History Main / ComplexityAddiction

2nd Apr '17 12:14:53 AM apai
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** During the Invasion of Konoha arc, Orochimaru has managed to place a kunai to Sarutobi's neck, but rather than kill him right then to win, he chooses to back off, makes a long-winded speech about what it feels to fight against a teacher, and then summons the souls of the previous Hokages (who were Sarutobi's teachers) so that Sarutobi can experience what he just talked about.
24th Mar '17 11:11:53 AM AthenaBlue
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* On ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', there is a sketch in which a group of gangsters plan complex intricate schemes to do perfectly legal and mundane tasks such as buying a watch from a store and withdrawing money from a bank. Only one of them questions why they are putting so much effort into doing legal acts.
* Happens on almost every episode of ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' as the super-scientists go through complex ideas to solve a major problem. It's non-scientist Carter who comes up with the solution so obvious and simple, it never occurs to the geniuses.

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* On ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'':
** Victoria Hand in "[[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS1E7TheHub The Hub]]". She sends Ward and Fitz on a mission to disarm a weapon that has fallen into terrorist hands, with the promise that they will be extracted afterward before S.H.I.E.L.D.'s takeover of the facility. In truth, however,
there is a sketch in no extraction plan and Ward and Fitz are likely going to their deaths. When Coulson confronts her about this, she merely states that they couldn't spare the resources. In the end, Coulson decides to go against her orders and take the rest of his team to rescue Ward and Fitz. Hand then reveals that she intended for him to do this all along... which a group begs the question of gangsters why she didn't just order Coulson to extract Ward and Fitz in the first place, since that's apparently what she wanted and (at least as far as the viewers are aware) it's not like Coulson and the others were really doing anything at the hub to begin with. Heads into GambitRoulette territory when you consider that Coulson wouldn't have even found out there was no extraction plan complex intricate schemes to do perfectly legal if Simmons and mundane tasks such as buying Skye hadn't also violated their orders and hacked into Hand's classified mission plans.
** In the later episode "[[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS1E7TheHub The Hub]]", Hand reveals that she's been evaluating Coulson to determine whether he CameBackWrong, so the events of "The Hub" might have been
a watch SecretTestOfCharacter (though still an overly-complex one).
* Everyone in ''Series/AlloAllo'' has this, with every plan
from a store Michelle or the Commandant having at least three steps too many. Stand out has to go to Herr Flick's plans though, at least Michelle and withdrawing money from a bank. Only one of them questions why the Commandant are usually ''trying'' to be discreet seeing as how they are putting so much effort into doing legal acts.
breaking the law. Herr Flick just likes to plot things.
* Happens on almost every In ''Series/{{Angel}}'' Jasmine's plan while possessing Cordelia gives the impression of being massively over-complicated. Apparently, she felt the need to unleash the Beast, make Connor think he was responsible for the apocalypse, have sex with him, blot out the sun, bring back Angelus, release him to generate even more chaos and possibly kill the Beast, which serves her, then give birth. Alternatively, she could have had sex with Connor, told Angel, "I need some time to think", and left the city for a [[ExpressDelivery month or two]].
** One possible justification for this is that actually ''required'' the deaths the Beast caused to bring her forth, and that Jasmine lacked full control in the early days. This would also explain why "Cordelia" had a nightmare (which the audience saw her having inside her own head) about a monstrous unknown demon--that ''works for her'' and she told to show up.
* In one
episode of ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' as ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'', Sheldon develops a game of three-person chess, then starts adding new pieces, new abilities... it quickly [[{{Calvinball}} spirals out of control]]. Naturally, the super-scientists go through complex ideas gang loves it.
-->'''Leonard:''' When is my pawn allowed
to solve a major problem. It's non-scientist Carter who comes up with use the solution so obvious golf cart?\\
'''Sheldon:''' When it's done charging. Or you land on the time machine... obviously.\\
'''Leonard:''' Oh...oh! Beekeeper to king twelve, I capture pope
and simple, it never occurs to release the geniuses. swarm. Checkmate on Sheldon!



* Series/TheInvisibleMan: Arnaud is addicted to devising complex schemes for getting the invisibility gland out of Darien. In one episode Darien actually asks Arnaud why he hasn't just shot him or cut the gland out?
* Many of the killers on ''Series/{{Monk}}'' and ''Series/{{Psych}}'' fit this trope. Many come up with very elaborate schemes to kill the people they want dead. And although the end result is a mystery that leaves many of the cops stumped and the main detectives boggled for a few minutes, there were too many places for something to go wrong, which will ultimately lead to the clue that indicts them.
** [[Series/{{Psych}} Shawn]] even lampshades this:
--->"First, you tried to make him fail a drug test, then you tried to trade him off to other teams, and when those didn't work you tried to kill him...I guess just injuring him would have been, what, too Tonya Harding-ish for you?"
** "Mr. Monk and the Sleeping Suspect" is one particular case: Brian Babbage successfully kills his sister Amanda while he himself is in a coma that he's been in for several months. How did he do it? With a bomb that was stuck to the bottom of the inside of a mailbox with a special type of glue that would hold out for a few months, meaning it would be delivered on a time release, after which it would go off when it finally got into the deliveree's hands. The possibility of it being delivered to the wrong address, of the victim moving, or of the bomb detonating too early or not at all don't seem to occur to Brian.

to:

* Series/TheInvisibleMan: Arnaud is addicted to devising complex schemes for getting the invisibility gland out of Darien. In one episode Darien actually asks Arnaud why he hasn't just shot him or cut the gland out?
* Many of the killers on ''Series/{{Monk}}'' and ''Series/{{Psych}}'' fit
Presenter Creator/TimShaw has this trope. Many come up in his ''Series/CarSOS'' show during the segment he returns restored cars back to their owners. He always goes for the most convoluted scheme, complete with very elaborate schemes to kill the people they want dead. And although the end result is a mystery that leaves many of the cops stumped cheesy disguises and the main detectives boggled for a few minutes, there were too many places for something to go wrong, which will ultimately lead to the clue that indicts them.
** [[Series/{{Psych}} Shawn]]
fake personae, possible; once even including a full pipe band in order to disguise a car's unique engine note. His co-presenter Creator/FuzzTownshend lampshades this:
--->"First, you tried to make him fail a drug test, then you tried to trade him off to other teams, and when those didn't work you tried to kill him...I guess
it as Tim just injuring him would have been, what, too Tonya Harding-ish for you?"
** "Mr. Monk
liking to dress up and the Sleeping Suspect" is one particular case: Brian Babbage successfully kills his sister Amanda while he himself is in a coma that he's been in for several months. How did he do it? With a bomb that was stuck to the bottom being frustrated {{Pantomime}} dame.
* Some
of the inside [=UnSubs=] of a mailbox with a special type of glue ''Series/CriminalMinds'' are pathologically stylish. The one that would hold out for a few months, meaning it comes to mind first would be delivered the Fisher King, who, for some reason, decided to send the protagonists on a time release, after which it would go off when it finally got into Myth/KingArthur-themed scavenger hunt to catch him and save his victim, [[spoiler:who was also his daughter]].
* One episode of ''Series/CSICyber'' involved a man who wanted to murder
the deliveree's hands. witnesses whose evidence had put his father in prison. The possibility of it being delivered obvious solution was, or course, to the wrong address, become one of the victim moving, or most skilled players of an online first person shooter, use his hacking skills to remove inventory items from accounts of some of the bomb detonating too early or not at other top players (who had to be adolescents living in the same city), befriend these players by gifting them replacement gear (hacked from yet more players), spend hours a day playing with them to gain their trust and then use them to unwittingly courier disguised firearms that he had ordered from the deep web and hide them in appropriate locations so that he could later retrieve the guns in order to shoot his targets. The point of all don't seem this was apparently so that the firearms would be untraceable but that is hardly the only challenging aspect of planning a murder and given the insane complexity of the plan it is difficult to occur believe that he couldn't have got hold of the illegal guns some other way (plus of course the cyber team are able to Brian.track him down anyway).
* ''Series/DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency'': Dirk and Todd complain that Dirk's employer designed a needlessly complicated and dangerous verification system of death traps to give them the clues they need.



** The Master, from both the Roger Delgado incarnation and (especially) the Anthony Ainley incarnation. As the Rani once stated, "he'd get dizzy if he tried to walk in a straight line!" This an intentional character flaw; Creator/TerranceDicks says the joke with the Master is that he's 'the man so intelligent that he can't see the simple things staring him in the face'.
** Styggron in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E4TheAndroidInvasion The Android Invasion]]" might have actually conquered Earth had he just sprayed the planet with the impossibly deadly poison that would certainly have killed every human on Earth, rather than spend so much of his time dicking around with robot doubles, {{Gaslighting}} spacemen, and building hyper-realistic training simulations where the pubs are kept fully stocked up with ale but every day on the calendar reads the same date.
** It's a commonly pointed-out plot hole in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius]]" that Solon's plan to give BrainInAJar Morbius a new body is far more complicated than it needs to be. Much of the plot is driven by his intention to cut off the Doctor's "magnificent" head and use it as the final piece of the FrankensteinsMonster body that he built for Morbius to live in. It would have been a lot more straightforward just to [[BrainTransplant put Morbius into the Doctor's body]]--or even Condo's. This was mostly a holdover from earlier drafts of the script in which Condo was absent and Solon was a robot stitching together bodies from downed spaceships with no understanding of how they looked together and the PlotHole was big enough that Creator/TerranceDicks wanted his name taken off the script. The production subtitles on the DVD suggest that, as someone who already spent a lot of time on the mishmash body, Solon may be experiencing "the same logic blind spot that engulfs someone when they are trying to assemble a flatpack wardrobe in that they would rather spend time and effort hammering in new bits, cutting off useless parts and searching for non-existent screws so that they can actually get the darn thing installed than start afresh with something far more suitable for the purpose intended".
** The Doctor himself occasionally falls prey to the disease. More than one Companion has had to point him in the direction of the simple approach when he's started going a little too tangential in his solutions than is tolerable (or safe...or sane).
** The Silence's plan to kill the Doctor seemed needlessly complicated. Apparently they were controlling humanity and manipulating the space race to get a space suit which their assassin would be in while killing the Doctor. This despite the fact that they are capable of time travel and seem to have a base in the 52nd century.
* In ''Series/{{Angel}}'' Jasmine's plan while possessing Cordelia gives the impression of being massively over-complicated. Apparently, she felt the need to unleash the Beast, make Connor think he was responsible for the apocalypse, have sex with him, blot out the sun, bring back Angelus, release him to generate even more chaos and possibly kill the Beast, which serves her, then give birth. Alternatively, she could have had sex with Connor, told Angel, "I need some time to think", and left the city for a [[ExpressDelivery month or two]].
** One possible justification for this is that actually ''required'' the deaths the Beast caused to bring her forth, and that Jasmine lacked full control in the early days. This would also explain why "Cordelia" had a nightmare (which the audience saw her having inside her own head) about a monstrous unknown demon--that ''works for her'' and she told to show up.
* This is Nate Ford's shtick in ''Series/{{Leverage}}''. Numerous characters have pointed out that he's addicted to running increasingly complex cons.
** Although unlike most of the other characters here, he is [[ManipulativeBastard sufficiently skilled]] that his plans usually work. This is helped by his [[BadassCrew extremely skilled associates]].
** In a season four episode, Hardison proves himself vulnerable to this, failing to complete a con because the marks began to suspect that the rigmarole was too extensive. Nate explains that he's able to be addicted to complexity because he begins from Plan G, the "ugly plan" that'll probably end up working even when everything else doesn't and that the other Plans help advancing.

to:

** The Master, from both the Roger Delgado incarnation and (especially) the Anthony Ainley incarnation. As the Rani once stated, "he'd get dizzy if he tried to walk in a straight line!" This is an intentional character flaw; Creator/TerranceDicks says the joke with the Master is that he's 'the "the man so intelligent that he can't see the simple things staring him in the face'.
face".
** Styggron in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E4TheAndroidInvasion The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E4TheAndroidInvasion "The Android Invasion]]" Invasion"]] might have actually conquered Earth had he just sprayed the planet with the impossibly deadly poison that would certainly have killed every human on Earth, rather than spend so much of his time dicking around with robot doubles, {{Gaslighting}} spacemen, and building hyper-realistic training simulations where the pubs are kept fully stocked up with ale but every day on the calendar reads the same date.
** It's a commonly pointed-out plot hole in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius "The Brain of Morbius]]" Morbius"]] that Solon's plan to give BrainInAJar Morbius a new body is far more complicated than it needs to be. Much of the plot is driven by his intention to cut off the Doctor's "magnificent" head and use it as the final piece of the FrankensteinsMonster body that he built for Morbius to live in. It would have been a lot more straightforward just to [[BrainTransplant put Morbius into the Doctor's body]]--or body]] -- or even Condo's. This was mostly a holdover from earlier drafts of the script in which Condo was absent and Solon was a robot stitching together bodies from downed spaceships with no understanding of how they looked together and the PlotHole was big enough that Creator/TerranceDicks wanted his name taken off the script. The production subtitles on the DVD suggest that, as someone who already spent a lot of time on the mishmash body, Solon may be experiencing "the same logic blind spot that engulfs someone when they are trying to assemble a flatpack wardrobe in that they would rather spend time and effort hammering in new bits, cutting off useless parts and searching for non-existent screws so that they can actually get the darn thing installed than start afresh with something far more suitable for the purpose intended".
** The Doctor himself occasionally falls prey to the disease. More than one Companion has had to point him in the direction of the simple approach when he's started going a little too tangential in his solutions than is tolerable (or safe...safe . . . or sane).
** The Silence's plan to kill the Doctor seemed needlessly was extremely complicated. Apparently they were controlling humanity and manipulating the space race to get a space suit which their assassin would be in while killing the Doctor. This despite the fact that they are capable of time travel and seem to have a base in the 52nd century.
* In ''Series/{{Angel}}'' Jasmine's plan while possessing Cordelia gives
52[[superscript:nd]] century. However, there is a reason: they want the impression of being massively over-complicated. Apparently, she felt the Doctor's death to ''[[KilledOffForReal stick]]'', and so need to unleash the Beast, make Connor think he was responsible arrange for the apocalypse, have sex with him, blot out right place, to be able to make it a fixed point in time, and the sun, bring back Angelus, release him to generate even more chaos and possibly kill right assassin.
* Happens on almost every episode of ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' as
the Beast, which serves her, then give birth. Alternatively, she could have had sex with Connor, told Angel, "I need some time to think", and left the city for a [[ExpressDelivery month or two]].
** One possible justification for this is that actually ''required'' the deaths the Beast caused to bring her forth, and that Jasmine lacked full control in the early days. This would also explain why "Cordelia" had a nightmare (which the audience saw her having inside her own head) about a monstrous unknown demon--that ''works for her'' and she told to show up.
* This is Nate Ford's shtick in ''Series/{{Leverage}}''. Numerous characters have pointed out that he's addicted to running increasingly
super-scientists go through complex cons.
** Although unlike most of
ideas to solve a major problem. It's non-scientist Carter who comes up with the other characters here, he is [[ManipulativeBastard sufficiently skilled]] that his plans usually work. This is helped by his [[BadassCrew extremely skilled associates]].
** In a season four episode, Hardison proves himself vulnerable
solution so obvious and simple, it never occurs to this, failing to complete a con because the marks began to suspect that the rigmarole was too extensive. Nate explains that he's able to be addicted to complexity because he begins from Plan G, the "ugly plan" that'll probably end up working even when everything else doesn't and that the other Plans help advancing.geniuses.



* A minor plot point in the season 2 finale of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'': [[spoiler:In an aversion of HollywoodHacking, Sherlock is so convinced that Moriarty actually made a program that can hack into anything that he never once considers the possibility that Moriarty simply bribed the right people to open the right doors and set off the right alarms at the proper times to make it look like he had developed such a program]]. Moriarty is legitimately disappointed in Holmes for not figuring this out, and calls him out on it.
-->'''Moriarty:''' That's your problem: you always want everything to be clever.
** In Series 3, [[spoiler:Sherlock claims that this in turn was all part of an elaborate BatmanGambit cooked up by him and Mycroft to bring down Moriarty and his organization. [[MindScrew If that was really Sherlock]]]].

to:

* A minor plot point in ''Series/TheInvisibleMan'': Arnaud is addicted to devising complex schemes for getting the season 2 finale invisibility gland out of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'': [[spoiler:In an aversion of HollywoodHacking, Sherlock is so convinced that Moriarty Darien. In one episode Darien actually made a program asks Arnaud why he hasn't just shot him or cut the gland out?
* This is Nate Ford's shtick in ''Series/{{Leverage}}''. Numerous characters have pointed out
that can hack into anything he's addicted to running increasingly complex cons.
** Although unlike most of the other characters here, he is [[ManipulativeBastard sufficiently skilled]]
that he never once considers his plans usually work. This is helped by his [[BadassCrew extremely skilled associates]].
** In a season four episode, Hardison proves himself vulnerable to this, failing to complete a con because
the possibility marks began to suspect that Moriarty simply bribed the right people rigmarole was too extensive. Nate explains that he's able to open be addicted to complexity because he begins from Plan G, the right doors and set off the right alarms at the proper times to make it look like he had developed such a program]]. Moriarty is legitimately disappointed in Holmes for not figuring this out, and calls him out on it.
-->'''Moriarty:''' That's your problem: you always want
"ugly plan" that'll probably end up working even when everything to be clever.
** In Series 3, [[spoiler:Sherlock claims
else doesn't and that this the other Plans help advancing.
* ''Series/MacGyver'': Karl, the bad guy
in turn was all part of an "Deadly Silents", seems to suffer from this; concocting several elaborate BatmanGambit cooked up by him death traps to kill Mac and Mycroft to bring down Moriarty and Pinky, even as his organization. [[MindScrew If that was really Sherlock]]]].partner keeps urging WhyDontYouJustShootHim.



* Some of the [=UnSubs=] of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' are pathologically stylish. The one that comes to mind first would be the Fisher King, who, for some reason, decided to send the protagonists on a Myth/KingArthur-themed scavenger hunt to catch him and save his victim, [[spoiler:who was also his daughter]].

to:

* Some Many of the [=UnSubs=] of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' are pathologically stylish. The one killers on ''Series/{{Monk}}'' and ''Series/{{Psych}}'' fit this trope. Many come up with very elaborate schemes to kill the people they want dead. And although the end result is a mystery that comes leaves many of the cops stumped and the main detectives boggled for a few minutes, there were too many places for something to mind first go wrong, which will ultimately lead to the clue that indicts them.
** [[Series/{{Psych}} Shawn]] even lampshades this:
--->"First, you tried to make him fail a drug test, then you tried to trade him off to other teams, and when those didn't work you tried to kill him...I guess just injuring him would have been, what, too Tonya Harding-ish for you?"
** "Mr. Monk and the Sleeping Suspect" is one particular case: Brian Babbage successfully kills his sister Amanda while he himself is in a coma that he's been in for several months. How did he do it? With a bomb that was stuck to the bottom of the inside of a mailbox with a special type of glue that would hold out for a few months, meaning it
would be the Fisher King, who, for some reason, decided to send the protagonists delivered on a Myth/KingArthur-themed scavenger hunt time release, after which it would go off when it finally got into the deliveree's hands. The possibility of it being delivered to catch the wrong address, of the victim moving, or of the bomb detonating too early or not at all don't seem to occur to Brian.
* On ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', there is a sketch in which a group of gangsters plan complex intricate schemes to do perfectly legal and mundane tasks such as buying a watch from a store and withdrawing money from a bank. Only one of them questions why they are putting so much effort into doing legal acts.
* On ''Series/NewGirl'' Schmitt and Ceecee are helping Winston with what they think is a proposal to their girlfriend. They're surprised when he doesn't as Winston explains he has a "28-point plan" for the proposal.
** Winston enlists Jess' help cutting the list down and she starts tossing out items like erotic skywriting, the Los Angeles Children's Choir and a bobcat costume.
* During a stint of unemployment, Ben of ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' invents a game called "Cones of Dunshire", but when he attempts to explain the rules to Leslie, he realizes that it is far too complicated and fears that ItWillNeverCatchOn. The game's complexity is exactly what endears it to the employees of an accounting firm that offers him a job.
* SOP for pretty much every ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' villain. They almost invariably utterly outclass all of the Rangers put together, and could easily wipe them out on Day 1, but choose to go through a whole process of summoning a monster, sending it out, waiting for the Rangers to beat it, making it grow, then complain about not being able to beat those pesky Rangers. Repeat as necessary.
* A minor plot point in the season 2 finale of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'': [[spoiler:In an aversion of HollywoodHacking, Sherlock is so convinced that Moriarty actually made a program that can hack into anything that he never once considers the possibility that Moriarty simply bribed the right people to open the right doors and set off the right alarms at the proper times to make it look like he had developed such a program]]. Moriarty is legitimately disappointed in Holmes for not figuring this out, and calls him out on it.
-->'''Moriarty:''' That's your problem: you always want everything to be clever.
** In Series 3, [[spoiler:Sherlock claims that this in turn was all part of an elaborate BatmanGambit cooked up by
him and save Mycroft to bring down Moriarty and his victim, [[spoiler:who organization. [[MindScrew If that was also his daughter]].really Sherlock]]]].



* Everyone in ''Series/AlloAllo'' has this, with every plan from Michelle or the Commandant having at least three steps too many. Stand out has to go to Herr Flick's plans though, at least Michelle and the Commandant are usually ''trying'' to be discreet seeing as how they are breaking the law. Herr Flick just likes to plot things.
* ''Series/MacGyver'': Karl, the bad guy in "Deadly Silents", seems to suffer from this; concocting several elaborate death traps to kill Mac and Pinky, even as his partner keeps urging WhyDontYouJustShootHim.
* In one episode of ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'', Sheldon develops a game of three-person chess, then starts adding new pieces, new abilities... it quickly [[{{Calvinball}} spirals out of control]]. Naturally, the gang loves it.
-->'''Leonard:''' When is my pawn allowed to use the golf cart?\\
'''Sheldon:''' When it's done charging. Or you land on the time machine... obviously.\\
'''Leonard:''' Oh...oh! Beekeeper to king twelve, I capture pope and release the swarm. Checkmate on Sheldon!
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'':
** Victoria Hand in "[[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS1E7TheHub The Hub]]". She sends Ward and Fitz on a mission to disarm a weapon that has fallen into terrorist hands, with the promise that they will be extracted afterward before S.H.I.E.L.D.'s takeover of the facility. In truth, however, there is no extraction plan and Ward and Fitz are likely going to their deaths. When Coulson confronts her about this, she merely states that they couldn't spare the resources. In the end, Coulson decides to go against her orders and take the rest of his team to rescue Ward and Fitz. Hand then reveals that she intended for him to do this all along... which begs the question of why she didn't just order Coulson to extract Ward and Fitz in the first place, since that's apparently what she wanted and (at least as far as the viewers are aware) it's not like Coulson and the others were really doing anything at the hub to begin with. Heads into GambitRoulette territory when you consider that Coulson wouldn't have even found out there was no extraction plan if Simmons and Skye hadn't also violated their orders and hacked into Hand's classified mission plans.
** In the later episode "[[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS1E7TheHub The Hub]]", Hand reveals that she's been evaluating Coulson to determine whether he CameBackWrong, so the events of "The Hub" might have been a SecretTestOfCharacter (though still an overly-complex one).
* During a stint of unemployment, Ben of ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' invents a game called "Cones of Dunshire", but when he attempts to explain the rules to Leslie, he realizes that it is far too complicated and fears that ItWillNeverCatchOn. The game's complexity is exactly what endears it to the employees of an accounting firm that offers him a job.
* SOP for pretty much every ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' villain. They almost invariably utterly outclass all of the Rangers put together, and could easily wipe them out on Day 1, but choose to go through a whole process of summoning a monster, sending it out, waiting for the Rangers to beat it, making it grow, then complain about not being able to beat those pesky Rangers. Repeat as necessary.
* Presenter Creator/TimShaw has this in his ''Series/CarSOS'' show during the segment he returns restored cars back to their owners. He always goes for the most convoluted scheme, complete with cheesy disguises and fake personae, possible; once even including a full pipe band in order to disguise a car's unique engine note. His co-presenter Creator/FuzzTownshend lampshades it as Tim just liking to dress up and being frustrated {{Pantomime}} dame.
* One episode of ''Series/CSICyber'' involved a man who wanted to murder the witnesses whose evidence had put his father in prison. The obvious solution was, or course, to become one of the most skilled players of an online first person shooter, use his hacking skills to remove inventory items from accounts of some of the other top players (who had to be adolescents living in the same city), befriend these players by gifting them replacement gear (hacked from yet more players), spend hours a day playing with them to gain their trust and then use them to unwittingly courier disguised firearms that he had ordered from the deep web and hide them in appropriate locations so that he could later retrieve the guns in order to shoot his targets. The point of all this was apparently so that the firearms would be untraceable but that is hardly the only challenging aspect of planning a murder and given the insane complexity of the plan it is difficult to believe that he couldn't have got hold of the illegal guns some other way (plus of course the cyber team are able to track him down anyway).



* ''Series/DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency'': Dirk and Todd complain that Dirk's employer designed a needlessly complicated and dangerous verification system of death traps to give them the clues they need.
* On ''Series/NewGirl'' Schmitt and Ceecee are helping Winston with what they think is a proposal to their girlfriend. They're surprised when he doesn't as Winston explains he has a "28-point plan" for the proposal.
** Winston enlists Jess' help cutting the list down and she starts tossing out items like erotic skywriting, the Los Angeles Children's Choir and a bobcat costume.


Added DiffLines:

12th Mar '17 11:19:16 AM CumbersomeTercel
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** The Master, from both the Roger Delgado incarnation and (especially) the Anthony Ainley incarnation. As the Rani once stated, "he'd get dizzy if he tried to walk in a straight line!" This an intentional character flaw; Terrance Dicks says the joke with the Master is that he's 'the man so intelligent that he can't see the simple things staring him in the face'.
** Styggron in "The Android Invasion" might have actually conquered Earth had he just sprayed the planet with the impossibly deadly poison that would certainly have killed every human on Earth, rather than spend so much of his time dicking around with robot doubles, {{Gaslighting}} spacemen, and building hyper-realistic training simulations where the pubs are kept fully stocked up with ale but every day on the calendar reads the same date.
** It's a commonly pointed-out plot hole in "The Brain of Morbius" that Solon's plan to give BrainInAJar Morbius a new body is far more complicated than it needs to be. Much of the plot is driven by his intention to cut off the Doctor's "magnificent" head and use it as the final piece of the FrankensteinsMonster body that he built for Morbius to live in. It would have been a lot more straightforward just to [[BrainTransplant put Morbius into the Doctor's body]]--or even Condo's. This was mostly a holdover from earlier drafts of the script in which Condo was absent and Solon was a robot stitching together bodies from downed spaceships with no understanding of how they looked together and the plot hole was big enough that Creator/TerranceDicks wanted his name taken off the script. The production subtitles on the DVD suggest that, as someone who already spent a lot of time on the mishmash body, Solon may be experiencing "the same logic blind spot that engulfs someone when they are trying to assemble a flatpack wardrobe in that they would rather spend time and effort hammering in new bits, cutting off useless parts and searching for non-existent screws so that they can actually get the darn thing installed than start afresh with something far more suitable for the purpose intended".

to:

** The Master, from both the Roger Delgado incarnation and (especially) the Anthony Ainley incarnation. As the Rani once stated, "he'd get dizzy if he tried to walk in a straight line!" This an intentional character flaw; Terrance Dicks Creator/TerranceDicks says the joke with the Master is that he's 'the man so intelligent that he can't see the simple things staring him in the face'.
** Styggron in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E4TheAndroidInvasion The Android Invasion" Invasion]]" might have actually conquered Earth had he just sprayed the planet with the impossibly deadly poison that would certainly have killed every human on Earth, rather than spend so much of his time dicking around with robot doubles, {{Gaslighting}} spacemen, and building hyper-realistic training simulations where the pubs are kept fully stocked up with ale but every day on the calendar reads the same date.
** It's a commonly pointed-out plot hole in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius" Morbius]]" that Solon's plan to give BrainInAJar Morbius a new body is far more complicated than it needs to be. Much of the plot is driven by his intention to cut off the Doctor's "magnificent" head and use it as the final piece of the FrankensteinsMonster body that he built for Morbius to live in. It would have been a lot more straightforward just to [[BrainTransplant put Morbius into the Doctor's body]]--or even Condo's. This was mostly a holdover from earlier drafts of the script in which Condo was absent and Solon was a robot stitching together bodies from downed spaceships with no understanding of how they looked together and the plot hole PlotHole was big enough that Creator/TerranceDicks wanted his name taken off the script. The production subtitles on the DVD suggest that, as someone who already spent a lot of time on the mishmash body, Solon may be experiencing "the same logic blind spot that engulfs someone when they are trying to assemble a flatpack wardrobe in that they would rather spend time and effort hammering in new bits, cutting off useless parts and searching for non-existent screws so that they can actually get the darn thing installed than start afresh with something far more suitable for the purpose intended".



** Victoria Hand in "The Hub". She sends Ward and Fitz on a mission to disarm a weapon that has fallen into terrorist hands, with the promise that they will be extracted afterward before S.H.I.E.L.D.'s takeover of the facility. In truth, however, there is no extraction plan and Ward and Fitz are likely going to their deaths. When Coulson confronts her about this, she merely states that they couldn't spare the resources. In the end, Coulson decides to go against her orders and take the rest of his team to rescue Ward and Fitz. Hand then reveals that she intended for him to do this all along... which begs the question of why she didn't just order Coulson to extract Ward and Fitz in the first place, since that's apparently what she wanted and (at least as far as the viewers are aware) it's not like Coulson and the others were really doing anything at the hub to begin with. Heads into GambitRoulette territory when you consider that Coulson wouldn't have even found out there was no extraction plan if Simmons and Skye hadn't also violated their orders and hacked into Hand's classified mission plans.
** In the later episode "Turn, Turn, Turn", Hand reveals that she's been evaluating Coulson to determine whether he CameBackWrong, so the events of "The Hub" might have been a SecretTestOfCharacter (though still an overly-complex one).

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** Victoria Hand in "The Hub"."[[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS1E7TheHub The Hub]]". She sends Ward and Fitz on a mission to disarm a weapon that has fallen into terrorist hands, with the promise that they will be extracted afterward before S.H.I.E.L.D.'s takeover of the facility. In truth, however, there is no extraction plan and Ward and Fitz are likely going to their deaths. When Coulson confronts her about this, she merely states that they couldn't spare the resources. In the end, Coulson decides to go against her orders and take the rest of his team to rescue Ward and Fitz. Hand then reveals that she intended for him to do this all along... which begs the question of why she didn't just order Coulson to extract Ward and Fitz in the first place, since that's apparently what she wanted and (at least as far as the viewers are aware) it's not like Coulson and the others were really doing anything at the hub to begin with. Heads into GambitRoulette territory when you consider that Coulson wouldn't have even found out there was no extraction plan if Simmons and Skye hadn't also violated their orders and hacked into Hand's classified mission plans.
** In the later episode "Turn, Turn, Turn", "[[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS1E7TheHub The Hub]]", Hand reveals that she's been evaluating Coulson to determine whether he CameBackWrong, so the events of "The Hub" might have been a SecretTestOfCharacter (though still an overly-complex one).
11th Mar '17 2:52:00 AM TheNerevarine
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* In ''ComicBook/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', the infamous "Supply Lines..." mission has Zero sends CJ to humiliate his rival Berkeley by assassinating his couriers using a miniature plane that is very hard to easily maneuver, quite fragile and overall impractical for task instead of a more conventional method like personally gunning them down, like what CJ has been doing for the entire game. In fact, Zero could very easily ask CJ to get rid of Berkeley, but he would rather prefer to prove his superior intellect instead.

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* In ''ComicBook/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', the infamous "Supply Lines..." mission has Zero sends send CJ to humiliate his rival Berkeley by assassinating his couriers using a miniature plane that is very hard to easily maneuver, quite fragile and overall impractical for the task instead of a more conventional method like personally gunning them down, like what CJ has been doing for the entire game. In fact, Zero could very easily ask CJ to get rid of Berkeley, but he would rather prefer to prove his superior intellect instead.
10th Mar '17 9:13:22 PM GoblinCipher
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10th Mar '17 9:10:22 PM GoblinCipher
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** Harley Quinn once even asked him outright, "WhyDontYouJustShootHim" (and may be the {{Trope Namer|s}} for the trope).

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** Harley Quinn once even asked him outright, "WhyDontYouJustShootHim" (and may be the {{Trope Namer|s}} for the trope)."WhyDontYouJustShootHim".
10th Mar '17 3:02:23 AM SebastianGray
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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Tzeentch, being essentially a god of {{Magnificent Bastard}}s, acts almost exclusively through {{Gambit Roulette}}s, even when a more straightforward solution might be possible. Many of his plans appear to be in direct conflict with each other, and it's been suggested that he doesn't actually ''have'' an ultimate goal. In fact, a popular fan theory is that Tzeentch has a LITERAL complexity addiction. If he ever wins, that is to say becomes the utterly dominant Chaos power and overruns reality, then there will be no more schemes for him to enact. Which will mean he ceases to exist at the very instant of his victory. That's why so many of his goals are in opposition to each other -- he cannot afford to ever actually win, but nor can he cease trying to. Mind you, he does seem to [[ForTheLulz enjoy it,]] as well...

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'', ''TabletopGame/WarhammerAgeOfSigmar'' and ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Tzeentch, being essentially a god of {{Magnificent Bastard}}s, acts almost exclusively through {{Gambit Roulette}}s, even when a more straightforward solution might be possible. Many of his plans appear to be in direct conflict with each other, and it's been suggested that he doesn't actually ''have'' an ultimate goal. In fact, a popular fan theory is that Tzeentch has a LITERAL complexity addiction. If he ever wins, that is to say becomes the utterly dominant Chaos power and overruns reality, then there will be no more schemes for him to enact. Which will mean he ceases to exist at the very instant of his victory. That's why so many of his goals are in opposition to each other -- he cannot afford to ever actually win, but nor can he cease trying to. Mind you, he does seem to [[ForTheLulz enjoy it,]] as well...
3rd Mar '17 2:34:53 PM TheNerevarine
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''ComicBook/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', the infamous "Supply Lines..." mission has Zero sends CJ to humiliate his rival Berkeley by assassinating his couriers using a miniature plane that is very hard to easily maneuver, quite fragile and overall impractical for task instead of a more conventional method like personally gunning them down, like what CJ has been doing for the entire game. In fact, Zero could very easily ask CJ to get rid of Berkeley, but he would rather prefer to prove his superior intellect instead.
28th Feb '17 1:09:22 AM flodoris
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* [[spoiler: Obito]] from ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' has a pretty bad case. He can become intangible at will, warp people into a pocket dimension, and can teleport himself (or others) wherever he likes, ''and has been capable of doing this for the past twenty years''. At no point before the start of Shippuden did he ever consider capturing not only Naruto but any of the other eight Jinchuuriki that are necessary for his plan. And even then, when he decides it's time, he sends in a bunch of far less capable subordinates or starts a ninja war rather than simply use his own powers to easily capture the Jinchuriki when they're asleep or off-guard. There is also the fact that he infiltrated his own organization by pretending to be a harmless fool for seemingly no reason [[ItAmusedMe except perhaps because he enjoyed doing so]].
** It's also implied and speculated by Kakashi that the reality is simply [[spoiler:Obito could never fully commit himself to the plan out of both regret for his actions in the face of his former idealism and the love he held for his old friends]], so he intentionally invoked this trope to try and break Naruto's spirit during the War [[spoiler:and thus prove to himself that his [Obito's] original path was wrong and everything he's doing now is justified]]. Needless to say, it [[NotAsPlanned backfired]].

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* [[spoiler: Obito]] from ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' has a pretty bad case. He can become intangible at will, warp people into a pocket dimension, and can teleport himself (or others) wherever he likes, ''and has been capable of doing this for the past twenty seventeen years''. At no point before the start of Shippuden did he ever consider capturing not only Naruto but any of the other eight Jinchuuriki that are necessary for his plan. And even then, when he decides it's time, he sends in a bunch of far less capable subordinates or starts a ninja war rather than simply use his own powers to easily capture the Jinchuriki Jinchuuriki when they're asleep or off-guard. There is also the fact that he infiltrated wants force Naruto and Sasuke fight to see which one of them is stronger. Keep in mind that the rivalry between them is a relatively recent thing, therefore definitely not a part of his own organization by pretending to be a harmless fool for seemingly no reason [[ItAmusedMe except perhaps because he enjoyed doing so]].
original plan.
** It's also implied and speculated by Kakashi that the reality is simply [[spoiler:Obito could never fully commit himself to the plan out of both regret for his actions in the face of his former idealism and the love he held for his old friends]], so he intentionally invoked this trope to try and break Naruto's spirit during the War [[spoiler:and thus prove to himself that his [Obito's] original path was wrong and everything he's doing now is justified]]. Needless to say, it [[NotAsPlanned backfired]].
26th Feb '17 4:19:59 AM Silverblade2
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** Justified for SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker, who creates these elaborate plots to see if they'll ever kill his nemesis, but they never work. He wants to kill his enemy with a '''bang''', not a simple gunshot (even though he ''has'' resorted to a gun before).

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** Justified for SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker, ComicBook/TheJoker, who creates these elaborate plots to see if they'll ever kill his nemesis, but they never work. He wants to kill his enemy with a '''bang''', not a simple gunshot (even though he ''has'' resorted to a gun before).



* SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom is notorious for this. To the extent that more often than not it seems as if any given scheme was carried out by somebody that was ActuallyADoombot and Doom himself almost appears to be in multiple places at the same time. Generally this does little to improve the overall results of his many conspiracies beyond giving the heroes (and sometimes other villains) a good workout.

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* SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom * Doctor Doom from ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' is notorious for this. To the extent that more often than not it seems as if any given scheme was carried out by somebody that was ActuallyADoombot and Doom himself almost appears to be in multiple places at the same time. Generally this does little to improve the overall results of his many conspiracies beyond giving the heroes (and sometimes other villains) a good workout.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ComplexityAddiction