History Main / ComputerEqualsTapedrive

23rd Jun '17 2:09:28 PM LinTaylor
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* ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder'' zig-zags this; the game is set in an AlternateUniverse where Nazi Germany won World War II thanks to [[StupidJetpackHitler super-science]] provided by the BigBad Deathshead. As a result, the Germans have personal computers and even an elaborate moon base in the [=1960s=]...but the launch codes for a stolen nuclear submarine (which are stored at said moon base) come in the form of punchcards.
20th Apr '17 8:25:37 PM scooter
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* In the [[The8bitEraOfConsoleVideoGames 8 bit era]] of home computers (Commodore 64, Sinclair ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Dragon, TRS-80 and the like) software was available on cassette tapes, which were the exact same format as the Compact Cassettes that younger tropers associate with the 1990s for some reason (but were actually invented in the 1960s and were just as prevalent in the 1980s) In fact certain systems (the ZX Spectrum and TRS-80 Color Computer in particular, as well as the Apple ][) actually used standard cassette players as their tape "drives" and you could hear the software when if you played the software tapes in a standard Hi-Fi (which also meant that a dual deck cassette deck of the sort that was common in the early 1990s made a perfect copying device!). If you did your own programming you could record to them as well, making them the exact precursor to home use floppy drives.

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* In the [[The8bitEraOfConsoleVideoGames 8 bit era]] of home computers (Commodore 64, Sinclair ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Dragon, TRS-80 and the like) software was available on cassette tapes, which were the exact same format as the Compact Cassettes that younger tropers associate with the 1990s for some reason (but were actually invented in the 1960s and were just as prevalent in the 1980s) 1980s).
**
In fact certain systems (the ZX Spectrum and TRS-80 Color Computer in particular, as well as the Apple ][) actually used standard cassette players as their tape "drives" and you could hear the software when if you played the software tapes in a standard Hi-Fi (which also meant that a dual deck cassette deck of the sort that was common in the early 1990s made a perfect copying device!). If you did your own programming you could record to them as well, making them the exact precursor to home use floppy drives.
20th Apr '17 8:24:43 PM scooter
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* In the [[The8bitEraOfConsoleVideoGames 8 bit era]] of home computers (Commodore 64, Sinclair ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Dragon, TRS-80 and the like) software was available on cassette tapes, which were the exact same format as the Compact Cassettes that younger tropers associate with the 1990s for some reason (but were actually invented in the 1960s and were just as prevalent in the 1980s) In fact certain systems (the ZX Spectrum and TRS-80 Color Computer in particular) actually used standard cassette players as their tape "drives" and you could hear the software when if you played the software tapes in a standard Hi-Fi (which also meant that a dual deck cassette deck of the sort that was common in the early 1990s made a perfect copying device!)

to:

* In the [[The8bitEraOfConsoleVideoGames 8 bit era]] of home computers (Commodore 64, Sinclair ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, Dragon, TRS-80 and the like) software was available on cassette tapes, which were the exact same format as the Compact Cassettes that younger tropers associate with the 1990s for some reason (but were actually invented in the 1960s and were just as prevalent in the 1980s) In fact certain systems (the ZX Spectrum and TRS-80 Color Computer in particular) particular, as well as the Apple ][) actually used standard cassette players as their tape "drives" and you could hear the software when if you played the software tapes in a standard Hi-Fi (which also meant that a dual deck cassette deck of the sort that was common in the early 1990s made a perfect copying device!)device!). If you did your own programming you could record to them as well, making them the exact precursor to home use floppy drives.
1st Mar '17 10:25:53 AM justanid
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[[caption-width-right:300:[[Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade That belongs in a]] [[http://www.computerhistory.org/ museum!]] ]]

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[[caption-width-right:300:[[Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade [[caption-width-right:300:[[ItBelongsInAMuseum That belongs in a]] [[http://www.computerhistory.org/ museum!]] ]]
19th Jan '17 1:14:44 PM FordPrefect
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No longer as common, since in RealLife, almost everybody[[note]]except certain industrial class backup systems[[/note]] has stopped using the old-fashioned 9-track mag tape reel because of size and cost, e.g. a 6250 bpi, 1600 foot tape could hold, at most, a little over 100 megabytes of data,[[note]]the normal maximum block size is 32760 bytes, and each 32760-byte block takes, with the gap following it, 5.992 inches[[/note]] and costs about US$12. By 2012, it was possible to walk into a stationery store and buy a microSD card the size of a man's thumbnail for close to $12, and it would hold at least 4 billion bytes, or about 50 times as much as the above tape reel. And that's not even the cheapest example. A top-the-line 4 terabyte[[note]]that's 4 ''trillion'' bytes[[/note]] hard drive could often be purchased at or under US$200. That means data storage on modern hardware is ''[[ReadingsAreOffTheScale thousands]]'' of times cheaper today, and that's before factoring in inflation.[[note]]It's impractical to use because of extremely slow random access, not because of low capacity and high cost. Most have moved on to modern tape cassette drives, which has a capacity of up to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive#History 5 terabytes.]][[/note]]

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No longer as common, since in RealLife, almost everybody[[note]]except certain industrial class backup systems[[/note]] has stopped using the old-fashioned 9-track mag tape reel because of size and cost, e.g. a 6250 bpi, 1600 foot tape could hold, at most, a little over 100 megabytes of data,[[note]]the normal maximum block size is 32760 bytes, and each 32760-byte block takes, with the gap following it, 5.992 inches[[/note]] and costs about US$12. By 2012, it was possible to walk into a stationery store and buy a microSD card the size of a man's thumbnail for close to $12, and it would hold at least 4 billion bytes, or about 50 times as much as the above tape reel. And that's not even the cheapest example. A top-the-line top-of-the-line 4 terabyte[[note]]that's 4 ''trillion'' bytes[[/note]] hard drive could often be purchased at or under US$200. That means data storage on modern hardware is ''[[ReadingsAreOffTheScale thousands]]'' of times cheaper today, and that's before factoring in inflation.[[note]]It's impractical to use because of extremely slow random access, not because of low capacity and high cost. Most have moved on to modern tape cassette drives, which has have a capacity of up to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tape_drive#History 5 terabytes.]][[/note]]
8th Jan '17 2:24:52 PM john_e
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* Graeme's computer in ''Series/TheGoodies'' featured a large, obvious tape drive, although that was far from the oddest thing about. Spoofed in the 2005 "Return of the Goodies" documentary where a now middle-aged Graeme tries to insert an enormous disk in his computer.

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* Graeme's computer in ''Series/TheGoodies'' featured a large, obvious tape drive, although that was far from the oddest thing about. Spoofed in the 2005 "Return of the Goodies" documentary where a now middle-aged Graeme tries to insert an enormous disk (or possibly tape cartridge) in his computer.
14th Dec '16 4:37:57 PM jgkitarel
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** There is also the fact that when properly stored, in a dry and climate controlled environment, magnetic tapes last for decades. Try getting an HDD or CD to last that long.
8th Dec '16 6:41:39 PM WillKeaton
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* In ''Webcomic/TheInexplicableAdventuresOfBob,'' not only does the [[Film/TheAdventuresOfBuckarooBanzaiAcrossThe8thDimension Yoyodyne]]-built [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/d/20071208.html computer]] in the Generictown University Science Department have a tape drive (to be fair, the Dean's personal computer is a [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/d/20071229.html TRS-80)]], but so does a random [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/d/20091229.html gizmo]] on the alien planet of Butane.

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* In ''Webcomic/TheInexplicableAdventuresOfBob,'' not only does the [[Film/TheAdventuresOfBuckarooBanzaiAcrossThe8thDimension Yoyodyne]]-built [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/d/20071208.html computer]] in the Generictown University Science Department have a tape drive (to be fair, the Dean's personal computer is a [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/d/20071229.html TRS-80)]], TRS-80),]] but so does a random [[http://bobadventures.comicgenesis.com/d/20091229.html gizmo]] on the alien planet of Butane.
8th Dec '16 6:40:17 PM WillKeaton
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** In fact, the entire premise of the programme would be completely undermined by digital technology.



* Human computers in VideoGame/TheBureauXcomDeclassified. Since it's set in 1962, totally justified.

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* Human computers in VideoGame/TheBureauXcomDeclassified.''VideoGame/TheBureauXcomDeclassified''. Since it's set in 1962, totally justified.
8th Dec '16 6:36:35 PM WillKeaton
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* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' had "memory tapes". (The TNG era sensibly replaced them with "isolinear chips", which seem to be a combination of flash memory card and processing element.)

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' had "memory tapes". tapes." (The TNG era sensibly replaced them with "isolinear chips", which seem to be a combination of flash memory card and processing element.)
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