History Main / CopyProtection

22nd Feb '17 9:59:16 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A curious bit of copy protection was in Infocom's only romance game: ''Plundered Hearts''. The feelies in the game consist of facsimiles of the heroine's starting equipment, one of which is a banknote. The note shows the game's villain posing dramatically... but would you believe he's showing the solution to a puzzle? Grab his hat, try to grab the book he's carrying and press on the same part of the globe where he is and presto! Secret door!
* The original ''PrinceOfPersia'' had manual-based copy protection which set several apparent vials of poison over which hovered several different letters; a variant of the "Page/Line/Word" index. Drinking the wrong one three times in a row would result in death; drinking the right one caused the door to the next level to open. The second game had you select a symbol from a certain page of the manual between levels.

to:

* A curious bit of copy protection was in Infocom's only romance game: ''Plundered Hearts''.''VideoGame/PlunderedHearts''. The feelies in the game consist of facsimiles of the heroine's starting equipment, one of which is a banknote. The note shows the game's villain posing dramatically... but would you believe he's showing the solution to a puzzle? Grab his hat, try to grab the book he's carrying and press on the same part of the globe where he is and presto! Secret door!
* The original ''PrinceOfPersia'' ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia'' had manual-based copy protection which set several apparent vials of poison over which hovered several different letters; a variant of the "Page/Line/Word" index. Drinking the wrong one three times in a row would result in death; drinking the right one caused the door to the next level to open. The second game had you select a symbol from a certain page of the manual between levels.
14th Feb '17 11:44:49 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rg7c7A3HJ0 software supplied with the Sequential Music Mate keyboard for the C64]]''), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.

to:

** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rg7c7A3HJ0 software supplied with the Sequential Music Mate keyboard for the C64]]''), making the protection about as useful redundant as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.
14th Feb '17 11:41:58 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie a proprietary music keyboard for certain synthesizer software), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.

to:

** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie a proprietary music ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rg7c7A3HJ0 software supplied with the Sequential Music Mate keyboard for certain synthesizer software), the C64]]''), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.
14th Feb '17 11:39:40 PM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** And to top it all off, a number of software that used this proprietary protection is unusable without the prerequisite hardware installed (ie a proprietary music keyboard for certain synthesizer software), making the protection about as useful as the Pro Tools and ''Biggest Boon-Dongle in the World'' examples above.
15th Jan '17 4:20:39 PM BuddyBoy600alt
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Most commercially released DVD and BluRay discs are copy-protected by Macrovision. It prevents the disc on making bootleg copies.
14th Jan '17 12:58:27 PM BuddyBoy600alt
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Most commercially released VHS tapes have The Macrovision security code on the tape itself. Copying it to a blank VHS would cause the tape to act like it's damaged. Transferring to DVD will also not work. The VHS/DVD recorder will stop the tape and the error message will appear on the screen that reads "Recording Error!: This presentation is not allowed to be copied! Copying Copyrighted Material is Prohibited!"

to:

* Most commercially released VHS tapes (since 1983) have The Macrovision security code on the tape itself. Copying it to a blank VHS would cause the tape to act like it's damaged. Transferring it to DVD will also not work.work ether. The VHS/DVD recorder will stop the tape and the error message will appear on the screen that reads "Recording Error!: This presentation is not allowed to be copied! Copying Copyrighted Material is Prohibited!"
14th Jan '17 11:09:50 AM BuddyBoy600alt
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Most commercially released VHS tapes have The Macrovision security code on the tape itself. Copying it to a blank VHS would cause the tape to act like it's damaged. Transferring to DVD will also not work. The VHS/DVD recorder will stop the tape and the error message will appear on the screen that reads "Recording Error!: This presentation is not allowed to be copied! Copying Copyrighted Material is Prohibited!"
8th Jan '17 5:25:46 AM klausbaudelaire
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The first [=PlayStation=] read a tracking pattern pressed onto the lead-in of official [=CDs=], which cannot be reproduced normally. The [=PlayStation=] 2 uses a similar system. They will both refuse to read any disc that doesn't have a valid pattern. This made it impossible to burn a disc that would pass the protection. However, there were points exposed where people could solder a chip in to override the attempt to read the signature and replace it with a valid one. People ''could'' press pirated discs once they figured out how the protection really worked, though, yielding the boot disc. Worse yet, it turned out that by using a single valid Playstation game and some quick swapping of the burned disc any reasonably dexterous person could play burned discs on a completely unmodded console. It takes some practice, but it's not that difficult. The final evolution of this "swap trick" was the production of kits containing stickers to hold down the "lid open" sensors (so the console would not try to perform the security test again when the lid was opened to swap the discs), and boot discs that would pass the copy protection check, then stop the disc from spinning and wait patiently until the start button was pressed (so the user could swap in another disc at their leisure). Sony also tried to combat piracy for the [=PS1=] by making the discs' undersides black, causing them to be transparent only to the infrared laser used in CD drives, and more difficult to copy correctly since at the time of the console's release, consumers could not buy [=CD-Rs=] like this. Unfortunately for Sony, pretty soon blank discs with black undersides became available, and this part of their copy-protection scheme failed.

to:

** The first [=PlayStation=] read a tracking pattern pressed onto the lead-in of official [=CDs=], which cannot be reproduced normally. The [=PlayStation=] 2 uses a similar system. They will both refuse to read any disc that doesn't have a valid pattern. This made it impossible to burn a disc that would pass the protection. However, there were points exposed where people could solder a chip in to override the attempt to read the signature and replace it with a valid one. People ''could'' press pirated discs once they figured out how the protection really worked, though, yielding the boot disc. Worse yet, it turned out that by using a single valid Playstation game and some quick swapping of the burned disc any reasonably dexterous person could play burned discs on a completely unmodded console. It takes some practice, but it's not that difficult. The final evolution of this "swap trick" was the production of kits containing stickers to hold down the "lid open" sensors (so the console would not try to perform the security test again when the lid was opened to swap the discs), and boot discs that would pass the copy protection check, then stop the disc from spinning and wait patiently until the start button was pressed (so the user could swap in another disc at their leisure). Sony also tried Contrary to combat piracy popular belief, the black coating on original discs were more likely to be used for the cosmetic reasons (e.g. to distinguish them from audio [=CDs=] and bootlegs and had little to do with copy protection; any consumer disc drive can and will read a [=PS1=] by making the discs' undersides black, causing them to be transparent only to the infrared laser used in CD drives, and more difficult to copy correctly since at the time of the console's release, consumers could not buy [=CD-Rs=] like this. Unfortunately for Sony, pretty soon blank discs game disc perfectly as it would with black undersides became available, and this part of their copy-protection scheme failed.any media.
22nd Dec '16 12:21:37 PM Korodzik
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''War in Middle Earth'' would ask you to type in coordinates from the manual with the message: "The Valar seek to determine your fitness to continue this tale-weaving. Please enter the map coordinates of (location)".
20th Dec '16 3:29:48 PM Exxolon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''[[VideoGame/ElviraGames Elvira II: Jaws of Cerberus]] opening the main building door, and each of the studio doors, required a keypad code obtained via a code wheel. You needed to line up three symbols or words, and type in a code visible in the proper box. [[http://www.oldgames.sk/docs/codewheel/elvira2/ Here's an interactive online version of the codewheel]].

to:

* In ''[[VideoGame/ElviraGames Elvira II: Jaws of Cerberus]] Cerberus]]'' opening the main building door, and each of the studio doors, required a keypad code obtained via a code wheel. You needed to line up three symbols or words, and type in a code visible in the proper box. [[http://www.oldgames.sk/docs/codewheel/elvira2/ Here's an interactive online version of the codewheel]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 290. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CopyProtection