History Main / ComplexityAddiction

16th Nov '16 1:42:28 PM CelestialDraco
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* Happens on almost every episode of ''Series/Eureka'' as the super-scientists go through complex ideas to solve a major problem. It's non-scientist Carter who comes up with the solution so obvious and simple, it never occurs to the geniuses.

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* Happens on almost every episode of ''Series/Eureka'' ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' as the super-scientists go through complex ideas to solve a major problem. It's non-scientist Carter who comes up with the solution so obvious and simple, it never occurs to the geniuses.
9th Nov '16 12:26:24 AM Tron80
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* In ''[[ComicBook/JimmyOlsen Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen]]'' #30, Superman adopts Jimmy as his son for a 30-day trial. During this period, they visit the Fortress of Solitude, where Superman shows Jimmy his mural of a solar system he created, in which the inhabitants named various parts after him (such as "Superman's asteroid", "Superman's planet", ect.). After that, Superman leaves Jimmy be while he checks his "electronic oracle". The oracle predicts that on the day the trial adoption expires, "Superman will destroy his own son!" Now, Superman has two options: A) tell Jimmy the bad news and revoke the adoption to protect him, or B) consider that the oracle has problems with homonyms and conclude that it may be referring to the sun in the aforementioned solar system. What Superman decides on is option C) resort to {{Superdickery}} and treat Jimmy like crap without explaining why until Jimmy backs out of the trial.
** UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} Franchise/{{Superman}} had a severe ComplexityAddiction, thanks to his [[StoryBreakerPower story-breaking power level]]. Thus, he was always setting up elaborate hoaxes involving robot duplicates, fake newspaper headlines, and Batman wearing a Clark Kent mask, all to trick the aliens secretly preparing to attack Earth. Sure, Superman could just destroy the aliens--but that would take two pages.

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* Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'s villain Black Flame has a serious trouble with this. In ''[[ComicBook/JimmyOlsen Superman's ''Adventure Comics #400'', Supergirl is at her mercy: trapped in a locked room, unconscious and sprinkled with Green Kryptonite. And Black Flame orders her hired guns to hurry up and bring Supergirl to a DeathTrap before the Kryptonite kills her because she doesn't "want her go that easily". Supergirl survives Black Flame's elaborate death trap but she is immobilized and rendered unconscious. So Black Flame kills her? Nope. She sets another death trap up and waits for Supergirl coming around.
* Franchise/{{Superman}}:
** In ''Superman's
Pal Jimmy Olsen]]'' ComicBook/JimmyOlsen'' #30, Superman adopts Jimmy as his son for a 30-day trial. During this period, they visit the Fortress of Solitude, where Superman shows Jimmy his mural of a solar system he created, in which the inhabitants named various parts after him (such as "Superman's asteroid", "Superman's planet", ect.). After that, Superman leaves Jimmy be while he checks his "electronic oracle". The oracle predicts that on the day the trial adoption expires, "Superman will destroy his own son!" Now, Superman has two options: A) tell Jimmy the bad news and revoke the adoption to protect him, or B) consider that the oracle has problems with homonyms and conclude that it may be referring to the sun in the aforementioned solar system. What Superman decides on is option C) resort to {{Superdickery}} and treat Jimmy like crap without explaining why until Jimmy backs out of the trial.
** UsefulNotes/{{The Silver Age|of Comic Books}} Franchise/{{Superman}} had a severe ComplexityAddiction, thanks to his [[StoryBreakerPower story-breaking power level]].ComplexityAddiction. Thus, he was always setting up elaborate hoaxes involving robot duplicates, fake newspaper headlines, and Batman wearing a Clark Kent mask, all to trick the aliens secretly preparing to attack Earth. Sure, Superman could just destroy the aliens--but that would take two pages.
2nd Nov '16 4:44:08 PM Xtifr
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* In Somtow Sucharitkul's ''Inquestor'' stories, Inquestors play a very complicated "game" called ''makrugh'' in which the object is mainly to maneuver your opponents--basically, every other Inquestor--into losing face. Since this is pretty subjective, it tends to result in "You lost."/"Oh, but did I?" type conversations.

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* In Somtow Sucharitkul's Creator/SomtowSucharitkul's ''Inquestor'' stories, Inquestors play a very complicated "game" called ''makrugh'' in which the object is mainly to maneuver your opponents--basically, every other Inquestor--into losing face. Since this is pretty subjective, it tends to result in "You lost."/"Oh, but did I?" type conversations.
31st Oct '16 7:30:05 PM Discar
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/TheSecretWorld'': Justified with one of the main factions, the Dragon. Since they are students of Chaos Theory, in many cases the only point of their plans is to test their models. So they will set some ridiculously complex plot into motion just to see if it works. If it doesn't, they still get to gather data, and they'll be sure to do better next time.
31st Oct '16 1:06:36 PM DarthWalrus
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* The Lich King in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has a truly epic case of this. He comes up with a plan to [[spoiler: transform your player into one of his 10/25 (depending on dungeon mode) greatest generals by allowing you to train up by killing off any number of already competent servants, including his 10 most powerful minions you can only kill when outnumbering them at least 9 to 1, then slaughter your way up to his inner sanctum and nearly kill him, before he kills you and raises you as undead.]] Alternatively, his plan could have gone something like this: Lord Marrowgar....okay I made you too big to ever leave the room, stay where you are. Drakuru, who I didn't kill like an idiot, send out your super-trolls. Deathwhisper rally the cultists! Saurfang lead the troops! Putridus release your plagues! Unleash the Darkfallen! The other 8 billion of you...Charge! I mean seriously, you idiots are still ''killing each other'' even though the sole reason you're here is to fight a guy who ''reanimates the dead''.

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* The Lich King in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has a truly epic case of this. He comes up with a plan to [[spoiler: transform your player into one of his 10/25 (depending on dungeon mode) greatest generals by allowing you to train up by killing off any number of already competent servants, including his 10 most powerful minions you can only kill when outnumbering them at least 9 to 1, then slaughter your way up to his inner sanctum and nearly kill him, before he kills you and raises you as undead.]] Alternatively, his plan could have gone something like this: Lord Marrowgar....okay I made you too big to ever leave the room, stay where you are. Drakuru, who I didn't kill like an idiot, send out your super-trolls. Deathwhisper rally the cultists! Saurfang lead the troops! Putridus release your plagues! Unleash the Darkfallen! The other 8 billion of you...Charge! I mean seriously, you idiots [[TheAlliance those]] [[TheHorde idiots]] are still ''killing each other'' even though the sole reason you're here is to fight a guy who ''reanimates the dead''.
6th Oct '16 10:19:16 AM Dechstreme
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** In the ''Mystery Incorporated'' incarnation the fact that everyone's plans involve costumes and monsters is overall lampshaded/explained by the fact that Mystery Cove is famous for hauntings, and the overall plot involves as cursed treasure (That would be a very strange curse). Everyone just uses monsters because everyone acts as if monsters are real until the reveal, the townsfolk, lead by the money grubbing mayor, never think to prove the monsters are real, they just try to make money off of them, justified by their tourist economy/haunted history. The whole thing is not always complexity addiction, somethings it is a reasonable way to take advantage of everyone's unreasonable behavior. Though unless they are hiding something there is almost always an easier way.

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** In the ''Mystery Incorporated'' incarnation the fact that everyone's plans involve costumes and monsters is overall lampshaded/explained by the fact that Mystery Cove is famous for hauntings, and the overall plot involves as cursed treasure (That would be a very strange curse). Everyone just uses monsters because everyone acts as if monsters are real until the reveal, the townsfolk, lead by the money grubbing mayor, never think to prove the monsters are real, they just try to make money off of them, justified by their tourist economy/haunted history. The whole thing is not always complexity addiction, somethings sometimes it is a reasonable way to take advantage of everyone's unreasonable behavior. Though unless they are hiding something there is almost always an easier way.
30th Sep '16 11:31:54 AM flodoris
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* ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'':
** Aizen has a bad case of this. During the Soul Society arc, he had a very complicated plan to obtain the MacGuffin. When that (inevitably) failed, he simply walked up and took it. Why he didn't do that in the first place? Addictions are a strong force to be reckoned with.\\
\\
The Hueco Mundo arc is where he really succumbs to it. Aizen builds up an army of Arrancar, hollowfies Tousen and makes war with Soul Society. While Aizen has an ability that could let him easily defeat the entire Gotei 13, he more or less deliberately gets everyone but Gin killed for no real reason aside from it being more complex than simply single-handedly killing everyone with his overwhelmingly unfair powers personally. More idiotically, the only point the army could have possibly served beyond intimidating Soul Society was to serve as cannon fodder against Squad 0, the only real threat to Aizen's plan at this point. Aizen didn't seem to notice this, and thus made the creation of the Arrancar army ''completely pointless''.

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* ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'':
**
''Manga/{{Bleach}}'': Aizen has a bad case of this. During the Soul Society arc, he had a very complicated plan to obtain the MacGuffin. When that (inevitably) failed, he simply walked up and took it. Why he didn't do that in the first place? Addictions are a strong force to be reckoned with.\\
\\
with.
**
The Hueco Mundo arc is where he really succumbs to it. Aizen builds up an army of Arrancar, hollowfies Tousen and makes war with Soul Society. While Aizen has an ability that could let him easily defeat the entire Gotei 13, he more or less deliberately gets everyone but Gin killed for no real reason aside from it being more complex than simply single-handedly killing everyone with his overwhelmingly unfair powers personally. More idiotically, the only point the army could have possibly served beyond intimidating Soul Society was to serve as cannon fodder against Squad 0, the only real threat to Aizen's plan at this point. Aizen didn't seem to notice this, and thus made the creation of the Arrancar army ''completely pointless''.
26th Sep '16 6:43:55 AM LentilSandEater
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* Tom Sawyer's plan for freeing Jim in ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' might be the UrExample. They could have simply swiped the keys to his shackles and sneaked off in the middle of the night, but Tom insists on sawing the leg off Jim's bed that the shackle is attached to and making a rope ladder just to leave behind as a clue and all manner of other silly things, [[WrongGenreSavvy just because that's how prisoners in the books he's read escape]]. He insists doing it the easy way "just ain't proper." {{Justified}} because [[spoiler:Tom knows full well that Jim was already legally freed in the Widow Douglas' will. He just wants to [[RuleOfFun play a fun game]]]].

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* Tom Sawyer's plan for freeing Jim in ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn'' might be the UrExample. They could have simply swiped the keys to his shackles and sneaked off in the middle of the night, but Tom insists on sawing the leg off Jim's bed that the shackle is attached to and making a rope ladder just to leave behind as a clue and all manner of other silly things, [[WrongGenreSavvy just because that's how prisoners in the books he's read escape]]. He insists doing it the easy way "just ain't proper." {{Justified}} because [[spoiler:Tom knows full well that Jim was already legally freed in the Widow Douglas' will. [[InnocentBigot He just wants to to]] [[RuleOfFun play a fun game]]]].
26th Sep '16 6:43:03 AM LentilSandEater
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* A major aspect of the White Court of vampires in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' is that they ''don't'' operate with simple, straightforward plans. In the White Court, approval and influence is based partially on the way one maneuvers against one's opponents, both within the Court and outside of it. A White Court vampire could simply have an enemy gunned down, but that would be met with serious disapproval and a loss of respect and grace, while taking that foe down via ThePlan is viewed with admiration. It's ''institutional'' Complexity Addiction.
** Oddly enough, there's a practical reason behind this, making it a (somewhat) justified trope. White Court vampires do this to limit their accountability and culpability for their actions, which is important, since they work in and around human society far more than many other supernatural beings in the Dresdenverse. Hiring a gunman to shoot your rival can be easily traced back to you. Subtly goading another rival into a conflict with the first so ''he'' hires the gunman insulates you from the consequences far better. White Court culture has grown up around this principle, with the most respected actions being those that "everyone knows" you were responsible for, but nobody can connect you to with any sort of actual evidence.
*** Part of the reason for this behavior is that, although White Court vampires have SuperStrength, SuperSpeed, a HealingFactor, MoreThanMindControl capabilities, and so on and so forth, they are still considered lightweights in the supernatural community. They can be dangerous in a fight, but are physically outclassed by many, many other creatures. So, they turn to ThePlan to avoid any actual confrontation.
** Further, it should be said some of them have no qualms admitting a human or wizard is a WorthyOpponent if they can successfully manipulate a White Court Noble into doing what they want. ([[spoiler:See Harry and Lara's interaction at the end of ''Literature/WhiteNight'']].)

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* A major aspect of the White Court of vampires in ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' is that they ''don't'' operate with simple, straightforward plans. In the White Court, approval and influence is based partially on the way one maneuvers against one's opponents, both within the Court and outside of it. A White Court vampire could simply have an enemy gunned down, but that would be met with serious disapproval and a loss of respect and grace, while taking that foe down via ThePlan is viewed with admiration. It's ''institutional'' Complexity Addiction.
** Oddly enough, there's a practical reason behind this, making it a (somewhat) justified trope. White Court vampires do this to limit their accountability and culpability for their actions, which
Addiction.\\
\\
Another, equally important reason,
is important, that since they work in and around human society far more than many other supernatural beings in the Dresdenverse. Hiring a gunman to shoot your rival can be easily traced back to you. Subtly goading another rival into a conflict with the first so ''he'' hires the gunman insulates you from the consequences far better. White Court culture has grown up around this principle, with the most respected actions being those that "everyone knows" you were responsible for, but nobody can connect you to with any sort of actual evidence.
*** Part of the reason for
evidence. They also apply this behavior is that, although White Court vampires have SuperStrength, SuperSpeed, a HealingFactor, MoreThanMindControl capabilities, and so on and so forth, they are still considered lightweights in the to supernatural community. They can be dangerous in a fight, but are physically outclassed by many, many other creatures. So, they turn to ThePlan to avoid any actual confrontation.
** Further, it should be said some of them have no qualms admitting a human or wizard is a WorthyOpponent if they can successfully manipulate a White Court Noble into doing what they want. ([[spoiler:See Harry and Lara's interaction at the end of ''Literature/WhiteNight'']].)
being stronger than themselves.
26th Sep '16 6:33:18 AM LentilSandEater
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* from ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'':

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* from ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'':
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ComplexityAddiction