History Main / CopyProtection

20th May '17 10:18:44 AM nombretomado
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* The ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' games were particularly prone to this, forcing players to look up the {{Feelies}} for information from "Beyond the Portal" before being granted the right to save, leave the starting town, and so on.

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* The ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' games were particularly prone to this, forcing players to look up the {{Feelies}} for information from "Beyond the Portal" before being granted the right to save, leave the starting town, and so on.
15th Apr '17 5:23:39 PM nombretomado
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* On early pirated copies of ''{{Sonic CD}}'', instead of booting up the game, it would instead show [[http://tcrf.net/images/1/12/SonicCDsega.png one of the creepy screens from the sound test]].
* Pirated copies of ''[[SpyroTheDragon Spyro: Year of the Dragon]]'' will have Zoe the Fairy appear at the latter part of Sunrise Spring telling players that the copy is hacked and as such will lead to "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZinR10DC3-Q serious issues]]" you would not experience on a legal copy. The game also featured a "save file erasure" element similar to ''Videogame/EarthBound'', although in a more subtle manner. Instead of taking you back to an empty "select your save file" screen, it just stops the boss battle against the Sorceress and then a travel-between-worlds Saving-LoadingScreen appears, and after it, you return back to the Sunrise Spring Home with your hot air balloon, with the only difference being that your save file has been written with a new status - namely, a fat zero over everything you can collect. To sum it up, instead of erasing your save file, the game [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZT9O62ZNQSU&feature=related resets it back to the beginning]].

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* On early pirated copies of ''{{Sonic ''VideoGame/{{Sonic CD}}'', instead of booting up the game, it would instead show [[http://tcrf.net/images/1/12/SonicCDsega.png one of the creepy screens from the sound test]].
* Pirated copies of ''[[SpyroTheDragon Spyro: Year of the Dragon]]'' ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon'' will have Zoe the Fairy appear at the latter part of Sunrise Spring telling players that the copy is hacked and as such will lead to "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZinR10DC3-Q serious issues]]" you would not experience on a legal copy. The game also featured a "save file erasure" element similar to ''Videogame/EarthBound'', although in a more subtle manner. Instead of taking you back to an empty "select your save file" screen, it just stops the boss battle against the Sorceress and then a travel-between-worlds Saving-LoadingScreen appears, and after it, you return back to the Sunrise Spring Home with your hot air balloon, with the only difference being that your save file has been written with a new status - namely, a fat zero over everything you can collect. To sum it up, instead of erasing your save file, the game [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZT9O62ZNQSU&feature=related resets it back to the beginning]].
13th Mar '17 2:45:59 AM RAMChYLD
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** Actually, older commercial DVDs are copy-protected using a copy-protection routine called CSS. When a DVD player detects that a DVD is protected by CSS, it switches on a circuit built into the player that generates the Macrovision signal over all it's analog outputs. Needless to say, CSS was one of the first things hackers set out to crack when the format was released. Later DVDs combine CSS with Sony's [=ARccOS=] (mentioned below) and/or Cinevia to make life more difficult for people who backup their DVDs. It should be noted, however, that many cheap region-free DVD players also lacks the Macrovision module.
** Likewise, the oldest Blu-Ray discs only incude AACS copy protection, the Blu-Ray player houses the Macrovision signal generator and HDCP module, and will switch them on upon detecting an AACS-protected disc being played. Again, it was the first thing hackers sought out to crack. Later in the life of the player, BD+ scrabling was introduced, which introduced corruption into the disc, with a special encrypted BD+ program that presents an overlay that fixes the bad sectors has to be run by the player to fix the disc. Later still, Cinevia was introduced.

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** Actually, older commercial DVDs are copy-protected using a copy-protection routine called CSS. When a DVD player detects that a DVD is protected by CSS, it switches on a circuit built into the player that generates the Macrovision signal over all it's analog outputs. Needless to say, CSS was one of the first things hackers set out to crack when the format was released. Later DVDs combine CSS with Sony's [=ARccOS=] (mentioned below) and/or Cinevia to make life more difficult for people who backup their DVDs. It should be noted, however, that many a number of cheap region-free DVD players also lacks the Macrovision generator module.
** Likewise, the oldest Blu-Ray discs only incude AACS copy protection, the Blu-Ray player houses the Macrovision signal generator and HDCP lock module, and will switch them on upon detecting an AACS-protected disc being played. Again, it was the first thing hackers sought out to crack. Later in the life of the player, BD+ scrabling was introduced, which introduced corruption into the disc, with a special encrypted BD+ program that presents an overlay that fixes the bad sectors has to be run by the player to fix the disc. Later still, Cinevia was introduced. So far all three can be bypassed with varying levels of success.
13th Mar '17 2:43:56 AM RAMChYLD
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Added DiffLines:

** Actually, older commercial DVDs are copy-protected using a copy-protection routine called CSS. When a DVD player detects that a DVD is protected by CSS, it switches on a circuit built into the player that generates the Macrovision signal over all it's analog outputs. Needless to say, CSS was one of the first things hackers set out to crack when the format was released. Later DVDs combine CSS with Sony's [=ARccOS=] (mentioned below) and/or Cinevia to make life more difficult for people who backup their DVDs. It should be noted, however, that many cheap region-free DVD players also lacks the Macrovision module.
** Likewise, the oldest Blu-Ray discs only incude AACS copy protection, the Blu-Ray player houses the Macrovision signal generator and HDCP module, and will switch them on upon detecting an AACS-protected disc being played. Again, it was the first thing hackers sought out to crack. Later in the life of the player, BD+ scrabling was introduced, which introduced corruption into the disc, with a special encrypted BD+ program that presents an overlay that fixes the bad sectors has to be run by the player to fix the disc. Later still, Cinevia was introduced.
22nd Feb '17 9:59:16 PM PaulA
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* A curious bit of copy protection was in Infocom's only romance game: ''Plundered Hearts''. The feelies in the game consist of facsimiles of the heroine's starting equipment, one of which is a banknote. The note shows the game's villain posing dramatically... but would you believe he's showing the solution to a puzzle? Grab his hat, try to grab the book he's carrying and press on the same part of the globe where he is and presto! Secret door!
* The original ''PrinceOfPersia'' had manual-based copy protection which set several apparent vials of poison over which hovered several different letters; a variant of the "Page/Line/Word" index. Drinking the wrong one three times in a row would result in death; drinking the right one caused the door to the next level to open. The second game had you select a symbol from a certain page of the manual between levels.

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* A curious bit of copy protection was in Infocom's only romance game: ''Plundered Hearts''.''VideoGame/PlunderedHearts''. The feelies in the game consist of facsimiles of the heroine's starting equipment, one of which is a banknote. The note shows the game's villain posing dramatically... but would you believe he's showing the solution to a puzzle? Grab his hat, try to grab the book he's carrying and press on the same part of the globe where he is and presto! Secret door!
* The original ''PrinceOfPersia'' ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia'' had manual-based copy protection which set several apparent vials of poison over which hovered several different letters; a variant of the "Page/Line/Word" index. Drinking the wrong one three times in a row would result in death; drinking the right one caused the door to the next level to open. The second game had you select a symbol from a certain page of the manual between levels.
14th Feb '17 11:44:49 PM RAMChYLD
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** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rg7c7A3HJ0 software supplied with the Sequential Music Mate keyboard for the C64]]''), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.

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** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rg7c7A3HJ0 software supplied with the Sequential Music Mate keyboard for the C64]]''), making the protection about as useful redundant as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.
14th Feb '17 11:41:58 PM RAMChYLD
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** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie a proprietary music keyboard for certain synthesizer software), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.

to:

** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie a proprietary music ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rg7c7A3HJ0 software supplied with the Sequential Music Mate keyboard for certain synthesizer software), the C64]]''), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.
14th Feb '17 11:39:40 PM RAMChYLD
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Added DiffLines:

** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie a proprietary music keyboard for certain synthesizer software), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.
15th Jan '17 4:20:39 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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Added DiffLines:

* Most commercially released DVD and BluRay discs are copy-protected by Macrovision. It prevents the disc on making bootleg copies.
14th Jan '17 12:58:27 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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* Most commercially released VHS tapes have The Macrovision security code on the tape itself. Copying it to a blank VHS would cause the tape to act like it's damaged. Transferring to DVD will also not work. The VHS/DVD recorder will stop the tape and the error message will appear on the screen that reads "Recording Error!: This presentation is not allowed to be copied! Copying Copyrighted Material is Prohibited!"

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* Most commercially released VHS tapes (since 1983) have The Macrovision security code on the tape itself. Copying it to a blank VHS would cause the tape to act like it's damaged. Transferring it to DVD will also not work.work ether. The VHS/DVD recorder will stop the tape and the error message will appear on the screen that reads "Recording Error!: This presentation is not allowed to be copied! Copying Copyrighted Material is Prohibited!"
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