History Main / ComicbookTime

17th Jan '18 9:02:57 PM tropeminer
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* Franchise/{{Tarzan}} underwent constant recasting, from Johnny Weismuller (who played Tarzan from 1932 to 1948) to Lex Barker and further (Mike Henry served as the last series Tarzan in theatrical film in 1968). Since Brenda Joyce stayed on as Jane from the last Weismuller film to at least the first Barker film, this represents a case of a sliding timescale. It's most noticeable with their son Boy, who ages from infancy to childhood (about ten, in the movies) in the space of a cutscene, while his parents haven't aged a day.

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* Franchise/{{Tarzan}} ''Franchise/{{Tarzan}}'' underwent constant recasting, from Johnny Weismuller (who played Tarzan from 1932 to 1948) to Lex Barker and further (Mike Henry served as the last series Tarzan in theatrical film in 1968). Since Brenda Joyce stayed on as Jane from the last Weismuller film to at least the first Barker film, this represents a case of a sliding timescale. It's most noticeable with their son Boy, who ages from infancy to childhood (about ten, in the movies) in the space of a cutscene, while his parents haven't aged a day.
16th Jan '18 1:48:08 PM tropeminer
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* ''Film/SupermanReturns'' (2006) is set "five years" after ''Film/SupermanII'' (1980) which is set roughly between 1978 and 1981. Unless it's one hell of a typo or some ''Daily Planet'' editor played a prank, a [[http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6033/6243044530_2e1e436692_o.jpg newspaper]] clearly dates ''Superman Returns'' in 2006. [[MST3KMantra Then again, you really shouldn't think about this too hard]].

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* ''Film/SupermanReturns'' (2006) is set "five years" five years after ''Film/SupermanII'' (1980) which is set roughly between 1978 and 1981. Unless it's one hell of a typo or some ''Daily Planet'' editor played a prank, a [[http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6033/6243044530_2e1e436692_o.jpg newspaper]] clearly dates ''Superman Returns'' ''Returns'' in 2006. [[MST3KMantra Then again, you really shouldn't think about this too hard]].
16th Jan '18 1:43:18 PM tropeminer
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* ''Film/SupermanReturns'' (2006) is set "five years" after ''Film/SupermanII'' (1980) which is set roughly between 1978 and 1981. Unless it's a major typo or some ''Daily Planet'' editor played a prank, a [[http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6033/6243044530_2e1e436692_o.jpg newspaper]] clearly dates ''Superman Returns'' in 2006. [[MST3KMantra Then again, you really shouldn't think about this too hard]].

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* ''Film/SupermanReturns'' (2006) is set "five years" after ''Film/SupermanII'' (1980) which is set roughly between 1978 and 1981. Unless it's one hell of a major typo or some ''Daily Planet'' editor played a prank, a [[http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6033/6243044530_2e1e436692_o.jpg newspaper]] clearly dates ''Superman Returns'' in 2006. [[MST3KMantra Then again, you really shouldn't think about this too hard]].
16th Jan '18 1:39:27 PM tropeminer
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* ''Film/SupermanReturns'' is set "five years" after ''Film/SupermanII'' (1980), but a newspaper dated 2006 appears prominently. Especially problematic thanks to the casting of Kate Bosworth who was 23 when the movie was released (22 during filming) and looked at least that young. She must have gotten a really early start at the Planet (and a really early start at some other things, considering the age of her son). Brandon Routh, 26 during filming, was a little less noticeable. Comicbook/JimmyOlsen looks older than Lois (and in fact Sam Huntington is about a year older than Bosworth), despite being about a decade younger in most continuities.

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* ''Film/SupermanReturns'' (2006) is set "five years" after ''Film/SupermanII'' (1980), but (1980) which is set roughly between 1978 and 1981. Unless it's a newspaper dated 2006 appears prominently. major typo or some ''Daily Planet'' editor played a prank, a [[http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6033/6243044530_2e1e436692_o.jpg newspaper]] clearly dates ''Superman Returns'' in 2006. [[MST3KMantra Then again, you really shouldn't think about this too hard]].
**
Especially problematic thanks to the casting of Kate Bosworth who was 23 when the movie was released (22 during filming) and looked at least that young. She must have gotten a really early start at the Planet (and a really early start at some other things, considering the age of her son). Brandon Routh, 26 during filming, was a little less noticeable. Comicbook/JimmyOlsen looks older than Lois (and in fact Sam Huntington is about a year older than Bosworth), despite being about a decade younger in most continuities.
12th Jan '18 8:18:58 PM JackG
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* Literature/{{Quiller}} repeatedly says he's "[[FeelingTheirAge getting old]]" in the first novel, written in 1965. His last mission is in "Quiller Balalaika", written in 1996 -- as Quiller was a secret agent during the Second World War this would put him in his seventies.
10th Jan '18 10:28:55 AM MajinAkuma
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** Technology also keeps advancing in real-time. Old mobile phones are now replaced by cellphones, etc. In chapters 192-196, which were released in 1998, the concept of chatting on the internet was relatively new. But in chapter 1006-1008, released at the end of 2017, a rumor was spreaded fast and nation-wide through Twitter. Another extreme example is the flashback case in chapter 972-974, an event that occured 10 years prior to the story, yet the characters in that flashback were using image-sending cellphones with cameras and they could read freshly reported news on the internet.

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** Technology also keeps advancing in real-time. Old mobile phones are now replaced by cellphones, etc. In chapters 192-196, which were released in 1998, the concept of chatting on the internet was relatively new. But in chapter chapters 1006-1008, released at the end of 2017, a rumor was spreaded fast and nation-wide through Twitter. Another extreme example is the flashback case in chapter 972-974, an event that occured 10 years prior to the story, yet the characters in that flashback were using image-sending cellphones with cameras and they could read freshly reported news on the internet.
10th Jan '18 10:27:22 AM MajinAkuma
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Added DiffLines:

** Technology also keeps advancing in real-time. Old mobile phones are now replaced by cellphones, etc. In chapters 192-196, which were released in 1998, the concept of chatting on the internet was relatively new. But in chapter 1006-1008, released at the end of 2017, a rumor was spreaded fast and nation-wide through Twitter. Another extreme example is the flashback case in chapter 972-974, an event that occured 10 years prior to the story, yet the characters in that flashback were using image-sending cellphones with cameras and they could read freshly reported news on the internet.
15th Dec '17 12:29:59 PM merotoker
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* ''Film/XMenFirstClass'' is definitely marketed as a prequel to the original ''Film/XMen'' trilogy, but the timeline used in the film is very wonky. ''First Class'' takes place in 1962, which would put Xavier and Magneto in their 70s in the first movie (Creator/PatrickStewart was only 60 when the first film was released, and Creator/IanMckellen was around the same age). It's best not to think about Beast's age, either.

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* ''Film/XMenFirstClass'' is definitely marketed as a prequel to the original ''Film/XMen'' ''[[Film/XMenFilmSeries X-Men]]'' trilogy, but the timeline used in the film is very wonky. ''First Class'' takes place in 1962, which would put Xavier and Magneto in their 70s in the first movie (Creator/PatrickStewart was only 60 when the first film was released, and Creator/IanMckellen was around the same age). It's best not to think about Beast's age, either.



* In CliveCussler's NUMA novels, Dirk Pitt has been an eternal thirty-something (and Kurt Austin an eternal forty-something), even though roughly four decades have passed in-universe, where the fictional timeline approximately mirrors that of real life. Subverted in the later Dirk Pitt novels, where his age was advanced by approximately a decade, he discovered he had some kids that he never knew about (now college-age), and he got promoted to the head of his organization.

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* In CliveCussler's Creator/CliveCussler's NUMA novels, Dirk Pitt has been an eternal thirty-something (and Kurt Austin an eternal forty-something), even though roughly four decades have passed in-universe, where the fictional timeline approximately mirrors that of real life. Subverted in the later Dirk Pitt novels, where his age was advanced by approximately a decade, he discovered he had some kids that he never knew about (now college-age), and he got promoted to the head of his organization.



* ''Series/BreakingBad'' teeters on the edge of this. In the fourth episode of the fifth season it is confirmed that it has been one full year since Walter was diagnosed with cancer. This would mean that [[spoiler: Walter starting to cook meth with Jesse, Walter meeting Tuco, Tuco hiring Walter, Hank killing Tuco, Hank getting a promotion and going to El Paso and deciding to leave that job, Walter meeting Saul, Saul introducing him to Gus Fring, Walter's daughter being born, Fring hiring Walter, Walter causing a plane crash indirectly, Hank beating the hell out Jesse, Hank getting shot, Hank recovering, Hank getting a promotion despite his earlier bad behavior, Gus killing the entire Mexican Cartel leadership, Walter killing Fring and destroying his empire, Walt,Jesse and Mike starting a new partnership, Mike's share being bought out by Declan who is now Walter's employer and Mike getting killed by Walter]] all happened over the course of one year along with many other events. It's possible and the show's episodes and seasons due tend to flow directly into one another creating a somewhat shorter timeline but it also gives you a headache trying to reconcile that timetable with all these events AND how much Walter has changed from the pilot till now. More explicitly, in Season 2 there's a reference to the Phoenix lander recently finding water on Mars (2008), but in a Season 5 episode there's a reference to Bin Laden's death (2011).

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* ''Series/BreakingBad'' teeters on the edge of this. In the fourth episode of the fifth season it is confirmed that it has been one full year since Walter was diagnosed with cancer. This would mean that [[spoiler: Walter starting to cook meth with Jesse, Walter meeting Tuco, Tuco hiring Walter, Hank killing Tuco, Hank getting a promotion and going to El Paso and deciding to leave that job, Walter meeting Saul, Saul introducing him to Gus Fring, Walter's daughter being born, Fring hiring Walter, Walter causing a plane crash indirectly, Hank beating the hell out Jesse, Hank getting shot, Hank recovering, Hank getting a promotion despite his earlier bad behavior, Gus killing the entire Mexican Cartel leadership, Walter killing Fring and destroying his empire, Walt,Jesse Walt, Jesse and Mike starting a new partnership, Mike's share being bought out by Declan who is now Walter's employer and Mike getting killed by Walter]] all happened over the course of one year along with many other events. It's possible and the show's episodes and seasons due tend to flow directly into one another creating a somewhat shorter timeline but it also gives you a headache trying to reconcile that timetable with all these events AND how much Walter has changed from the pilot till now. More explicitly, in Season 2 there's a reference to the Phoenix lander recently finding water on Mars (2008), but in a Season 5 episode there's a reference to Bin Laden's death (2011).



* Many of the characters in ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' aged somewhat since their introduction. Schroeder and Lucy started out as toddlers, then grew to Charlie Brown's age; Lucy's "baby brother" Linus grew to one or two grades below Charlie Brown (and has been seen in the same classroom as him on occasion). Sally also started as a baby and later caught up to Linus. Rerun also was born during the strip's run and ended up as a toddler. Charlie Brown himself also aged somewhat over the course of the strip; he stated that he was four in [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1950/11/03 an 1950 strip]], six in [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1957/11/17 an 1957 one]], and eight and a half in an [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1979/07/11 1979 one]]. The strips and animated adaptations are set in the year created, and thus we've had stuff like the incredibly 80s "Flash Beagle" song in the animated specials and references to ''Literature/HarryPotter'' in the comics.

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* Many of the characters in ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' aged somewhat since their introduction. Schroeder and Lucy started out as toddlers, then grew to Charlie Brown's age; Lucy's "baby brother" Linus grew to one or two grades below Charlie Brown (and has been seen in the same classroom as him on occasion). Sally also started as a baby and later caught up to Linus. Rerun also was born during the strip's run and ended up as a toddler. Charlie Brown himself also aged somewhat over the course of the strip; he stated that he was four in [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1950/11/03 an a 1950 strip]], six in [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1957/11/17 an a 1957 one]], and eight and a half in an a [[http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1979/07/11 1979 one]]. The strips and animated adaptations are set in the year created, and thus we've had stuff like the incredibly 80s "Flash Beagle" song in the animated specials and references to ''Literature/HarryPotter'' in the comics.



* Lampshaded in ''ComicStrip/{{Sally Forth|Howard}}'' (June 26, 2014): "It doesn't feel like people ever age around here. It's like a "[[Series/TheTwilightZone1959 Twilight Zone]]" episode but with wi-fi."
** In another strip, Hillary remarks on the fact that her baby cousin is a year older, while she herself is the same age and in the same grade at school. She is then quickly admonished not to talk about it.

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* Lampshaded in ''ComicStrip/{{Sally Forth|Howard}}'' (June 26, 2014): "It doesn't feel like people ever age around here. It's like a "[[Series/TheTwilightZone1959 Twilight Zone]]" episode but with wi-fi."
**
" In another strip, Hillary remarks on the fact that her baby cousin is a year older, while she herself is the same age and in the same grade at school. She is then quickly admonished not to talk about it.



* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'': Bizarrely played with. Despite the fact that time flows at the same rate it does in the real world, none of the characters in-universe never seem to age a day.
** When celebrating a character's birthday, [[Main/AgelessBirthdayEpisode no mention is ever made to how old said character is.]]

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* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'': Bizarrely played with. Despite the fact that time flows at the same rate it does in the real world, none of the characters in-universe never seem to age a day.
**
day. When celebrating a character's birthday, [[Main/AgelessBirthdayEpisode [[AgelessBirthdayEpisode no mention is ever made to how old said character is.]]



** He's actually had a couple of birthdays in the Archie comics but since they're always rebooting the universe he never ages beyond 16.
*** One issue actually {{lampshade|Hanging}}d this - Sonic was celebrating a birthday after spending a year (Mobius-wise) lost in space. When they asked how old he was, he just said "Let's say I'm 16 and never mention this again."

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** He's actually had a couple of birthdays in the Archie comics but since they're always rebooting the universe he never ages beyond 16.
***
16. One issue actually {{lampshade|Hanging}}d this - Sonic was celebrating a birthday after spending a year (Mobius-wise) lost in space. When they asked how old he was, he just said "Let's say I'm 16 and never mention this again."



* ''WebAnimation/TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool'': In an example of WebcomicTime, Seasons 1 through 4 take place over a single school year (less, as the series began with the year already in progress) but were produced over the course of four calendar years. What makes it also qualify as ComicBookTime is that whenever a character mentions the current year, they say the current ''RealLife'' year, meaning it went from 2012 to 2015 during that single InUniverse year.

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* ''WebAnimation/TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool'': In an example of WebcomicTime, Seasons 1 through 4 take place over a single school year (less, as the series began with the year already in progress) but were produced over the course of four calendar years. What makes it also qualify as ComicBookTime is that whenever a character mentions the current year, they say the current ''RealLife'' year, meaning it went from 2012 to 2015 during that single InUniverse year.



** The 2017 ''Treehouse of Horror'' comic contains a parody of ''Film/It''. Notably, Crusty the Clown scares child versions of Carl and Lenny with the cancellation of ''Television/Alf'', despite both of those characters being introduced as Middle Aged men the same year the show was actually cancelled in real life.
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': The characters don't age much. Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny started out as 8-year-old boys in the third grade. In the 4th season, the boys move onto fourth grade and were 9-years old. By the season 15 episode "Crack Baby Athletic Association", all the boys were 10. None of the other characters in the series have aged at all either with the exception of Ike who started out as a toddler who could barely speak coherently, as of season eleven he is a bit taller, wears different clothes and he can now speak in full sentences. In the Facebook episode, "You have 0 Friends," first broadcast in spring of 2010, several of the boys' Facebook profiles were shown, listing their birth years as 2001 -- four years after the show started airing (in fact Ike's gravestone in an early episode had him born in 1996).

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** The 2017 ''Treehouse of Horror'' comic contains a parody of ''Film/It''. ''Film/{{It|1990}}''. Notably, Crusty the Clown scares child versions of Carl and Lenny with the cancellation of ''Television/Alf'', ''Series/{{Alf}}'', despite both of those characters being introduced as Middle Aged men the same year the show was actually cancelled in real life.
* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': The characters don't age much. Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny started out as 8-year-old boys in the third grade. In the 4th season, the boys move onto fourth grade and were 9-years old. By the season 15 episode "Crack Baby Athletic Association", all the boys were 10. None of the other characters in the series have aged at all either with the exception of Ike who started out as a toddler who could barely speak coherently, coherently; as of season eleven he is a bit taller, wears different clothes and he can now speak in full sentences. In the Facebook episode, "You have 0 Friends," first broadcast in spring of 2010, several of the boys' Facebook profiles were shown, listing their birth years as 2001 -- four years after the show started airing (in fact Ike's gravestone in an early episode had him born in 1996).



** The series featured the terms of an anthromorphic animal Bill Clinton and George Bush alike, yet Arthur and his friends are still in the third grade.
** DW has also turned five and the baby Kate born and aged to around nine months, yet Arthur is still eight. Kate has shown signs of entering toddlerhood but it's unlikely Arthur will move up to a grade as that'd remove Ratburn as a character and change the class structure. Eventually they did graduate in season 19.

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** The series featured the terms of an anthromorphic anthropomorphic animal Bill Clinton and George Bush alike, yet Arthur and his friends are still in the third grade.
** DW has also turned five and the baby Kate born and aged to around nine months, yet Arthur is still eight. Kate has shown signs of entering toddlerhood but it's unlikely Arthur will move up to a grade as that'd remove Ratburn as a character and change the class structure. Eventually they did graduate in season 19.



** During the first "comeback" season, Peter mentions that Bonnie has been pregnant for five years, and tells her to either have the baby or not. Stewie's age has been lampshaded a few times, notably when he says to Brian "But I'm only one!" and Brian replies "Still?"
*** Bonnie ''finally'' gave birth. Took almost ten years, but there you go.

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** During the first "comeback" season, Peter mentions that Bonnie has been pregnant for five years, and tells her to either have the baby or not. Stewie's age has been lampshaded a few times, notably when he says to Brian "But I'm only one!" and Brian replies "Still?"
***
"Still?" Bonnie ''finally'' gave birth. Took almost ten years, but there you go.



* ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'', having been first devised in 1992 as Craig [=McCracken=]'s school project as The Whoopass Girls, were first depicted as five-year-old children attending kindergarten in their first Hanna-Barbera commissioned short "Meat Fuzzy Lumkins." They remained five years old through all six seasons of their show (plus specials and the movie) in spite of the fact they celebrated a birthday in the episode "Birthday Bash." A few early episodes of have the series taking place in 2000 according to some scenes, and it shows in their technology (such as several characters owning a UsefulNotes/Nintendo64). By the special ''Dance Pantsed'' (which was released after the cartoon ended) the series takes place somewhere in the early 2010s as seen by the characters owning a UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. The ContinuityReboot ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls2016'' is a StealthSequel and takes place in the mid 2010s.

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* ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'', having been first devised in 1992 as Craig [=McCracken=]'s Creator/CraigMcCracken's school project as The Whoopass Girls, were first depicted as five-year-old children attending kindergarten in their first Hanna-Barbera commissioned short "Meat Fuzzy Lumkins." They remained five years old through all six seasons of their show (plus specials and the movie) in spite of the fact they celebrated a birthday in the episode "Birthday Bash." A few early episodes of have the series taking place in 2000 according to some scenes, and it shows in their technology (such as several characters owning a UsefulNotes/Nintendo64). By the special ''Dance Pantsed'' (which was released after the cartoon ended) the series takes place somewhere in the early 2010s as seen by the characters owning a UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. The ContinuityReboot ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls2016'' is a StealthSequel and takes place in the mid 2010s.



* DoubleSubverted in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'': At first, Finn [[CharacterAgedWithTheActor aged more or less in real-time]]: he began the show as a 12 year-old boy, and is 13 by the next season. However, the passage of time gradually slows down to the point where Finn is still just 16 as the show enters its eight year.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'' zig-zag this a little. The four principals never changed in appearance (apart from the usual art evolution such series goes through) through the birth of Pebbles and the adoption of Bamm-Bamm during the original six seasons and the movie (''The Man Called Flintstone''). They still don't in ''WesternAnimation/ThePebblesAndBammBammShow'' (1971) where the two infants are now teens and even those two don't change in the subsequent NBC shows later on (''The Flintstone Comedy Show, Flintstone Funnies''). Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm eventually graduate to adulthood in the 90s with two made-for-TV animated films (''I Yabba Dabba Do!, Hollyrock-A-Bye Baby'') while their parents, on the verge of grandparenthood, still look the way they did when the original series aired its finale in 1966. The 2001 Cartoon Network special ''Flintstones: On The Rocks'' retcons this, designing the four main characters as they looked from the original series' very start.

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* DoubleSubverted DoubleSubversion in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'': At first, Finn [[CharacterAgedWithTheActor aged more or less in real-time]]: he began the show as a 12 year-old boy, and is 13 by the next season. However, the passage of time gradually slows down to the point where Finn is still just 16 as the show enters its eight year.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'' zig-zag this a little. The four principals never changed in appearance (apart from the usual art evolution such series goes through) through the birth of Pebbles and the adoption of Bamm-Bamm during the original six seasons and the movie (''The Man Called Flintstone'').(''WesternAnimation/TheManCalledFlintstone''). They still don't in ''WesternAnimation/ThePebblesAndBammBammShow'' (1971) where the two infants are now teens and even those two don't change in the subsequent NBC shows later on (''The Flintstone Comedy Show, Flintstone Funnies''). Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm eventually graduate to adulthood in the 90s with two made-for-TV animated films (''I Yabba Dabba Do!, Hollyrock-A-Bye Baby'') while their parents, on the verge of grandparenthood, still look the way they did when the original series aired its finale in 1966. The 2001 Cartoon Network special ''Flintstones: On The Rocks'' retcons this, designing the four main characters as they looked from the original series' very start.



** Dwight and Cubert are stated to be about 12 years old in season 3 and remain so through the show's run. By the end, the should be in their mid-20s, which is about as old and Fry and Leela were when the show started.

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** Dwight and Cubert are stated to be about 12 years old in season 3 and remain so through the show's run. By the end, the they should be in their mid-20s, which is about as old and Fry and Leela were when the show started.



* This is averted in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}; however, the indicators of how much time have passed are subtle and can be easy to miss (other than the fact that ''The New Batman Adventures'' takes place a few years after ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'' obviously takes place 40+years in the future). Supergirl is probably the best indicator of how much time has passed...she's 16 in her first appearance in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', and it's mentioned to be her 21st birthday during her final appearance in ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]''. Similarly, in another episode in the final season of JLU, Grodd's fight with the Flash (which happened in the first season of ''Justice League'') is mentioned to have happened a "couple of years ago". It can be said that the first season of Justice League takes place 1-2 years after the end of S:TAS and JL/JLU take place over the course of 3-4 years.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' has a lot of contemporary references however the brothers are eight years old and ten years old. This creates a situation where Huey was ten when Obama became president however in episodes set years later he is still ten; either he should have aged or he would have been very young during that presidental election. Lampshaded in one episode where an elderly man is friends with Huey and explains to Robert and Riley that he and Huey "go way back."
* ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' originally began in 1996 and finished production in 2001 (though new episodes continued to air sporadically until 2004). A BigDamnMovie was produced to finally wrap up the series, and despite being aired in 2017, it picks up shortly after the events of "The Journal," the final ''Hey Arnold'' episode chronologically. The use of ComicBookTime is {{Lampshaded}} multiple times, such as repeated jokes about Bob's beeper store falling on hard times due to the proliferation of smartphones. Bob also expresses shock at Arnold's grandparents still being alive when he runs into them.

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* This is averted in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}; Franchise/DCAnimatedUniverse; however, the indicators of how much time have has passed are subtle and can be easy to miss (other than the fact that ''The New Batman Adventures'' takes place a few years after ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'' obviously takes place 40+years in the future). Supergirl is probably the best indicator of how much time has passed...she's 16 in her first appearance in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', and it's mentioned to be her 21st birthday during her final appearance in ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]''. Similarly, in another episode in the final season of JLU, Grodd's fight with the Flash (which happened in the first season of ''Justice League'') is mentioned to have happened a "couple of years ago". It can be said that the first season of Justice League takes place 1-2 years after the end of S:TAS and JL/JLU take place over the course of 3-4 years.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' has a lot of contemporary references however the brothers are eight years old and ten years old. This creates a situation where Huey was ten when Obama became president however in episodes set years later he is still ten; either he should have aged or he would have been very young during that presidental presidential election. Lampshaded in one episode where an elderly man is friends with Huey and explains to Robert and Riley that he and Huey "go way back."
* ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' originally began in 1996 and finished production in 2001 (though new episodes continued to air sporadically until 2004). A BigDamnMovie was produced to finally wrap up the series, and despite being aired in 2017, it picks up shortly after the events of "The Journal," the final ''Hey Arnold'' episode chronologically. The use of ComicBookTime trope is {{Lampshaded}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}d multiple times, such as repeated jokes about Bob's beeper store falling on hard times due to the proliferation of smartphones. Bob also expresses shock at Arnold's grandparents still being alive when he runs into them.
10th Dec '17 6:48:04 AM backpack
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** The 2017 ''Treehouse of Horror'' comic contains a parody of ''Film/It''. Notably, Crusty the Clown scares child versions of Carl and Lenny with the cancellation of ''Television/Alf'', despite both of those characters being introduced as Middle Aged men the same year the show was actually cancelled in real life.
10th Dec '17 5:07:01 AM LaszloZapacik
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** The new cast introduced in ''First Class'' hasn't aged by the time of ''Apocalypse'', 20 in-universe years later. Somewhat justified for Mystique, who can presumably appear as any age she likes, but why Xavier, Magneto, Beast, Moira and Havok don't appear to have aged much isn't answered.
*** Havok is, following the timeline, at least in his late 30s by ''Apocalypse'', but his younger brother Cyclops is apparently still school-aged.
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