History Main / CopyProtection

20th Nov '16 11:37:29 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the FictionalVideoGame ''OnlyYouCanSaveMankind'', in the novel of the same name by Terry Pratchett: "Someone in America or somewhere thought it was dead clever to make the game ask you little questions like "What's the first word on line 23 of page 19 of the manual" and then reset the machine if you didn't answer them right, so they'd obviously never heard of Wobbler's dad's office photocopier."
** "Basically, there were two sides to the world. There was the entire computer games software industry engaged in a tremendous effort to stamp out piracy, and there was Wobbler. Currently, Wobbler was in front."
* Fictional example: In ''UserUnfriendly'' by Vivian Vande Velde, the protagonists are playing a pirated copy of Virtual Reality RPG ''Rasmussem''. Unfortunately for them, [[TalkingIsAFreeAction discussing the game]] in front of an NPC initiates an infinite loop in the relevant AI which can only be terminated by a customer service representative.

to:

* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the FictionalVideoGame ''OnlyYouCanSaveMankind'', ''Literature/OnlyYouCanSaveMankind'', in the novel of the same name by Terry Pratchett: "Someone in America or somewhere thought it was dead clever to make the game ask you little questions like "What's 'What's the first word on line 23 of page 19 of the manual" manual' and then reset the machine if you didn't answer them right, so they'd obviously never heard of Wobbler's dad's office photocopier."
** "Basically, -->''Basically, there were two sides to the world. There was the entire computer games software industry engaged in a tremendous effort to stamp out piracy, and there was Wobbler. Currently, Wobbler was in front."
''
* Fictional example: In ''UserUnfriendly'' ''Literature/UserUnfriendly'' by Vivian Vande Velde, the protagonists are playing a pirated copy of Virtual Reality RPG ''Rasmussem''. Unfortunately for them, [[TalkingIsAFreeAction discussing the game]] in front of an NPC initiates an infinite loop in the relevant AI which can only be terminated by a customer service representative.
23rd Oct '16 6:20:15 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Amiga game ''[[ElviraGames Elvira: Mistress of the Dark]]'' had you hunting for six keys hidden in the castle, and one was hidden in a dark passage, requiring you to have Elvira cook up "Glowing Pride" to find it. However, you couldn't find any recipes inside the game; all of them were in the manual. In other words, you could play most of the game on a pirate version, but to complete it you needed the original version. (At least, until {{GameFAQs}} was invented.)

to:

* The Amiga game ''[[ElviraGames Elvira: Mistress of the Dark]]'' had you hunting for six keys hidden in the castle, and one was hidden in a dark passage, requiring you to have Elvira cook up "Glowing Pride" to find it. However, you couldn't find any recipes inside the game; all of them were in the manual. In other words, you could play most of the game on a pirate version, but to complete it you needed the original version. (At least, until {{GameFAQs}} Website/{{GameFAQs}} was invented.)



** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' had a character, early in the game, who "forgot" a vital communication frequency and mention that "it's on the back of the CD case," referring to one of the images on the back of the game's plastic case. If you rented the game, moving beyond that point was impossible. Better yet, Snake has a CD case in his in-game inventory. Many, many gamers tried to figure out how they were supposed to look at the back of that case. When they couldn't figure out the solution to the "puzzle", they turned to GameFAQs. However, this ends up being negated when the player can still receive the frequency by contacting Campbell enough times - even though he still ends up telling you to check the non-existent case, the frequency ends up added to the list either way. The remake ''The Twin Snakes'' eliminated this altogether by having the character say that the code is on the back of "the package", since there's no package item. The only other option for players was to try every radio frequency in sequential order until they reached the correct one.

to:

** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' had a character, early in the game, who "forgot" a vital communication frequency and mention that "it's on the back of the CD case," referring to one of the images on the back of the game's plastic case. If you rented the game, moving beyond that point was impossible. Better yet, Snake has a CD case in his in-game inventory. Many, many gamers tried to figure out how they were supposed to look at the back of that case. When they couldn't figure out the solution to the "puzzle", they turned to GameFAQs.Website/GameFAQs. However, this ends up being negated when the player can still receive the frequency by contacting Campbell enough times - even though he still ends up telling you to check the non-existent case, the frequency ends up added to the list either way. The remake ''The Twin Snakes'' eliminated this altogether by having the character say that the code is on the back of "the package", since there's no package item. The only other option for players was to try every radio frequency in sequential order until they reached the correct one.
15th Oct '16 10:40:32 AM Berrenta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''OperationFlashpoint'' was notable for being the first game to use the FADE copyright system, which slowly degraded the quality of gameplay (for example, decreasing the accuracy of the player's weapons) if piracy was detected. The same applied to ''Videogame/{{ARMA}} : Armed Assault'', its {{spiritual successor}}. The best copy protection for ''ARMA'' was of course the fact that [[TheyJustDidntCare it didn't run under Vista.]]

to:

* ''OperationFlashpoint'' was notable for being the first game to use the FADE copyright system, which slowly degraded the quality of gameplay (for example, decreasing the accuracy of the player's weapons) if piracy was detected. The same applied to ''Videogame/{{ARMA}} : Armed Assault'', its {{spiritual successor}}. The best copy protection for ''ARMA'' was of course the fact that [[TheyJustDidntCare it didn't run under Vista.]]
13th Oct '16 6:45:41 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The first ''{{Mafia}}'', used the FADE system : The farther you got in an illegal copy of the game, the more choppy it ran, forcing the player to continually lower the graphics quality. It didn't stop ''[[{{Determinator}} some people]]'' from beating the game, though.
* On pirated copies of ''Michael Jackson: The Experience'' for the Nintendo DS (which is basically an ''EliteBeatAgents'' clone, by the way), the notes don't appear, ''and'' it plays [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup vuvuzelas]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZwFxAi76iI over the music.]]

to:

* The first ''{{Mafia}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Mafia}}'', used the FADE system : The farther you got in an illegal copy of the game, the more choppy it ran, forcing the player to continually lower the graphics quality. It didn't stop ''[[{{Determinator}} some people]]'' from beating the game, though.
* On pirated copies of ''Michael Jackson: The Experience'' for the Nintendo DS (which is basically an ''EliteBeatAgents'' ''VideoGame/EliteBeatAgents'' clone, by the way), the notes don't appear, ''and'' it plays [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup vuvuzelas]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZwFxAi76iI over the music.]]



* ''MortalKombat: Armageddon'' had copy protection which caused the game to boot up and then go into ''Cabela's Big Game Hunter''.

to:

* ''MortalKombat: Armageddon'' ''VideoGame/MortalKombatArmageddon'' had copy protection which caused the game to boot up and then go into ''Cabela's Big Game Hunter''.
4th Oct '16 7:24:13 PM zaphod77
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** Windows 10 can do this... on the Xbox One, where MS can actually tell legit software from pirated without false positives. Many DRM free games from GOG.com actually come with scene cracks, making it very difficult to tell a legit copy from a pirated one. In fact, it's completely impossible with a GOG.com game, even if it doesn't have a scene crack, because of the complete lack of DRM. It could have been bought, or it could have been torrented, and there's no way to know.
6th Sep '16 11:34:22 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** OEM computers starting with those that came bundled with Windows 7 and later did away with authentication stickers that contain the product key, instead embedding the serial into the BIOS itself, to which Windows or the installer looks up to activate the system as a legitimate copy. This made it a pain for those who would like to take a written record of the serial in a pinch, as you need to view it through special software, but at least you wouldn't lose it as easily as having the said sticker fade away or get torn off over time due to rough handling. However, if you do want to know the serial anyway, there's tools like ProduKey that allows you to take a peek.

to:

*** OEM computers starting with those that came bundled with Windows 7 and later did away with authentication stickers that contain the product key, instead embedding the serial into the BIOS itself, to which Windows or the installer looks up to activate the system as a legitimate copy. This made it a pain for those who would like to take a written record of the serial in a pinch, as you need to view it through special software, software like [=ProduKey=] but at least you wouldn't lose it as easily as having the said sticker fade away or get torn off over time due to rough handling. However, if you do want to know the serial anyway, there's tools like ProduKey that allows you to take a peek.handling.
5th Sep '16 7:33:11 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The original ''Print Shop'' by {{Broderbund}} for MS-DOS has a pretty silly one. If you perform a straight-on disk clone using the diskcopy command, the copy would flash a message saying that it is an unauthorized copy and refuse to proceed. However, the software comes with a ''backup program'' which can be used to make a perfect working copy of the software, and copies made using said backup program will also contain the backup program, which then could be used to copy the backup, which... you get the idea. It is also worth noting that the backup program can be used an unlimited amount of times.

to:

* The original ''Print Shop'' by {{Broderbund}} for MS-DOS has a pretty silly one. If you perform a straight-on disk clone using the diskcopy command, the copy would flash a message saying that it is an unauthorized copy and refuse to proceed. However, the software comes with a ''backup program'' which can be used to make a perfect working copy of the software, and copies made using said backup program will also contain the backup program, which then could be used to copy the backup, which... you get the idea. It is also worth noting that while the backup program will destroy itself on the original disk once it's run, the program will still exist on the backup copy's disk. Additionally, the backup program is just a batch file, so it can be easily defanged such that it can be used an unlimited amount of times.
5th Sep '16 7:27:15 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The dreaded Macrovision protection on analog Pay TV signals and store-bought videocassettes. Some Pay TV providers have been known to erroneously apply the signal to channels that are supposed to be in the clear as well. Complaints have fallen onto deaf ears (or the blame being shifted to the contractors for the Pay TV company). And to make things worse, it's ''illegal'' to circumvent thanks to the DMCA. This has carried on to the digital age via HDCP.

to:

* The dreaded Macrovision protection on analog Pay TV signals and store-bought videocassettes. Some Pay TV providers have been known to erroneously apply the signal to channels that are supposed to be in the clear as well. Complaints have fallen onto deaf ears (or the blame being shifted to the contractors for the Pay TV company).company, who pointed their finger back at the provider, both sides playing the blame game and nothing gets fixed). And to make things worse, it's ''illegal'' to circumvent thanks to the DMCA. This has carried on to the digital age via HDCP.
4th Sep '16 7:11:06 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most games with multiplayer, or at least some form of online component that use serial keys, like for instance ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games back in the mid to late 2000s, and ''VideoGame/TheSims3'', scan for the game's CD/DVD key whenever the player tries to access the game's online mode. The game would run in single player as with legitimate copies, but would not allow the player to connect at all if the serial was found to be illegally generated.

to:

* Most games with multiplayer, or at least some form of online component that use serial keys, like for instance ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games back in the mid to late 2000s, and ''VideoGame/TheSims3'', scan for the game's CD/DVD key whenever the player tries to access the game's online mode. The game would run in single player as with legitimate copies, but would not allow the player to connect at all if the serial was found to be illegally generated.
21st Aug '16 9:59:09 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** OEM computers starting with those that came bundled with Windows 7 and later did away with authentication stickers that contain the product key, instead embedding the serial into the BIOS itself, to which Windows or the installer looks up to activate the system as a legitimate copy. This made it a pain for those who would like to take a written record of the serial in a pinch, as you need to view it through special software, but at least you wouldn't lose it as easily as having the said sticker fade away or get torn off over time due to rough handling.

to:

*** OEM computers starting with those that came bundled with Windows 7 and later did away with authentication stickers that contain the product key, instead embedding the serial into the BIOS itself, to which Windows or the installer looks up to activate the system as a legitimate copy. This made it a pain for those who would like to take a written record of the serial in a pinch, as you need to view it through special software, but at least you wouldn't lose it as easily as having the said sticker fade away or get torn off over time due to rough handling. However, if you do want to know the serial anyway, there's tools like ProduKey that allows you to take a peek.



* Windows 10 blocks access to some older CD-ROM based games (2003-2008) using [=SafeDisk=] and [=SecuROM=] DRM, citing them as being outdated and full of security vulnerabilities. Users with games that use these will be forced to use a no-CD patch to continue playing, encouraging piracy. However, Microsoft states that there are already patches from developers for those games, and that sites like GOG contain versions of those games that work.

to:

* Windows 10 blocks access to some older CD-ROM based games (2003-2008) using [=SafeDisk=] and [=SecuROM=] DRM, citing them as being outdated and full of security vulnerabilities. Users with games that use these will be forced to use a no-CD patch to continue playing, encouraging piracy. However, Microsoft states that there are already patches from developers for those games, and that sites like GOG contain versions of those games that work. Unfortunately, if you go the GOG route, [[OneGameForThePriceOfTwo you need to buy the game all over again]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 279. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CopyProtection