History Main / ContractualGenreBlindness

8th Sep '16 12:22:08 AM HelloLamppost
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* WesternAnimation/Bravestarr was once forced into a deal with his enemy Tex Hex. Bravestarr went along with it because he knew Tex was such a compulsive backstabber that there was virtually no chance he'd keep his end of the deal, which would free Bravestarr from having to stand by it, either. Sure enough, Tex broke his word.

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* WesternAnimation/Bravestarr WesternAnimation/{{Bravestarr}} was once forced into a deal with his enemy Tex Hex. Hex. Bravestarr went along with it because he knew Tex was such a compulsive backstabber that there was virtually no chance he'd keep his end of the deal, which would free Bravestarr from having to stand by it, either. either. Sure enough, Tex broke his word.
8th Sep '16 12:21:23 AM HelloLamppost
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* WesternAnimation/Bravestarr was once forced into a deal with his enemy Tex Hex. Bravestarr went along with it because he knew Tex was such a compulsive backstabber that there was virtually no chance he'd keep his end of the deal, which would free Bravestarr from having to stand by it, either. Sure enough, Tex broke his word.
19th Jul '16 11:36:20 AM AnonFangeekGirl
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* In ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', ContractualGenreBlindness is a clever survival technique, because as long as ''you'' play by the rules and aren't too great of a threat, you can expect the other side to do so too.

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* In ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', ContractualGenreBlindness is a clever survival technique, because as long as ''you'' play by the rules and aren't too great of a threat, you can expect the other side to do so too. Being an effective and dangerous villain will just make sure that when your enemies defeat you, they'll go to great lengths to make sure you ''don't show up again''.
19th Jul '16 11:34:25 AM AnonFangeekGirl
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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''
** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum,'' the old Count de Magpyr explains that it's better for a vampire to display a sense of fairness (having big open windows with heavy drapes and easily breakable furniture in your castle) and get let yourself be killed every so often, than to become a hated tyrant and have people actually ''trying'' to get rid of you in a more longlasting way.

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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''
In ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'', ContractualGenreBlindness is a clever survival technique, because as long as ''you'' play by the rules and aren't too great of a threat, you can expect the other side to do so too.
** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum,'' the old Count de Magpyr explains that it's better for a vampire to display a sense of fairness (having big open windows with heavy drapes drapes, items that can easily be turned into holy symbols. and easily breakable furniture in your castle) and get let yourself be killed every so often, than to become a hated tyrant and have people actually ''trying'' to get rid of you in a more longlasting way.



** ContractualGenreBlindness is a clever survival technique. In the case of the Old Count, he knows that [[GoodOldWays deliberately obeying old stereotypes]] is much better than subverting them and earning the total enmity of the local villagers, risking them putting him in a coffin full of garlic and posting a guard every year. Evil Harry Dread's continued "I'll be back" survival also works because he abides by the same rules as the heroes. If they killed Harry once and for all, they would be depriving themselves of a future job. As such, Harry is considered a close friend, even though he is still a "bad guy".
17th Jul '16 9:15:25 AM Morgenthaler
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DangerouslyGenreSavvy villains are evil, and they know it. For every complicated villain with [[FreudianExcuse abandonment issues]] that has a chance to redeem themselves, there are ten {{Card Carrying Villain}}s out there who are just in it because they [[ForTheEvulz love being villains.]]

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DangerouslyGenreSavvy villains are evil, and they know it. For every complicated villain with [[FreudianExcuse abandonment issues]] that has a chance to redeem themselves, there are ten {{Card Carrying Villain}}s out there who are just in it because they [[ForTheEvulz love being villains.]]



SlaveToPR to the extreme. Villains who say "screw it" to this policy instead become DangerouslyGenreSavvy. If a villain, usually a MadScientist, has a mental handicap which ''forces'' them to act like this, even when they know better, that's ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder.

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SlaveToPR to the extreme. Villains who say "screw it" to this policy instead become DangerouslyGenreSavvy. If a villain, usually a MadScientist, has a mental handicap which ''forces'' them to act like this, even when they know better, that's ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder.



* Classic ''Series/DoctorWho's'' the Master fell into this a lot. New Who manages to make him Contractually Genre Blind and DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''at the same time''.

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* Classic ''Series/DoctorWho's'' the Master fell into this a lot. New Who manages to make him Contractually Genre Blind and DangerouslyGenreSavvy GenreSavvy ''at the same time''.



** In a fairly meta example, anyone who plays role-playing games for any length of time will paradoxically combine this with DangerouslyGenreSavvy, because of the FourthWall. Anyone who's played for any length of time will pick up on the [[TropesAreTools cliches and tropes]] that the GameMaster uses due to dozens of exposures; however, each new ''character'' being played will not have the benefit of that experience, so the player must act as if {{genre blind|ness}}, or risk BreakingTheFourthWall - which most [[GameMaster GMs]] frown upon. Attempting instead to act as if there is NoFourthWall generally (not inevitably) leads to powergaming, {{Munchkin}}s, a KillerGameMaster and, when it all comes crashing down, RocksFallEveryoneDies.
** Virtually the only exceptions are blatantly self-aware games such as ''TOON'' or ''Paranoia,'' in which your character's attempts to be DangerouslyGenreSavvy are [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption predestined for humiliation]] and PlayedForLaughs.
** A new player checks the chest for traps. An experienced player checks the floors, walls, and ceilings for traps. A DangerouslyGenreSavvy player has someone ''else'' check the ceiling for traps. A truly experienced player walks up and just opens the chest, then starts laughing when the DM starts rolling dice.

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** In a fairly meta example, anyone who plays role-playing games for any length of time will paradoxically combine this with DangerouslyGenreSavvy, GenreSavvy, because of the FourthWall. Anyone who's played for any length of time will pick up on the [[TropesAreTools cliches and tropes]] that the GameMaster uses due to dozens of exposures; however, each new ''character'' being played will not have the benefit of that experience, so the player must act as if {{genre blind|ness}}, or risk BreakingTheFourthWall - which most [[GameMaster GMs]] frown upon. Attempting instead to act as if there is NoFourthWall generally (not inevitably) leads to powergaming, {{Munchkin}}s, a KillerGameMaster and, when it all comes crashing down, RocksFallEveryoneDies.
** Virtually the only exceptions are blatantly self-aware games such as ''TOON'' or ''Paranoia,'' in which your character's attempts to be DangerouslyGenreSavvy GenreSavvy are [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption predestined for humiliation]] and PlayedForLaughs.
** A new player checks the chest for traps. An experienced player checks the floors, walls, and ceilings for traps. A DangerouslyGenreSavvy GenreSavvy player has someone ''else'' check the ceiling for traps. A truly experienced player walks up and just opens the chest, then starts laughing when the DM starts rolling dice.



** Nale and Elan's father Tarquin takes this so far he loops back into DangerouslyGenreSavvy. He's running an evil empire fully aware that many stories have such empires toppled and their leaders slain. He doesn't mind the possibility that such will be his fate if it means he gets to run an evil empire for a few decades. He's even happier to go along with genre conventions after finding out his son Elan has become an adventuring hero; rather than dying at the hands of some random schmuck, he will be defeated in an epic duel with his own son. He seems more excited at the prospect of ''losing'' than winning -- winning just means he'll get to rule a bit longer, while losing will make him a '''legend''' since the villain is always more memorable in such tales. He sums it up quite nicely to Elan: "Here's to us Elan. We're going to tell the best story ''ever''."

to:

** Nale and Elan's father Tarquin takes this so far he loops back into DangerouslyGenreSavvy.GenreSavvy. He's running an evil empire fully aware that many stories have such empires toppled and their leaders slain. He doesn't mind the possibility that such will be his fate if it means he gets to run an evil empire for a few decades. He's even happier to go along with genre conventions after finding out his son Elan has become an adventuring hero; rather than dying at the hands of some random schmuck, he will be defeated in an epic duel with his own son. He seems more excited at the prospect of ''losing'' than winning -- winning just means he'll get to rule a bit longer, while losing will make him a '''legend''' since the villain is always more memorable in such tales. He sums it up quite nicely to Elan: "Here's to us Elan. We're going to tell the best story ''ever''."
4th Jul '16 4:18:53 PM frogpatrol
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[[folder:Comicbooks]]
* ''Comicbook/{{Empowered}}'', by Adam Warren: The bad guys do this as a survival mechanism. Smack around the hero and leave him (her) tied up and escape with the diamonds? Good show, whatever. We'll get you next time! Shoot the hero? Every other hero will be after you. Unfortunately, there are villains who simply don't care and are powerful enough that the prospect of being hunted by every other hero doesn't worry them.

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[[folder:Comicbooks]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* In ''Comicbook/{{Empowered}}'', by Adam Warren: The Warren, the bad guys do this as a survival mechanism. Smack around the hero and leave him (her) tied up and escape with the diamonds? Good show, whatever. We'll get you next time! Shoot the hero? Every other hero will be after you. Unfortunately, there are villains who simply don't care and are powerful enough that the prospect of being hunted by every other hero doesn't worry them.



* Captain Cold alluded to this during The Rogues' Revenge storyline after ''Comicbook/FinalCrisis''. When your foe is Franchise/TheFlash, a man capable of finishing any fight before you even think of defending yourself, you keep your crimes light and theatrical and hope he responds in turn.
* This is basically [[Franchise/{{Batman}} the Riddler's]] whole schtick. Of ''course'' he'd be a more successful criminal if he didn't leave puzzle clues behind. He ''knows'' that. But he's got a psychological hang-up (sometimes identified as a form of obsessive compulsive disorder) that just compels him to go about it this way.

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* Captain Cold alluded to this during The "The Rogues' Revenge Revenge" storyline after ''Comicbook/FinalCrisis''.following''Comicbook/FinalCrisis''. When your foe is Franchise/TheFlash, a man capable of finishing any fight before you even think of defending yourself, you keep your crimes light and theatrical and hope he responds in turn.
* This is basically [[Franchise/{{Batman}} the Riddler's]] whole schtick. Of ''course'' he'd be a more successful criminal if he didn't leave puzzle clues behind. He ''knows'' that. But he's got a psychological hang-up (sometimes identified as a form of obsessive compulsive obsessive-compulsive disorder) that just compels him to go about it this way.
4th Jul '16 4:15:58 PM frogpatrol
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** This is all because he suffers from a mental illness -- "[[ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder Malign Hypercognition Disorder]]." He ''knows'' his actions are irrational, and most of his struggle in the books are with himself, alternately denying his problem and pitying/hating himself for it.

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** This is all because he suffers from a mental illness -- "[[ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder from[[ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder Malign Hypercognition Disorder]]." Disorder]]. He ''knows'' his actions are irrational, and most of his struggle in the books are with himself, alternately denying his problem and pitying/hating himself for it.



* ''Literature/BridgeOfBirds'': The Duke of Ch'in does this out of fear: tough as he acts, he's still [[TheManBehindTheCurtain confused and frightened]], so he mimics the villains in fairy tales rather than think on his own.

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* ''Literature/BridgeOfBirds'': The In Barry Hughart's ''Literature/BridgeOfBirds'' the Duke of Ch'in does this out of fear: tough as he acts, he's still [[TheManBehindTheCurtain confused and frightened]], so he mimics the villains in fairy tales rather than think on his own.



* In what may be TruthInTelevision, the actors in the George Reeves ''Series/TheAdventuresOfSuperman'' show actually said that they never noticed Clark and Superman looked the same because they wanted to keep their jobs.



* Players:

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* Players:RPG players:



** Virtually the only exceptions are surreal games such as ''TOON'' or ''Paranoia,'' in which your character's attempts to be DangerouslyGenreSavvy are [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption predestined for humiliation]] and PlayedForLaughs.
** A new player checks the chest for traps. An experienced player checks the floors, walls, and ceilings for traps. A DangerouslyGenreSavvy player has someone ELSE check the ceiling for traps. An ultimately experienced player walks up and just opens the chest, then starts laughing when the DM starts rolling dice.

to:

** Virtually the only exceptions are surreal blatantly self-aware games such as ''TOON'' or ''Paranoia,'' in which your character's attempts to be DangerouslyGenreSavvy are [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption predestined for humiliation]] and PlayedForLaughs.
** A new player checks the chest for traps. An experienced player checks the floors, walls, and ceilings for traps. A DangerouslyGenreSavvy player has someone ELSE ''else'' check the ceiling for traps. An ultimately A truly experienced player walks up and just opens the chest, then starts laughing when the DM starts rolling dice.



* Most of the point of ''TabletopGame/BetterAngels'', where the [[PlayerCharacter player characters]] are ''supervillains'' forced to hatch evil plans for their demonic masters. Fortunately, demonic masters don't understand this trope, so the characters can deliberately build weaknesses and vulnerabilities into their plans to be exploited. Rebellion has a far worse punishment than failure.

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* Most of the point of ''TabletopGame/BetterAngels'', where in which the [[PlayerCharacter player characters]] are ''supervillains'' forced to hatch evil plans for their demonic masters. (They also play the demons controlling other PC's) Fortunately, demonic masters don't understand this trope, so leaving the characters can free to deliberately build weaknesses and vulnerabilities into their plans in order to be exploited. Rebellion has a far exploit them. Rebellion, after all, carries with it worse punishment than failure.
4th Jul '16 4:09:32 PM frogpatrol
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But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with '''Contractual
Genre Blindness'''. This is the baddy who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.

to:

But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with '''Contractual
'''Contractual Genre Blindness'''. This is the baddy who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.
4th Jul '16 4:09:11 PM frogpatrol
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But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with '''ContractualGenreBlindness'''. This is the baddy who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.

to:

But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with '''ContractualGenreBlindness'''.'''Contractual
Genre Blindness'''.
This is the baddy who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.
4th Jul '16 4:08:50 PM frogpatrol
Is there an issue? Send a Message


But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with ContractualGenreBlindness. This is the man who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.

to:

But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with ContractualGenreBlindness. '''ContractualGenreBlindness'''. This is the man baddy who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.



SlaveToPR to the extreme. Villains who say "Screw it" to this policy instead become DangerouslyGenreSavvy. If a villain, usually a MadScientist, has a mental handicap which ''forces'' them to act like this, even when they know better, that's ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder.

to:

SlaveToPR to the extreme. Villains who say "Screw "screw it" to this policy instead become DangerouslyGenreSavvy. If a villain, usually a MadScientist, has a mental handicap which ''forces'' them to act like this, even when they know better, that's ScienceRelatedMemeticDisorder.
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