History Main / ConvictionByContradiction

13th Nov '17 9:37:34 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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* ''Series/BluePeter'' annuals used to feature a regular story in which a detective called [=McCann=] and his nephew Bob would catch a thief after the thief made six (always six) factual errors. This was a fairly good example of the trope because the mistakes were things the suspect would have known if they were who they claimed to be, and merely exposed them as suspicious imposters. The actual proof was that they had the stolen artefact on them.
11th Nov '17 3:54:24 PM LinTaylor
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** Spoofed in "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS12E15HungryHungryHomer Hungry, Hungry Homer]]" where Homer finds evidence that the Duff corporation, owners of the Springfield Isotopes, are planning on selling the team to New Mexico but nobody believes him because the owners hid said evidence. Homer goes on a hunger strike to get Henry Duff VIII to tell the truth, which he exploits as a publicity stunt. When it looks like Homer's about to give up, Duff offer him a hot dog; however, he notices the toppings (mesquite-grilled onions, jalapeño relish, mango-lime salsa) and observes "That's the kind of bold flavor they enjoy in...Albuquerque!" '''This''' is treated as the smoking gun that proves Homer right, despite the fact that there's absolutely no reason a stadium couldn't just choose to serve a Southwestern-style hot dog. Also, the hot dog wrappers say "Albuquerque Isotopes", but apparently [[FailedASpotCheck nobody noticed that until Homer brought it up]].
5th Nov '17 10:49:44 AM lillolillo
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* One early ''Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'' comic featured a woman impersonating a man claiming to be Supergirl's husband-that-she-forgot-she-had, in order to make her (the woman's) boyfriend give up his crush on Supergirl. Supergirl saw through this at the beginning, because the woman put "his" arms around Supergirl's neck when "he" kissed her rather than around her waist, which is apparently something ''only'' girls do. [[FridgeLogic Though she should be able to literally see through the disguise, being]] Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}.
* The first storyline in which Superman and Batman learned each other's secret identities (via ContrivedCoincidence) featured Batman concluding that someone was lying about being an electrical engineer because he wasn't wearing rubber-soled shoes. ''On a holiday cruise.'' While a) Superman had X-ray-spotted a gun in the suspect's pocket and b) the guy did claim to have a job to do in a few minutes on the ship's generators, it's still rather jarring that "[[InformedAbility The World's Greatest Detective]]" apparently concluded that no-one can own more than one set of shoes.

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* One early ''Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'' comic featured a woman impersonating a man claiming to be Supergirl's husband-that-she-forgot-she-had, in order to make her (the woman's) boyfriend give up his crush on Supergirl. Supergirl saw through this at the beginning, because the woman put "his" arms around Supergirl's neck when "he" kissed her rather than around her waist, which is apparently something ''only'' girls do. [[FridgeLogic Though she should be able to literally see through the disguise, being]] Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}.
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* The first storyline in which Superman Franchise/{{Superman}} and Batman Franchise/{{Batman}} learned each other's secret identities (via ContrivedCoincidence) featured Batman concluding that someone was lying about being an electrical engineer because he wasn't wearing rubber-soled shoes. ''On a holiday cruise.'' While a) Superman had X-ray-spotted a gun in the suspect's pocket and b) the guy did claim to have a job to do in a few minutes on the ship's generators, it's still rather jarring that "[[InformedAbility The World's Greatest Detective]]" apparently concluded that no-one can own more than one set of shoes.
3rd Nov '17 12:41:54 PM Madrugada
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** In one, Inspector Winters asks for bicarbonate of soda for an upset stomach while in a bakery. The baker says she doesn't have any; this leads the detective to deduce that the bakery must be a front for smuggling, since bicarbonate of soda is baking soda and no real bakery would be without it. Except there's the possibility that the baker was unfamiliar with an antiquated term for baking soda (even more egregious today than when it was originally written: many modern ''chemists'' might find the term unfamiliar, since the proper scientific terminology has been "sodium hydrogen carbonate" for ''decades'', and was "sodium bicarbonate" rather than "bicarbonate of soda" for some time before that). And then there's the possibility they ran out of baking soda using it to, you know, bake.

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** In one, Inspector Winters asks for bicarbonate of soda for an upset stomach while in a bakery. The baker says she doesn't have any; this leads the detective to deduce that the bakery must be a front for smuggling, since bicarbonate of soda is baking soda and no real bakery would be without it. Except there's the possibility that the baker was unfamiliar with an antiquated term for baking soda (even more egregious today than when it was originally written: many modern ''chemists'' might find the term unfamiliar, since the proper scientific terminology has been "sodium hydrogen carbonate" for ''decades'', and was "sodium bicarbonate" rather than "bicarbonate of soda" for some time before that). And then there's the possibility they ran out of baking soda using it to, you know, bake.bake; or that they bake pies and pastries which don't require it.
27th Oct '17 12:32:05 PM Tinandel_1
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* ''Series/TheWestWing'' invokes the trope in a minor example in the first season; after Sam discovers (after the fact) that a girl he slept with was a prostitute, he is eventually confronted by an angry CJ, who demands to know why he didn't tell her sooner. When Sam begins to act like he didn't think there was a problem, CJ preemptively shoots him down, pointing out that he asked both Josh and Toby for advice on the matter, so there's no way he can feign ignorance.
25th Sep '17 2:49:36 PM Gravidef
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' had an episode like this. Angelica has Tommy hold a trial to find out who broke his favorite lamp, with Angelica as the "persecutor". She attempts to finger Phil, Lil and Chuckie as the "poopatrator", but all of them have solid alibis. It isn't until Tommy realizes something random [[spoiler: Angelica taking a nap—he said that she took one earlier and her introduction earlier in the episode had her obviously faking a wake up but was considered throw away]] that makes the babies realize that it would have been impossible for her to know what exactly they were doing and thinking unless ''she was there'', which she was.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' had an episode like this. this titled "The Trial." After Tommy's favorite clown lamp is broken, Angelica has Tommy suggests that he [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin hold a trial trial]] to find out who broke his favorite lamp, with determine the culprit. Angelica as plays the "persecutor". She role of "persecutor" and attempts to finger Phil, Lil and Chuckie as the "poopatrator", pointing out their various actions that endangered the lamp, but all of them have solid alibis. they're able to defend themselves. It isn't until Tommy realizes something random that [[spoiler: Angelica Angelica's supposed "alibi"--she was taking a nap—he said that nap---doesn't hold up because she supposedly took one earlier and at her introduction earlier in the own house (the episode had opens with her obviously faking a wake up coming into the room after "waking up," but was considered throw away]] she's clearly lying)]] that makes the babies realize that it would have been impossible for her to know what exactly they were doing and thinking unless ''she was there'', which she was.


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* Zigzagged in "False Alarm," an episode of ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold''. Eugene is accused of pulling a fire alarm, and a jury of students--consisting of Arnold, Gerald, Phoebe, Helga, Harold, and Curly--is called to find him guilty. Arnold is the lone holdout (much of the episode parodies ''Film/TwelveAngryMen''), and eventually uses this trope to prove his point: one of the pieces of evidence is a pencil from Wankyland, an amusement park, found near the broom closet where Eugene was discovered hiding. Arnold argues that Eugene ''couldn't'' own a Wankyland pencil, as he was banned from the park for [[NoodleIncident somehow ruining a Thanksgiving Day parade]] the previous year. It's never suggested that Eugene might have had the pencil from ''before'' being banned, but it turns out to be a moot point, as the real culprit--Curly--reveals himself once Arnold makes this argument.
25th Sep '17 2:23:57 PM Gravidef
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* The short story collection ''Inspector Forsooth's Whodunits'' sets out to very deliberately [[AvertedTrope avert this trope]], even citing the classic example of "the English professor who 'committed suicide' and left a note filled with grammatical mistakes." Author Derrick Niederman certainly succeeds--the mysteries are ''intense'', and require disproving alibis based on evidence, codes, and occasional outside knowledge (various cases include needing to know [[spoiler: state tax laws, the dates of zodiac signs, and the intricacies of a particular Chopin piece]]).
25th Sep '17 9:49:43 AM Gravidef
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** Even Donald Sobol (the author of Encyclopedia Brown) [[EveryoneHasStandards seemed to realize that this one was flimsy]]; Mrs. Brown specifically mentions that the store is notorious for demanding ''exactly'' ten items for the express lane. That doesn't quite fix the problems (again, the lane might not have been open in the first place), but points for trying.
12th Sep '17 6:42:06 AM Derkhan
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* In ''Literature/TerraIgnota'', Papadelias, the cop who brought Mycroft in after Mycroft's two-week-long murder rampage, has known for years that there is something off about Mycroft's case, based mostly on how Mycroft seemed to be in two places at the same time while commiting his crimes. Every time they run into each other, he quizzes Mycroft on the timeline, trying to find discrepancies. Mycroft always has a correct and plausible answer. [[spoiler:Papadelias is right, though. Mycroft is hiding his lover and partner in crime Saladin, who commited half the murders.]]
21st Jul '17 12:35:56 AM gophergiggles
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* An episode of ''Series/{{House}}'' ("The Tyrant") has House confront Wilson's neighbor, an amputee who claims to have lost his arm in Vietnam. House deduces from various clues that the man is a veteran of the ''Canadian'' Army, and calls him out as a fraud—only to be told that although Canada didn't take part in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, they did send troops to Vietnam to enforce the Paris Peace Accords, which is how he lost his arm in a landmine incident.

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* An episode of ''Series/{{House}}'' ("The Tyrant") has House confront Wilson's neighbor, an amputee who claims to have lost his arm in Vietnam. House deduces from various clues that the man is a veteran of the ''Canadian'' Army, and calls him out as a fraud—only to be told that although Canada didn't take part in UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, they did send troops to Vietnam to enforce the Paris Peace Accords, which is how he lost his arm in a landmine incident. It's also a straight example as Canadian troops ''did'' fight in Vietnam: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_and_the_Vietnam_War#Canadians_in_the_U.S._military 30,000 soldiers in all]].
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