History Main / ContractualGenreBlindness

11th Apr '16 9:44:42 AM ObsidianFire
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[[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Genre Savvy villains]] are evil, and they know it. For every complicated villain with [[FreudianExcuse abandonment issues]] that has a chance to redeem themselves, there are ten {{Card Carrying Villain}}s out there who are just in it because they [[ForTheEvulz love being villains.]]

But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with Contractual Genre Blindness. This is the man who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.

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[[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Genre Savvy villains]] DangerouslyGenreSavvy villains are evil, and they know it. For every complicated villain with [[FreudianExcuse abandonment issues]] that has a chance to redeem themselves, there are ten {{Card Carrying Villain}}s out there who are just in it because they [[ForTheEvulz love being villains.]]

But what happens when you have a villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with Contractual Genre Blindness.ContractualGenreBlindness. This is the man who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.



** Contractual Genre Blindness is a clever survival technique. In the case of the Old Count, he knows that [[GoodOldWays deliberately obeying old stereotypes]] is much better than subverting them and earning the total enmity of the local villagers, risking them putting him in a coffin full of garlic and posting a guard every year. Evil Harry Dread's continued "I'll be back" survival also works because he abides by the same rules as the heroes. If they killed Harry once and for all, they would be depriving themselves of a future job. As such, Harry is considered a close friend, even though he is still a "bad guy".
** In Harry and Cohen's case, in typical Pratchett fashion, the [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Dangerouly Genre Savviness]] of both sides, resulting in their mutual Contractual Genre Blindness curved right back around to being DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''about'' Contractual Genre Blindness. When Harry seems genuinely surprised that they were expecting him to betray Cohen's Silver Horde exactly at the culmination of their grand plan, they explain that they expected nothing less from someone like Harry and congratulate him on being one of the best {{Evil Overlord}}s they had ever encountered. Harry [[ManlyTears tears up]] not only from the respect he receives from them, but also the idea that they may be parting ways forever.

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** Contractual Genre Blindness ContractualGenreBlindness is a clever survival technique. In the case of the Old Count, he knows that [[GoodOldWays deliberately obeying old stereotypes]] is much better than subverting them and earning the total enmity of the local villagers, risking them putting him in a coffin full of garlic and posting a guard every year. Evil Harry Dread's continued "I'll be back" survival also works because he abides by the same rules as the heroes. If they killed Harry once and for all, they would be depriving themselves of a future job. As such, Harry is considered a close friend, even though he is still a "bad guy".
** In Harry and Cohen's case, in typical Pratchett fashion, the [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Dangerouly Genre Savviness]] of both sides, resulting in their mutual Contractual Genre Blindness curved right back around to being DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''about'' Contractual Genre Blindness. When Harry seems genuinely surprised that they were expecting him to betray Cohen's Silver Horde exactly at the culmination of their grand plan, they explain that they expected nothing less from someone like Harry and congratulate him on being one of the best {{Evil Overlord}}s they had ever encountered. Harry [[ManlyTears tears up]] not only from the respect he receives from them, but also the idea that they may be parting ways forever.
guy".



* In Creator/JohnMoore's ''Literature/HeroicsForBeginners'', the evil overlord mentions trying to foreclose the mortgage on an orphanage and chase down puppies to kick because that's how one becomes an evil overlord. This is an interesting case, as the overlord manages to be a stereotypical villain while still being DangerouslyGenreSavvy. The only reason he's ultimately defeated is because the hero doesn't use conventional "heroic" methods.

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* In Creator/JohnMoore's ''Literature/HeroicsForBeginners'', the evil overlord mentions trying to foreclose the mortgage on an orphanage and chase down puppies to kick because that's how one becomes an evil overlord. This is an interesting case, as the overlord manages to be a stereotypical villain while still being DangerouslyGenreSavvy.smart. The only reason he's ultimately defeated is because the hero doesn't use conventional "heroic" methods.



* Classic ''Series/DoctorWho's'' the Master fell into this a lot. New Who manages to make him Contractually Genre Blind and DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''at the same time''.

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* Classic ''Series/DoctorWho's'' the Master fell into this a lot. New Who manages to make him Contractually Genre Blind ContractuallyGenreBlind and DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''at the same time''.



* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Señor Senior Sr. took up [=supervillainy=] as a hobby and has since adhered to Contractual Genre Blindness. In fact, it's a tradition followed both by the villains and the heroes. So much so that the character gets upset when one villain refuses to follow the rules. He considers it to be good form.

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* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Señor Senior Sr. took up [=supervillainy=] as a hobby and has since adhered to Contractual Genre Blindness.ContractualGenreBlindness. In fact, it's a tradition followed both by the villains and the heroes. So much so that the character gets upset when one villain refuses to follow the rules. He considers it to be good form.
23rd Mar '16 3:41:12 PM DragonEmperor90
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** Most [=supervillains=] are members of the Guild of Calamitous Intent -- a WeirdTradeUnion whose bylaws obligate them to behave in this manner. It's suggested that the Guild enforces this as a protection measure for both their members and for society at large. An episode where Jonas Jr does not play along has Brock Samson warning him that a psycho with a private army, flying machines and so forth needs to be indulged if only to keep him away from committing real crimes.

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** Most [=supervillains=] are members of the Guild of Calamitous Intent -- a WeirdTradeUnion whose bylaws obligate them to behave in this manner. It's suggested that the Guild enforces this as a protection measure for both their members and for society at large. An episode where Jonas Jr Rusty does not play along has Brock Samson warning him that a psycho with a private army, flying machines and so forth needs to be indulged if only to keep him away from committing real crimes.
14th Mar '16 12:08:37 PM Discar
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** Evil Harry Dread in ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' is constrained by the Dark Lord Code of Honour, later defined in [[http://www.sjgames.com/pyramid/sample.html?id=2919 this Pyramid article]].\\
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Contractual Genre Blindness is a clever survival technique. In the case of the Old Count, he knows that [[GoodOldWays deliberately obeying old stereotypes]] is much better than subverting them and earning the total enmity of the local villagers, risking them putting him in a coffin full of garlic and posting a guard every year. Evil Harry Dread's continued "I'll be back" survival also works because he abides by the same rules as the heroes. If they killed Harry once and for all, they would be depriving themselves of a future job. As such, Harry is considered a close friend, even though he is still a "bad guy".\\
\\
In Harry and Cohen's case, in typical Pratchett fashion, the [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Dangerouly Genre Savviness]] of both sides, resulting in their mutual Contractual Genre Blindness curved right back around to being DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''about'' Contractual Genre Blindness. When Harry seems genuinely surprised that they were expecting him to betray Cohen's Silver Horde exactly at the culmination of their grand plan, they explain that they expected nothing less from someone like Harry and congratulate him on being one of the best {{Evil Overlord}}s they had ever encountered. Harry [[ManlyTears tears up]] not only from the respect he receives from them, but also the idea that they may be parting ways forever.\\
One last note: in much the same way that Cohen and the Horde are the "Last Heroes", Harry is the Last Dread Lord - he always stuck to his end of the code, but ''the other side didn't''. "The first thing they do these days, they block up your secret escape tunnels."

to:

** Evil Harry Dread in ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' is constrained by the Dark Lord Code of Honour, later defined in [[http://www.sjgames.com/pyramid/sample.html?id=2919 this Pyramid article]].\\
\\
article]].
**
Contractual Genre Blindness is a clever survival technique. In the case of the Old Count, he knows that [[GoodOldWays deliberately obeying old stereotypes]] is much better than subverting them and earning the total enmity of the local villagers, risking them putting him in a coffin full of garlic and posting a guard every year. Evil Harry Dread's continued "I'll be back" survival also works because he abides by the same rules as the heroes. If they killed Harry once and for all, they would be depriving themselves of a future job. As such, Harry is considered a close friend, even though he is still a "bad guy".\\
\\
guy".
**
In Harry and Cohen's case, in typical Pratchett fashion, the [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Dangerouly Genre Savviness]] of both sides, resulting in their mutual Contractual Genre Blindness curved right back around to being DangerouslyGenreSavvy ''about'' Contractual Genre Blindness. When Harry seems genuinely surprised that they were expecting him to betray Cohen's Silver Horde exactly at the culmination of their grand plan, they explain that they expected nothing less from someone like Harry and congratulate him on being one of the best {{Evil Overlord}}s they had ever encountered. Harry [[ManlyTears tears up]] not only from the respect he receives from them, but also the idea that they may be parting ways forever.\\
forever.
**
One last note: in much the same way that Cohen and the Horde are the "Last Heroes", Harry is the Last Dread Lord - he always stuck to his end of the code, but ''the other side didn't''. "The first thing they do these days, they block up your secret escape tunnels."



* ''Literature/SoonIWillBeInvincible'' by Austin Grossman: villain Dr. Impossible does many things because that's what villains are supposed to do, but with a lot of realistic consequences [[spoiler: Dr. Impossible dons his [=supervillain=] costume to impress the C-list villains at a local hangout, gets beat up and thrown out, and has to change out of his costume in nearby bushes before getting on the local Greyhound bus to go home.]].\\
\\
In other instances, he manages to stop himself just before pulling a classic [=supervillain=] move. In one scene, he's being laughed at by some prison guards, which gets him so annoyed he begins to retort by saying "You won't be laughing when I..." Then he stops, and chides himself for always giving away his master plan.

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* ''Literature/SoonIWillBeInvincible'' by Austin Grossman: villain Grossman:
** Villain
Dr. Impossible does many things because that's what villains are supposed to do, but with a lot of realistic consequences [[spoiler: Dr. Impossible dons his [=supervillain=] costume to impress the C-list villains at a local hangout, gets beat up and thrown out, and has to change out of his costume in nearby bushes before getting on the local Greyhound bus to go home.]].\\
\\
]].
**
In other instances, he manages to stop himself just before pulling a classic [=supervillain=] move. In one scene, he's being laughed at by some prison guards, which gets him so annoyed he begins to retort by saying "You won't be laughing when I..." Then he stops, and chides himself for always giving away his master plan.



* ''Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'': A rare heroic example; TomSawyer insists on breaking Jim out in the most elaborate, difficult way possible because "that's how it's supposed to be done." Given all the trouble this causes, you can tell Creator/MarkTwain [[CreatorBacklash had gotten sick of Tom Sawyer]] by the time he wrote ''Huckleberry Finn''.\\
\\
To elaborate on how idiotic the breakout plan was: one step of it involved moving a boulder into Jim's cell (don't ask). The two boys aren't strong enough to move it in themselves, so Jim helps them. That's right, Jim ''walks out of the cell and goes back in voluntarily''. And then lets himself be locked back in again. Poor Jim. Jim is legally already free; Tom Sawyer just refused to tell him until he had 'broken him out' first.
\\
Additionally, only after this stupid escape attempt does Tom reveal that Jim is a free man, since his owner has willed it after her death. So the whole thing wasn't even necessary.

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* ''Literature/AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'': A rare heroic example; TomSawyer insists on breaking Jim out in the most elaborate, difficult way possible because "that's how it's supposed to be done." Given all the trouble this causes, you can tell Creator/MarkTwain [[CreatorBacklash had gotten sick of Tom Sawyer]] by the time he wrote ''Huckleberry Finn''.\\
\\
To elaborate on how idiotic the breakout plan was: one
One step of it involved moving a boulder into Jim's cell (don't ask). The two boys aren't strong enough to move it in themselves, so Jim helps them. That's right, Jim ''walks out of the cell and goes back in voluntarily''. And then lets himself be locked back in again. Poor Jim. Jim is legally already free; Tom Sawyer just refused to tell him until he had 'broken him out' first.
\\
first. Additionally, only after this stupid escape attempt does Tom reveal that Jim is a free man, since his owner has willed it after her death. So the whole thing wasn't even necessary.



* In a fairly meta example, anyone who plays role-playing games for any length of time will paradoxically combine this with DangerouslyGenreSavvy, because of the FourthWall. Anyone who's played for any length of time will pick up on the [[TropesAreTools cliches and tropes]] that the GameMaster uses due to dozens of exposures; however, each new ''character'' being played will not have the benefit of that experience, so the player must act as if {{genre blind|ness}}, or risk BreakingTheFourthWall - which most [[GameMaster GMs]] frown upon. Attempting instead to act as if there is NoFourthWall generally (not inevitably) leads to powergaming, {{Munchkin}}s, a KillerGameMaster and, when it all comes crashing down, RocksFallEveryoneDies.

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* Players:
**
In a fairly meta example, anyone who plays role-playing games for any length of time will paradoxically combine this with DangerouslyGenreSavvy, because of the FourthWall. Anyone who's played for any length of time will pick up on the [[TropesAreTools cliches and tropes]] that the GameMaster uses due to dozens of exposures; however, each new ''character'' being played will not have the benefit of that experience, so the player must act as if {{genre blind|ness}}, or risk BreakingTheFourthWall - which most [[GameMaster GMs]] frown upon. Attempting instead to act as if there is NoFourthWall generally (not inevitably) leads to powergaming, {{Munchkin}}s, a KillerGameMaster and, when it all comes crashing down, RocksFallEveryoneDies.



** Elan actually manages to ''[[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0793.html weaponise]]'' this trope by displaying surprise at the revelation that [[NeverFoundTheBody Nale was alive when he never actually SAW him die]]. Naturally, Elan knew that Nale was probably still alive, but knows that [[NoOneCouldSurviveThat the hero never expects the villain to return.]] Nale gets a headache trying to parse [[LogicBomb how Elan could be surprised by what he knew happened.]]

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** Elan actually manages to ''[[http://www.[[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0793.html weaponise]]'' uses this trope trope]] by displaying surprise at the revelation that [[NeverFoundTheBody Nale was alive when he never actually SAW him die]]. Naturally, Elan knew that Nale was probably still alive, but knows that [[NoOneCouldSurviveThat the hero never expects the villain to return.]] Nale gets a headache trying to parse [[LogicBomb how Elan could be surprised by what he knew happened.]]



-->"You're a [=supervillain=]. Your efforts are supposed to be foiled by your ambition and hubris. Failure is the surest sign of success."

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-->"You're -->'''Henchmen:''' You're a [=supervillain=]. Your efforts are supposed to be foiled by your ambition and hubris. Failure is the surest sign of success."



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24th Dec '15 4:56:14 AM LadyDrillKnight
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* In ''Film/LethalWeapon2'', the South Africans dump Riggs in the sea tied up to CementShoes. They leave the scene, but leave a couple mooks to stand guard in case he somehow escapes. Not that it helps, since an enraged Riggs ([[RoaringRampageOfRevenge who found his girlfriend dead, having drowned before he escaped]]) kills all the mooks anyway.
8th Dec '15 7:13:56 AM ChronoLegion
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* The entire gameplay of ''VideoGame/EvilGenius'' is designed around this trope. Your ElaborateUndergroundBase has an easily-visible entrance with doors that can be accessed by any agent smart enough to quickly slip past it when your minions use them. Additionally, your minions will ''never'' attack them unless each enemy is tagged. While WhyDontYouJustShootHim is averted for regular enemy agents, super agents cannot be killed by normal means. Attempting to execute them while they're in your cage results in their escape. EvilGloating has the same result.

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* The entire gameplay of ''VideoGame/EvilGenius'' is designed around this trope. Your ElaborateUndergroundBase has an easily-visible entrance with doors that can be accessed by any agent smart enough to quickly slip past it when your minions use them. Additionally, your minions will ''never'' attack them unless each enemy is tagged. While WhyDontYouJustShootHim is averted for regular enemy agents, super agents cannot be killed by normal means. Attempting to execute them while they're in your cage results in their escape. EvilGloating has the same result. Additionally, all doors are unguarded. The only way to have your minions guard a door is to set it to security level 4, but that also restricts its use to your evil self, meaning it's useless unless it's a location that your minions don't need to visit (and most locations need to be visited by them). Of course, some GenreSavvy players have learned to exploit this behavior by creating a dummy entrance on the other side of the mountain that leads to either nowhere (running out the clock on the agent) or into a series of traps.
8th Dec '15 6:57:06 AM ChronoLegion
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Added DiffLines:

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Additionally, only after this stupid escape attempt does Tom reveal that Jim is a free man, since his owner has willed it after her death. So the whole thing wasn't even necessary.
9th Nov '15 10:04:50 AM HelloLamppost
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* This is basically [[Franchise/{{Batman}} the Riddler's]] whole schtick. Of ''course'' he'd be a more successful criminal if he didn't leave puzzle clues behind. He ''knows'' that. But he's got a psychological hang-up (sometimes identified as a form of obsessive compulsive disorder) that just compels him to go about it this way.
27th Oct '15 5:08:51 PM Vir
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[[folder:Videogames]]
* Luka of ''Videogame/MonsterGirlQuest'' is a heroic example. He's a KnightInSourArmor who acts like an IdiotHero because it's the heroic thing to do.

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[[folder:Videogames]]
[[folder:Video Games]]
* Luka of ''Videogame/MonsterGirlQuest'' ''VideoGame/MonsterGirlQuest'' is a heroic example. He's a KnightInSourArmor who acts like an IdiotHero because it's the heroic thing to do.
19th Oct '15 1:41:45 PM crazysamaritan
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Apparently, there ''is'' such a thing as being too GenreSavvy. [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Genre Savvy villains]] are evil, and they know it. For every complicated villain with [[FreudianExcuse abandonment issues]] that has a chance to redeem themselves, there are ten {{Card Carrying Villain}}s out there who are just in it because they [[ForTheEvulz love being villains.]]

But what happens when you have a GenreSavvy villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with Contractual Genre Blindness. This is the man who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.

While usually reserved for a GenreSavvy CardCarryingVillain, this trope does reach out into the realms of the AffablyEvil, the PunchClockVillain, the smarter HarmlessVillain, [[SpysSuspiciousSpouse Spies trying to keep their job secret from their spouse]], CartoonishSupervillainy and the DeadpanSnarker who gives up and "plays along."

to:

Apparently, there ''is'' such a thing as being too GenreSavvy. [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy Genre Savvy villains]] are evil, and they know it. For every complicated villain with [[FreudianExcuse abandonment issues]] that has a chance to redeem themselves, there are ten {{Card Carrying Villain}}s out there who are just in it because they [[ForTheEvulz love being villains.]]

But what happens when you have a GenreSavvy villain who understands that to be a good villain, you ''have'' to have GenreBlindness? You're left with a villain stricken with Contractual Genre Blindness. This is the man who captures the hero and uses overly complicated {{Death Trap}}s, not because it's the smart thing to do, but because it's what a villain is ''supposed'' to do.

While usually reserved for a GenreSavvy CardCarryingVillain, this trope does reach out into the realms of the AffablyEvil, the PunchClockVillain, the smarter HarmlessVillain, [[SpysSuspiciousSpouse Spies trying to keep their job secret from their spouse]], CartoonishSupervillainy and the DeadpanSnarker who gives up and "plays along."



* The main cast in ''[[LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya]]'' literally fall under this trope because they're trying to maintain the {{Masquerade}} when they know that [[spoiler:Haruhi is a very GenreSavvy [[AGodAmI godlike being]], and if she expects a trope, that trope will manifest; however, if she knows this, there's a very real risk of...''[[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt consequences]]''.]]

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* The main cast in ''[[LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya]]'' literally fall under this trope because they're trying to maintain the {{Masquerade}} when they know that [[spoiler:Haruhi is a very GenreSavvy [[AGodAmI godlike being]], and if she expects a trope, that trope will manifest; however, if she knows this, there's a very real risk of...''[[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt consequences]]''.]]



* Dr. Evil from ''Film/AustinPowers''. He criticizes his son for being practical, saying he's just not nearly as evil because he's GenreSavvy. Take, for example, Dr. Evil putting Austin and Vanessa into a DeathTrap:

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* Dr. Evil from ''Film/AustinPowers''. He criticizes his son for being practical, saying he's just not nearly as evil because he's GenreSavvy.evil. Take, for example, Dr. Evil putting Austin and Vanessa into a DeathTrap:



* ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'': Toons, as cartoon characters, tend to act very poorly when it comes to being GenreSavvy and acknowledge it, because for them it's very hard if not outright impossible to jump away from the "role" they've been created for. (Roger tells Eddie that he wouldn't ever be capable to murder because "My whole purpose in life is to make people laugh!"). Double-subverted with [[spoiler: Judge Doom,]] who is able to repress his basic toon urges to maintain his human disguise, but can't fight his villain "role" and places the heroes in an overly-dramatic and slow-moving DeathTrap which [[HoistByHisOwnPetard eventually causes his own demise.]]
* The Devil in ''Film/TenaciousDInThePickOfDestiny'' has this almost literally. He is pissed when the main characters challenge him to a rock-off, since the "demon code" prevents him from declining. He has never lost before, but he is still reluctant to accept.
** In the end he exploits a loophole; they never said ''who gets to judge it''...

to:

* ''Film/WhoFramedRogerRabbit'': Toons, as cartoon characters, tend to act very poorly when it comes to being GenreSavvy and acknowledge it, because for them For toons, it's very hard if not outright impossible to jump away from the "role" they've been created for. (Roger tells Eddie that he wouldn't ever be capable to murder because "My whole purpose in life is to make people laugh!"). Double-subverted with [[spoiler: Judge Doom,]] who is able to repress his basic toon urges to maintain his human disguise, but can't fight his villain "role" and places the heroes in an overly-dramatic and slow-moving DeathTrap which [[HoistByHisOwnPetard eventually causes his own demise.]]
* The Devil in ''Film/TenaciousDInThePickOfDestiny'' has this almost literally. He is pissed when the main characters challenge him to a rock-off, since the "demon code" prevents him from declining. He has never lost before, but he is still reluctant to accept.
**
accept. In the end he exploits a loophole; they never said ''who gets to judge it''...



** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum,'' the old Count de Magpyr explains that it's better for a vampire to display a sense of fairness (having big open windows with heavy drapes and easily breakable furniture in your castle) and get let yourself be killed every so often, than to become a [[GenreSavvy hated tyrant]] and have people actually ''trying'' to get rid of you in a more longlasting way.

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** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum,'' the old Count de Magpyr explains that it's better for a vampire to display a sense of fairness (having big open windows with heavy drapes and easily breakable furniture in your castle) and get let yourself be killed every so often, than to become a [[GenreSavvy hated tyrant]] tyrant and have people actually ''trying'' to get rid of you in a more longlasting way.



** Nale. He truly is [[GenreSavvy Elan]]'s [[EvilTwin equal and opposite]]. However he gets bit in the rear by the fact that he thinks he's MagnificentBastard material, which [[SmugSnake just isn't the case]].

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** Nale. He truly Nale is [[GenreSavvy Elan]]'s Elan's [[EvilTwin equal and opposite]]. However he gets bit in the rear by the fact that he thinks he's MagnificentBastard material, which [[SmugSnake just isn't the case]].



* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Señor Senior Sr. is a particularly GenreSavvy old man who took up [=supervillainy=] as a hobby and has since adhered to Contractual Genre Blindness. In fact, it's a tradition followed both by the villains and the heroes. So much so that the character gets upset when one villain refuses to follow the rules. He considers it to be good form.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Señor Senior Sr. is a particularly GenreSavvy old man who took up [=supervillainy=] as a hobby and has since adhered to Contractual Genre Blindness. In fact, it's a tradition followed both by the villains and the heroes. So much so that the character gets upset when one villain refuses to follow the rules. He considers it to be good form.
1st Oct '15 10:16:44 PM Medinoc
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* In ''Webcomic/LeftoverSoup'', during a roleplaying session, Max has the party [[LetsSplitUpGang split up voluntarily]] despite common wisdom, because they're roleplaying ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo''.
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