History Main / ConvictionByContradiction

16th Mar '17 12:43:22 AM marcoasalazarm
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** Parodied in a random Duff poster that appears on an episode where Homer and Barney visited the local plant, which (having been done during UsefulNotes/TheColdWar) had someone ''[[DisproportionateRetribution accused of being a Communist spy and arrested]]'' simply because he didn't liked Duff.

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** Parodied in a random Duff poster that appears on an episode where Homer and Barney visited the local plant, which (having been done during UsefulNotes/TheColdWar) The UsefulNotes/ColdWar) had someone ''[[DisproportionateRetribution accused of being a Communist spy and arrested]]'' simply because he didn't liked Duff.
16th Mar '17 12:41:28 AM marcoasalazarm
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** Parodied in a random Duff poster that appears on an episode where Homer and Barney visited the local plant, which (having been done during TheColdWar) had someone ''accused of being a Communist spy and arrested'' simply because he didn't liked Duff.

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** Parodied in a random Duff poster that appears on an episode where Homer and Barney visited the local plant, which (having been done during TheColdWar) UsefulNotes/TheColdWar) had someone ''accused ''[[DisproportionateRetribution accused of being a Communist spy and arrested'' arrested]]'' simply because he didn't liked Duff.
5th Mar '17 11:05:47 PM TheGreatUnknown
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* The perp tells someone he's hidden a $2 note between an odd and even page of a book that are normally on opposite sides of a leaf if the book is read left to right. It might be possible that the book had a typo, breaks the tradition, had its pages printed out of order, or the perp simply misremembered the book pages.

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* The perp tells someone he's hidden a $2 note bill between an odd and even page of a book that are normally on opposite sides of a leaf if the book is read left to right. It might be possible that the book had a typo, breaks the tradition, had its pages printed out of order, or the perp simply misremembered the book pages.
24th Feb '17 6:30:25 AM tromag
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* Played with in ''Film/AFewGoodMen'' – a murder victim in Guantanamo Bay's military base in Cuba had supposedly received long-awaited transfer orders for a flight early the next morning, but had not packed by the time of his murder later that night nor called any friends or family back home to make preparations. When this is mentioned during a witness examination with the man issuing the transfer, intended to trick the witness into self-incrimination, the witness counters that he couldn't possibly explain the dead man's motives, not being the man in question. However, the contradiction is enough to irritate the witness and put him on the defensive—[[XanatosGambit just]] [[ZigzaggingTrope as planned.]]

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* Played with in ''Film/AFewGoodMen'' – a murder victim in Guantanamo Bay's military base in Cuba had supposedly received long-awaited transfer orders for a flight early the next morning, but had not packed by the time of his murder later that night nor called any friends or family back home to make preparations. When his commander is asked about this is mentioned during a witness examination with the man issuing the transfer, intended to trick the witness into self-incrimination, the witness counters at trial, he quickly points out that there could be any number of explanations for those facts (maybe he couldn't possibly liked to pack in the morning), and he can't be expected to explain the dead man's motives, not being the man in question.them. However, the contradiction is enough to irritate the witness and put him on the defensive—[[XanatosGambit just]] [[ZigzaggingTrope as planned.]]
9th Feb '17 12:29:15 PM Gosicrystal
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* Averted in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series. The core mechanic of the game is to find and expose contradictions in witness testimony by presenting evidence. However, at no point is ''anyone'' ever proved guilty by a single contradiction alone. Instead, the objective is to expose a contradiction, which will then be covered up by a new, weaker story ("No! Wait! I was mistaken! It happened this way!") which can also be contradicted, [[PullTheThread and so on and so forth until the actual perpetrator's guilt is confirmed]]. The end result is that Phoenix and Apollo always need to present a pretty extensive case and put forth quite a bit of evidence before the court even considers believing them.
** This is straight said to be an impossible act in the fourth game, when Apollo is accusing someone of being the real killer. Even though he's presented a pretty convincing case with quite a bit of evidence to back it up, and pointed out a load of contradictions in the witness's testimony, he's still unable to get them for the murder, due to not having any evidence that actually links them directly to the crime. Apollo does eventually get him by [[spoiler:forcing a confession out of them.]]
** Phoenix is also a defense attorney and his client is always the one on trial, so pointing out the contradictions is actually perfectly valid when the point is to create doubt in the testimony of those accusing your client. Also, it's suggested that the real perpetrators have to undergo another trial at a later date, so even when Phoenix exposes evidence against them they aren't necessarily convicted immediately. However, this isn't to state that the games don't use spurious evidence to advance the cases sometimes, nor that contradictions in testimony aren't sometimes given more weight as points of suspicion than they probably should be.


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* Averted in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series. The core mechanic of the game is to find and expose contradictions in witness testimony by presenting evidence. However, at no point is ''anyone'' ever proved guilty by a single contradiction alone. Instead, the objective is to expose a contradiction, which will then be covered up by a new, weaker story ("No! Wait! I was mistaken! It happened this way!") which can also be contradicted, [[PullTheThread and so on and so forth until the actual perpetrator's guilt is confirmed]]. The end result is that [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney Phoenix]], [[VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney Apollo]] and [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies Athena]] always need to present a pretty extensive case and put forth quite a bit of evidence before the court even considers believing them. And even then, sometimes evidence will not be enough to convict a culprit, which sometimes requires getting a confession out of them (e.g. in Apollo's game, third case). Also, it's suggested that the real perpetrators have to undergo another trial at a later date, so even when Phoenix exposes evidence against them they aren't necessarily convicted immediately. Other times, though, pointing out the contradictions is actually perfectly valid when the point is to create doubt in the testimony of those accusing your client.
3rd Feb '17 1:04:17 PM marcoasalazarm
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** Parodied in a random Duff poster that appears on an episode where Homer and Barney visited the local plant, which (having been done during TheColdWar) had someone ''accused of being a Communist spy and arrested'' simply because he didn't liked Duff.
22nd Jan '17 10:12:18 AM Psyclone
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* A very tall suspect claims he didn't use a car that had been involved with a crime, but the car seat was pushed back far enough that a normal-sized person couldn't have used it but the suspect could have. Because no other tall people exist that could have used the car. And no shorter person could have used the car and then adjusted the seat to throw off the police.
10th Jan '17 5:04:29 AM GliderPro
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* A very tall suspect claims he didn't use a car that had been involved with a crime, but the car seat was pushed back far enough that a normal-sized person couldn't have used it but the suspect could have. Because no other tall people exist that could have used the car. And no shorter person could have used the car and then adjusted the seat to throw off the police.
11th Dec '16 2:13:20 AM Xtifr
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* One short story in the anthology ''Creator/AlfredHitchcock's Sinister Spies'' is called "[=QL696.C9=]", by Anthony Boucher. It's about a librarian who was killed, leaving a the titular mysterious sequence of letters and numbers nearby. At the end of the story, the detective gathers the suspects in the, um, library in the traditional fashion,[[spoiler: declares that the code was probably a library subject reference number, and starts to look it up.]] He's interrupted by the need to keep the murderer (a spy), from killing herself with the pistol she hid in her blouse. Turns out he knew it was her as soon as he figured out what the code was for, as the killer had the only name that was a noun, and the whole library scene was just to flush her out. FridgeBrilliance kicks in when you realize that the detective needed something from the suspect to avert this trope, since there's all sorts of perfectly good reasons a librarian would have to write down a Library of Congress reference code [[spoiler:for swifts]]. Ironically, the anthology in question comes up when you search the [=LoC=] for the code.

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* One short story in the anthology ''Creator/AlfredHitchcock's Sinister Spies'' is called "[=QL696.C9=]", by Anthony Boucher.Creator/AnthonyBoucher. It's about a librarian who was killed, leaving a the titular mysterious sequence of letters and numbers nearby. At the end of the story, the detective gathers the suspects in the, um, library in the traditional fashion,[[spoiler: declares that the code was probably a library subject reference number, and starts to look it up.]] He's interrupted by the need to keep the murderer (a spy), from killing herself with the pistol she hid in her blouse. Turns out he knew it was her as soon as he figured out what the code was for, as the killer had the only name that was a noun, and the whole library scene was just to flush her out. FridgeBrilliance kicks in when you realize that the detective needed something from the suspect to avert this trope, since there's all sorts of perfectly good reasons a librarian would have to write down a Library of Congress reference code [[spoiler:for swifts]]. Ironically, the anthology in question comes up when you search the [=LoC=] for the code.
5th Dec '16 3:44:54 AM AG1995
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[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'': The first solid clue that leads to the third culprit's identity is the fact that [[NeverSuicide their victim's cause of death was not by hanging, but rather by strangulation]]. [[spoiler:After all, how could Mikan, the Ultimate Nurse, have missed that when her autopsies had been so accurate before, unless ''she'' was the one trying to hide it.]]
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ConvictionByContradiction