History Main / CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel

24th Sep '16 6:10:13 PM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/TheSims 3'' is set 25 years before the original, when many of the iconic characters such as Mortimer, Bella and Bob Newbie were much younger, yet the game is packaged with 2009 fashion, 2009 furniture, 2009 tech, and 2009 houses, compared to the early 2000s feel of the original game.
* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', compared to its prequels, ''[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution Human Revolution]]'', ''VideoGame/DeusExTheFall'' and ''[[Videogame/DeusExMankindDivided Mankind Divided]]. The original is set in 2052, where nano augmentation is replacing mechanical augmentation, but ''Human Revolution'', set in 2027, make ''Deus Ex'' look far more primitive. WordOfGod for ''Human Revolution'' has handwaved this by saying that the game is set during a "golden age" of technology which was immediately followed by the economic and socio-political collapse that created the CrapsackWorld of the original and caused technology to become more cost effective. Interestingly, WordOfGod for the original noted the preponderance of slum levels, suggesting the more advanced tech was "off screen", so to speak.

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* ''VideoGame/TheSims 3'' ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' is set 25 years before [[VideoGame/TheSims1 the original, original]], when many of the iconic characters such as Mortimer, Bella and Bob Newbie were much younger, yet the game is packaged with 2009 fashion, 2009 furniture, 2009 tech, and 2009 houses, compared to the early 2000s feel of the original game.
* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', compared to its prequels, ''[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution Human Revolution]]'', ''VideoGame/DeusExTheFall'' and ''[[Videogame/DeusExMankindDivided Mankind Divided]].Divided]]''. The original is set in 2052, where nano augmentation is replacing mechanical augmentation, but ''Human Revolution'', set in 2027, make ''Deus Ex'' look far more primitive. WordOfGod for ''Human Revolution'' has handwaved this by saying that the game is set during a "golden age" of technology which was immediately followed by the economic and socio-political collapse that created the CrapsackWorld of the original and caused technology to become more cost effective. Interestingly, WordOfGod for the original noted the preponderance of slum levels, suggesting the more advanced tech was "off screen", so to speak.
12th Sep '16 6:01:15 AM Hanz
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* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', compared to its prequels, ''[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution Human Revolution]]'' and ''VideoGame/DeusExTheFall''. The original is set in 2052, where nano augmentation is replacing mechanical augmentation, but ''Human Revolution'', set in 2027, make ''Deus Ex'' look far more primitive. WordOfGod for ''Human Revolution'' has handwaved this by saying that the game is set during a "golden age" of technology which was immediately followed by the economic and socio-political collapse that created the CrapsackWorld of the original and caused technology to become more cost effective. Interestingly, WordOfGod for the original noted the preponderance of slum levels, suggesting the more advanced tech was "off screen", so to speak.
** Also one thing to note is that while the mechanical augmentations in the original game look clunky compared to the ones in the prequels, it should be noted that the only heavy augmentations ever really seen are usually on military or security types, which would prioritize function over form. The majority of augmentations seen in the prequels are civilian-grade, which would be more aesthetically pleasing. [[spoiler: And if the Darrow ending or Taggart endings are canon, it could be speculated that augmentations were later regulated away from civilians.]]

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* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'', compared to its prequels, ''[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution Human Revolution]]'' Revolution]]'', ''VideoGame/DeusExTheFall'' and ''VideoGame/DeusExTheFall''.''[[Videogame/DeusExMankindDivided Mankind Divided]]. The original is set in 2052, where nano augmentation is replacing mechanical augmentation, but ''Human Revolution'', set in 2027, make ''Deus Ex'' look far more primitive. WordOfGod for ''Human Revolution'' has handwaved this by saying that the game is set during a "golden age" of technology which was immediately followed by the economic and socio-political collapse that created the CrapsackWorld of the original and caused technology to become more cost effective. Interestingly, WordOfGod for the original noted the preponderance of slum levels, suggesting the more advanced tech was "off screen", so to speak.
** Also one thing to note is that while the mechanical augmentations in the original game look clunky compared to the ones in the prequels, it should be noted that the only heavy augmentations ever really seen are usually on military or security types, which would prioritize function over form. The majority of augmentations seen in the prequels are civilian-grade, which would be more aesthetically pleasing. [[spoiler: And if the Darrow ending or Taggart endings are canon, it could be speculated that augmentations were later regulated away from civilians.]]
13th Aug '16 4:32:28 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** ''VideoGame/HaloWars'' also shows this trope, where the UNSC has a ''ton'' of better vehicles and technology, including aircraft like Vultures, HumongousMecha like the Cyclops, advanced bases, tanks with reverse-engineered plasma cannons, and even more protective armor for the infantry! The original trilogy has none of this, even though ''Halo Wars'' takes place two decades before the first-person games. Some canon has handwaved this by saying the advanced tech became too expensive later in the timeline, especially as the war began to take a toll on humanity.
** Games taking place ''after'' the Human-Covenant War mitigate somewhat. ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' starts off with only ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}''-era weaponry, and once reunited with UNSC forces you can find armor mods and use weapons only previously shown in ''Reach'', supporting the theory of weapon/tech adoption being slow because of the war. Additionally, the ''Infinity'' is the newest UNSC flagship outfitted with reverse-engineered Covenant and Forerunner tech, and has the largest single contingent of [[SuperSoldier Spartan-IVs]] in the entire galaxy. It makes sense that it would have all the toys.

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** ''VideoGame/HaloWars'' also shows this trope, where the UNSC has a ''ton'' of better vehicles and technology, including aircraft like Vultures, HumongousMecha like the Cyclops, advanced bases, tanks with reverse-engineered plasma cannons, and even more protective armor for the infantry! The original trilogy has none of this, even though ''Halo Wars'' takes place two decades before the first-person games.first game. Some canon has handwaved this by saying the advanced tech became too expensive later in the timeline, especially as the war began to take a toll on humanity.
** Games taking place ''after'' the Human-Covenant War mitigate somewhat. ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'' starts off with only ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}''-era weaponry, and once reunited with UNSC forces you can find armor mods and use weapons only previously shown in ''Reach'', supporting the theory of weapon/tech adoption being slow because of the war. Additionally, the ''Infinity'' is the newest UNSC flagship outfitted with reverse-engineered Covenant and Forerunner tech, and has the largest single contingent of [[SuperSoldier Spartan-IVs]] in the entire galaxy. It makes sense that it would have all the toys.
13th Aug '16 4:30:15 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' has a certain degree of justification for why you have certain weapons and abilities that the original ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' did not, largely that the original game was about the crew of a single ship being trapped with limited supplies. Reach takes place on the largest Human colony and the headquarters of military research and development. That said the Spartan Laser is a bit anachronistic to its first appearance in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'', and the armor abilities are nowhere to be found despite much of the action in later games have you with nearly unlimited resources. The Covenant itself has weapons and even more enemy types that were never seen in any previous game (the needle rifle is far superior to the needler and Carbine, although the focus rifle is inferior to the beam rifle. The Skirmisher is the major new enemy, a fast and improved Jackal). Some of this is handwaved as that the battle of Reach really did hurt the Covenant pretty bad and some of the tech and even enemy types were depleted in the aftermath, resulting in the differences between games.
** Some of this can be further {{Hand Wave}}d because Reach was a primary research center for the human military and much of that R&D hadn't been put into wider use yet.
*** [[http://www.halopedian.com/United_Nations_Space_Command_Emergency_Priority_Order_098831A-1 The Cole Protocol]] tends to be a double edged sword when it comes to preventing human technology from falling into Covenant hands. It says that any human ships "jumping" from an encounter with the Covenant have to make the jump at random. If they're in danger of capture, they have to scrub their astral navigation databases and computers, and self-destruct if they are at risk of capture. Considering that the entire planet Reach was an encounter, and Halo started immediately afterward, it makes sense that there would be no time for the human tech to be mass-produced and distributed in the three-months and change between the start of Reach and the end of 3, especially since they were still in testing.
*** Oddly, one aspect where ''Reach'' averts this is in the design of the non-SPARTAN soldiers' armour: individual plates are blockier, more poorly-fitted to the body and generally less comprehensive when compared with Marines on the ''Pillar of Autumn'' in the first game or on Earth in the second and third; most personnel don't have any protection for their lower arms and legs, and the Orbital Drop Shock Troopers seem to wear much the same armour (with the addition of their distinctive plastron, pauldrons and vambraces from [[VideoGame/Halo3ODST ODST]]) and the same two-piece twill battle-dress as the Army and Marine troops, where by contrast the previous two games had them sporting full-body plating over armoured, vacuum-enabled bodysuits. This is made doubly strange by the idea, as mentioned above, that Reach was the point-of-origin for the UNSC's more ''advanced'' kit.
** ''VideoGame/HaloWars'' also shows this trope, where the UNSC has a ''ton'' of better vehicles and technology, including aircraft like Vultures, HumongousMecha like the Cyclops, advanced bases, tanks with reverse-engineered plasma cannons, and even more protective armor for the infantry! The later ''Halo'' series has none of this, even though ''Halo Wars'' takes place two decades before the first-person games. Some canon has handwaved this by saying the advanced tech became too expensive later in the timeline, especially as the war began to take a toll on humanity.
** With the release of ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'', this is mitigated somewhat. The game starts off with only Halo 3 era weaponry, and once reunited with UNSC forces you can find armor mods and use weapons only previously shown in Reach, supporting the theory of weapon/tech adoption being slow because of the war.
*** Additionally, the ''Infinity'' is the newest UNSC flagship outfitted with reverse-engineered Covenant and Forerunner tech. It's also the training HQ for the SPARTAN-IV program. It makes sense that it would have all the toys.

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* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
** Prequel
''VideoGame/HaloReach'' has a certain degree of justification for why you have certain weapons and abilities that weren't available in the original ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' did not, ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'', largely that the original game ''CE'' was about the crew of a single ship being trapped with limited supplies. Reach In contrast, ''Reach'' takes place on the largest Human human colony and the headquarters of military research and development. development, with several of your toys being prototypes that didn't get a chance to be produced elsewhere (hence why you don't see them in the original trilogy). That said said, the Spartan Laser is still a bit anachronistic to its first appearance in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'', and the armor abilities are nowhere to be found despite much of the action in later games have you with nearly unlimited resources. 3}}''.
***
The Covenant itself has weapons and even more enemy types that were never seen in any previous game (the game; in particular, the needle rifle is far superior to the needler Needler and Carbine, although Carbine (although the focus rifle is inferior to the beam rifle. The Skirmisher is the major new enemy, a fast and improved Jackal). Some of this is rifle). It's handwaved as that a mix of the battle of Reach really did hurt hurting the Covenant pretty bad and enough to momentarily deplete some of their stockpiles, and the tech and even enemy types were depleted in the aftermath, resulting in the differences between games.
** Some
Covenant genuinely not giving a crap about standardizing their equipment across their fleets, though none of this can be further {{Hand Wave}}d because Reach was a primary research center for completely explains why the human military and much Covenant in the first game, who were part of the same fleet as in ''Reach'', don't have those weapons (especially considering that R&D hadn't been put the ''Anniversary'' remake did retcon them into wider use yet.
wearing ''Reach''-style armor).
*** [[http://www.halopedian.com/United_Nations_Space_Command_Emergency_Priority_Order_098831A-1 halopedia.org/United_Nations_Space_Command_Emergency_Priority_Order_098831A-1 The Cole Protocol]] tends to be a double edged sword when it comes to preventing human technology from falling into Covenant hands. It says that any human ships "jumping" from an encounter with the Covenant have to make the jump at random. If they're in danger of capture, they have to scrub their astral navigation databases and computers, and self-destruct if they are at risk of capture. Considering that the entire planet Reach was an encounter, and Halo started immediately afterward, it makes sense that there would be no time for the more advanced human tech to be mass-produced and distributed in the three-months and change less-than-four months between the start of Reach and the end of 3, ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'', especially since they were still in testing.
*** Oddly, one aspect where ''Reach'' averts this is in the design of the non-SPARTAN non-Spartan soldiers' armour: individual plates are blockier, more poorly-fitted to the body and generally less comprehensive when compared with the Marines on the ''Pillar of Autumn'' in the first game (though ''CE Anniversary'' retcons them into wearing ''Reach''-style armor) or on Earth in the second [[VideoGame/{{Halo 2}} second]] and third; most personnel don't have any protection for their lower arms and legs, and legs. Additionally, the Orbital Drop Shock Troopers seem to wear much the same armour (with (but with the addition of their distinctive plastron, pauldrons and vambraces from [[VideoGame/Halo3ODST ODST]]) ''VideoGame/Halo3ODST'') and the same two-piece twill battle-dress as the Army and Marine troops, where by contrast the previous two games had them [=ODSTs=] sporting full-body plating over armoured, armoured vacuum-enabled bodysuits. This is made doubly strange by the idea, as mentioned above, that Reach was the point-of-origin for the UNSC's more ''advanced'' kit.
kit.
** ''VideoGame/HaloWars'' also shows this trope, where the UNSC has a ''ton'' of better vehicles and technology, including aircraft like Vultures, HumongousMecha like the Cyclops, advanced bases, tanks with reverse-engineered plasma cannons, and even more protective armor for the infantry! The later ''Halo'' series original trilogy has none of this, even though ''Halo Wars'' takes place two decades before the first-person games. Some canon has handwaved this by saying the advanced tech became too expensive later in the timeline, especially as the war began to take a toll on humanity.
** With Games taking place ''after'' the release of Human-Covenant War mitigate somewhat. ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' starts off with only ''VideoGame/{{Halo 4}}'', this is mitigated somewhat. The game starts off with only Halo 3 era 3}}''-era weaponry, and once reunited with UNSC forces you can find armor mods and use weapons only previously shown in Reach, ''Reach'', supporting the theory of weapon/tech adoption being slow because of the war.
***
war. Additionally, the ''Infinity'' is the newest UNSC flagship outfitted with reverse-engineered Covenant and Forerunner tech. It's also tech, and has the training HQ for largest single contingent of [[SuperSoldier Spartan-IVs]] in the SPARTAN-IV program.entire galaxy. It makes sense that it would have all the toys.
31st Jul '16 8:40:27 AM HighCrate
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** Despite this, there were attempts at making the ship seem antiquated at the least compared to the Next Generation era shows (TNG, [=DS9=] and VOY), where the set design and special FX aren't quite as dated. The NX-01 deliberately has a submarine feel (there is a risk hitting your head on a crossbeam in the captains ready-room), you can actually see the bolts holding the set together as if they were the design structure of the actual ship, there is an actual sealed-off decontamination chamber (largely utilized for {{fanservice}}) and the doctor is ready to use alien squids to help with healing injuries. The computers and consoles also have physical buttons and other controls versus a touch-screen interface.
** Played With in one episode of Enterprise, where Mirror Universe Evil Archer finds the missing ship from TOS's Tholian Web. One of the first things he mentions is how incredibly futuristic it looks.
** In-universe there has been at least one attempt to explain that at least some of the design is due to the prevailing sense of aesthetics of the 23rd century rather than any technological change (Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine's "Trials and Tribble-ations"). Also, the Enterprise at the beginning of ''Star Trek: The Motion Picture" is stated to have undergone a refit, which would explain why the movie version of the ship looks so much more 'modern' than the TV series version.
** Since the divergence point of the 2009 film's AlternateUniverse is after ''Enterprise'', the USS ''Enterprise'' does, in fact, look more high tech than its predecessor. It's often compared to an Apple Store. More in "Film", above.
31st Jul '16 8:39:16 AM HighCrate
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** At least with regard to non-living things one can also argue that [[UsedFuture because of roughly 30-40 years of ongoing warfare society's infrastructure is breaking down and things are starting to look more and more crude.]]
** Also it's worth noting that the prequels mostly took place in grand senate chambers and ornate temples while the original trilogy took place in rebel bases and warships.
** Another aspect was the look of the Naboo vehicles which were sleek fighters with generous use of chrome. After time many people pointed out how cars in the 50's and 60's had sleek designs and generous use of chrome which contrasts the more utilitarian and "boxy" look of the 70's and 80's. Given that GeorgeLucas is a notorious car buff, this was likely intentional. The 50's car connection is brought further when in ''AttackOfTheClones'' Anakin drives [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/XJ-6_airspeeder a speeder]] that is basically "''AmericanGraffiti'' [[RecycledInSpace IN SPACE]]".
* The 2009 ''Film/StarTrek'' movie had put itself in a strange position of being part ContinuityReboot and part {{prequel}}. Unlike the ''Enterprise'' example there was almost no attempt at a "retro-future" look and the technology looks like it would rival anything from ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'' shows (24th Century). The bridge looking like an Apple Store was stated by the production team itself. The engine room, on the other hand, looks like it would pass muster on a modern-day military warship (assuming said warship contained a brewery).
** The updated look and special effects served to reinvigorate the franchise to gain greater appeal to all audiences and not only Trek purists. It's justified, however, since WordOfGod says the [[FridgeBrilliance reason]] the alternate reality tech is significantly more advanced is because the 23rd century Kelvin [[http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1611878/jj-abrams-responds-star-trek-fans-theories.jhtml sent Starfleet the readings it took]] of the 24th century Narada and thus 2380s technology was introduced and reversed engineered in the 2230s and so on.
** There's also the theory that ''Star Trek's'' new reality tech wasn't solely [[ButterflyOfDoom caused]] by Nero's incursion, but also by Picard and the crew of the ''Enterprise''-E in ''[[Film/StarTrekFirstContact Star Trek: First Contact]]''. Word Of God also states that the events of ''First Contact'' did indeed somewhat alter the timeline of ''Star Trek: Enterprise'' possibly explaining it's comparable advanced technology which may have led to that of the 2009 reboot.
** Even if Nero hadn't shown up, the USS ''Kelvin'' would've still been a technological forerunner to the original TOS ''Enterprise'' despite how the ''Kelvin's'' tech looks like it could be very well past the 23rd century. Again, this is possibly a byproduct of the above theory.

to:

** At least with regard to non-living things one can also argue that [[UsedFuture because of roughly 30-40 years of ongoing warfare society's infrastructure is breaking down and things are starting to look more and more crude.]]
** Also it's worth noting that the prequels mostly took place in grand senate chambers and ornate temples while the original trilogy took place in rebel bases and warships.
** Another aspect was the look of the Naboo vehicles which were sleek fighters with generous use of chrome. After time many people pointed out how cars in the 50's and 60's had sleek designs and generous use of chrome which contrasts the more utilitarian and "boxy" look of the 70's and 80's. Given that GeorgeLucas is a notorious car buff, this was likely intentional. The 50's car connection is brought further when in ''AttackOfTheClones'' Anakin drives [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/XJ-6_airspeeder a speeder]] that is basically "''AmericanGraffiti'' [[RecycledInSpace IN SPACE]]".
* The 2009 ''Film/StarTrek'' movie had put itself in a the strange position of being part ContinuityReboot and part {{prequel}}. Unlike the ''Enterprise'' example there was almost no attempt at a "retro-future" look and the technology looks like it would rival anything from ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'' shows (24th Century). The bridge looking like an Apple Store was stated by the production team itself. The engine room, on the other hand, looks like it would pass muster on a modern-day military warship (assuming said warship contained a brewery).
** The updated look and special effects served to reinvigorate the franchise to gain greater appeal to all audiences and not only Trek purists. It's justified, however, since WordOfGod says the [[FridgeBrilliance reason]] the alternate reality tech is significantly more advanced is because the 23rd century Kelvin [[http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1611878/jj-abrams-responds-star-trek-fans-theories.jhtml sent Starfleet the readings it took]] of the 24th century Narada and thus 2380s technology was introduced and reversed engineered in the 2230s and so on.
** There's also the theory that ''Star Trek's'' new reality tech wasn't solely [[ButterflyOfDoom caused]] by Nero's incursion, but also by Picard and the crew of the ''Enterprise''-E in ''[[Film/StarTrekFirstContact Star Trek: First Contact]]''. Word Of God also states that the events of ''First Contact'' did indeed somewhat alter the timeline of ''Star Trek: Enterprise'' possibly explaining it's comparable advanced technology which may have led to that of the 2009 reboot.
** Even if Nero hadn't shown up, the USS ''Kelvin'' would've still been a technological forerunner to the original TOS ''Enterprise'' despite how the ''Kelvin's'' tech looks like it could be very well past the 23rd century. Again, this is possibly a byproduct of the above theory.
brewery).
20th Jul '16 9:58:28 PM SuperFeatherYoshi
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** This is actually lampshaded by Conrad Verner in '''VideoGame/MassEffect3''', who was apparently unaware of the invention of thermal clips and feels that they're a step backward when informed of them.

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** This is actually lampshaded by Conrad Verner in '''VideoGame/MassEffect3''', ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'', who was apparently unaware of the invention of thermal clips and feels that they're a step backward when informed of them.
20th Jul '16 9:58:05 PM SuperFeatherYoshi
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Added DiffLines:

** This is actually lampshaded by Conrad Verner in '''VideoGame/MassEffect3''', who was apparently unaware of the invention of thermal clips and feels that they're a step backward when informed of them.
2nd Jul '16 1:03:36 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Played with regarding the VF-0 in ''Anime/MacrossZero'', which does have some sleeker-looking bits and various features not found on the Variable Fighters in the original series, however it's overall design is bulkier and less refined than the VF-1 with very spindly, unfinished-looking arms, all of which makes sense for a prototype. Played straighter with the Rebel [=VFs=], however, who look more like the mechs from ''Anime/MacrossPlus'' with a just a few spindly, unfinished mechanical touches of their own to remind us that they're early prototypes.

to:

* Played with regarding the VF-0 in ''Anime/MacrossZero'', which does have some sleeker-looking bits and various features not found on the Variable Fighters in the original series, however it's ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross''; however, its overall design is bulkier and less refined than the VF-1 VF-1, with very spindly, unfinished-looking arms, all of which makes sense for a prototype. Played straighter with the Rebel [=VFs=], however, who look more like the mechs from ''Anime/MacrossPlus'' post-''SDF'' sequel ''Anime/MacrossPlus'', with a just a few spindly, unfinished mechanical touches of their own to remind us that they're early prototypes.
18th Jun '16 1:02:04 PM Saurubiker
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* With the introduction of the Big Boss-oriented prequel games in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series, this trope has firmly sunk its claws into the franchise. With the Big Boss games taking place during a timespan from 1964 through 1984 (as opposed to the games starring Solid Snake, which all occur during a timeframe of 1995 to 2014), it's shocking to see Big Boss confront amazingly high-tech machines that look as if they would be more at home in the 2070s rather than the 1970s, such as the Shagohod in ''Snake Eater'', as well as the A.I. Weapons and Zeke in ''Peace Walker''. Aside from looking infinitely more advanced, they're shown in combat to be much more agile and powerful than everything found in the original MSX games, which take place two decades after ''Peace Walker''. Even the REX from the first ''MGS'' looks sluggish in comparison, with its nuclear-capable railgun having already been used by the Chrysalis and Zeke in ''PW''. This is particularly egregious with the Sahelanthropus introduced in ''The Phantom Pain'', a humanoid-looking Metal Gear with functional arms capable of standing upright, which looks more like a precursor to the Orbital Frames from the ''VideoGame/ZoneOfTheEnders'' series than the predecessor to the TX-55 that is supposed to be.

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* With the introduction of the Big Boss-oriented prequel games in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series, this trope has firmly sunk its claws into the franchise. With the Big Boss games taking place during a timespan from 1964 through 1984 (as opposed to the games starring Solid Snake, which all occur during a timeframe of 1995 to 2014), it's specifically with ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' (the two mainline games directed by Creator/HideoKojima following the release of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', which was written to conclude the series). It's shocking to see Big Boss confront amazingly high-tech machines that look as if they would be more at home in the 2070s rather [=21st=] century than the 1970s, [=20th=] century, such as the Shagohod in ''Snake Eater'', as well as the A.I. Weapons and Zeke in ''Peace Walker''. ''PW'' (set in 1974), and Sahelanthropus in ''TPP'' (set in 1984). Aside from looking infinitely more advanced, they're shown in combat to be much more agile and powerful than everything found in the original MSX games, which take place two decades a decade after ''Peace Walker''.''TPP''. Even the REX from the first ''MGS'' looks sluggish in comparison, with its nuclear-capable railgun having already been used by the Chrysalis and Zeke in ''PW''. This is particularly egregious with the Sahelanthropus introduced in ''The Phantom Pain'', Sahelanthropus, a humanoid-looking Metal Gear with functional arms capable of standing upright, which looks more like a precursor predecessor to the Orbital Frames from the ''VideoGame/ZoneOfTheEnders'' series than the predecessor direct precursor to the TX-55 that is it's supposed to be.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel