcruxes are destroyed lickety-split (even ''offscreen'')]], ''truckloads'' of important, nay, essential information is revealed, and the plot relevant (or irrelevant) deaths start cropping up all over the place.
* This occurred often in the early ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books, with a plot being set up in the first 200 pages, and then resolved in five.



* The novelization of the first ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' game is a good example of this, as the first third of the game takes up about two thirds of the book, with the remaining two-thirds crammed into the last sixty pages or so.



** See ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' below.
* ''[[Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy Night's Dawn]]'' ends in between 50 and 100 pages, after taking more than ''3000'' to get to that point.
* All of Richard Hooker and William Butterworth's ''[[Literature/{{MASH}} M*A*S*H Goes to...]]'' sequels are subject to this, more pronouncedly as the series continues. The books have six to ten plots and subplots that get more and more convoluted and intertwined until roughly page 170. Then suddenly ''everything is resolved'' (happily for the protagonists and the young lovers, of course) in the space of 10 to 15 pages.
* Many of the books in ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series have far more plot in the last 50 to 100 pages than they do in the several hundred it takes to get to that point.
** The only book to have any major good guy offed is the fourteenth and last in a series of {{Door Stopper}}s.
** The three Sanderson-penned volumes aren't exceptionally fast-paced by most standards, but still count as this trope in comparison to the... [[SlowPacedBeginning leisurely]] pace of the half-dozen that precede them.
* The last part of ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Exile's Valor]]'' rushes to cover many of the background events mentioned in the first Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar trilogy.
** The end of ''Storm Breaking'' may have rushed to finish things as well.
* In ''Literature/TheSumOfAllFears'' spends approximately the first three quarters of the book dealing with the protagonist's miserable personal life. Then the nuclear bomb finally goes off and the plot that everyone came for is wrapped up in under 200 pages.
** Most of Clancy's books operate to a cosmic deadline - this is a conscious decision on his part. The intent is to show how crises start small, then snowball and snowball. His other reason is to illustrate how much planning goes into military operations. He can spend 300 pages getting all the pieces in place for 100 pages of fast-paced action. It's his style.
* Creator/NealStephenson's ''Literature/TheDiamondAge'' suffers from this a little. After the leisurely progress of the rest of the book, the last 100 pages or so run at a breakneck pace. Fortunately, it's well written enough that you don't mind the dizziness too much.



* The last two books of ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' sped things up intensively, and characters ''finally'' got started on solving problems present from the third book. Interestingly, the last three books in that series were written shortly after Stephen King himself almost died (this fact became a plot point). Apparently, he suddenly realised he wouldn't live forever, and made an intense effort to finish the series before another car hit him. Among fans, the results are controversial.



* ''Literature/SongOfTheLioness'', Creator/TamoraPierce's first series, was edited from a longer single book to fit in with the ironclad page limit rules of 80s young-adult fiction. As a result, huge swathes of time (sometimes even years) tend to get passed over with just a few sentences, with subplots happening mostly off-screen.
* ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'' is fairly slow-paced and low-key until the last handful of pages, when suddenly [[spoiler:the main characters fall into a trap laid by an evil wizard who had previously been a background character. He savagely beats them then attempts to force them to jump off a cliff to their deaths, prompting their adopted daughter to reveal that she's actually a dragon in human form by summoning a ''bigger'' dragon to come burn the evil wizard off the face of the world]].

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* ''Literature/SongOfTheLioness'', Creator/TamoraPierce's Creator/NealStephenson's ''Literature/TheDiamondAge'' suffers from this a little. After the leisurely progress of the rest of the book, the last 100 pages or so run at a breakneck pace. Fortunately, it's well written enough that you don't mind the dizziness too much.
* This occurred often in the early ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books, with a plot being set up in the
first series, was edited from a longer single book 200 pages, and then resolved in five.
* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'': Dante has only nine lines left in ''Purgatorio''
to fit describe how he bathed in with the ironclad page limit rules river of 80s young-adult fiction. good memories, so he admits that he doesn't have enough space to do the account justice and assures that the river is important for the next part of his journey, which will be covered in ''Paradiso''.
-->''"[S]ince all of the pages pre-disposed for this, the second canticle, are full, the curb of art will not let me continue."''
* The last part of ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Exile's Valor]]'' rushes to cover many of the background events mentioned in the first Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar trilogy.
%%** The end of ''Storm Breaking'' may have rushed to finish things as well.
* The whole ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series. We only learn what Horcruxes are in Book 6 (out of 7).
As a result, huge swathes while only two Horcruxes have been found and destroyed by the end of time (sometimes even years) tend to get passed book 6, the heroes must find and destroy four of them over with just the course of ONE book. ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows Deathly Hallows]]'' then continues this trend: After too many pages detailing a few sentences, with subplots happening mostly off-screen.
* ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'' is fairly slow-paced
camping trip and low-key until the last handful of pages, when other hairsbreadth escapes, suddenly [[spoiler:the main the Trio arrives at [[spoiler: Hogwarts]] and [[spoiler: Horcruxes are destroyed lickety-split (even ''offscreen'')]], ''truckloads'' of important, nay, essential information is revealed, and the plot relevant (or irrelevant) deaths start cropping up all over the place.
* Some of the books in Steven Erikson's ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' become veritable blood baths near the end as the story comes full circle and doomed
characters fall into a trap laid by an evil wizard who had previously been a background character. He savagely beats them then attempts are killed off. ''Literature/MidnightTides'', ''Literature/ReapersGale'' and ''Literature/TheCrippledGod'' are the most bloody examples.
* All of Richard Hooker and William Butterworth's ''[[Literature/{{MASH}} M*A*S*H Goes to...]]'' sequels are subject
to force them this, more pronouncedly as the series continues. The books have six to jump off a cliff to their deaths, prompting their adopted daughter to reveal ten plots and subplots that she's actually a dragon in human form by summoning a ''bigger'' dragon to come burn get more and more convoluted and intertwined until roughly page 170. Then suddenly ''everything is resolved'' (happily for the evil wizard off protagonists and the face young lovers, of course) in the world]].space of 10 to 15 pages.
* ''[[Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy Night's Dawn]]'' ends in between 50 and 100 pages, after taking more than ''3000'' to get to that point.


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* ''The Oracle's Queen'', the last book in the ''[[Literature/{{Nightrunner}} Tamír Trilogy]]'', ends so quickly after the FinalBattle that the MacGuffin doesn't even get a mention in the epilogue and is instead reduced to an author's note. (Although, to be fair, the MacGuffin was primarily buildup for a plotline that not only would happen hundreds of years later in-universe time, but ''[[{{Prequel}} had been published ten years earlier]]'' in real world time.)
* The novelization of the first ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' game is a good example of this, as the first third of the game takes up about two thirds of the book, with the remaining two-thirds crammed into the last sixty pages or so.
* In many of his early novels (particularly the "juveniles"), Creator/RobertAHeinlein would wrap up the plot in a page or two, often leaving the story unresolved. This was probably due to word count/length limitations. Several blatant examples are ''Literature/BetweenPlanets'', ''Literature/SpaceCadet'', ''Literature/TheRollingStones'' and ''Literature/ThePuppetMasters''.
* ''Literature/SongOfTheLioness'', Creator/TamoraPierce's first series, was edited from a longer single book to fit in with the ironclad page limit rules of 80s young-adult fiction. As a result, huge swathes of time (sometimes even years) tend to get passed over with just a few sentences, with subplots happening mostly off-screen.
* In ''Literature/TheSumOfAllFears'' spends approximately the first three quarters of the book dealing with the protagonist's miserable personal life. Then the nuclear bomb finally goes off and the plot that everyone came for is wrapped up in under 200 pages.
** Most of Clancy's books operate to a cosmic deadline - this is a conscious decision on his part. The intent is to show how crises start small, then snowball and snowball. His other reason is to illustrate how much planning goes into military operations. He can spend 300 pages getting all the pieces in place for 100 pages of fast-paced action. It's his style.
* ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'' is fairly slow-paced and low-key until the last handful of pages, when suddenly [[spoiler:the main characters fall into a trap laid by an evil wizard who had previously been a background character. He savagely beats them then attempts to force them to jump off a cliff to their deaths, prompting their adopted daughter to reveal that she's actually a dragon in human form by summoning a ''bigger'' dragon to come burn the evil wizard off the face of the world]].


Added DiffLines:

* Many of the books in ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series have far more plot in the last 50 to 100 pages than they do in the several hundred it takes to get to that point.
** The only book to have any major good guy offed is the fourteenth and last in a series of {{Door Stopper}}s.
** The three Sanderson-penned volumes aren't exceptionally fast-paced by most standards, but still count as this trope in comparison to the... [[SlowPacedBeginning leisurely]] pace of the half-dozen that precede them.
11th Nov '17 8:50:36 PM Xtifr
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* ScienceFiction author Mack Reynolds seems to have this problem in a lot of his books.

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%% * ScienceFiction author Mack Reynolds Creator/MackReynolds seems to have this problem in a lot of his books.
24th Sep '17 7:16:58 AM Gosicrystal
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* VideoGame/BrutalLegend has an accelerating example. The first part of the game is very spaced out, and your battles with Lionwhyte have other missions between them where you acquire more followers. The enemies you're fighting are supposed to be low-level lackeys, but it takes up at least 2/3 of the game. The second part has you mostly fighting Ophelia and the Drowning Doom, and while there are about the same number of battles there are almost no other missions and the other arcs are all either already resolved or abandoned at this point, with the previously constant parade of new kooky characters coming to an abrupt halt. After that arc ends the BigBad Doviculus shows up and you immediately have a boss fight on the same field as the final battle with Ophelia; you don't even get a proper stage battle with him since he relies entirely on gimmicks.

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* VideoGame/BrutalLegend ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' has an accelerating example. The first part of the game is very spaced out, and your battles with Lionwhyte have other missions between them where you acquire more followers. The enemies you're fighting are supposed to be low-level lackeys, but it takes up at least 2/3 of the game. The second part has you mostly fighting Ophelia and the Drowning Doom, and while there are about the same number of battles there are almost no other missions and the other arcs are all either already resolved or abandoned at this point, with the previously constant parade of new kooky characters coming to an abrupt halt. After that arc ends the BigBad Doviculus shows up and you immediately have a boss fight on the same field as the final battle with Ophelia; you don't even get a proper stage battle with him since he relies entirely on gimmicks.
16th Aug '17 3:05:32 PM Jacob175
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* Benimaru Itoh was slated to draw an eleven-issue ''Super VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'' comic, which Americans may know from its appearance in Nintendo Power. For [[ExecutiveMeddling annoying reasons]], he was abruptly forced to write a conclusion in the fifth issue. The result? The titular Metroid is killed by two minor characters in a brief side scene, the bosses are killed in [[{{Montage}} a two-page spread]], Ridley ''flees'' and is never seen again, and the battle against Mother Brain is resolved in about three pages.

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* Benimaru Itoh was slated to draw an eleven-issue ''Super VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'' ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' comic, which Americans may know from its appearance in Nintendo Power.''Magazine/NintendoPower''. For [[ExecutiveMeddling annoying reasons]], he was abruptly forced to write a conclusion in the fifth issue. The result? The titular Metroid is killed by two minor characters in a brief side scene, the bosses are killed in [[{{Montage}} a two-page spread]], Ridley ''flees'' and is never seen again, and the battle against Mother Brain is resolved in about three pages.



* ''Anime/SenkiZesshouSymphogear''. There is a popular belief that the episode count was halved after it started airing. This is [[FanDumb absolutely]] [[GodNeverSaidThat untrue]] - what actually went on is that they had too many ideas to fit in one season, and they were only given enough funding to do one season. End resut: The DarkMagicalGirl's HeelFaceTurn proceeds ludicrously quickly, the BigBad's nature and plan comes out of nowhere, and there's little to no explanation for the nature of the magical stuff.

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* ''Anime/SenkiZesshouSymphogear''. There is a popular belief that the episode count was halved after it started airing. This is [[FanDumb absolutely]] [[GodNeverSaidThat untrue]] - what actually went on is that they had too many ideas to fit in one season, and they were only given enough funding to do one season. End resut: result: The DarkMagicalGirl's HeelFaceTurn proceeds ludicrously quickly, the BigBad's nature and plan comes out of nowhere, and there's little to no explanation for the nature of the magical stuff.



** The ending of the Arrancar Saga is curiously rushed given how notoriously drawn out the arc as a whole is. Aizen has achieved great power and trashed everyone who stood in his way of annhilating Karakura Town. When Ichigo confronts him, instead of an epic battle that has both characters throwing everything they have at each other, Ichigo's latest power up has put him so far above Aizen that all Aizen can do is stall him. Once Ichigo is finished letting Aizen realize how outmatched he is, he easily beats him and Aizen's power is sealed away. The final fight wasn't the only abrupt thing about the arc either. When the Soul Society arc ended, the story took the time to show how the supporting cast was doing and how they were dealing with the events of the arc. By comparison, Deicide only showed the fate of a handful of characters, with most of them being left in limbo for a year or so while the next arc focused on other characters.

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** The ending of the Arrancar Saga is curiously rushed given how notoriously drawn out the arc as a whole is. Aizen has achieved great power and trashed everyone who stood in his way of annhilating annihilating Karakura Town. When Ichigo confronts him, instead of an epic battle that has both characters throwing everything they have at each other, Ichigo's latest power up has put him so far above Aizen that all Aizen can do is stall him. Once Ichigo is finished letting Aizen realize how outmatched he is, he easily beats him and Aizen's power is sealed away. The final fight wasn't the only abrupt thing about the arc either. When the Soul Society arc ended, the story took the time to show how the supporting cast was doing and how they were dealing with the events of the arc. By comparison, Deicide only showed the fate of a handful of characters, with most of them being left in limbo for a year or so while the next arc focused on other characters.



** ''Series/{{Angel}}'' was cancelled by the network early into its 5th season but was allowed to finish out the year, meaning the writers had to hurry to let Angel defeat the series long [[BigBad big bads]] Wolfram & Hart as well as tie up romantic loose ends like finding Angel a new werewolf girlfriend and pairing off Wesley and Fred (who also died in a plot that would have been a much longer arc otherwise). The shanshu plot thread was dropped as well, [[RunningGag magically]] Subverted in the episode "Awakening" (which aired in the middle of the fourth season), in which the breakneck happy ending is at last revealed to be a mind screw, an illusion designed to give Angel a damning moment of perfect happiness. Incidentally, the episode is quite a stunning display of the writing staffs' skills, showing how, no matter how knotty and overheated the narrative has become, it can be satisfyingly resolved anytime at the drop of a hat.

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** ''Series/{{Angel}}'' was cancelled by the network early into its 5th season but was allowed to finish out the year, meaning the writers had to hurry to let Angel defeat the series long [[BigBad big bads]] Wolfram & Hart as well as tie up romantic loose ends like finding Angel a new werewolf girlfriend and pairing off Wesley and Fred (who also died in a plot that would have been a much longer arc otherwise). The shanshu plot thread was dropped as well, [[RunningGag magically]] magically]]. Subverted in the episode "Awakening" (which aired in the middle of the fourth season), in which the breakneck happy ending is at last revealed to be a mind screw, an illusion designed to give Angel a damning moment of perfect happiness. Incidentally, the episode is quite a stunning display of the writing staffs' skills, showing how, no matter how knotty and overheated the narrative has become, it can be satisfyingly resolved anytime at the drop of a hat.



* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain: Soul Reaver'' ends very abruptly as a result of the deadline its developers were under. The finished game contains foreshadowing to the chopped out bits, which were eventually worked into the later titles in heavily modified forms. This is probably one of the few instances where a CosmicDeadline actually ''[[TropesAreNotBad benefited]]'' a series as a whole: The original ending effectively closed off the series to any more sequels, with Raziel wiping out the vampires and restoring the Pillars finally. While the cliffhanger was infuriating to many, the resulting plotline was well worth it.

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* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain: Soul Reaver'' ends very abruptly as a result of the deadline its developers were under. The finished game contains foreshadowing to the chopped out bits, which were eventually worked into the later titles in heavily modified forms. This is probably one of the few instances where a CosmicDeadline Cosmic Deadline actually ''[[TropesAreNotBad ''[[TropesAreTools benefited]]'' a series as a whole: The original ending effectively closed off the series to any more sequels, with Raziel wiping out the vampires and restoring the Pillars finally. While the cliffhanger was infuriating to many, the resulting plotline was well worth it.



* ''VideoGame/TalesOfXillia'' was rushed for the series 15th anniversery, and it shows in the later half of the plot. Developments move at a rapid pace and many threads are [[AbortedArc aborted and left to sidequests]]. The main issue comes with the HalfwayPlotSwitch to a SaveBothWorlds story. It'd probably work a lot better if the second world had more than [[DisappointingLastLevel four visitable areas]].

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* ''VideoGame/TalesOfXillia'' was rushed for the series 15th anniversery, anniversary, and it shows in the later half of the plot. Developments move at a rapid pace and many threads are [[AbortedArc aborted and left to sidequests]]. The main issue comes with the HalfwayPlotSwitch to a SaveBothWorlds story. It'd probably work a lot better if the second world had more than [[DisappointingLastLevel four visitable areas]].



* Lampshaded by Belkar in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0649.html this]] ''[[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]]'' strip, though the plot slows down again after that burst of accomplishment.

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* Lampshaded by Belkar in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0649.html this]] ''[[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]]'' ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' strip, though the plot slows down again after that burst of accomplishment.



* A number of fans feel like the second half of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''' second season falls prey to this, with a number of characters failing to get proper development despite playing integral roles in the GrandFinale (Wendy and the Author of the Journals, in particular) and a decent number of loose-threads that had to be concluded in post-series book ''Literature/GravityFallsJournal3''. It's generally agreed among this group that creator Alex Hirsch should have stayed with his original plan for a three season MythArc, rather hasten and condense the last two storylines into a single season.

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* A number of fans feel like the second half of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls''' second season falls prey to this, with a number of characters failing to get proper development despite playing integral roles in the GrandFinale (Wendy and the Author of the Journals, in particular) and a decent number of loose-threads that had to be concluded in post-series book ''Literature/GravityFallsJournal3''. It's generally agreed among this group that creator Alex Hirsch should have stayed with his original plan for a three season MythArc, rather than hasten and condense the last two storylines into a single season.
3rd Aug '17 12:28:50 AM crashkey
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* Parody in ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes'' - Jeane's backstory is literally fast-forwarded in game to get to the "final" boss. Not only a cosmic deadline, but a cosmic limitation. The characters seem to believe there's a limit to how much messed-up stuff they can say before the game gets cancelled/delayed. If the scene is replayed at a slowed rate, the story becomes understandable. It is notable as an example that combines terror and NoFourthWall as Jeane's backstory goes from TearJerker to unimaginablely screwed up quickly, making the reaction portrayed beliveable.

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* Parody Parodied in ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes'' - Jeane's backstory is literally fast-forwarded in game to get to the "final" boss. Not only a cosmic deadline, but a cosmic limitation. The characters seem to believe there's a limit to how much messed-up stuff they can say before the game gets cancelled/delayed. If the scene is replayed at a slowed rate, the story becomes understandable. It is notable as an example that combines terror and NoFourthWall as Jeane's backstory goes from TearJerker to unimaginablely screwed up quickly, making the reaction portrayed beliveable.
3rd Aug '17 12:28:30 AM crashkey
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* Jeane's backstory in ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes'' is literally fast-forwarded in game to get to the "final" boss. Not only a cosmic deadline, but a cosmic limitation. The characters seem to believe there's a limit to how much messed-up stuff they can say before the game gets cancelled/delayed. If the scene is replayed at a slowed rate, the story becomes understandable. It is notable as an example that combines terror and NoFourthWall as Jeane's backstory goes from TearJerker to unimaginablely screwed up quickly, making the reaction portrayed beliveable.

to:

* Jeane's backstory Parody in ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes'' - Jeane's backstory is literally fast-forwarded in game to get to the "final" boss. Not only a cosmic deadline, but a cosmic limitation. The characters seem to believe there's a limit to how much messed-up stuff they can say before the game gets cancelled/delayed. If the scene is replayed at a slowed rate, the story becomes understandable. It is notable as an example that combines terror and NoFourthWall as Jeane's backstory goes from TearJerker to unimaginablely screwed up quickly, making the reaction portrayed beliveable.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CosmicDeadline