History Main / ComplexityAddiction

21st Aug '16 3:30:51 PM DanaO
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* Chaos in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'' actually deliberately makes her plans unnecessarily complex and unreliable, largely because [[PrescienceIsPredictable the alternative is too boring for her]].

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* Chaos in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'' actually deliberately makes her plans unnecessarily complex and unreliable, largely because [[PrescienceIsPredictable the alternative is too boring for her]]. In fact, it's easy to argue the actual ''goal'' of her plans is to fail, and her nominal goals are chosen not so much because she wants to achieve them is to give the [[AchievementsInIgnorance greatest degree of freedom]] for the consequences of her plans failing.
17th Aug '16 6:04:03 PM flodoris
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** Tobi's one saving grace is that he's [[spoiler: following the directions of the real Madara.]] He doesn't really know how to plan, he's just doing the best that he can in the meantime. It's also implied and speculated by Kakashi that the reality is simply [[spoiler:Obito could never fully commit himself to the plan out of both regret for his actions in the face of his former idealism and the love he held for his old friends]], so he intentionally invoked this trope to try and break Naruto's spirit during the War [[spoiler:and thus prove to himself that his [Obito's] original path was wrong and everything he's doing now is justified]]. Needless to say, it [[NotAsPlanned backfired]].

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** Tobi's one saving grace is that he's [[spoiler: following the directions of the real Madara.]] He doesn't really know how to plan, he's just doing the best that he can in the meantime. It's also implied and speculated by Kakashi that the reality is simply [[spoiler:Obito could never fully commit himself to the plan out of both regret for his actions in the face of his former idealism and the love he held for his old friends]], so he intentionally invoked this trope to try and break Naruto's spirit during the War [[spoiler:and thus prove to himself that his [Obito's] original path was wrong and everything he's doing now is justified]]. Needless to say, it [[NotAsPlanned backfired]].
15th Aug '16 12:17:52 PM DracoKanji
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** Heroic example in ''[[Film/ThePhantomMenace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace]]'': Qui-Gon's ridiculously complicated plan to get the hyperdrive replacement needed to repair Amidala's ship from Watto. Watto is apparently the only vendor in Mos Espa who has the part they need, but he won't take Qui-Gon's Republic credits because they're worthless on Tatooine. So Qui-Gon hatches an elaborate plan involving tricking Watto into gambling the part in an upcoming Pod Race and then entering Watto's nine-year-old slave Anakin into the race and having him win it for him. Even though the movie makes it pretty clear Qui-Gon's Force powers meant he knew Anakin would win, you'd think there might have been and easier (and less dangerous) way. Like finding someone willing to exchange credits for a local currency, or trading their current ship for a less valuable but functional one. Or just book passage on a transport, or with a smuggler or something. Give them all the money he has now (a trader or a smuggler would have use for Republic credits, unlike a planet-bound merchant like Watto), and promise them a reward from the Jedi council when they arrive at Coruscant.[[note]]Funnily enough, this is pretty much exactly what his former student Obi-Wan does about two decades later to get off the same planet. And if it hadn't been for the Empire destroying Alderaan, it would have worked just fine.[[/note]]

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** Heroic example in ''[[Film/ThePhantomMenace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace]]'': Qui-Gon's ridiculously complicated plan to get the hyperdrive replacement needed to repair Amidala's ship from Watto. Watto is apparently the only vendor in Mos Espa who has the part they need, but he won't take Qui-Gon's Republic credits because they're worthless on Tatooine. So Qui-Gon hatches an elaborate plan involving tricking Watto into gambling the part in an upcoming Pod Race and then entering Watto's nine-year-old slave Anakin into the race and having him win it for him. Even though the movie makes it pretty clear Qui-Gon's Force powers meant he knew Anakin would win, you'd think there might have been and easier (and less dangerous) way. Like finding someone willing to exchange credits for a local currency, or trading their current ship for a less valuable but functional one. Or just book passage on a transport, or [[Film/ANewHope with a smuggler smuggler]] or something. Give them all the money he has now (a trader or a smuggler would have use for Republic credits, unlike a planet-bound merchant like Watto), and promise them a reward from the Jedi council when they arrive at Coruscant.[[note]]Funnily enough, this is pretty much exactly what his former student Obi-Wan does about two decades later to get off the same planet. And if it hadn't been for the Empire destroying Alderaan, it would have worked just fine.[[/note]]
9th Aug '16 4:57:19 AM Lithp
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** When she first used Resurrección, Harribel displayed the necessary speed and power necessary to get around Hitsugaya's defenses with her sword, and could have ended the fight at literally any point. Instead, she spent the entire rest of the fight playing tug of war with her [[MakingASplash water powers]] and his [[AnIcePerson ice powers]], evidently attempting to set up some sort of [[LimitBreak super attack]].

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** When she first used Resurrección, Harribel displayed the necessary speed and power necessary to get around Hitsugaya's defenses with her sword, and could have ended the fight at literally any point. Instead, she spent the entire rest of the fight playing tug of war with her [[MakingASplash water powers]] and his [[AnIcePerson ice powers]], evidently attempting to set up some sort of [[LimitBreak super attack]].attack]].
*** Somewhat justified in that she was one of the Espada who wasn't big on fighting, and attacked him in a moment of rage.


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*** Byakuya does sacrifice his arm when Zommari aims his power at the Captain's head, though Byakuya allows him to keep taking control of body parts and slicing the tendons for no apparent reason but being too arrogant to use Bankai until he's out of limbs.
8th Aug '16 12:59:13 PM Discar
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* Makes a cameo appearance, ''in actual drug form'', in ''Fanfic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality''. Called [[IdiotBall Bahl's Stupifecation]], it is a narcotic that has the side effect of bringing about idiotically complex and impractical plans in Dark Wizards with Slytherin tendencies. The example presented in the narration is [[TakeThat suspiciously similar]] to Voldemort's plan from ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire''.
** Lucius Malfoy warns his son to avoid plans that require more than two things to happen.

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* ''Fanfic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality'':
**
Makes a cameo appearance, ''in actual drug form'', in ''Fanfic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality''.form''. Called [[IdiotBall Bahl's Stupifecation]], it is a narcotic that has the side effect of bringing about idiotically complex and impractical plans in Dark Wizards with Slytherin tendencies. The example presented in the narration is [[TakeThat suspiciously similar]] to Voldemort's plan from ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire''.
** Lucius Malfoy warns his son to avoid plans that require any plan that requires more than two three things to happen.happen will never work; however, since only an idiot makes things as complicated as possible, the real limit is two.
** Voldemort seems to have a bad case of this, with many bizarre plots similar to the ones in canon. Harry has difficulty understanding how someone so stupid could be an actual threat. [[spoiler:This is because Voldemort was a ''game'' to Tom Riddle, just practice for the real villain he planned to play later]]. He tells Harry that while essential plans should be simple and perfect (eg; apparate in front of your target and hit them with the Killing Curse), nonessential plans can be as complicated as you want, since by definition they're not important. This has the side benefit of giving you a reputation for [[ObfuscatingStupidity succeeding through blind luck rather than skill]].
5th Aug '16 12:00:29 AM PaulA
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* This seems to be the generally accepted MO for the Yendi in novels set in ''Literature/{{Dragaera}}''. For example, in the novel ''Yendi'', the Sorceress in Green arranges for Vlad's rival Laris to try to take over Vlad's territory in an obviously clumsy manner so that Vlad is on his guard when Cawti and Norathar try to kill him so that Vlad's allies in House Dragon will kill Norathar in a way that dishonors them all so that the next Dragon Emperor or Empress will be a person inclined to make the Sorceress's friend Sethra the Younger [[TheDragon Dragon Warlord]]. In the event that the assassination fails (which it does), the deliberate clumsiness of the previous attacks causes Norathar to find out that Laris set her up so that Norathar will kill him in a manner that dishonors her, which would also take her out of the line of succession. This secondary plan also fails.

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* This seems to be the generally accepted MO for the Yendi (a cultural group whose [[PlanetOfHats hat]] is being scheming and secretive) in novels set in ''Literature/{{Dragaera}}''. For example, in the novel ''Yendi'', ''Literature/{{Yendi}}'', the Sorceress in Green arranges for Vlad's rival Laris to try to take over Vlad's territory in an obviously clumsy manner so that Vlad is on his guard when Cawti and Norathar try to kill him so that Vlad's allies in House Dragon will kill Norathar in a way that dishonors them all so that the next Dragon Emperor or Empress will be a person inclined to make the Sorceress's friend Sethra the Younger [[TheDragon Dragon Warlord]]. In the event that the assassination fails (which it does), the deliberate clumsiness of the previous attacks causes Norathar to find out that Laris set her up so that Norathar will kill him in a manner that dishonors her, which would also take her out of the line of succession. This secondary plan also fails.
29th Jul '16 7:35:39 AM Discar
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* ''Film/InsideMan'': One of the running plotlines is the police trying to find out what the bank robbers want, since their plan is so confusing and convoluted that it's impossible to tell. This turns out to be the point; [[spoiler:by confusing everyone, they were able to slip out among the hostages after stealing something that wasn't supposed to exist]]. That being said, they still overcomplicated things a bit. They wanted to make money and [[spoiler:expose a war criminal who collaborated with the Nazis]]. They could have done either one easily, but doing both at the same time required the complex plan.
-->'''Russel:''' I'm no saint. I did it for the money. But what's the point of having money if you can't look yourself in the mirror?
9th Jul '16 1:29:28 PM StFan
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[[folder:Comics]]

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[[folder:Comics]][[folder:Comic Books]]



-->'''Jason''': Look at him! He's huge! He's strong! He's sitting on a pile of skulls! How are you not supposed to fight him?
-->'''Paige''': What is your IQ again?

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-->'''Jason''': -->'''Jason:''' Look at him! He's huge! He's strong! He's sitting on a pile of skulls! How are you not supposed to fight him?
-->'''Paige''':
him?\\
'''Paige:'''
What is your IQ again?



* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'': Tzeentch, being essentially a god of {{Magnificent Bastard}}s, acts almost exclusively through {{Gambit Roulette}}s, even when a more straightforward solution might be possible. Many of his plans appear to be in direct conflict with each other, and it's been suggested that he doesn't actually ''have'' an ultimate goal.
** In fact, a popular fan theory is that Tzeentch has a LITERAL complexity addiction. If he ever wins, that is to say becomes the utterly dominant Chaos power and overruns reality, then there will be no more schemes for him to enact. Which will mean he ceases to exist at the very instant of his victory. That's why so many of his goals are in opposition to each other--he cannot afford to ever actually win, but nor can he cease trying to.
*** Mind you, he does seem to [[ForTheLulz enjoy it,]] as well...

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'': ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Tzeentch, being essentially a god of {{Magnificent Bastard}}s, acts almost exclusively through {{Gambit Roulette}}s, even when a more straightforward solution might be possible. Many of his plans appear to be in direct conflict with each other, and it's been suggested that he doesn't actually ''have'' an ultimate goal.
**
goal. In fact, a popular fan theory is that Tzeentch has a LITERAL complexity addiction. If he ever wins, that is to say becomes the utterly dominant Chaos power and overruns reality, then there will be no more schemes for him to enact. Which will mean he ceases to exist at the very instant of his victory. That's why so many of his goals are in opposition to each other--he other -- he cannot afford to ever actually win, but nor can he cease trying to.
***
to. Mind you, he does seem to [[ForTheLulz enjoy it,]] as well...



* Tinker gnomes in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'''s ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' and ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' settings have this. It's most obvious in the {{Rube Goldberg Device}}s they're (in)famous for, but they're perfectly capable of falling in love with just about any "brilliant" idea or scheme at a moment's notice as well. (Some examples of their [[TryToFitThatOnABusinessCard naming conventions]] would seem to indicate that their brains may indeed run a mile a minute--they'd have to just to cope with all the information they try to put ''into'' a "proper" name--they just do so without bothering to stop for common sense along the way.)

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* Tinker gnomes in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'''s ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' and ''TabletopGame/{{Spelljammer}}'' settings have this. It's most obvious in the {{Rube Goldberg Device}}s they're (in)famous for, but they're perfectly capable of falling in love with just about any "brilliant" idea or scheme at a moment's notice as well. (Some examples of their [[TryToFitThatOnABusinessCard naming conventions]] would seem to indicate that their brains may indeed run a mile a minute--they'd minute -- they'd have to just to cope with all the information they try to put ''into'' a "proper" name--they name -- they just do so without bothering to stop for common sense along the way.)



* In ''Webcomic/TalesOfTheQuestor'', the Fae, at least the Unseleighe Fae, trend toward this. Princeling Dolan had an ongoing political scheme that involved the Racconans, the Duke, the Wild Hunt, a minor plague, an unpayable debt and the daughters of a rival Fae Princeling and had been unfolding for over a century. As Sam put it, "(The Unseleighe Fae) think like a corkscrew."

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* In ''Webcomic/TalesOfTheQuestor'', the ''Webcomic/TalesOfTheQuestor'':
** The
Fae, at least the Unseleighe Fae, trend toward this. Princeling Dolan had an ongoing political scheme that involved the Racconans, the Duke, the Wild Hunt, a minor plague, an unpayable debt and the daughters of a rival Fae Princeling and had been unfolding for over a century. As Sam put it, "(The Unseleighe Fae) think like a corkscrew."



* The fae of ''{{Webcomic/Roommates}}'' are no better. For example a simple installment of the custody battle between the Erlkönig and his ex Jadis involved BloodMagic, {{Shadow Archetype}}s, a magical mercenary doppelgänger, a cursed ring, an elaborate DreamWithinADream LotusEaterMachine, wrapped in several layers of symbolism, including planting ideas hundreds of years before, etc.... they both have a terminal case. (They are also incredibly [[LargeHam hammy]] and have the power to intentionally invoke several "Rule Of..." tropes.)
** Speaking of the Erlkönig. He is one of the few, who bother with human disguises. But it has really obvious flaws[[note]]still having slightly pointed ears, a shadow that shows his true form, using "Figlio Perduto" as ringtone, going with the alias Lord ''Er''ro''l'' ''King'', etc.[[/note]] which either means he is leaving clues so this trope, or the proof that he is [[GlamourFailure really]] [[MostDefinitelyNotAVillain bad at disguises]].

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* The fae of ''{{Webcomic/Roommates}}'' ''Webcomic/{{Roommates}}'' are no better. For example a simple installment of the custody battle between the Erlkönig and his ex Jadis involved BloodMagic, {{Shadow Archetype}}s, a magical mercenary doppelgänger, a cursed ring, an elaborate DreamWithinADream LotusEaterMachine, wrapped in several layers of symbolism, including planting ideas hundreds of years before, etc.... they both have a terminal case. (They are also incredibly [[LargeHam hammy]] and have the power to intentionally invoke several "Rule Of..." tropes.)
**
) Speaking of the Erlkönig. He is one of the few, who bother with human disguises. But it has really obvious flaws[[note]]still having slightly pointed ears, a shadow that shows his true form, using "Figlio Perduto" as ringtone, going with the alias Lord ''Er''ro''l'' ''King'', etc.[[/note]] which either means he is leaving clues so this trope, or the proof that he is [[GlamourFailure really]] [[MostDefinitelyNotAVillain bad at disguises]].



* ''{{Webcomic/xkcd}}'' brings in someone with one of these for "[[http://xkcd.com/1172/ Workflow]]". Configuring your system to interpret "hold spacebar" as "control" is reasonable. Making this configuration depend on a bug that overheats your computer is, in the admin's own words, horrifying.

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* ''{{Webcomic/xkcd}}'' ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' brings in someone with one of these for "[[http://xkcd.com/1172/ Workflow]]". Configuring your system to interpret "hold spacebar" as "control" is reasonable. Making this configuration depend on a bug that overheats your computer is, in the admin's own words, horrifying.



-->"What? Maroon Jackdaw was being completely unreasonable!"

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-->"What? -->'''Asstronomous:''' What? Maroon Jackdaw was being completely unreasonable!"unreasonable!



* Gavin Free of WebVideo/AchievementHunter has this problem sometimes, going for grandiose or flashy gimmicks when it would be better to do something simple. This is most evident in the group's various Let's Plays of the ''VideoGame/{{Worms}}'' series, where a well-known running gag is him using the grappling hook or jetpack to drop bombs on people which more often than not causes the death of his own worm instead when he panics and lets go at the wrong time. A more recent example would be in one of their Let's Plays of the Terrorist Hunt mode of ''VideoGame/RainbowSixVegas'', where he continually uses breach charges on doors just because it's cool instead of just opening them. The last time this happens he ends up ''killing a teammate.''
* There's a VideoGame/TraumaCenter sketch from SanityNotIncluded, involving two doctors who are treating a patient with a cold. One comes up with a ridiculous plan to shrink down her partner and inject him into the patient's bloodstream so he can destroy the virus from within. The male doctor simply suggests they just give the patient some cough syrup, prompting the female doctor to ask if he's high.

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* Gavin Free of WebVideo/AchievementHunter ''WebVideo/AchievementHunter'' has this problem sometimes, going for grandiose or flashy gimmicks when it would be better to do something simple. This is most evident in the group's various Let's Plays of the ''VideoGame/{{Worms}}'' series, where a well-known running gag is him using the grappling hook or jetpack to drop bombs on people which more often than not causes the death of his own worm instead when he panics and lets go at the wrong time. A more recent example would be in one of their Let's Plays of the Terrorist Hunt mode of ''VideoGame/RainbowSixVegas'', where he continually uses breach charges on doors just because it's cool instead of just opening them. The last time this happens he ends up ''killing a teammate.''
* There's a VideoGame/TraumaCenter sketch from SanityNotIncluded, involving two doctors who are treating a patient with a cold. One comes up with a ridiculous plan to shrink down her partner and inject him into the patient's bloodstream so he can destroy the virus from within. The male doctor simply suggests they just give the patient some cough syrup, prompting the female doctor to ask if he's high.
''



* A running gag in ''WesternAnimation/LesShadoks'' are the title characters' ridiculous and nonsensical so-called "proverbs". Among one of the most popular is: "Pourquoi faire simple quand on peut faire compliqué ?", which is a parody of the French counterpart to "Why make it complicated when it can be easy?" Guess what it means? "Why make it easy when it can be complicated?"!

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* A running gag in ''WesternAnimation/LesShadoks'' are is the title characters' ridiculous and nonsensical so-called "proverbs". Among one of the most popular is: "Pourquoi faire simple quand on peut faire compliqué ?", which is a parody of the French counterpart to "Why make it complicated when it can be easy?" Guess what it means? "Why make it easy when it can be complicated?"!
3rd Jul '16 5:02:08 PM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'': Makuta's original plan failed. So he came with something even more complicated that required thousands of years of precise timing, careful execution, reliance on [[JustAsPlanned his opponents doing exactly what he expected them to do in trying to foil his schemes]], and even his [[ThanatosGambit own potential death]]. Some of his allies seriously complain about the over-complexity, wanting to simply use brute force instead, and a running joke among the Brotherhood was that he had back-up plans in place for his breakfast. Heck, Makuta himself even seemed aware of his addiction, as at several points he admitted to having "schemes within schemes" that would tear apart his enemies' minds if they tried to seriously decipher them.

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* ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}}'': ''Toys/{{Bionicle}}'': Makuta's original plan failed. So he came with something even more complicated that required thousands of years of precise timing, careful execution, reliance on [[JustAsPlanned his opponents doing exactly what he expected them to do in trying to foil his schemes]], and even his [[ThanatosGambit own potential death]]. Some of his allies seriously complain about the over-complexity, wanting to simply use brute force instead, and a running joke among the Brotherhood was that he had back-up plans in place for his breakfast. Heck, Makuta himself even seemed aware of his addiction, as at several points he admitted to having "schemes within schemes" that would tear apart his enemies' minds if they tried to seriously decipher them.
22nd Jun '16 1:48:00 PM ironballs16
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* ''Film/AustinPowers'' spoofs this trope as it commonly appears in spy films. [[BigBad Dr. Evil]] is notorious for making his plans to kill the titular character exceedingly complicated, such as in the first movie where he has Austin and Vanessa standing on a platform suspended over a pool of water with mutated, enraged sea bass ready to eat them, in a secluded room with the door closed and one easily defeated guard stationed there. Dr. Evil's son, Scott, is [[LampshadeHanging usually the one who calls him out]] on these things and [[StatingTheSimpleSolution states much easier ways]] to kill Austin.

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* ''Film/AustinPowers'' spoofs this trope as it commonly appears in spy films. [[BigBad Dr. Evil]] is notorious for making his plans to kill the titular character exceedingly complicated, such as in the first movie where he has Austin and Vanessa standing on a platform suspended over a pool of water with mutated, enraged sea bass ready to eat them, in a secluded room with the door closed and one easily defeated guard stationed there. Dr. Evil's son, Scott, is [[LampshadeHanging usually the one who calls him out]] on these things and [[StatingTheSimpleSolution states much easier ways]] to kill Austin. Earlier in the film, Number Two kept trying to convince Dr. Evil that their best option was to CutLexLuthorACheck, [[CardCarryingVillain which Dr. Evil roundly objected to]].
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