History Main / ContinuitySnarl

11th Jun '18 11:31:57 PM merotoker
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*** Obi-Wan ''was'' roughly as old as Alec Guiness as of Episode IV, though: He was born in 57 BBY according to canon, which makes him only 5 years younger than his actor. The confusion presumably comes from Ewan McGregor being 30 years younger at the time of III than Alec Guiness was at the time of IV, i.e. him being 5 years ''younger'' than "his" version of Obi-Wan.

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*** Obi-Wan ''was'' roughly as old as Alec Guiness Creator/AlecGuinness as of Episode IV, though: He was born in 57 BBY according to canon, which makes him only 5 years younger than his actor. The confusion presumably comes from Ewan McGregor Creator/EwanMcGregor being 30 years younger at the time of III than Alec Guiness Guinness was at the time of IV, i.e. him being 5 years ''younger'' than "his" version of Obi-Wan.



** A particularly embarrassing debate is the question of why Klingons look completely different in [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]] to the rest. And a Klingon easily passing himself off as human was a plot point in one episode, so it can't be excused as SpecialEffectsFailure. It was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in one ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' episode, but deliberately wasn't explained (the ''[=DS9=]'' writers [[WordOfGod stated]] they realised any explanation, especially a virus-based one (which they had considered but abandoned) would be underwhelming, forced and ridiculous so decided to acknowledge it in a humorous way but not insult the fanbase with a horrible technobabble solution). ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'' made it worse, with their ridged Klingons (so they had them, then lost them, then got them back?) and decided to create an explanation in the fourth season, which is when it ''truly'' remembers "we're a prequel series" and starts to tell the story of how the TOS-era Franchise/TrekVerse came to be. [[spoiler: The TOS Klingons are the descendants of several Klingon colonies that got infected by a virus that caused a genetic mutation that made them look more human. Said virus was created by a Klingon scientist hoping to enhance Klingon soldiers using DNA from genetically engineered humans, after said genetically engineered humans 1) kicked their asses, 2) stole one of their ships, and 3) flew circles around the Earth Starfleet's flagship.]] Apparently, reconstructive surgery in the ''Enterprise'' episode suggests that individual gene therapy became possible between ENT and ''Deep Space Nine'', thus explaining Kang, Kor, and Koloth's sudden appearances of ridges in the latter, and also the appearance of ridged Klingons in ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness''. The video game ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' tries to fix this by explaining that B'Vat, a war-hungry Klingon from the 25th Century kidnapped Miral Paris, daughter of [[Series/StarTrekVoyager B'Elanna and Tom Paris]] and MessianicArchetype the Kuvah'magh, brought her to the 23rd Century and used her DNA to fix them.

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** A particularly embarrassing debate is the question of why Klingons look completely different in [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries the original series]] to the rest. And a Klingon easily passing himself off as human was a plot point in one episode, so it can't be excused as SpecialEffectsFailure.SpecialEffectFailure. It was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in one ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' episode, but deliberately wasn't explained (the ''[=DS9=]'' writers [[WordOfGod stated]] they realised any explanation, especially a virus-based one (which they had considered but abandoned) would be underwhelming, forced and ridiculous so decided to acknowledge it in a humorous way but not insult the fanbase with a horrible technobabble solution). ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'' made it worse, with their ridged Klingons (so they had them, then lost them, then got them back?) and decided to create an explanation in the fourth season, which is when it ''truly'' remembers "we're a prequel series" and starts to tell the story of how the TOS-era Franchise/TrekVerse came to be. [[spoiler: The TOS Klingons are the descendants of several Klingon colonies that got infected by a virus that caused a genetic mutation that made them look more human. Said virus was created by a Klingon scientist hoping to enhance Klingon soldiers using DNA from genetically engineered humans, after said genetically engineered humans 1) kicked their asses, 2) stole one of their ships, and 3) flew circles around the Earth Starfleet's flagship.]] Apparently, reconstructive surgery in the ''Enterprise'' episode suggests that individual gene therapy became possible between ENT and ''Deep Space Nine'', thus explaining Kang, Kor, and Koloth's sudden appearances of ridges in the latter, and also the appearance of ridged Klingons in ''Film/StarTrekIntoDarkness''. The video game ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' tries to fix this by explaining that B'Vat, a war-hungry Klingon from the 25th Century kidnapped Miral Paris, daughter of [[Series/StarTrekVoyager B'Elanna and Tom Paris]] and MessianicArchetype the Kuvah'magh, brought her to the 23rd Century and used her DNA to fix them.



* In ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', Maddie asks London's help to pass gym when she realizes that, despite her [[RichBitch pampered lifestyle]], the rich girl is in great shape. In the sequel show, Suite Life On Deck, London suddenly needs Zack's help to pass gym.

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* In ''Series/TheSuiteLifeOfZackAndCody'', Maddie asks London's help to pass gym when she realizes that, despite her [[RichBitch pampered lifestyle]], the rich girl is in great shape. In the sequel show, Suite ''Suite Life On Deck, on Deck'', London suddenly needs Zack's help to pass gym.



* The VideoGame/StarRevenge series of VideoGame/SuperMario64 ROM hacks. Seriously, just [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bzs1FL5re-t2R3JtbG5lSFFUTXc/view look at this]]. A lot of the confusion comes from remakes of the games having different stories than the original and the story splitting between both versions. Also, TimeTravel is involved. The timeline is a mess and that picture even {{Lampshades}} it. [[note]] Furthermore, notice how [=SR6.9=] happens multiple times[[/note]]

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* The VideoGame/StarRevenge series of VideoGame/SuperMario64 ROM hacks. Seriously, just [[https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bzs1FL5re-t2R3JtbG5lSFFUTXc/view look at this]]. A lot of the confusion comes from remakes of the games having different stories than the original and the story splitting between both versions. Also, TimeTravel is involved. The timeline is a mess and that picture even {{Lampshades}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it. [[note]] Furthermore, notice how [=SR6.9=] happens multiple times[[/note]]



* Any attempt to create a consistent origin for [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment Dr. Insano]] creates an awful one of these, mostly because there is no effort made to keep things in the [[NegativeContinuity slightest consistent]]. The Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses site now features an [[http://thatguywiththeglasses.com/videolinks/teamt/cr/ff/27514-dr-insano attempt to explain his existence]], which will probably be made inaccurate next time he shows up (the basic idea is that there are ''at least'' 3 of him around).
** Amusingly, Spoony's explanation for him is "There is no continuity, there is only Insano." Though he did say he was flattered that people cared enough to put forth the effort.
*** Later "explained" in ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' as [[spoiler:the effect of [[NegativeSpaceWedgie the Plot Hole]], along with any and all other plot holes in the site's continuity]].

to:

* Any attempt to create a consistent origin for [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment Dr. Insano]] creates an awful one of these, mostly because there is no effort made to keep things in the [[NegativeContinuity slightest consistent]]. The Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses site now features featured an [[http://thatguywiththeglasses.com/videolinks/teamt/cr/ff/27514-dr-insano attempt to explain his existence]], existence, which will probably be made inaccurate next time he shows up (the basic idea is that there are ''at least'' 3 of him around).
**
around). Amusingly, Spoony's explanation for him is "There is no continuity, there is only Insano." Though he did say he was flattered that people cared enough to put forth the effort.
***
effort. Later "explained" in ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'' as [[spoiler:the effect of [[NegativeSpaceWedgie the Plot Hole]], along with any and all other plot holes in the site's continuity]].



*** The Fallen's application ran into a particular case of this. In the ''Transformers'' multiverse, contradictory stories are explained as the result of the audience looking at a parallel universe -- for instance, a toy bio where a character who is dead is treated as alive means that there's a universe where they survived or came back. This is also the case for multiple adaptations of the same story -- the novelization of an episode's plot takes place in its own universe to the episode. Now combine that with the above information about The Fallen and the massive amount of ancillary material surrounding ''Film/RevengeOfTheFallen'', and you have the [[FridgeLogic apparent situation]] where the Fallen dies at the end of the movie, somehow survives, travels to the universe of the novelization, lives out his entire long history in the exact same manner and enacts the exact same scheme, dies in the exact same way, travels to the universe of the comic book adaptation, to the read-along storybook, to the video game, to the portable version of the video game, and so on and so forth, failing miserably every single time.

to:

*** The Fallen's application ran into a particular case of this. In the ''Transformers'' multiverse, contradictory stories are explained as the result of the audience looking at a parallel universe -- for instance, a toy bio where a character who is dead is treated as alive means that there's a universe where they survived or came back. This is also the case for multiple adaptations of the same story -- the novelization of an episode's plot takes place in its own universe to the episode. Now combine that with the above information about The Fallen and the massive amount of ancillary material surrounding ''Film/RevengeOfTheFallen'', ''Film/TransformersRevengeOfTheFallen'', and you have the [[FridgeLogic apparent situation]] where the Fallen dies at the end of the movie, somehow survives, travels to the universe of the novelization, lives out his entire long history in the exact same manner and enacts the exact same scheme, dies in the exact same way, travels to the universe of the comic book adaptation, to the read-along storybook, to the video game, to the portable version of the video game, and so on and so forth, failing miserably every single time.



* Due to the sheer length of time it's been on the air coupled with its ageless cast and focus on American cultural commentary, ''TheSimpsons'' has increasingly severe continuity problems regarding when the characters were born, what generation they belong to, etc. Early episodes, set in the early 1990s, established Marge and Homer as kids of the late 1950s — baby boomers, basically — with Bart and Lisa being kids of the early 1980s. Early episodes flashbacks were completely unambiguous about this — young Homer watching JFK on TV, Lisa's birth overlapping with the 1984 Olympics, and so on. However, the show has survived for so long, it is now impossible to honor this past without absurdity -- Lisa cannot still be eight years old in the late 2010s if she was born in the 1980s, etc. Flashbacks in contemporary episodes now have to occur in some vague, unspecified "past" with decade-identifying details scrubbed, though this is not so easily done for certain characters for whom time-sensitive events are a big part of their identity: for example, Abe being a WWII vet, Seymour having served in Vietnam, Marge, Homer, and Artie Ziff having attended a very 60s prom — to say nothing of Disco Stu! It seems many of these details are being quietly retired for snarl reasons.

to:

* Due to the sheer length of time it's been on the air coupled with its ageless cast and focus on American cultural commentary, ''TheSimpsons'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' has increasingly severe continuity problems regarding when the characters were born, what generation they belong to, etc. Early episodes, set in the early 1990s, established Marge and Homer as kids of the late 1950s — baby boomers, basically — with Bart and Lisa being kids of the early 1980s. Early episodes flashbacks were completely unambiguous about this — young Homer watching JFK on TV, Lisa's birth overlapping with the 1984 Olympics, and so on. However, the show has survived for so long, it is now impossible to honor this past without absurdity -- Lisa cannot still be eight years old in the late 2010s if she was born in the 1980s, etc. Flashbacks in contemporary episodes now have to occur in some vague, unspecified "past" with decade-identifying details scrubbed, though this is not so easily done for certain characters for whom time-sensitive events are a big part of their identity: for example, Abe being a WWII vet, Seymour having served in Vietnam, Marge, Homer, and Artie Ziff having attended a very 60s prom — to say nothing of Disco Stu! It seems many of these details are being quietly retired for snarl reasons.
11th Jun '18 3:49:28 PM RedScharlach
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* In ''Film/TheMummyReturns'' Rick and Evie have an 8 year old son named Alex. The first movie takes place mostly in 1926, while the second takes place in 1933. 1933 is 7 years after 1926, Alex being 8 is problematic for time.

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* In ''Film/TheMummyReturns'' Rick and Evie have an 8 year old 8-year-old son named Alex. The first movie takes place mostly in 1926, while the second takes place in 1933. 1933 is 7 years after 1926, so Alex being 8 is problematic for time.problematic.



** Doctor Who avoids it more than most decades-long franchises because the show embraces its NarmCharm so much and features TimeTravel. It's got no "why do the Klingons look different" situations because Zygons are still red, rubbery, and suction cup-y, and Daleks are still evil pepper shakers of doom - prop quality has advanced but the look hasn't - and no "why did the year 2000 look super futuristic then but now look like the actual year 2000 did" questions because cracks in time ''ate'' that Dalek invasion you don't remember - the malleability of reality in this show means ''it's part of continuity that continuity is flexible.'' The TARDIS interior goes from [[{{Zeerust}} the 60s and 70s idea of futuristic]] in the 60s and 70s to looking organic because it's a LivingShip in the Russell T Davies seasons to TheAllegedCar, Spaceship Edition in the Amy and Rory years to TheNewTens' idea of futuristic in the Clara years because it's a LivingShip, GeniusLoci, and EldritchLocation that can change anything about its inner dimension on a whim. Some things seem more advanced [[CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel at an earlier point in their own history]] for simpler reasons -- aesthetics change and in the year 5000 when he'll be made, K9 will look modern again.

to:

** Doctor Who avoids it more than most decades-long franchises because the show embraces its NarmCharm so much and features TimeTravel. It's got no "why do the Klingons look different" situations because Zygons are still red, rubbery, and suction cup-y, and Daleks are still evil pepper shakers of doom - -- prop quality has advanced but the look hasn't - -- and no "why did the year 2000 look super futuristic then but now look looks like the actual year 2000 did" questions because cracks in time ''ate'' that Dalek invasion you don't remember - -- the malleability of reality in this show means ''it's part of continuity that continuity is flexible.'' The TARDIS interior goes from [[{{Zeerust}} the 60s and 70s idea of futuristic]] in the 60s and 70s to looking organic because it's a LivingShip in the Russell T Davies seasons to TheAllegedCar, Spaceship Edition in the Amy and Rory years to TheNewTens' idea of futuristic in the Clara years because it's a LivingShip, GeniusLoci, and EldritchLocation that can change anything about its inner dimension on a whim. Some things seem more advanced [[CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel at an earlier point in their own history]] for simpler reasons -- aesthetics change and in the year 5000 when he'll be made, K9 will look modern again.



** On the topic of ''Kamen Rider'', there's the 3 [[MultipleEndings alternate ending films]] for ''Series/KamenRiderRyuki'', ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz'', and ''Series/KamenRiderBlade''. While there's evidence in all 3 as to when they are supposed to take place, all 3 of them have elements that contradict what's happened in the series proper - i.e., ''Episode Final''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 46[[/note]] has Shinji and Yui meet prior to the series, which is never stated; ''Paradise Lost''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 25[[/note]] has the Delta gear destroyed, whereas in the series proper, it's still in tact at the time the movie takes place[[note]]although the differences are explained in [[AllThereInTheManual an SIC Hero Saga story]], indicating that the Saga and the movie are the result of ForWantOfANail[[/note]]; and ''Missing Ace''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 47 of ''Blade''[[/note]] a), incorrectly states that humanity was the winner of the Battle Royale that occured prior to the series (when it was the Human Undead), and b), [[spoiler: by having the [[TheAntiChrist Joker Undead]] be the last Undead to be sealed, technically means that the Joker Undead won the Battle Royale depicted in the series, when it's established that, should that happen, TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt will happen (yet it's stated that the movie is set 4 years after the TV series)]].

to:

** On the topic of ''Kamen Rider'', there's the 3 [[MultipleEndings alternate ending films]] for ''Series/KamenRiderRyuki'', ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz'', and ''Series/KamenRiderBlade''. While there's evidence in all 3 as to when they are supposed to take place, all 3 of them have elements that contradict what's happened in the series proper - i.e., ''Episode Final''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 46[[/note]] has Shinji and Yui meet prior to the series, which is never stated; ''Paradise Lost''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 25[[/note]] has the Delta gear destroyed, whereas in the series proper, it's still in tact intact at the time the movie takes place[[note]]although the differences are explained in [[AllThereInTheManual an SIC Hero Saga story]], indicating that the Saga and the movie are the result of ForWantOfANail[[/note]]; and ''Missing Ace''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 47 of ''Blade''[[/note]] a), incorrectly states that humanity was the winner of the Battle Royale that occured prior to the series (when it was the Human Undead), and b), [[spoiler: by having the [[TheAntiChrist Joker Undead]] be the last Undead to be sealed, technically means that the Joker Undead won the Battle Royale depicted in the series, when it's established that, should that happen, TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt will happen (yet it's stated that the movie is set 4 years after the TV series)]].



* ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' is no stranger to this. At first its different series didn't try to be in continuity, but teamup episodes do. As they get bigger and bigger, there's now one continuity that seems to contain every franchise ever owned by Creator/ToeiCompany and every franchise Creator/ShotaroIshinomori ever had a hand in. Even so, they don't even try to make them fit now that such crossovers are a thing! For example:

to:

* ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' is no stranger to this. At first first, its different series didn't try to be in continuity, but teamup episodes do. As they get bigger and bigger, there's now one continuity that seems to contain every franchise ever owned by Creator/ToeiCompany and every franchise Creator/ShotaroIshinomori ever had a hand in. Even so, they don't even try to make them fit now that such crossovers are a thing! For example:



* While early ''Fanchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games' differences between "Generation" versions are mostly aesthetic, later years significantly change the plot and in ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'''s case, who the main antagonist is. Then there's whether the original releases of a generation are canon, or if only their respective [[VideoGameRemake remakes]] are.

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* While early ''Fanchise/{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games' differences between "Generation" versions are mostly aesthetic, later years significantly change the plot and in ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'''s case, who the main antagonist is. Then there's whether the original releases of a generation are canon, or if only their respective [[VideoGameRemake remakes]] are.



* The Nibelheim incident in the ''Compilation of VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII''. The original game alone provides about three different versions of the event because of the poeple involved [[spoiler:Cloud's memories are messed up, Sephiroth deliberately manipulates him and Tifa doesn't know all the details]]. While at some point we DO get what seems to be what actually happened, when the other parts compilation retell the events each version is different and multiple details don't match up. For example in ''[[Anime/LastOrderFinalFantasyVII Last Order]]'' [[spoiler: Sephiroth deliberatly jumped into Mako shaft]] while every other version has [[spoiler:him thrown into it by Cloud]], while ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'' has Genesis present during the events, something that doesn't happen in any other version.

to:

* The Nibelheim incident in the ''Compilation of VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII''. The original game alone provides about three different versions of the event because of the poeple involved [[spoiler:Cloud's memories are messed up, Sephiroth deliberately manipulates him and Tifa doesn't know all the details]]. While at some point we DO get what seems to be what actually happened, when the other parts compilation retell the events each version is different and multiple details don't match up. For example in ''[[Anime/LastOrderFinalFantasyVII Last Order]]'' [[spoiler: Sephiroth deliberatly [[spoiler:Sephiroth deliberately jumped into the Mako shaft]] while every other version has [[spoiler:him thrown into it by Cloud]], while ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'' has Genesis present during the events, something that doesn't happen in any other version.



*** The Fallen's application ran into a particular case of this. In the ''Transformers'' multiverse, contradictory stories are explained as the result of the audience looking at a parallel universe - for instance, a toy bio where a character who is dead is treated as alive means that there's a universe where they survived or came back. This is also the case for multiple adaptations of the same story -- the novelization of an episode's plot takes place in its own universe to the episode. Now combine that with the above information about The Fallen and the massive amount of ancillary material surrounding ''Film/RevengeOfTheFallen'', and you have the [[FridgeLogic apparent situation]] where the Fallen dies at the end of the movie, somehow survives, travels to the universe of the novelization, lives out his entire long history in the exact same manner and enacts the exact same scheme, dies in the exact same way, travels to the universe of the comic book adaptation, to the read-along storybook, to the video game, to the portable version of the video game, and so on and so forth, failing miserably every single time.

to:

*** The Fallen's application ran into a particular case of this. In the ''Transformers'' multiverse, contradictory stories are explained as the result of the audience looking at a parallel universe - -- for instance, a toy bio where a character who is dead is treated as alive means that there's a universe where they survived or came back. This is also the case for multiple adaptations of the same story -- the novelization of an episode's plot takes place in its own universe to the episode. Now combine that with the above information about The Fallen and the massive amount of ancillary material surrounding ''Film/RevengeOfTheFallen'', and you have the [[FridgeLogic apparent situation]] where the Fallen dies at the end of the movie, somehow survives, travels to the universe of the novelization, lives out his entire long history in the exact same manner and enacts the exact same scheme, dies in the exact same way, travels to the universe of the comic book adaptation, to the read-along storybook, to the video game, to the portable version of the video game, and so on and so forth, failing miserably every single time.



** Played straight in the series with its own continuity. The inclusion of Poof as a main cast member has brought up some confusion regarding his absence in the finale of the movie ''WesternAnimation/ChannelChasers''. Also, the addition of Sparky in Season Nine brings on more continuity issues, such as Sparky not being there on the end of ''WesternAnimation/ChannelChasers'' (the same contradiction happened with Poof) and he not being on the live-action movies - ''[[Film/AFairlyOddMovieGrowUpTimmyTurner A Fairly Odd Movie]]'' and ''Film/AFairlyOddChristmas'' - both taking place thirteen years after the events of the main series. In ''Film/{{A Fairly Odd Movie|GrowUpTimmyTurner}}'', there is even a scene in which Wanda states that Timmy doesn't have a dog.

to:

** Played straight in the series with its own continuity. The inclusion of Poof as a main cast member has brought up some confusion regarding his absence in the finale of the movie ''WesternAnimation/ChannelChasers''. Also, the addition of Sparky in Season Nine brings on more continuity issues, such as Sparky not being there on at the end of ''WesternAnimation/ChannelChasers'' (the same contradiction happened with Poof) and he his not being on in the live-action movies - -- ''[[Film/AFairlyOddMovieGrowUpTimmyTurner A Fairly Odd Movie]]'' and ''Film/AFairlyOddChristmas'' - -- both taking place thirteen years after the events of the main series. In ''Film/{{A Fairly Odd Movie|GrowUpTimmyTurner}}'', there is even a scene in which Wanda states that Timmy doesn't have a dog.



* Due to the sheer length of time it's been on the air coupled with its ageless cast and focus on American cultural commentary, ''TheSimpsons'' has increasingly severe continuity problems regarding when the characters were born, what generation they belong to, etc. Early episodes, set in the early 1990s, established Marge and Homer as kids of the late 1950s — baby boomers, basically — with Bart and Lisa being kids of the early 1980s. Early episodes flashbacks were completely unambiguous about this — young Homer watching JFK on TV, Lisa's birth overlapping with the 1984 Olympics, and so on. However, the show has survived for so long, it is now impossible to honor this past without absurdity — Lisa cannot still be eight years old in the late 2010s if she was born in the 1980s, etc. Flashbacks in contemporary episodes now have to occur in some vague, unspecified "past" with decade-identifying details scrubbed, though this is not so easily done for certain characters for whom time-sensitive events are a big part of their identity: for example, Abe being a WWII vet, Seymour having served in Vietnam, Marge, Homer, and Artie Ziff having attended a very 60s prom — to say nothing of Disco Stu! It seems many of these details are being quietly retired for snarl reasons.

to:

* Due to the sheer length of time it's been on the air coupled with its ageless cast and focus on American cultural commentary, ''TheSimpsons'' has increasingly severe continuity problems regarding when the characters were born, what generation they belong to, etc. Early episodes, set in the early 1990s, established Marge and Homer as kids of the late 1950s — baby boomers, basically — with Bart and Lisa being kids of the early 1980s. Early episodes flashbacks were completely unambiguous about this — young Homer watching JFK on TV, Lisa's birth overlapping with the 1984 Olympics, and so on. However, the show has survived for so long, it is now impossible to honor this past without absurdity — -- Lisa cannot still be eight years old in the late 2010s if she was born in the 1980s, etc. Flashbacks in contemporary episodes now have to occur in some vague, unspecified "past" with decade-identifying details scrubbed, though this is not so easily done for certain characters for whom time-sensitive events are a big part of their identity: for example, Abe being a WWII vet, Seymour having served in Vietnam, Marge, Homer, and Artie Ziff having attended a very 60s prom — to say nothing of Disco Stu! It seems many of these details are being quietly retired for snarl reasons.



* The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crisis_of_the_Third_Century Crisis of the Third Century]] in Roman History is one to modern historians. Not only were there multiple civil wars and rival claimants for the throne (26 of them over a 50 year period), but the historical records we do have for the area contradict each other regarding when events happened. In some cases, it's unclear whether multiple battles took place at particular locations years apart, or whether there was only a single battle that's been recorded incorrectly.

to:

* The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crisis_of_the_Third_Century Crisis of the Third Century]] in Roman History is one to modern historians. Not only were there multiple civil wars and rival claimants for the throne (26 of them over a 50 year 50-year period), but the historical records we do have for the area contradict each other regarding when events happened. In some cases, it's unclear whether multiple battles took place at particular locations years apart, or whether there was only a single battle that's been recorded incorrectly.
25th May '18 5:18:04 PM ruthlesstyrant
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Added DiffLines:

*** Obi-Wan ''was'' roughly as old as Alec Guiness as of Episode IV, though: He was born in 57 BBY according to canon, which makes him only 5 years younger than his actor. The confusion presumably comes from Ewan McGregor being 30 years younger at the time of III than Alec Guiness was at the time of IV, i.e. him being 5 years ''younger'' than "his" version of Obi-Wan.
22nd May '18 6:13:50 PM Savini24
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* Generally speaking the line between "history" and "pre-history" is drawn where written records exist. However, the vast majority of all the stuff ever written (even all the stuff of historic significance ever written) does not survive to this day and literate and illiterate cultures have existed side by side for most of history. And the sources often had other things in mind than telling an accurate account of history as best they could. Many authors wanted to make one side or political faction look good or bad, delegitimize or legitimize current claims or past acts and of course people were occasionally declared UnPerson. Even for periods of the Roman Empire where multiple authors survive, historians tend to mistrust the sources to some degree as they almost all were of senatorial rank and had certain biases. An emperor who pissed of senators is certain to have gotten a HistoricalVillainUpgrade, whereas an inept or brutal ruler who pleased the senate may have gotten a HistoricalHeroUpgrade. And when several claimants vied for power, authors writing after the fact were liable to dismiss those that missed out on power or whose memory the current rulers didn't want to evoke, even if they actually got to rule for significant amounts of time.

to:

* Generally speaking the line between "history" and "pre-history" is drawn where written records exist. However, the vast majority of all the stuff ever written (even all the stuff of historic significance ever written) does not survive to this day and literate and illiterate cultures have existed side by side for most of history. And the sources often had other things in mind than telling an accurate account of history as best they could. Many authors wanted to make one side or political faction look good or bad, delegitimize or legitimize current claims or past acts and of course people were occasionally declared UnPerson. Even for periods of the Roman Empire where multiple authors survive, historians tend to mistrust the sources to some degree as they almost all were of senatorial rank and had certain biases. An emperor who pissed of off senators is certain to have gotten a HistoricalVillainUpgrade, whereas an inept or brutal ruler who pleased the senate may have gotten a HistoricalHeroUpgrade. And when several claimants vied for power, authors writing after the fact were liable to dismiss those that missed out on power or whose memory the current rulers didn't want to evoke, even if they actually got to rule for significant amounts of time.
20th May '18 11:33:19 PM crazyrabbits
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* ''Series/RebootTheGuardianCode'': Thanks to a TroubledProduction and a producer who admitted internally that he'd never watched more than a couple episodes of the first season of [[WesternAnimation/{{Reboot}} the cartoon]], attempts to place the two shows in continuity with each other ran smackdab into this issue by the time the first-season finale rolled around.
** The four main characters learn that the original Mainframe server has seemingly been rebooted, which has set all of the characters inside back to their original factory defaults. Not only does this result in nearly the entire population of the original Mainframe (including Fong, Hack & Slash, Mouse, Mike the TV and all of the other Sprites) being absent for no reason, but Bob is also present on the server, despite the original pilot episode of the cartoon establishing that he is a Guardian who travelled to Mainframe and wasn't present when it was initially formed.
** Additionally, the characters are greatly changed from their first appearances in the series. Bob is missing most of the personality he had in the original pilot episode when he is re-introduced, and his opening lines are the speech given at the beginning of each episode of the cartoon. Hexadecimal inexplicably has the ability to have facial expressions (something she was expressly given then had taken away in the ''My Two Bobs'' season). Conversely, Dot Matrix (an ActionGirl and savvy businesswoman in the cartoon) ''hides behind her kid brother'' when Megabyte threatens the group.
** The User (a BasementDweller fanboy who is obsessed with Mainframe) is revealed to have collected merchandise suggesting that events from later on in Mainframe's timeline canonically happened (including the events of Seasons 3 and 4), but have somehow become a ShowWithinAShow that was marketed to great success.
** It is claimed by the User that he's finally going to win a Game for the first time in 20 years. This disregards multiple instances where the User won games in the cartoon, including one that occurs ''in the first ten minutes of the pilot'' (Hack & Slash bar Bob from entering a game, causing all the Sprites inside to perish when the User wins), along with a very notable case at the end of Season 3 as well as several instances that occur off-screen throughout Season 4.
** The sequence with the User accessing Mainframe again suggests that the system is actually some type of online server that has reactivated -- except it throws continuity under the bus within the same episode by showing that Mainframe is ''already'' running on a server locating within Room 01 in the school. Additionally, this is a marked change from the original cartoon, where the entire show is implied to have been running solely on the User's computer -- the finale of the original run was caused by Enzo, Bob and the other Sprites allowing so much damage to happen to the computer (due to botched Games and the null errors it generated) that the User was forced to reboot the operating system to get it back to working order.
18th May '18 6:39:20 PM RoarkTenjouin
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** ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' just inflated the Snarl UpToEleven with their second finale, the result of whose TimeTravel Plot resulted in only one change: The dinosaurs never went extinct and live with Humans in the modern age. As there are implications that the resulting battle possibly wiped out the Prime Timeline, this [[TimeyWimeyBall potentially screws with or outright Retcons]] much of the canon established for almost all of MMPR up to ''In Space''[[note]]As Zordon powered the Power Coins with energy from the extinct dinosaurs and Saber-toothed Tiger; while the other season suits were [[MidSeasonUpgrade re-models]] of the initial ones.[[/note]], Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder,[[note]] [[SharedUniverse Which operates on being connected to every other previous season]].[[/note]] and Series/PowerRangersSPD.[[note]]Which is the second-furthest series in the timeline that acknowledges the past frequently.[[/note]] Until WordOfGod addresses it though, [[RuleofCautiousEditingJudgement speculating is useless.]]

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** ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge'' just inflated the Snarl UpToEleven with their second finale, the result of whose TimeTravel Plot resulted in only one change: The dinosaurs never went extinct and live with Humans in the modern age. As there are implications that the resulting battle possibly wiped out the Prime Timeline, this [[TimeyWimeyBall potentially screws with or outright Retcons]] much of the canon established for almost all of MMPR up to ''In Space''[[note]]As Zordon powered the Power Coins with energy from the extinct dinosaurs and Saber-toothed Tiger; while the other season suits were [[MidSeasonUpgrade re-models]] of the initial ones.[[/note]], Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder,[[note]] [[SharedUniverse Which operates on being connected to every other previous season]].[[/note]] and Series/PowerRangersSPD.[[note]]Which is the second-furthest series in the timeline that acknowledges the past frequently.[[/note]] Until WordOfGod addresses it though, [[RuleofCautiousEditingJudgement speculating is useless.]]]][[note]]in fact, the only previous series that one can say with complete certainty ''wasn't'' retconned by the ending of ''Dino Charge'' is the aforementioned ''RPM'', thanks to it explicitly being established to be in an alternate dimension, since crossovers between seasons and ''Series/PowerRangersMegaforce'' establishing that all ''RPM'' is the only pre-''Megaforce'' season not to be in the main dimension[[/note]].



** ''Series/ZyudenSentaiKyoryuger'' comes ''after Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' met members of every team ever at least once. It ''still'' comes up with a new take on how PhlebotinumKilledTheDinosaurs that's totally incompatible with all others.

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** ''Series/ZyudenSentaiKyoryuger'' comes ''after Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' met members of every team ever at least once. It ''still'' comes up with a new take on how PhlebotinumKilledTheDinosaurs that's totally incompatible with all others.others[[note]]although it's worth noting that the takes in ''Zyuranger'' and ''Abaranger'' both contradicted each other as well, even before the one in ''Kyoryuger'' was created[[/note]].
18th May '18 6:26:19 PM RoarkTenjouin
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** On the topic of ''Kamen Rider'', there's the 3 [[AlternateEndings alternate ending films]] for ''Series/KamenRiderRyuki'', ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz'', and ''Series/KamenRiderBlade''. While there's evidence in all 3 as to when they are supposed to take place, all 3 of them have elements that contradict what's happened in the series proper - i.e., ''Episode Final''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 46[[/note]] has Shinji and Yui meet prior to the series, which is never stated; ''Paradise Lost''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 25[[/note]] has the Delta gear destroyed, whereas in the series proper, it's still in tact at the time the movie takes place[[note]]although the differences are explained in [[AllThereInTheManual an SIC Hero Saga story]] that's presumably ForWantOfANail[[/note]]; and ''Missing Ace''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 47 of ''Blade''[[/note]] a), incorrectly states that humanity was the winner of the Battle Royale that occured prior to the series (when it was the Human Undead), and b), [[spoiler: by having the [[TheAntiChrist Joker Undead]] be the last Undead to be sealed, technically means that the Joker Undead won the Battle Royale depicted in the series, when it's established that, should that happen, TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt will happen (yet it's stated that the movie is set 4 years after the TV series)]].

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** On the topic of ''Kamen Rider'', there's the 3 [[AlternateEndings [[MultipleEndings alternate ending films]] for ''Series/KamenRiderRyuki'', ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz'', and ''Series/KamenRiderBlade''. While there's evidence in all 3 as to when they are supposed to take place, all 3 of them have elements that contradict what's happened in the series proper - i.e., ''Episode Final''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 46[[/note]] has Shinji and Yui meet prior to the series, which is never stated; ''Paradise Lost''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 25[[/note]] has the Delta gear destroyed, whereas in the series proper, it's still in tact at the time the movie takes place[[note]]although the differences are explained in [[AllThereInTheManual an SIC Hero Saga story]] that's presumably story]], indicating that the Saga and the movie are the result of ForWantOfANail[[/note]]; and ''Missing Ace''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 47 of ''Blade''[[/note]] a), incorrectly states that humanity was the winner of the Battle Royale that occured prior to the series (when it was the Human Undead), and b), [[spoiler: by having the [[TheAntiChrist Joker Undead]] be the last Undead to be sealed, technically means that the Joker Undead won the Battle Royale depicted in the series, when it's established that, should that happen, TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt will happen (yet it's stated that the movie is set 4 years after the TV series)]].
18th May '18 6:19:34 PM RoarkTenjouin
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** On the topic of ''Kamen Rider'', there's the 3 [[AlternateEndings alternate ending films]] for ''Series/KamenRiderRyuki'', ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz'', and ''Series/KamenRiderBlade''. While there's evidence in all 3 as to when they are supposed to take place, all 3 of them have elements that contradict what's happened in the series proper - i.e., ''Episode Final''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 46[[/note]] has Shinji and Yui meet prior to the series, which is never stated; ''Paradise Lost''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 25[[/note]] has the Delta gear destroyed, whereas in the series proper, it's still in tact at the time the movie takes place[[note]]although the differences are explained in [[AllThereInTheManual an SIC Hero Saga story]] that's presumably ForWantOfANail[[/note]]; and ''Missing Ace''[[note]]''would'' take place after episode 47 of ''Blade''[[/note]] a), incorrectly states that humanity was the winner of the Battle Royale that occured prior to the series (when it was the Human Undead), and b), [[spoiler: by having the [[TheAntiChrist Joker Undead]] be the last Undead to be sealed, technically means that the Joker Undead won the Battle Royale depicted in the series, when it's established that, should that happen, TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt will happen (yet it's stated that the movie is set 4 years after the TV series)]].
14th May '18 8:47:28 AM RedScharlach
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* Despite mostly having only one writer, the classic ''Manga/AstroBoy'' series turned into a first class continuity snarl towards the end. What happened was that in the final episode of the original anime, Astro died performing a HeroicSacrifice to deliver a device into the center of the sun to stop it from dying. Shortly after the anime ended, Creator/OsamuTezuka began a new Astro Boy story as a newspaper strip in the Sankei Shimbun newspaper, which featured Astro's melted carcass being recovered by time-traveling aliens and brought back to life before winding up trapped in the distant past (the readers' present). Because Astro had never died in the manga, however, when the collected edition came out Tezuka redid the first chapter that involved Astro, alive and well getting thrown back in time when the alien timeship crashes on Earth instead. Tezuka then produced three more different, contradictory stories of Astro's future in various publications: a pilot for a second Astro Boy series that never got off the ground which also takes place after the end of the anime where Astro is found by a completely different race of time traveling aliens, upgraded into a new body with time travel capabilities and sent back to Earth to find the era he came from; A one-shot nostalgia piece in a men's magazine, yet another followup to the anime where Astro is resurrected by {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s and taken to a planet millions of light years from Earth from which he may never return, so Ochanomizu and the rest of the Ministry Of Science staff create a replacement, who turns out to be a lazy sex maniac because he was designed to be more "Human"; and finally, "The End Of Astroboy", which doesn't mention his death and simply has him in a display case in a robot museum due to being supplanted by more advanced robots and then freed by some human rebels to help them fight against said robots who have taken over the world.

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* Despite mostly having only one writer, the classic ''Manga/AstroBoy'' series turned into a first class continuity snarl towards the end. What happened was that in the final episode of the original anime, Astro died performing a HeroicSacrifice to deliver a device into the center of the sun to stop it from dying. Shortly after the anime ended, Creator/OsamuTezuka began a new Astro Boy story as a newspaper strip in the Sankei Shimbun newspaper, which featured Astro's melted carcass being recovered by time-traveling aliens and brought back to life before winding up trapped in the distant past (the readers' present). Because Astro had never died in the manga, however, when the collected edition came out Tezuka redid the first chapter that involved Astro, alive and well getting thrown back in time when the alien timeship crashes on Earth instead. Tezuka then produced three more different, contradictory stories of Astro's future in various publications: a pilot for a second Astro Boy series that never got off the ground which also takes place after the end of the anime where Astro is found by a completely different race of time traveling aliens, upgraded into a new body with time travel capabilities and sent back to Earth to find the era he came from; A a one-shot nostalgia piece in a men's magazine, yet another followup to the anime where Astro is resurrected by {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s and taken to a planet millions of light years from Earth from which he may never return, so Ochanomizu and the rest of the Ministry Of Science staff create a replacement, who turns out to be a lazy sex maniac because he was designed to be more "Human"; and finally, "The End Of Astroboy", which doesn't mention his death and simply has him in a display case in a robot museum due to being supplanted by more advanced robots and then freed by some human rebels to help them fight against said robots who have taken over the world.



* In the three Japanese-exclusive ''[[Franchise/TheTransformers Transformers]]'' anime series (''Anime/TransformersHeadmasters'', ''Anime/TransformersSuperGodMasterforce'', and ''Anime/TransformersVictory''), characters who died in ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformersTheMovie'' show up alive and well, as if nothing happened. This is because the movie wouldn't hit Japan until 1989, leaving much of its events unknown to the Japanese audience/creators. These characters are Prowl, who appears in ''Headmasters'', and Wheeljack, who appears in ''Victory''. Prowl is especially bad, since he was explicitly name-checked as being deceased in the Japanese dub of "Dark Awakening". Later fiction would handwave these appearances by explaining them as being versions of themselves from the ''Binaltech'' universe, taking the place of the originals who really did die during the movie.

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* In the three Japanese-exclusive ''[[Franchise/TheTransformers Transformers]]'' anime series (''Anime/TransformersHeadmasters'', ''Anime/TransformersSuperGodMasterforce'', and ''Anime/TransformersVictory''), characters who died in ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformersTheMovie'' show up alive and well, as if nothing happened. This is because the movie wouldn't hit Japan until 1989, leaving much many of its events unknown to the Japanese audience/creators. These characters are Prowl, who appears in ''Headmasters'', and Wheeljack, who appears in ''Victory''. Prowl is especially bad, since he was explicitly name-checked as being deceased in the Japanese dub of "Dark Awakening". Later fiction would handwave these appearances by explaining them as being versions of themselves from the ''Binaltech'' universe, taking the place of the originals who really did die during the movie.



** Leia claimed to have remembered her mother in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', but Padme died in childbirth in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''. Possibly explainable if she was thinking about her adopted mother Breha Organa, although Luke does specify "your real mother" when he asks, what implies Leia had a first adoptive mother or a nanny before Breha that she mistook for her true late mother. The novelization of ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' lampshades/handwaves this. When the twins are born Luke is described as having his eyes shut tightly while Leia's are open as if trying to take in everything. Presumably, [[AWizardDidIt the Force then allows Leia to remeber Padmé even though newborns don't have a working long-term memory]]. It's later addressed in Marvel's ''ComicBook/PrincessLeia'' series, where she has a Force vision of Padme while visiting Naboo, realizing at once that the former queen is her mother.

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** Leia claimed to have remembered her mother in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', but Padme died in childbirth in ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''. Possibly explainable if she was thinking about her adopted mother Breha Organa, although Luke does specify "your real mother" when he asks, what implies Leia had a first adoptive mother or a nanny before Breha that she mistook for her true late mother. The novelization of ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' lampshades/handwaves this. When the twins are born Luke is described as having his eyes shut tightly while Leia's are open as if trying to take in everything. Presumably, [[AWizardDidIt the Force then allows Leia to remeber remember Padmé even though newborns don't have a working long-term memory]]. It's later addressed in Marvel's ''ComicBook/PrincessLeia'' series, where she has a Force vision of Padme while visiting Naboo, realizing at once that the former queen is her mother.



** An in-universe example happens in ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'', where it's mentioned that Djellibeybi's mythology has been changing so thoroughly over the years, several concepts and objects have multiple gods and stories that explain it, each of them contradicting each other. The sun ''alone'' has several gods that are supposed to move it around. The High Priest is the only one that can keep them straight, mostly through prodigious Doublethink that lets him believe each mythological continuity simultaneously while being aware they can't exactly mesh. [[spoiler:And when all of these mythologies come to life when [[RealityIsOutToLunch reality goes on a Pyramid-assisted lunch break]], they cannot keep the stories straight either, and agree to decide who's real through an all-out brawl, complete with announcer]]

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** An in-universe example happens in ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'', where it's mentioned that Djellibeybi's mythology has been changing so thoroughly over the years, several concepts and objects have multiple gods and stories that explain it, them, each of them contradicting each other. The sun ''alone'' has several gods that who are supposed to move it around. The High Priest is the only one that can keep them straight, mostly through prodigious Doublethink that lets him believe each mythological continuity simultaneously while being aware they can't exactly mesh. [[spoiler:And when all of these mythologies come to life when [[RealityIsOutToLunch reality goes on a Pyramid-assisted lunch break]], they cannot keep the stories straight either, and agree to decide who's real through an all-out brawl, complete with announcer]]



* Chris Roberson aims for this by intention--as a kid, he loved reading comic books and seeing all the ways they interconnected. Pretty much everything he writes that isn't a tie-in to ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' is in a single setting, but he explicitly uses the "many worlds" model of quantum mechanics, and [[ForWantOfANail slight deviations lead to massive differences over a relatively short period of time]]. Attempting to fit his works into a single continuity would be arguably meaningless, and it's uncertain whether even he knows what he's doing half the time.

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* Chris Roberson aims for this by intention--as on purpose--as a kid, he loved reading comic books and seeing all the ways they interconnected. Pretty much everything he writes that isn't a tie-in to ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' is in a single setting, but he explicitly uses the "many worlds" model of quantum mechanics, and [[ForWantOfANail slight deviations lead to massive differences over a relatively short period of time]]. Attempting to fit his works into a single continuity would be arguably meaningless, and it's uncertain whether even he knows what he's doing half the time.



** Doctor Who avoids it more than most decades-long franchises because the show embraces its NarmCharm so much and features TimeTravel. It's got no "why do the Klingons look different" situations because Zygons are still red, rubbery, and suction cup-y, and Daleks are still evil pepper shakers of doom - prop quality has advanced but the look hasn't - and no "why did the year 2000 look super futuristic then but now look like the actual year 2000 did" questions because cracks in time ''ate'' that Dalek invasion you don't remember - the malleability of reality in this show means ''it's part of continuity that continuity is flexible.'' The TARDIS interior goes from [[{{Zeerust}} the 60s and 70s idea of futuristic]] in the 60s and 70s to looking organic because it's a LivingShip in the Russell T Davies seasons to TheAllegedCar, Spaceship Edition in the Amy and Rory years to TheNewTens' idea of futuristic in the Clara years because it's a LivingShip, GeniusLoci, and EldritchLocation that can change anything about its inner dimension on a whim. Some things seem more advanced [[CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel at an earlier point in their own history]] for simpler reasons - aesthetics change and in the year 5000 when he'll be made, K9 will look modern again.

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** Doctor Who avoids it more than most decades-long franchises because the show embraces its NarmCharm so much and features TimeTravel. It's got no "why do the Klingons look different" situations because Zygons are still red, rubbery, and suction cup-y, and Daleks are still evil pepper shakers of doom - prop quality has advanced but the look hasn't - and no "why did the year 2000 look super futuristic then but now look like the actual year 2000 did" questions because cracks in time ''ate'' that Dalek invasion you don't remember - the malleability of reality in this show means ''it's part of continuity that continuity is flexible.'' The TARDIS interior goes from [[{{Zeerust}} the 60s and 70s idea of futuristic]] in the 60s and 70s to looking organic because it's a LivingShip in the Russell T Davies seasons to TheAllegedCar, Spaceship Edition in the Amy and Rory years to TheNewTens' idea of futuristic in the Clara years because it's a LivingShip, GeniusLoci, and EldritchLocation that can change anything about its inner dimension on a whim. Some things seem more advanced [[CosmeticallyAdvancedPrequel at an earlier point in their own history]] for simpler reasons - -- aesthetics change and in the year 5000 when he'll be made, K9 will look modern again.



* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' fixed a year issue caused by Seasons 6-9 each being half a school year long. Causing time in series to lag behind the real world. So start of Season 10 it is suddenly current year, 2008 to 2010 over the summer break... But given Emma's birthdate is a fixed point, and her first day at Degrassi is also fixed by the Class reunion of the DJH characters, makes a lot of interactions between Seasons 7-9 problematic. Specifically between characters like Sav and Holly J with characters like Paige and Spinner.
* ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' is starting to run into this especially where Jenna and Toby are concerned. This is probably the result of initially following their book characterizations then pulling a WhamEpisode regarding them and developing them into their own characters but''keeping their new characters for flashbacks where they should be their old selves.'' Jenna isn't too bad since she's made out to be a BitchInSheepsClothing in the early books but Toby goes from a creepy loner EmoTeen pre-character development to having always been a IronWoobie with no hints of creepiness.

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* ''Series/{{Degrassi}}'' fixed a year issue caused by Seasons 6-9 each being half a school year long. Causing time in series to lag behind the real world. So start of Season 10 it is suddenly current year, 2008 to 2010 over the summer break... But given Emma's birthdate is a fixed point, and her first day at Degrassi is also fixed by the Class reunion of the DJH characters, this makes a lot of interactions between Seasons 7-9 problematic. Specifically between characters like Sav and Holly J with characters like Paige and Spinner.
* ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' is starting to run into this especially where Jenna and Toby are concerned. This is probably the result of initially following their book characterizations then pulling a WhamEpisode regarding them and developing them into their own characters but''keeping their new characters for flashbacks where they should be their old selves.'' Jenna isn't too bad since she's made out to be a BitchInSheepsClothing in the early books but Toby goes from a creepy loner EmoTeen pre-character development to having always been a an IronWoobie with no hints of creepiness.



** The god Strife gets killed by a god-slaying weapon in "Armageddon Now: Part 1", and Zeus gets killed in "God Fearing Child", yet Strife appears in "Yes Virgina, There Is a Hercules" (which is set in the modern day), while Zeus is mentioned as being active. Some fans have {{Handwave}}d this by suggesting the two may have been resurrected somewhere down the line.

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** The god Strife gets killed by a god-slaying weapon in "Armageddon Now: Part 1", and Zeus gets killed in "God Fearing Child", yet Strife appears in "Yes Virgina, Virginia, There Is a A Hercules" (which is set in the modern day), while Zeus is mentioned as being active. Some fans have {{Handwave}}d this by suggesting the two may have been resurrected somewhere down the line.



** As a long running show there's bound to be one or two things that don't add up, but a pretty bad one occurs in Season 1 that there's little excuse for because it comes about in the space of two episodes right at the start of the show. There's barely any continuity to screw up. One episode centres on Ross moping because it's the anniversary of his first having sex with Carol (and also losing his virginity). Monica is the one who first remembers, which is {{Squick}}y but Ross says there were few people he didn't tell. In the very next episode, Monica says the line "Wow, my brother didn't even tell me when he lost his virginity."
** Chandler and Rachel are shown interacting in Thanksgiving flashbacks to their teen years, and in a flashback to a few months before the series began, and yet in the pilot they're introduced as total strangers. Ross gets a "You remember..." before his name, as Chandler ought to as well.

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** As a long running long-running show there's bound to be one or two things that don't add up, but a pretty bad one occurs in Season 1 that there's little excuse for because it comes about in the space of two episodes right at the start of the show. There's barely any continuity to screw up. One episode centres on Ross moping because it's the anniversary of his first having sex with Carol (and also losing his virginity). Monica is the one who first remembers, which is {{Squick}}y but Ross says there were few people he didn't tell. In the very next episode, Monica says the line "Wow, my brother didn't even tell me when he lost his virginity."
** Chandler and Rachel are shown interacting in Thanksgiving flashbacks to their teen years, and in a flashback to a few months before the series began, and yet in the pilot they're introduced as total strangers. Ross gets a "You remember..." before his name, as so Chandler ought to as well.



* ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' took the odd step of dating its final episode as taking place exactly a year after its first. This removed the implausibility of people keeping their crazy powers a secret for years at a time, but made it pretty much impossible for the show's 37 episodes to fit into that time period. Most episodes take place over a few days or weeks and most of the season premiers imply that months have passed whilst the show has been off air.
* ''{{Series/Charmed}}'' was notorious for its numerous continuity errors, especially in the sixth season, where Chris Perry - a KidFromTheFuture - appeared to stop the Titans from conquering the world. When he gets his origin episode in season 6, there is no mention about the Titans [[spoiler: and his brother Wyatt is the BigBad in the future]]. He also orbs into the attic in his debut episode but this shows him going back in time via a portal in the attic wall. Additionally his hair was short when he arrived on the show but the actor grew it long for season 6 - and it's the same in his origin episode.

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* ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' took the odd step of dating its final episode as taking place exactly a year after its first. This removed the implausibility of people keeping their crazy powers a secret for years at a time, but made it pretty much impossible for the show's 37 episodes to fit into that time period. Most episodes take place over a few days or weeks and most of the season premiers imply that months have passed whilst while the show has been off air.
* ''{{Series/Charmed}}'' was notorious for its numerous continuity errors, especially in the sixth season, where Chris Perry - -- a KidFromTheFuture - -- appeared to stop the Titans from conquering the world. When he gets his origin episode in season 6, there is no mention about the Titans [[spoiler: and his brother Wyatt is the BigBad in the future]]. He also orbs into the attic in his debut episode but this shows him going back in time via a portal in the attic wall. Additionally his hair was short when he arrived on the show but the actor grew it long for season 6 - -- and it's the same in his origin episode.



* ''Series/RoboCopTheSeries'' sees this with regards to when in its timeline Alex Murphy was turned into the title cyborg. The pilot states that [=RoboCop=] and Pudface Morgan had the encounter that disfigured Morgan five years ago. However, in the episode "Zone Five", it was stated that Murphy was killed (the very thing that allowed OCP to use him to make [=RoboCop=]) three years ago.

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* ''Series/RoboCopTheSeries'' sees this with regards to when in its timeline Alex Murphy was turned into the title titular cyborg. The pilot states that [=RoboCop=] and Pudface Morgan had the encounter that disfigured Morgan five years ago. However, in the episode "Zone Five", it was stated that Murphy was killed (the very thing that allowed OCP to use him to make [=RoboCop=]) three years ago.



** Also from the Bible, the books of Luke and Matthew both give geneologies of Jesus which are completely different for every generation after David. There have been multiple theological attempts to explain this; that one is through Joseph and one through Mary (and that her father is coincidentally also named Joseph) is popular, as is the idea that one is the "legal" genealogy and on the biological one (thanks to complicated inheritance laws), but its never addressed in the text itself.

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** Also from the Bible, the books of Luke and Matthew both give geneologies of Jesus which are completely different for every generation after David. There have been multiple theological attempts to explain this; that one is through Joseph and one through Mary (and that her father is coincidentally also named Joseph) is popular, as is the idea that one is the "legal" genealogy and on the biological one (thanks to complicated inheritance laws), but its it's never addressed in the text itself.



** Namine is simultaneously both an example and not an example. She was somehow born from Sora's body and Kairi's heart when Sora became a Heartless in the first game giving her power over his memories. Roxas is kinda like her twin, born from Sora's body and heart (and taking on the form of Ventus because his heart was hiding in Sora and it's hinted part (or all) of it stayed in Roxas). The series explains this quite clearly and points out Namine is a special type of non-standard Nobody. This is minor issue until you realize Sora also gets his body BACK within minutes of losing it due to the now restored Kairi's powers as a Princes of Heart, resulting in Roxas getting NONE of Sora's memories, and it's unclear if Namine got any of either of her "parent's" memories. And let's not get into Xion and the fact the fact that she's Sora's memories made manifest while also being a replica of Sora....Yes, the series explains how all this happened quite clearly! But it doesn't explain how any of that CAN happen.

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** Namine is simultaneously both an example and not an example. She was somehow born from Sora's body and Kairi's heart when Sora became a Heartless in the first game giving her power over his memories. Roxas is kinda like her twin, born from Sora's body and heart (and taking on the form of Ventus because his heart was hiding in Sora and it's hinted part (or all) of it stayed in Roxas). The series explains this quite clearly and points out Namine is a special type of non-standard Nobody. This is minor issue until you realize Sora also gets his body BACK within minutes of losing it due to the now restored Kairi's powers as a Princes of Heart, resulting in Roxas getting NONE of Sora's memories, and it's unclear if Namine got any of either of her "parent's" "parents"' memories. And let's not get into Xion and the fact the fact that she's Sora's memories made manifest while also being a replica of Sora....Yes, the series explains how all this happened quite clearly! But it doesn't explain how any of that CAN happen.



** There are more straight examples of snarls in the actual story, mostly the result of the lead writer shift after ''[=MK4=]'' . The two which stand out the most are Scorpion's oath to protect Sub-Zero (started in his ''MKII'' ending, supported in the official comic and ''[=UMK3=]'' ending, then ignored completely in ''[=MK4=]'', with following games being ambiguous about the whole ordeal, or portraying him as an AxCrazy [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge revenge-seeker]]), and Kintaro's fate after ''MKII'' (with 3 different sources, all of debatable canonicity, stating different and contradicting fates for the Shokan).

to:

** There are more straight examples of snarls in the actual story, mostly the result of the lead writer shift after ''[=MK4=]'' .''[=MK4=]''. The two which stand out the most are Scorpion's oath to protect Sub-Zero (started in his ''MKII'' ending, supported in the official comic and ''[=UMK3=]'' ending, then ignored completely in ''[=MK4=]'', with following games being ambiguous about the whole ordeal, or portraying him as an AxCrazy [[RoaringRampageOfRevenge revenge-seeker]]), and Kintaro's fate after ''MKII'' (with 3 different sources, all of debatable canonicity, stating different and contradicting fates for the Shokan).



** ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'', which are kind of the third version but not quite (since its still a pair of games rather then a single definitive version of the generation) is another kettle of fish entirely. This game is considered to be an "alternate retelling" of the base Sun and Moon games. It starts off similarly, but it veers off the rails here and there:

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** ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'', which are kind of the third version but not quite (since its it's still a pair of games rather then a single definitive version of the generation) is another kettle of fish entirely. This game is considered to be an "alternate retelling" of the base Sun and Moon games. It starts off similarly, but it veers off the rails here and there:



*** Ultra Space is more explorable [[spoiler: Its made up of both distant planets, {{Alternate Dimension}}s and {{Alternate Universe}}s, including one that's a version of Hau'Oli City that's been [[ApocalypseHow hit with a nuclear meltdown]].]] You can also find regular Pokémon and Legendary Pokémon from past games in these Ultra Spaces, but no explanation is given as to how they got there.
* ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' may only be a 2-game series, but it has one thing it can't agree with itself on. ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' introduces a Akuro, who is the BigBad of the game. Now, dialogue when he's introduced heavily implies that he is the successor of the previous game's BigBad, Yami. But later, the Knowing Jewel claims that he merely used Yami as a vessel. Keep in mind that Akuro didn't exist in the first game, and that both of these versions of what Akuro is come from the ''same game!'' Jeez!

to:

*** Ultra Space is more explorable [[spoiler: Its [[spoiler:It's made up of both distant planets, {{Alternate Dimension}}s and {{Alternate Universe}}s, including one that's a version of Hau'Oli City that's been [[ApocalypseHow hit with a nuclear meltdown]].]] You can also find regular Pokémon and Legendary Pokémon from past games in these Ultra Spaces, but no explanation is given as to how they got there.
* ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' may only be a 2-game series, but it has one thing it can't agree with itself on. ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' introduces a Akuro, who is the BigBad of the game. Now, dialogue when he's introduced heavily implies that he is the successor of the previous game's BigBad, Yami. But later, the Knowing Jewel claims that he merely used Yami as a vessel. Keep in mind that Akuro didn't exist in the first game, and that both of these versions of what Akuro is come from the ''same game!'' Jeez!



** Abd al-Hazir mention that Zoltun Kulle was a Vizjerei mage and as evidence cites the Demonicus de Zoltun Kulle. In the Book of Cain, Cain suspect Zoltun was a Ennead mage.

to:

** Abd al-Hazir mention that Zoltun Kulle was a Vizjerei mage and as evidence cites the Demonicus de Zoltun Kulle. In the Book of Cain, Cain suspect Zoltun was a an Ennead mage.



** Out-of-universe, first we have the RID 2001 toy, then the ''Armada'' toy which uses the same bio, reworded to add Minicons. Then the Armada character, an agent and ''offshoot'' of Unicron. Then the ''Cybertron'' character: same name, same gimmick, different revelation about who he is. These are considered to be the same guy, officially. Then the explanation of Cybertron's differences from the connected Armada series - Unicron exists in all dimensions and as such, all are affected by the black hole - better known as the ''Unicron Singularity.'' As "multiversal singularities," Primus, Unicron, and their direct creations exist in all dimensions as the same person. This would mean that Sideways can exist in multiple universes and seem to have a complete, differing history in each, but it's always still him and he'll always be Unicron's herald. The ''Animated'' ExpandedUniverse makes Animated Sideways and Movie Sideways maybe the same guy, and colors him like Armada Sideways… ''without'' anything beyond colors to say that he's also that one. Movie Sideways is cut in half and reappears in the next movie (the likes of which is no big feat for Armada Sideways, who can take many forms and whose true form seems to be energy that looks like multicolored television static), and his toy bios treat him as a manipulator like Armada and Cybertron Sideways, suggesting that he is Armada Sideways or at least just like him… but toy bios say a ''lot'' about movie characters that clashes with the movies, and a lot of movie Decepticons have the same or similar body types. Canon as it was understood at the time of the Unicron Trilogy would seem to make Armada Sideways the true identity of all the others, but there just kept not being any sign of that in later appearances - or any acknowledgement of different series existing in TheMultiverse in any television, film, or mainstream comic incarnation. Finally, they embraced the fact that sense cannot be made of it: the "Ask Vector Prime" column, where fans can ask things of the ancient TimeMaster and get in-character tongue-in-cheek answers, has Sideways take over for one installment when the question is asked - ''first'' he reminds us that [[UnreliableNarrator he's a lying liar who lies]], and tells us that all, some, or none of the past ideas of who he is are totally true… or not.

to:

** Out-of-universe, first we have the RID 2001 toy, then the ''Armada'' toy which uses the same bio, reworded to add Minicons. Then the Armada character, an agent and ''offshoot'' of Unicron. Then the ''Cybertron'' character: same name, same gimmick, different revelation about who he is. These are considered to be the same guy, officially. Then the explanation of Cybertron's differences from the connected Armada series - -- Unicron exists in all dimensions and as such, all are affected by the black hole - -- better known as the ''Unicron Singularity.'' As "multiversal singularities," Primus, Unicron, and their direct creations exist in all dimensions as the same person. This would mean that Sideways can exist in multiple universes and seem to have a complete, differing history in each, but it's always still him and he'll always be Unicron's herald. The ''Animated'' ExpandedUniverse makes Animated Sideways and Movie Sideways maybe the same guy, and colors him like Armada Sideways… ''without'' anything beyond colors to say that he's also that one. Movie Sideways is cut in half and reappears in the next movie (the likes of which is no big feat for Armada Sideways, who can take many forms and whose true form seems to be energy that looks like multicolored television static), and his toy bios treat him as a manipulator like Armada and Cybertron Sideways, suggesting that he is Armada Sideways or at least just like him… but toy bios say a ''lot'' about movie characters that clashes with the movies, and a lot of movie Decepticons have the same or similar body types. Canon as it was understood at the time of the Unicron Trilogy would seem to make Armada Sideways the true identity of all the others, but there just kept not being any sign of that in later appearances - or any acknowledgement of different series existing in TheMultiverse in any television, film, or mainstream comic incarnation. Finally, they embraced the fact that sense cannot be made of it: the "Ask Vector Prime" column, where fans can ask things of the ancient TimeMaster and get in-character tongue-in-cheek answers, has Sideways take over for one installment when the question is asked - ''first'' he reminds us that [[UnreliableNarrator he's a lying liar who lies]], and tells us that all, some, or none of the past ideas of who he is are totally true… or not.



*** The Fallen's application ran into a particular case of this. In the ''Transformers'' multiverse, contradictory stories are explained as the result of the audience looking at a parallel universe - for instance, a toy bio where a character who is dead is treated as alive means that there's a universe where they survived or came back. This is also the case for multiple adaptations of the same story - the novelization of an episode's plot takes place in its own universe to the episode. Now combine that with the above information about The Fallen and the massive amount of ancillary material surrounding ''Film/RevengeOfTheFallen'', and you have the [[FridgeLogic apparent situation]] where the Fallen dies at the end of the movie, somehow survives, travels to the universe of the novelization, lives out his entire long history in the exact same manner and enacts the exact same scheme, dies in the exact same way, travels to the universe of the comic book adaptation, to the read-along storybook, to the video game, to the portable version of the video game, and so on and so forth, failing miserably every single time.

to:

*** The Fallen's application ran into a particular case of this. In the ''Transformers'' multiverse, contradictory stories are explained as the result of the audience looking at a parallel universe - for instance, a toy bio where a character who is dead is treated as alive means that there's a universe where they survived or came back. This is also the case for multiple adaptations of the same story - -- the novelization of an episode's plot takes place in its own universe to the episode. Now combine that with the above information about The Fallen and the massive amount of ancillary material surrounding ''Film/RevengeOfTheFallen'', and you have the [[FridgeLogic apparent situation]] where the Fallen dies at the end of the movie, somehow survives, travels to the universe of the novelization, lives out his entire long history in the exact same manner and enacts the exact same scheme, dies in the exact same way, travels to the universe of the comic book adaptation, to the read-along storybook, to the video game, to the portable version of the video game, and so on and so forth, failing miserably every single time.



* Due to the sheer length of time it's been on the air coupled with its ageless cast and focus on American cultural commentary, ''TheSimpsons'' has increasingly severe continuity problems regarding when the characters were born, what generation they belong to, etc. Early episodes, set in the early 1990s, established Marge and Homer as kids of the late 1950s — baby boomers, basically — with Bart and Lisa kids of the early 1980s. Early episodes flashbacks were completely unambiguous about this — young Homer watching JFK on TV, Lisa's birth overlapping with the 1984 Olympics, and so on. However, the show has survived for so long, it is now impossible to honor this past without absurdity — Lisa cannot still be eight years old in the late 2010s if she was born in the 1980s, etc. Flashbacks in contemporary episodes now have to occur in some vague, unspecified "past" with decade-identifying details scrubbed, though this is not so easily done for certain characters for whom time-sensitive events are a big part of their identity: for example, Abe being a WWII vet, Seymour having served in Vietnam, Marge, Homer, and Artie Ziff having attended a very 60s prom — to say nothing of Disco Stu! It seems many of these details are being quietly retired for snarl reasons.

to:

* Due to the sheer length of time it's been on the air coupled with its ageless cast and focus on American cultural commentary, ''TheSimpsons'' has increasingly severe continuity problems regarding when the characters were born, what generation they belong to, etc. Early episodes, set in the early 1990s, established Marge and Homer as kids of the late 1950s — baby boomers, basically — with Bart and Lisa being kids of the early 1980s. Early episodes flashbacks were completely unambiguous about this — young Homer watching JFK on TV, Lisa's birth overlapping with the 1984 Olympics, and so on. However, the show has survived for so long, it is now impossible to honor this past without absurdity — Lisa cannot still be eight years old in the late 2010s if she was born in the 1980s, etc. Flashbacks in contemporary episodes now have to occur in some vague, unspecified "past" with decade-identifying details scrubbed, though this is not so easily done for certain characters for whom time-sensitive events are a big part of their identity: for example, Abe being a WWII vet, Seymour having served in Vietnam, Marge, Homer, and Artie Ziff having attended a very 60s prom — to say nothing of Disco Stu! It seems many of these details are being quietly retired for snarl reasons.
9th May '18 3:09:02 PM Someoneman
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* ''VideoGame/RWBYGrimmEclipse'' contains a few contradicting elements which make it impossible to fit in ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'''s timeline. Yang [[spoiler:still has both her arms]] and Pyrrha [[spoiler:is still alive]], which would place the events of the game during or before Volume 3. However, Jaune [[spoiler:has awakened his semblance]], which would place the game sometime after Volume 5.

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* ''VideoGame/RWBYGrimmEclipse'' contains a few contradicting elements which make it impossible to fit in ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'''s timeline. Yang [[spoiler:still has both her arms]] and Pyrrha [[spoiler:is still alive]], which would place the events of the game during or before Volume 3. However, Jaune [[spoiler:has awakened his semblance]], which would place the game sometime after Volume 5. Volume 5 (or 4, or that matter) wasn't even out when the game was released, making the latter point a case of EarlyBirdCameo.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuitySnarl