History Main / ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodeNames

12th Apr '17 12:08:15 AM KingZeal
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[[caption-width-right:350:...I thought his last name was [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "America"...]]]]
11th Apr '17 9:13:15 PM LinTaylor
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*** This is however averted in the ''[[Series/KamenRiderExAid Ex-Aid]]'' special ''Kamen Sentai Gorider''; Baron and Marika both refer to themselves as Kamen Riders, and absolutely no mention is made of the term Armored Riders.



** ''Series/KamenRiderGhost'' goes back to generally not using the title (except for the OpeningNarration). Oddly, it is established to exist in-universe as Ghost is given the "Kamen Rider" title by the sage who gives him his powers; but unlike in other Rider series no reason is ever provided as to ''why'' the sage would name him that.

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** ''Series/KamenRiderGhost'' goes back to generally not using the title (except for the OpeningNarration). Oddly, it is established to exist in-universe as Ghost is given the "Kamen Rider" title by the sage who gives him his powers; but unlike in other Rider series no reason is ever provided as to ''why'' the sage would name him that. ''Film/KamenRider1'' suggests that this is because the sage knows about the original Kamen Rider and has a great deal of respect for him, giving Ghost the name in honor of the legendary hero.
8th Apr '17 5:21:13 PM PhantomRider
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** Anatoli Knyazev is never called the "[=KGBeast=]".

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** Anatoli Knyazev is never called the "[=KGBeast=]". He's also a sympathetic mob captain ([[TheFamilyForTheWholeFamily who is only shown doing anything nasty to other, less honorable rivals]]) as opposed to a supervillain. Also also, he's a decade or two too late for the name to make sense.
*Averted in the relatively LighterAndSofter spinoff ''Series/TheFlash2014,'' where all the superhero trappings are happily embraced. Cisco is TheNicknamer and comes up with most of the hero/villain names.
6th Apr '17 3:36:00 PM dasuberkaiser
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[[folder: Webcomics]]
* ''Webcomic/CiemWebcomicSeries''
** Candi has to actually tell the reporter that "Ciem" sounds like a good abbreviation for "ciempies." But other than instances where there is no choice but to call her by that name, most characters take pains in the books to avoid ever using the word "Ciem" at all.
** Likewise, Jeral Cormier is only routinely referred to as "Botan the Plant-Man" by the media. Those who know him will almost never use the name; calling him Jeral all the time. Some strangers know him as "Derrick of the Dandelions," and prefer that over calling him Botan.
** After learning about the AI backvisor that was controlling Jeraime, Candi always insists on distinguishing between Jeraime and "Musaran" with the latter referring to the AI.
** Jack has the codename of "Jackrabbit" because of his jumping ability, but has no real way to conceal his identity. So the nickname proves to be useless and everyone calls him Jack anyway.
** Inverted with the Chinese spies, whose real names were not revealed [[AllThereInTheManual until they were published to the wiki in 2011]]. Black Rat, Tin Dragon, Teal Hog, and Stung Hornet are known almost exclusively by their codenames, even to each other. Possibly justified in that they're spies.
[[/folder]]



[[folder: Webcomics]]
* ''Webcomic/CiemWebcomicSeries''
** Candi has to actually tell the reporter that "Ciem" sounds like a good abbreviation for "ciempies." But other than instances where there is no choice but to call her by that name, most characters take pains in the books to avoid ever using the word "Ciem" at all.
** Likewise, Jeral Cormier is only routinely referred to as "Botan the Plant-Man" by the media. Those who know him will almost never use the name; calling him Jeral all the time. Some strangers know him as "Derrick of the Dandelions," and prefer that over calling him Botan.
** After learning about the AI backvisor that was controlling Jeraime, Candi always insists on distinguishing between Jeraime and "Musaran" with the latter referring to the AI.
** Jack has the codename of "Jackrabbit" because of his jumping ability, but has no real way to conceal his identity. So the nickname proves to be useless and everyone calls him Jack anyway.
** Inverted with the Chinese spies, whose real names were not revealed [[AllThereInTheManual until they were published to the wiki in 2011]]. Black Rat, Tin Dragon, Teal Hog, and Stung Hornet are known almost exclusively by their codenames, even to each other. Possibly justified in that they're spies.
[[/folder]]
31st Mar '17 6:22:05 AM NightShade96
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[[folder:The Marvel Cinematic Universe]]
In general, the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse goes out of its way to subvert, lampshade, and defy the concept of a SecretIdentity. None of the Avengers have one -- not even Iron Man, who had one for decades in the comics. Tony himself mocks how pointless it is and defies the trope by outing himself in the last scene of [[Film/IronMan1 his first film]] before the end credits. That isn't to say that the heroes don't have their comic codenames, though they are usually given to the characters by another source, either as propaganda, used as a military call sign, or are dubbed as such by the media.

* ''Film/IronMan'':
** Iron Man himself doesn't get called that name until the end of the first film and it's only used once or twice in the following films where he appears ("I am Iron Man" gets an echo in ''Iron Man 2'' and ComicBook/NickFury refers to him as Iron Man once), but the name is also used in specific reference to the suit (i.e. "the Iron Man weapon" or "Tony Stark's Iron Man").
** The words "ComicBook/WarMachine" originate in ''Film/IronMan2'' as an offhanded insult from Tony to James Rhodes. Averted by ''3'', where "War Machine" is his official codename and Tony is incredulous that Rhodey actually adopted it just from that remark. Or rather, his ''official'' codename in ''3'' is "Iron Patriot", which Rhodey claims "tested better with focus groups"; but a number of people state they liked "War Machine" better. By ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'', he's just "War Machine" again and uses the name in a BadassBoast.
** As for the villains, Obadiah Stane is never called "Iron Monger", although he briefly says the word in reference to Stark Industries' role as a weapon manufacturer. Meanwhile, there's Ivan Vanko: a CompositeCharacter of two villains named "Crimson Dynamo" and "Whiplash". He gets called neither in the second film, though the marketing referred to him as Whiplash. In ''Iron Man 3'', Eric Savin and Jack Taggert go by their real names, and are never once referred to as "Coldblood" or "Firepower" (and the Extremis soldiers all have heat powers, so "Coldblood" wouldn't even make sense anyway). The Mandarin is an aversion, being referred to as such, [[spoiler:though the character Ben Kingsley played is ultimately revealed as a DecoyLeader. The real villain, Aldrich Killian, only refers to himself as the Mandarin once]]. This gets even stranger in the short ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail The King]]'', where it's revealed that [[spoiler:Killian wasn't the REAL Mandarin either, and had stolen the name. The REAL one, though never shown, is naturally miffed at other people stealing his shtick.]]
** In ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'', Tony uses a special massive set of armor designed to subdue the Hulk. It's popularly known and marketed as the "Hulkbuster", but the name only shows up in the movie on Tony's HUD - in dialogue, the actual codename for the armor seems to be [[BettyAndVeronica "Veronica"]].
* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'':
** Averted by The Hulk, who is called "Hulk" four times. The first time comes after the Culver University fight, where some college students refer to him as a "big hulk". Later, the military guys chasing the transformed Blonsky through New York mistakenly report that "the Hulk is in the street." Blonsky explicitly uses that name after the Hulk shows up for the final battle and the Hulk himself uses his [[CatchPhrase patented "HULK SMASH!"]] at the end of the fight. In ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', Bruce Banner notably takes pains not to call his alter-ego "the Hulk", preferring to call him "the other guy" instead. The one time he ''does'' say Hulk, he immediately corrects himself. But no-one else has the same qualms.
** "The Abomination" a.k.a. Emil Blonsky goes by his given name and there is only an offhand reference to that title once, when Dr. Sterns tells Blonksky that augmenting him with the Hulk's blood might turn him into "an abomination". In ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots The Consultant]]'', the name Abomination is brought up but Agent Coulson says "[The World Security Council] ''really'' don't like when you call him that."
* Averted in the ''Film/{{Thor}}'' films, where everyone's "superhero" identities are in fact their real names. Thor himself inverts it in the first movie, as the character once had a civilian identity in the comics, but the movies don't bother. So "Thor" is used all throughout the movie, while the name "Dr. Donald Blake" is the one that only gets [[MythologyGag a few token mentions]].
* In the ''[[Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger Captain America]]'' movies:
** The eponymous hero plays with the trope constantly. He only takes the name Captain America as a stage name, not as a superhero. Once he makes the transition to war hero, all of the characters call him Steve or "Captain Rogers" with a few exceptions (once by Bucky, once by Cap himself, and the other time by the Red Skull), and most of those examples are used as humor, irony, or mockery. Further, unlike in the original [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeofComicBooks Golden Age]] comics, Cap does officially have the rank of "Captain", and since we've got various characters referring to him by "Captain", it's hard to know if they're using his stage name or military rank. By ''The Avengers'', though, Captain America has become legendary and the name is in widespread use.
** Johann Schmidt gets called "The ComicBook/RedSkull" (by ''Hitler'', no less) one time as an insult, much to his annoyance. For the rest of the movie, only his real name is used. However, when he's mentioned in future movies and shows, it's only done by his codename.
** ComicBook/TheFalcon has his codename used regularly in the various movies he appears in, adopted from the model of flight pack he uses.
** Technically, this trope is true of Montgomery Falsworth, aka "Union Jack", in the first movie. However, Falsworth is not a costumed hero in this movie so there would be no reason to say the name at all.
** In ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'': The "Winter Soldier" codename is invoked frequently, but the heroes stop calling him this once they find out that he is [[spoiler:ComicBook/BuckyBarnes]]. In ''Civil War'' it's explained that [[spoiler:there are more HYDRA super-assassins, and Bucky refers to them as "Winter Soldiers" as well]]. Georges Batroc is revised to be a normal mercenary instead of a supervillainous one and is never called "Batroc the Leaper". Finally, Sharon Carter is referred to as "ComicBook/{{Agent 13}}" throughout most of the movie, with Natasha only revealing her first name during the movie's last scene; in ''Civil War'' she only goes by her given name (and may in fact have lost her "Agent" designation after [[spoiler:S.H.I.E.L.D. fell]]).
** ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'': Brock Rumlow is never referred to as Crossbones, though a tie-in comic establishes that the codename does exist in-universe (it also wasn't used when the character was in ''Winter Soldier'', but at that point he hadn't taken the identity of Crossbones yet). Zemo never had a codename to begin with, but is nonetheless changed from ''Baron'' Zemo since he's a Sokovian soldier rather than an German aristocrat as he is in the comics.
* From multiple movies, Natasha Romanov's handle of "Comicbook/BlackWidow" never comes up in ''Iron Man 2'', and is only used in ''The Avengers'' twice. In the first instance, it was spoken ''in Russian'', so anyone watching the film outside of its Russian dub actually only gets to ''read'' the name in subtitle form. Its other brief appearance is on the screen of a dossier Coulson is viewing. It's used all of once in ''The Winter Soldier'', where an agent refers to her as Black Widow while communicating with Rumlow. The name was absent from ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'', but reappeared in ''Civil War'' when Zemo mentions "the Black Widow."
* In ''The Avengers'', Clint Barton is called "{{ComicBook/Hawkeye}}" all of once by the Black Widow during the Battle of New York. It appears to be his radio callsign, with the name appearing briefly when Coulson is viewing his dossier in the film's beginning. The closest anyone comes otherwise is Dr. Erik Selvig semi-dismissively calling him "the Hawk". During his prior cameo in ''Thor'' it wasn't even alluded to, and in ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'' it's used once in an affectionately mocking way by [[spoiler:his wife]]. It's absent again in ''Civil War'', and when meeting Black Panther he explicitly introduces himself as "Clint", not "Hawkeye".
* This trope can be applied to the MacGuffin of ''Captain America'' and ''The Avengers''. In the movies, it's called the Tesseract, or "the cube". They never use its comic book name, the "Cosmic Cube". However, it and other {{MacGuffin}}s are collectively known as [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Stones]], a name that ''is'' taken from the comics.
* From ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'': Most characters don't go by codenames, though a reference is often snuck in somewhere:
** Franklin Hall and Donnie Gill didn't go by their supervillain names, Graviton and Blizzard, in their introductory episodes... but then again, they weren't supervillains ''yet''. When Gill reappears, it's mentioned that the experiments with his powers had been codenamed "Project Blizzard".
** Lampshaded aversion: Raina manipulates a pyrokinetic's ego by suggesting he adopt the name "Scorch," commenting on how nobody knows "Steve Rogers" but "Captain America" is a household name. Everyone who hears it is incredulous at the idea, including the pyro at first, but he warms up to it (pun not intended) and by the time S.H.I.E.L.D. shows up he's embraced it; which is then taken as a sign he's getting out of control.
--->'''Coulson:''' [[OhCrap Ah, crap,]] they gave him a ''name''.
** Another episode concerns a device whose name is Russian and translates to "Overkill" in English; there's some snark that something must have been lost in translation but it's generally referred to as the Overkill Device in this and future episodes -- in the comics it was called the Overkill ''Horn''. (Since it uses sound waves)
** Averted again with the first season BigBad, who is known as "the Clairvoyant"; although almost every character rejects the possibility of actual psychic powers, they keep calling him that because they don't have another name for him. They eventually are able to communicate with him directly, where the Clairvoyant says his subordinates coined the name and he himself finds it a bit overdramatic. Once he drops his cover he encourages everyone to use his real name. (And for the record, [[spoiler:no, he does not have psychic powers; his "omniscience" is based on high-level SHIELD security clearance.]])
** Coulson's team discovers a super-soldier project codenamed "Deathlok", and they soon start referring to the project's subject himself as Deathlok completely unironically. Later in the first season, [[spoiler:it's discovered that there is more than one subject, at which point Deathlok becomes somewhat of a generic label.]]
** Marcus Daniels is never called "Blackout" in dialogue, though eagle-eyed viewers can make out the name on his profile. The source of his powers ''is'' called the Darkforce, however, with requisite lampshading:
--->'''Coulson:''' Because [[SarcasmMode nothing bad ever happens]] when you're working with [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast something called "Darkforce."]]
*** Darkforce and its other name from ''Agent Carter'', "Zero Matter", get referenced in a later season, prompting another round of snark:
--->'''Mack:''' Who names these? Are there focus groups for evil things?
** Other villains that don't have their codenames used include Carl Creel (the Absorbing Man, though it is referenced in dialogue), Daniel Whitehall (Kraken), Marcus Scarlotti (Whiplash, likely because it was already taken by Vanko in ''Iron Man 2''), and David Angar (Angar the Screamer). The same goes for one of the heroes, Bobbi Morse (ComicBook/{{Mockingbird}}).
** Inverted with one of Whitehall's [[TheDragon Dragons]], Agent 33, who had suffered a LossOfIdentity thanks to {{Brainwashing}} and whose name ([[spoiler:Kara Palamas]]) was not known, even to her, until she started getting it back.
** The real names of Skye and her father (originally credited as "the Doctor") were deliberately withheld from the audience in order to hide their identities and the fact that they are even ''from'' the comics in the first place. Eventually their names were revealed to be ComicBook/{{Daisy|Johnson}} and Cal Johnson respectively, known in the comics as "Quake" and "Mister Hyde" (real name Calvin ''Zabo''). Cal's codename wound up never being used during his time on the show, but he implied that it existed (he mentioned that he changed his surname, though he didn't specify whether it was to "Zabo" or "Hyde"). Skye eventually switched to using "Daisy Johnson" full-time, while the name "Quake" didn't appear until another season and a half after the reveal, when [[spoiler:Daisy became a vigilante and the media caught wind of her]].
** CanonForeigner Lincoln Campbell was assigned the codename "Sparkplug" by SHIELD, but it has never been used in the show and barely shows up in promotional material either.
** Averted with Lash for similar reasons as the Clairvoyant; to preserve the mystery of his real name. After TheReveal, it's still used [[spoiler:to differentiate his human identity from his [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity less rational superpowered side]].]]
** The Season Three BigBad is known in the comics as Hive (as in MindHive). In the show, it took most of the season to reveal that in ancient times it was known as "Alveus" (Latin for "Hive"), but once that's known the English translation caught on quickly. Up until then, the closest thing it had to a name was [[NothingIsScarier "It"]].
** Defied with James in Season Three. As soon as he gets [[PlayingWithFire heat and explosion]] powers, he starts brainstorming fire-related codenames to use before he settles on his comics name of "Hellfire".
** Played with for Elena Rodriguez. In the comics, she's ''Yolanda'' Rodriguez, with the nickname of "Yo-Yo" but the official codename of "Slingshot". In the show, she still gets the nickname "Yo-Yo" despite the fact that it no longer links to her given name, but "Slingshot" is never used... until a series of web videos starring her came out, bearing the title ''WebVideo/AgentsOfSHIELDSlingshot''. Even then, "Slingshot" still isn't used in-universe.
** The results of an imperfect attempt to create Inhumans are dubbed "Primitives". In the comics, these are the ''Alpha'' Primitives, the Inhumans' slave race. The "alpha" part gets a nod when their creator says they're just an alpha version and begs his boss to let him make improvements for a beta test.
** Averted with [[ComicBook/AllNewGhostRider Ghost Rider]], who is introduced as having already started to become an urban legend under that name in LA.
** Jeffrey Mace doesn't use the codename "Patriot", but is referred to as a patriot a few times in dialogue. [[spoiler:And the serum that gives him his powers is also called "Project Patriot".]] He's also compared to Captain America in-universe, referencing how he held that title in the comics for a while as Rogers' successor.
* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'': In general, the movie uses the same aversion as the ''Thor'' movies in that everyone's names are their real ones, but there are a few examples:
** The team's name "the guardians of the galaxy" is a mocking nickname given to the group by Ronan the Accuser. Peter throws it back in his face when they defeat him, with the implication that they may adopt it as a group name.
** Parodied with "Star-Lord", as Peter Quill introduces himself as that, but people just respond with confusion. When the space cops later look at his rap sheet, they comment that apparently the only person who calls Quill "Star-Lord" is ''himself''. Comically, he is ecstatic when, in the last act of the film, someone actually ''does'' call him Star-Lord.
--->'''Rhomann Dey:''' Hey! If it isn't "Star-Prince."\\
'''Quill:''' Star-''Lord''.\\
'''Rhomann:''' Sorry; "Lord." ''[to his partner]'' I picked this guy up a while back for petty theft. He's got a ''code name!''\\
'''Quill:''' Come on, man, it's an ''outlaw'' name.\\
'''Rhomann:''' Relax, pal, it's cool to have a code name. It's not that weird.
** Inverted with Drax the Destroyer. In the comics, he's a transformed human named Arthur Douglas. In the movie, he's an alien and Drax is his real name (with the "Destroyer" nickname earned for his RoaringRampageOfRevenge).
** Rocket's full name in the comics is "Rocket Raccoon," but everyone calls him Rocket. It's justified by two reasons: 1) Rocket hates being called an animal, which the name clearly insinuates; and 2) he doesn't even know what a raccoon ''is''.
** One character is formally introduced, both here and in TheStinger of ''Thor: The Dark World'', as "Taneleer Tivan, the Collector", covering both real name and "codename" in one fell swoop.
** Like the Cosmic Cube example from ''Captain America'' and ''The Avengers'', nobody refers to Ronan's hammer as the Universal Weapon (partly because it never comes up; the bigger threat is Ronan himself).
* In ''Series/AgentCarter'':
** Neither of Season One's main villains are called by their codename. [[spoiler:A Black Widow agent]] has no direct reference made to her codename (or any real name for that matter; her given name is explicitly an alias) and is only identifiable by sharing a backstory with [[spoiler:Natasha Romanoff]]. The codename of [[spoiler:Doctor Faustus]] gets a nod when he's shown reading [[Theatre/DoctorFaustus his namesake play]]. Codenames are also referenced when Peggy teams up with her war buddies in the Howling Commandos and "Dum Dum" Dugan realizes she never had a nickname like the rest of the squad. He suggests "Miss Union Jack" (see in the Captain America section above), which she declines.
** In Season Two, Whitney Frost doesn't go by her codename Madame Masque; there are some visual references made to it but as Whitney never actually wears a mask, the name wouldn't make sense if it were used. Joseph Manfredi also doesn't go by "Blackwing", though it's another case where this version isn't a supervillain and so has no need for a codename. The conspiracy of powerbrokers has been renamed from the Secret Empire to the Council of Nine or just "the Council". Finally, the season's {{Phlebotinum}} is called Zero Matter instead of Darkforce, though Wilkes calls it ''a'' "dark force" (and ''Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.'' had already established that it will be called Darkforce by modern times).
* ''Series/Daredevil2015'':
** Daredevil starts out as just "the man in the black mask". After the bombings of the Russian hideouts and the cops getting shot, Wilson Fisk paints him as a terrorist and the media dub him "the Devil of Hell's Kitchen". It's only at the end of the season when he's proven himself a hero by stopping Fisk's escape attempt, that he becomes "Daredevil". Matt Murdock and his friends make fun of but admit is better than the last name. However, the "Daredevil" name is not used that often in season 2 as people still are more used to his more dramatic "Devil of Hell's Kitchen" alias.
** Wilson Fisk is never called "Comicbook/TheKingpin" once in the first season, but he does receives a few references to kings (examples: on Ben Urich's corkboard, Fisk is represented by a ''King'' of Hearts playing card affixed by a white push''pin'', Detective Blake calls him "King Frickin' Kong"). It eventually comes into play in season 2 while he's in prison. Dutton, an inmate who runs the prison's underground economy, [[BullyingADragon tries to intimidate Fisk by claiming he's the kingpin of the joint.]] Fisk, of course, arranges his death at the hands of the Punisher, and then, as Dutton lies dying on a hospital bed, tells him, "In prison, there's only room for one kingpin," and officially takes the nickname for himself. Even then, the nickname doesn't really catch on, as whenever Fisk gets mentioned in ''Series/LukeCage2016'', it's only by his real name.
** In the second season, Frank Castle's alias as "ComicBook/ThePunisher" starts out as a codename the NYPD used while trying to figure out who the guy was, and the media popularize it from there.
** In [[http://collider.com/daredevil-season-2-deborah-ann-woll-elden-henson-interview/ a January 2016 interview]], Creator/DeborahAnnWoll (Karen Page) commented that she more often than not has a habit of referring to Fisk and Castle by their pedestrian names more often than their villain names, and posits that the non-usage of their codenames establishes these characters as complex people who gradually evolve into the persona of their codename.
** Many of Wilson Fisk's henchmen have codenames in the comics, like Leland Owlsley (The Owl), John Healy (Tenpin [[CompositeCharacter and/or]] Oddball), Roscoe Sweeney (The Fixer), Melvin Potter (Gladiator), and Ben Donovan (Big Ben). Obviously, these are just normal people and not costumed supervillains. There are a few nods to the names, but not many: Healy kills a victim with a bowling ball, Melvin has some Roman gladiator posters on his workshop wall and in season 2 offers to show off his Gladiator suit, Roscoe Sweeney is ''a'' fixer of boxing matches, Owlsley is shown getting a business suit tailored that looks like his comics suit, etc.
** Season 2 has a rare inversion, assigning a codename to someone that didn't have it before. Part of the plot involves tracking down a mysterious drug lord, called "the Blacksmith" because nobody knows his real identity. The character existed in the ''Punisher'' comics, and like the show was a drug dealer and [[spoiler:Frank's former commanding officer Ray Schoonover]], but didn't have a codename.
* Shared among the various Netflix shows, the Chitauri invasion from ''The Avengers'' is simply known as "The Incident". The early script drafts for ''Daredevil'' were originally going to refer to it more directly, but it was found that the words "AlienInvasion" killed the mood the series was going for. As time goes on, the shows are more willing to directly refer to the attack and use the word "alien", especially in ''Series/JessicaJones2015'' and ''Series/LukeCage2016''.
** Another cross-show example is Claire Temple, a CompositeCharacter with the comics character codenamed "Night Nurse". In five seasons across four shows so far, the codename has only been mentioned once when a gangster referred to her as such in ''Luke Cage''.
* ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'':
** Averted with ComicBook/{{Ultron}} and ComicBook/TheVision, who have no other names. Vision was originally referred to as a metaphorical vision of various characters', but later, Tony, and eventually Steve and Thor use it by the end of the movie, all in a way that indicates it's been adopted as his official name.
** Wanda and Pietro Maximoff are never referred to as ComicBook/ScarletWitch and ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}} by way of WritingAroundTrademarks[[note]]due to the cinematic rights to the mutant characters being owned by 20th Century Fox, whose X-films have actually introduced their ''own'' Quicksilver[[/note]]. The closest is when Tony refers to Wanda as "that little witch".
*** Parodied by ''WebVideo/HonestTrailers'':
-->...The Avengers roster bloats even further with '''Vision''', '''Scarlet Witch''' and '''Quicksilver''', who for some reason, are never called '''Vision''', '''Scarlet Witch''' or '''Quicksilver.'''
* ''Film/AntMan:'' The "ComicBook/AntMan" moniker is used by SHIELD (in its anti-Soviet propaganda films) to refer to Hank Pym. The latter then passes the title (along with the corresponding powered suit) to Scott Lang. Hank also explicitly refers to his wife Janet van Dyne as "ComicBook/TheWasp". "Yellowjacket" is the name for the new powered suit Darren Cross develops rather than a specific person's nickname, although he is the only person to use this technology in the movie.
** In ''Civil War'', Scott [[spoiler:uses his powers to grow to AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhatever size for the first time]], but none of the related codenames like [[spoiler:"Giant-Man" or "Goliath"]] are mentioned.
* ''Series/JessicaJones2015'':
** Jessica Jones and Luke Cage (below) hardly had them in the comics to begin with. In a flashback, Trish encourages Jessica to take up superheroics, suggesting she use the nickname "Jewel" (the codename in her comic backstory). Jessica shoots the idea down and says "Jewel is a stripper's name, a really slutty stripper. And if I wear that thing, you're gonna have to call me Cameltoe." Kilgrave is quite disappointed that she's "just Jessica Jones" when asking for her superhero name.
** Trish Walker ([[ComicBook/PatsyWalker Hellcat]]) and Will Simpson (Nuke) don't get their codenames referenced either. Given Simpson's first name was changed for the series[[note]]He's Frank Simpson in the comics. His first name was changed so as [[OneSteveLimit to avoid confusion with Frank Castle]], who was being introduced in season 2 of ''Series/Daredevil2015''[[/note]], it isn't immediately apparent that he's Nuke, right down to the pills that give him super powers, until he utters his (in)famous catchphrase of demanding "Reds."
** Not even established superheroes like the Avengers have their names stated when they're mentioned, with Jessica using sarcastic nicknames like "the flag-waver" or "the big green guy".
** Played with for Kilgrave. In the comics he's "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_Man The Purple Man]]", real name Zebediah Killgrave. In the show, he's simply "Kilgrave", and characters ''still'' [[RunningGag mock it as sounding like a blatant]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast scary name]], the kind of name a kid would come up with to sound threatening but is actually ridiculous. [[spoiler:It turns out that "Kilgrave" is an alias. His real name is Kevin Thompson, and he really ''is'' [[PsychopathicManchild that childish]].]] While he's never referred to as the "Purple Man" on screen, the name is still alluded to: most of his wardrobe is comprised of purple clothing, a purple tint is applied to a number of his scenes, and people affected by his mind control see the world covered in purple light. In the finale, he does start turning purple after getting a power boost, but even that is more subtle than the deep shade of his comic book version. He also starts turning purple as Jessica chokes him and breaks his neck.
* ''Series/LukeCage2016'':
** ComicBook/{{Luke|CageHeroForHire}} himself and ComicBook/MistyKnight barely have codenames in the first place. Luke does have an infrequently-used name of "Power Man" in the comics, which is shown here as one of Pop's {{Affectionate Nickname}}s for him.
** In a clever aversion, the codenames used by criminals, such as Shades (real name Hernan Alvarez) and Diamondback (real name Willis Stryker), are repurposed as street gang nicknames.
** Played with for Cottonmouth. In the comics, it was [[StevenUlyssesPerhero his real surname]]. Here, his name is Cornell ''Stokes''. [[BerserkButton And he absolutely hates being called]] [[EmbarrassingNickname "Cottonmouth"]].
** Mariah Dillard doesn't go by "Black Mariah". The one time that Cottonmouth taunts her with that name, it [[BerserkButton sets her off]].
* ''Film/DoctorStrange2016'' is another case where nobody has codenames to begin with. Yes, even our hero himself, who is legally [[StevenUlyssesPerhero Stephen Strange, MD]]. Like the Zemo example above, Baron Mordo is not actually a Baron here and is just called Karl Mordo.
* ''Series/IronFist2017'': Averted for Danny Rand. "Iron Fist" is a proper title that was bestowed upon him. Played with for ComicBook/ColleenWing: she didn't have her own codename in the comics, she does make a reference by calling herself "Daughter of the Dragon" when participating in underground cage matches; which is the team name for [[ComicBook/DaughtersOfTheDragon her and Misty Knight as a duo]].
* ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming'': Spider-Man averted it early on, as in his debut appearance in ''Civil War'', Peter and Tony openly discuss his codename. ("You're, what? Spider-ling? Spider-Boy?" "...Spider-Man." "Not in that onesie.")
* ''Film/BlackPanther'': When the character is introduced in ''Civil War'', T'Challa mentions the name to explain why his costume is cat-themed, but it's otherwise unused. Even so, its existence is justified since it's not merely a codename but a tribal and royal title. In ''Age of Ultron'', ''Panther'' villain Ulysses Klaw appears under his original surname of ''Klaue'', instead of his supervillain name.

to:

[[folder:The Marvel Cinematic Universe]]
In general,
[[index]]
* ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames/TheDarkKnightTrilogy
* ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames/MarvelCinematicUniverse
* ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames/XMenFilmSeries
[[/index]]

[[folder:(Non-MCU) Spider-Man Films]]
* An entire scene played for laughs in ''Film/SpiderMan2'' was dedicated to J. Jonah Jameson coming up with a good nickname for ComicBook/DoctorOctopus, only for him to mostly go by his real name or
the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse goes out of its way to subvert, lampshade, and defy the concept of a SecretIdentity. None nickname "Doc Ock" for most of the Avengers have one -- not even Iron Man, who had one movie, as well as the real life advertising and merchandising.
* ComicBook/{{Venom}} is known only by his real name, Eddie Brock, throughout all of ''Film/SpiderMan3''. Similarly, Flint Marko is generally known by his real name
for decades most of the film until a reporter calls him "the Sandman" during the final battle.
** In the novelization, the name is at least alluded to when Eddie taunts Spider-Man by saying that they are (in reference to himself in the symbiote) his "venom".
* While ComicBook/NormanOsborn was called "Green Goblin" multiple times in [[Film/SpiderMan1 the first movie]], when it came time for his son Harry to adopt that persona, the name was never uttered. In fact, promotional material called him ''New Goblin'', a name that was never used
in the comics. Tony The closest Harry comes to being known as the Green Goblin is when Peter mockingly calls him "Goblin Jr.". Harry himself mocks how pointless it is and defies the trope by outing himself in the last scene of [[Film/IronMan1 his first film]] before the end credits. That isn't to say that the heroes don't have their comic codenames, though they are usually given to the characters by another source, either as propaganda, used as a military call sign, or are dubbed as such by the media.

* ''Film/IronMan'':
** Iron Man himself doesn't get called that name until the end
strips most of the first film goblin styling out of the hardware, going for basic armor and it's only used once or twice a hoverboard in place of the following films where he appears ("I am Iron Man" gets an echo in ''Iron Man 2'' and ComicBook/NickFury refers to him as Iron Man once), but the name is also used in specific reference to the suit (i.e. "the Iron Man weapon" or "Tony Stark's Iron Man").
** The words "ComicBook/WarMachine" originate in ''Film/IronMan2'' as an offhanded insult from Tony to James Rhodes.
spiky hang-glider (which [[FridgeBrilliance makes sense]], given that [[SpikesOfVillainy those spikes]] ''[[HoistByHisOwnPetard killed]]'' his father...).
*
Averted by ''3'', where "War Machine" in ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan''. The mutated Dr. Curt Connors is his official codename and Tony is incredulous that Rhodey actually adopted it just from that remark. Or rather, his ''official'' codename in ''3'' is "Iron Patriot", which Rhodey claims "tested better with focus groups"; but a number of people state they liked "War Machine" better. By ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'', he's just "War Machine" again and uses the name in a BadassBoast.
** As for the villains, Obadiah Stane is never called "Iron Monger", although he briefly says the word in reference to Stark Industries' role as a weapon manufacturer. Meanwhile, there's Ivan Vanko: a CompositeCharacter of two villains named "Crimson Dynamo" and "Whiplash". He gets called neither in the second film, though the marketing referred to him as Whiplash. In ''Iron Man 3'', Eric Savin and Jack Taggert go by their real names, and are never once
referred to as "Coldblood" or "Firepower" (and "the Lizard" several times. Spider-Man himself, of course, is another clear aversion.
** Played straight and averted in
the Extremis soldiers all have heat powers, so "Coldblood" wouldn't even make sense anyway). The Mandarin [[Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan2 sequel]] though. Spider-Man is an aversion, being referred to as such, [[spoiler:though the character Ben Kingsley played is ultimately revealed as a DecoyLeader. The real villain, Aldrich Killian, only called such very frequently. Electro refers to himself as the Mandarin once]]. This gets such even stranger in the short ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail The King]]'', where it's revealed that [[spoiler:Killian wasn't the REAL Mandarin either, and had stolen the name. The REAL one, though never shown, is naturally miffed at other people stealing his shtick.]]
** In ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'', Tony uses a special massive set of armor designed to subdue the Hulk. It's popularly known and marketed as the "Hulkbuster", but the name only shows up in the movie on Tony's HUD - in dialogue, the actual codename for the armor seems to be [[BettyAndVeronica "Veronica"]].
* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'':
** Averted by The Hulk, who is called "Hulk" four times. The first time comes after the Culver University fight, where some college students refer to him as a "big hulk". Later, the military guys chasing the transformed Blonsky through New York mistakenly report that "the Hulk is in the street." Blonsky explicitly uses that name after the Hulk shows up for the final battle and the Hulk himself uses his [[CatchPhrase patented "HULK SMASH!"]] at the end of the fight. In ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', Bruce Banner notably takes pains not to call his alter-ego "the Hulk", preferring to call him "the other guy" instead. The one time he ''does'' say Hulk, he immediately corrects himself. But no-one else has the same qualms.
** "The Abomination" a.k.a. Emil Blonsky goes by his given name and there is only an offhand reference to that title once, when Dr. Sterns tells Blonksky that augmenting him with the Hulk's blood might turn him into "an abomination". In ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots The Consultant]]'', the name Abomination is brought up but Agent Coulson says "[The World Security Council] ''really'' don't like when you call him that."
* Averted in the ''Film/{{Thor}}'' films, where everyone's "superhero" identities are in fact their real names. Thor himself inverts it in the first movie, as the character once had a civilian identity in the comics, but the movies don't bother. So "Thor" is used all throughout the movie, while the name "Dr. Donald Blake" is the one that only gets [[MythologyGag a few token mentions]].
* In the ''[[Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger Captain America]]'' movies:
** The eponymous hero plays with the trope constantly. He only takes the name Captain America as a stage name, not as a superhero. Once he makes the transition to war hero, all of the characters call him Steve or "Captain Rogers" with a few exceptions (once by Bucky, once by Cap himself, and the other time by the Red Skull), and most of those examples are used as humor, irony, or mockery. Further, unlike in the original [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeofComicBooks Golden Age]] comics, Cap does officially have the rank of "Captain", and since we've got various characters referring to him by "Captain", it's hard to know if they're using his stage name or military rank. By ''The Avengers'', though, Captain America has become legendary and the name is in widespread use.
** Johann Schmidt gets called "The ComicBook/RedSkull" (by ''Hitler'', no less) one time as an insult, much to his annoyance. For the rest of the movie, only his real name is used. However,
when he's mentioned in future movies just being tortured and shows, it's only done by his codename.
** ComicBook/TheFalcon has his codename used regularly in the various movies he appears in, adopted from the model of flight pack he uses.
** Technically, this trope is true of Montgomery Falsworth, aka "Union Jack", in the first movie. However, Falsworth is not a costumed hero in this movie so there would be no reason
continues to say the name at all.
** In ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'': The "Winter Soldier" codename is invoked frequently, but the heroes stop calling him this once they find out that he is [[spoiler:ComicBook/BuckyBarnes]]. In ''Civil War'' it's explained that [[spoiler:there are more HYDRA super-assassins, and Bucky refers to them as "Winter Soldiers" as well]]. Georges Batroc is revised to be a normal mercenary instead of a supervillainous one and is never called "Batroc the Leaper". Finally, Sharon Carter is referred to as "ComicBook/{{Agent 13}}" throughout most of the movie, with Natasha only revealing her first name during the movie's last scene; in ''Civil War'' she only goes by her given name (and may in fact have lost her "Agent" designation after [[spoiler:S.H.I.E.L.D. fell]]).
** ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'': Brock Rumlow is never referred to as Crossbones, though a tie-in comic establishes that the codename does exist in-universe (it also wasn't used
when the character was in ''Winter Soldier'', but at that point he hadn't taken the identity of Crossbones yet). Zemo never had becomes a codename to begin with, but is nonetheless changed from ''Baron'' Zemo since he's a Sokovian soldier rather than an German aristocrat as he is in the comics.
* From multiple movies, Natasha Romanov's handle of "Comicbook/BlackWidow" never comes up in ''Iron Man 2'', and is only used in ''The Avengers'' twice. In the first instance, it was spoken ''in Russian'', so anyone watching the film outside of its Russian dub actually only gets to ''read'' the name in subtitle form. Its other brief appearance is on the screen of a dossier Coulson is viewing. It's used all of once in ''The Winter Soldier'', where an agent refers to her as Black Widow while communicating with Rumlow. The name was absent from ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'', but reappeared in ''Civil War'' when Zemo mentions "the Black Widow."
* In ''The Avengers'', Clint Barton is called "{{ComicBook/Hawkeye}}" all of once by the Black Widow during the Battle of New York. It appears to be his radio callsign, with the name appearing briefly when Coulson is viewing his dossier in the film's beginning. The closest anyone comes otherwise is Dr. Erik Selvig semi-dismissively calling him "the Hawk". During his prior cameo in ''Thor'' it wasn't even alluded to, and in ''Avengers: Age of Ultron'' it's used once in an affectionately mocking way by [[spoiler:his wife]]. It's absent again in ''Civil War'', and when meeting Black Panther he explicitly introduces himself as "Clint", not "Hawkeye".
* This trope can be applied to the MacGuffin of ''Captain America'' and ''The Avengers''. In the movies, it's
proper villain. [[spoiler:Harry,]] however, isn't called the Tesseract, or "the cube". They never use its comic book name, the "Cosmic Cube". However, it and other {{MacGuffin}}s are collectively known as [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Stones]], a Green Goblin at all. The Rhino gets very little screen time but is only identified by his civilian name that ''is'' taken from the comics.
* From ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'': Most characters don't go by codenames, though a reference is often snuck in somewhere:
** Franklin Hall and Donnie Gill didn't go by their supervillain names, Graviton and Blizzard, in their introductory episodes... but then again, they weren't supervillains ''yet''. When Gill reappears, it's mentioned that the experiments with his powers had been codenamed "Project Blizzard".
** Lampshaded aversion: Raina manipulates a pyrokinetic's ego by suggesting
(though he adopt the name "Scorch," commenting on how nobody knows "Steve Rogers" but "Captain America" is a household name. Everyone who hears it is incredulous at the idea, including the pyro at first, but he warms up to it (pun not intended) and by the time S.H.I.E.L.D. shows up he's embraced it; which is then taken as a sign he's getting out of control.
--->'''Coulson:''' [[OhCrap Ah, crap,]] they gave him a ''name''.
** Another episode concerns a device whose name is Russian and translates to "Overkill" in English; there's some snark that something must have been lost in translation but it's generally referred to as the Overkill Device in this and future episodes -- in the comics it was called the Overkill ''Horn''. (Since it uses sound waves)
** Averted again with the first season BigBad, who is known as "the Clairvoyant"; although almost every character rejects the possibility of actual psychic powers, they keep calling him that because they don't have another name for him. They eventually are able to communicate with him directly, where the Clairvoyant says his subordinates coined the name and he
calls himself finds it a bit overdramatic. Once he drops his cover he encourages everyone to use his real name. (And for the record, [[spoiler:no, he does not The Rhino). We also have psychic powers; his "omniscience" is based on high-level SHIELD security clearance.]])
** Coulson's team discovers a super-soldier project codenamed "Deathlok", and they soon start referring to the project's subject himself as Deathlok completely unironically. Later in the first season, [[spoiler:it's discovered that there is more than one subject, at which point Deathlok becomes somewhat of a generic label.]]
** Marcus Daniels is never called "Blackout" in dialogue, though eagle-eyed viewers can make out the name on his profile. The source of his powers ''is'' called the Darkforce, however, with requisite lampshading:
--->'''Coulson:''' Because [[SarcasmMode nothing bad ever happens]] when you're working with [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast something called "Darkforce."]]
*** Darkforce and its other name from ''Agent Carter'', "Zero Matter", get referenced in a later season, prompting another round of snark:
--->'''Mack:''' Who names these? Are there focus groups for evil things?
** Other villains that don't have their codenames used include Carl Creel (the Absorbing Man, though it is referenced in dialogue), Daniel Whitehall (Kraken), Marcus Scarlotti (Whiplash, likely because it was already taken by Vanko in ''Iron Man 2''), and David Angar (Angar the Screamer). The same goes for one of the heroes, Bobbi Morse (ComicBook/{{Mockingbird}}).
** Inverted with one of Whitehall's [[TheDragon Dragons]], Agent 33, who had suffered a LossOfIdentity thanks to {{Brainwashing}} and whose name ([[spoiler:Kara Palamas]]) was not known, even to her, until
"Felicia" but she started getting it back.
** The real names of Skye and her father (originally credited as "the Doctor") were deliberately withheld from the audience in order to hide their identities and the fact that they are even ''from'' the comics in the first place. Eventually their names were revealed to be ComicBook/{{Daisy|Johnson}} and Cal Johnson respectively, known in the comics as "Quake" and "Mister Hyde" (real name Calvin ''Zabo''). Cal's codename wound up never being used during his time on the show, but he implied that it existed (he mentioned that he changed his surname, though he didn't specify whether it was to "Zabo" or "Hyde"). Skye eventually switched to using "Daisy Johnson" full-time, while the name "Quake" didn't appear until another season and a half after the reveal, when [[spoiler:Daisy became a vigilante and the media caught wind of her]].
** CanonForeigner Lincoln Campbell was assigned the codename "Sparkplug" by SHIELD, but it has never been used in the show and barely shows up in promotional material either.
** Averted with Lash for similar reasons as the Clairvoyant; to preserve the mystery of his real name. After TheReveal, it's still used [[spoiler:to differentiate his human identity from his [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity less rational superpowered side]].]]
** The Season Three BigBad is known in the comics as Hive (as in MindHive). In the show, it took most of the season to reveal that in ancient times it was known as "Alveus" (Latin for "Hive"), but once that's known the English translation caught on quickly. Up until then, the closest thing it had to a name was [[NothingIsScarier "It"]].
** Defied with James in Season Three. As soon as he gets [[PlayingWithFire heat and explosion]] powers, he starts brainstorming fire-related codenames to use before he settles on his comics name of "Hellfire".
** Played with for Elena Rodriguez. In the comics, she's ''Yolanda'' Rodriguez, with the nickname of "Yo-Yo" but the official codename of "Slingshot". In the show, she still gets the nickname "Yo-Yo" despite the fact that it no longer links to her given name, but "Slingshot" is never used... until a series of web videos starring her came out, bearing the title ''WebVideo/AgentsOfSHIELDSlingshot''. Even then, "Slingshot" still isn't used in-universe.
** The results of an imperfect attempt to create Inhumans are dubbed "Primitives". In the comics, these are the ''Alpha'' Primitives, the Inhumans' slave race. The "alpha" part gets a nod when their creator says they're just an alpha version and begs his boss to let him make improvements for a beta test.
** Averted with [[ComicBook/AllNewGhostRider Ghost Rider]], who is introduced as having already started to become an urban legend under that name in LA.
** Jeffrey Mace
doesn't use the codename "Patriot", but is referred to as a patriot a few times in dialogue. [[spoiler:And the serum that gives him his powers is also called "Project Patriot".]] He's also compared to Captain America in-universe, referencing how he held that title in the comics for a while as Rogers' successor.
* ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'': In general, the movie uses the same aversion as the ''Thor'' movies in that everyone's names are their real ones, but there are a few examples:
** The team's name "the guardians of the galaxy" is a mocking nickname given to the group by Ronan the Accuser. Peter throws it back in his face when they defeat him, with the implication that they may adopt it as a group name.
** Parodied with "Star-Lord", as Peter Quill introduces himself as that, but people just respond with confusion. When the space cops later look at his rap sheet, they comment that apparently the only person who calls Quill "Star-Lord" is ''himself''. Comically, he is ecstatic when, in the last act of the film, someone actually ''does'' call him Star-Lord.
--->'''Rhomann Dey:''' Hey! If it isn't "Star-Prince."\\
'''Quill:''' Star-''Lord''.\\
'''Rhomann:''' Sorry; "Lord." ''[to his partner]'' I picked this guy up a while back for petty theft. He's got a ''code name!''\\
'''Quill:''' Come on, man, it's an ''outlaw'' name.\\
'''Rhomann:''' Relax, pal, it's cool to have a code name. It's not that weird.
** Inverted with Drax the Destroyer. In the comics, he's a transformed human named Arthur Douglas. In the movie, he's an alien and Drax is his real name (with the "Destroyer" nickname earned for his RoaringRampageOfRevenge).
** Rocket's full name in the comics is "Rocket Raccoon," but everyone calls him Rocket. It's justified by two reasons: 1) Rocket hates being called an animal, which the name clearly insinuates; and 2) he doesn't even know what a raccoon ''is''.
** One character is formally introduced, both here and in TheStinger of ''Thor: The Dark World'', as "Taneleer Tivan, the Collector", covering both real name and "codename" in one fell swoop.
** Like the Cosmic Cube example from ''Captain America'' and ''The Avengers'', nobody refers to Ronan's hammer as the Universal Weapon (partly because it never comes up; the bigger threat is Ronan himself).
* In ''Series/AgentCarter'':
** Neither of Season One's main villains are called by their codename. [[spoiler:A
become Black Widow agent]] has no direct reference made to her codename (or any real name for that matter; her given name is explicitly an alias) and is only identifiable by sharing a backstory with [[spoiler:Natasha Romanoff]]. The codename of [[spoiler:Doctor Faustus]] gets a nod when he's shown reading [[Theatre/DoctorFaustus his namesake play]]. Codenames are also referenced when Peggy teams up with her war buddies in Cat within the Howling Commandos and "Dum Dum" Dugan realizes she never had a nickname like the rest of the squad. He suggests "Miss Union Jack" (see in the Captain America section above), which she declines.
** In Season Two, Whitney Frost doesn't go by her codename Madame Masque; there are some visual references made to it but as Whitney never actually wears a mask, the name wouldn't make sense if it were used. Joseph Manfredi also doesn't go by "Blackwing", though it's another case where this version isn't a supervillain and so has no need for a codename. The conspiracy of powerbrokers has been renamed from the Secret Empire to the Council of Nine or just "the Council". Finally, the season's {{Phlebotinum}} is called Zero Matter instead of Darkforce, though Wilkes calls it ''a'' "dark force" (and ''Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.'' had already established that it will be called Darkforce by modern times).
* ''Series/Daredevil2015'':
** Daredevil starts out as just "the man in the black mask". After the bombings of the Russian hideouts and the cops getting shot, Wilson Fisk paints him as a terrorist and the media dub him "the Devil of Hell's Kitchen". It's only at the end of the season when he's proven himself a hero by stopping Fisk's escape attempt, that he becomes "Daredevil". Matt Murdock and his friends make fun of but admit is better than the last name. However, the "Daredevil" name is not used that often in season 2 as people still are more used to his more dramatic "Devil of Hell's Kitchen" alias.
** Wilson Fisk is never called "Comicbook/TheKingpin" once in the first season, but he does receives a few references to kings (examples: on Ben Urich's corkboard, Fisk is represented by a ''King'' of Hearts playing card affixed by a white push''pin'', Detective Blake calls him "King Frickin' Kong"). It eventually comes into play in season 2 while he's in prison. Dutton, an inmate who runs the prison's underground economy, [[BullyingADragon tries to intimidate Fisk by claiming he's the kingpin of the joint.]] Fisk, of course, arranges his death at the hands of the Punisher, and then, as Dutton lies dying on a hospital bed, tells him, "In prison, there's only room for one kingpin," and officially takes the nickname for himself. Even then, the nickname doesn't really catch on, as whenever Fisk gets mentioned in ''Series/LukeCage2016'', it's only by his real name.
** In the second season, Frank Castle's alias as "ComicBook/ThePunisher" starts out as a codename the NYPD used while trying to figure out who the guy was, and the media popularize it from there.
** In [[http://collider.com/daredevil-season-2-deborah-ann-woll-elden-henson-interview/ a January 2016 interview]], Creator/DeborahAnnWoll (Karen Page) commented that she more often than not has a habit of referring to Fisk and Castle by their pedestrian names more often than their villain names, and posits that the non-usage of their codenames establishes these characters as complex people who gradually evolve into the persona of their codename.
** Many of Wilson Fisk's henchmen have codenames in the comics, like Leland Owlsley (The Owl), John Healy (Tenpin [[CompositeCharacter and/or]] Oddball), Roscoe Sweeney (The Fixer), Melvin Potter (Gladiator), and Ben Donovan (Big Ben). Obviously, these are just normal people and not costumed supervillains. There are a few nods to the names, but not many: Healy kills a victim with a bowling ball, Melvin has some Roman gladiator posters on his workshop wall and in season 2 offers to show off his Gladiator suit, Roscoe Sweeney is ''a'' fixer of boxing matches, Owlsley is shown getting a business suit tailored that looks like his comics suit, etc.
** Season 2 has a rare inversion, assigning a codename to someone that didn't have it before. Part of the plot involves tracking down a mysterious drug lord, called "the Blacksmith" because nobody knows his real identity. The character existed in the ''Punisher'' comics, and like the show was a drug dealer and [[spoiler:Frank's former commanding officer Ray Schoonover]], but didn't have a codename.
* Shared among the various Netflix shows, the Chitauri invasion from ''The Avengers'' is simply known as "The Incident". The early script drafts for ''Daredevil'' were originally going to refer to it more directly, but it was found that the words "AlienInvasion" killed the mood the series was going for. As time goes on, the shows are more willing to directly refer to the attack and use the word "alien", especially in ''Series/JessicaJones2015'' and ''Series/LukeCage2016''.
** Another cross-show example is Claire Temple, a CompositeCharacter with the comics character codenamed "Night Nurse". In five seasons across four shows so far, the codename has only been mentioned once when a gangster referred to her as such in ''Luke Cage''.
* ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'':
** Averted with ComicBook/{{Ultron}} and ComicBook/TheVision, who have no other names. Vision was originally referred to as a metaphorical vision of various characters', but later, Tony, and eventually Steve and Thor use it by the end of the movie, all in a way that indicates it's been adopted as his official name.
** Wanda and Pietro Maximoff are never referred to as ComicBook/ScarletWitch and ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}} by way of WritingAroundTrademarks[[note]]due to the cinematic rights to the mutant characters being owned by 20th Century Fox, whose X-films have actually introduced their ''own'' Quicksilver[[/note]]. The closest is when Tony refers to Wanda as "that little witch".
*** Parodied by ''WebVideo/HonestTrailers'':
-->...The Avengers roster bloats even further with '''Vision''', '''Scarlet Witch''' and '''Quicksilver''', who for some reason, are never called '''Vision''', '''Scarlet Witch''' or '''Quicksilver.'''
* ''Film/AntMan:'' The "ComicBook/AntMan" moniker is used by SHIELD (in its anti-Soviet propaganda films) to refer to Hank Pym. The latter then passes the title (along with the corresponding powered suit) to Scott Lang. Hank also explicitly refers to his wife Janet van Dyne as "ComicBook/TheWasp". "Yellowjacket" is the name for the new powered suit Darren Cross develops rather than a specific person's nickname, although he is the only person to use this technology in the movie.
** In ''Civil War'', Scott [[spoiler:uses his powers to grow to AttackOfTheFiftyFootWhatever size for the first time]], but none of the related codenames like [[spoiler:"Giant-Man" or "Goliath"]] are mentioned.
* ''Series/JessicaJones2015'':
** Jessica Jones and Luke Cage (below) hardly had them in the comics to begin with. In a flashback, Trish encourages Jessica to take up superheroics, suggesting she use the nickname "Jewel" (the codename in her comic backstory). Jessica shoots the idea down and says "Jewel is a stripper's name, a really slutty stripper. And if I wear that thing, you're gonna have to call me Cameltoe." Kilgrave is quite disappointed that she's "just Jessica Jones" when asking for her superhero name.
** Trish Walker ([[ComicBook/PatsyWalker Hellcat]]) and Will Simpson (Nuke) don't get their codenames referenced either. Given Simpson's first name was changed for the series[[note]]He's Frank Simpson in the comics. His first name was changed so as [[OneSteveLimit to avoid confusion with Frank Castle]], who was being introduced in season 2 of ''Series/Daredevil2015''[[/note]], it isn't immediately apparent that he's Nuke, right down to the pills that give him super powers, until he utters his (in)famous catchphrase of demanding "Reds."
** Not even established superheroes like the Avengers have their names stated when they're mentioned, with Jessica using sarcastic nicknames like "the flag-waver" or "the big green guy".
** Played with for Kilgrave. In the comics he's "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_Man The Purple Man]]", real name Zebediah Killgrave. In the show, he's simply "Kilgrave", and characters ''still'' [[RunningGag mock it as sounding like a blatant]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast scary name]], the kind of name a kid would come up with to sound threatening but is actually ridiculous. [[spoiler:It turns out that "Kilgrave" is an alias. His real name is Kevin Thompson, and he really ''is'' [[PsychopathicManchild that childish]].]] While he's never referred to as the "Purple Man" on screen, the name is still alluded to: most of his wardrobe is comprised of purple clothing, a purple tint is applied to a number of his scenes, and people affected by his mind control see the world covered in purple light. In the finale, he does start turning purple after getting a power boost, but even that is more subtle than the deep shade of his comic book version. He also starts turning purple as Jessica chokes him and breaks his neck.
* ''Series/LukeCage2016'':
** ComicBook/{{Luke|CageHeroForHire}} himself and ComicBook/MistyKnight barely have codenames in the first place. Luke does have an infrequently-used name of "Power Man" in the comics, which is shown here as one of Pop's {{Affectionate Nickname}}s for him.
** In a clever aversion, the codenames used by criminals, such as Shades (real name Hernan Alvarez) and Diamondback (real name Willis Stryker), are repurposed as street gang nicknames.
** Played with for Cottonmouth. In the comics, it was [[StevenUlyssesPerhero his real surname]]. Here, his name is Cornell ''Stokes''. [[BerserkButton And he absolutely hates being called]] [[EmbarrassingNickname "Cottonmouth"]].
** Mariah Dillard doesn't go by "Black Mariah". The one time that Cottonmouth taunts her with that name, it [[BerserkButton sets her off]].
* ''Film/DoctorStrange2016'' is another case where nobody has codenames to begin with. Yes, even our hero himself, who is legally [[StevenUlyssesPerhero Stephen Strange, MD]]. Like the Zemo example above, Baron Mordo is not actually a Baron here and is just called Karl Mordo.
* ''Series/IronFist2017'': Averted for Danny Rand. "Iron Fist" is a proper title that was bestowed upon him. Played with for ComicBook/ColleenWing: she didn't have her own codename in the comics, she does make a reference by calling herself "Daughter of the Dragon" when participating in underground cage matches; which is the team name for [[ComicBook/DaughtersOfTheDragon her and Misty Knight as a duo]].
* ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming'': Spider-Man averted it early on, as in his debut appearance in ''Civil War'', Peter and Tony openly discuss his codename. ("You're, what? Spider-ling? Spider-Boy?" "...Spider-Man." "Not in that onesie.")
* ''Film/BlackPanther'': When the character is introduced in ''Civil War'', T'Challa mentions the name to explain why his costume is cat-themed, but it's otherwise unused. Even so, its existence is justified since it's not merely a codename but a tribal and royal title. In ''Age of Ultron'', ''Panther'' villain Ulysses Klaw appears under his original surname of ''Klaue'', instead of his supervillain name.
film.



[[folder:X-Men Film Series]]
* This trope is played with all over the place. Codenames are something of a plot point; it's shown that the concept of a "true name" began with Xavier's eponymous "[[Film/XMenFirstClass first class]]." However, it's originally used in playful jest and doesn't become serious until Magneto insists upon being called by that name at the very end of the film. In later movies, a few mutants seem to adopt codenames as their "true names" as evidenced when Marie changes her name to Rogue or when Magneto asks John what his real name is and he starts calling himself Pyro. Other than that, the codenames are generally used as {{Mythology Gag}}s or {{Futureshadowing}}, and occasionally to differentiate between a person's "regular" self and his/her superhero/supervillain persona.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesWolverine Wolverine]] goes by the name Logan almost exclusively and even mocks people with codenames. Stryker seems to be the only one who wants to call him Wolverine, which was more of a military-style CodeName. In the first film, it is mentioned that "The Wolverine" is a nickname he uses in his cage-fighting career, and in ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', he's inspired to take the pseudonym by a Myth/{{Native American|Mythology}} folk-tale his girlfriend recounts to him.
** The code name [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesProfessorCharlesXavier Professor X]] is only used twice in both ''Film/XMenFirstClass'' and the ''Film/XMenFilmSeries'', and Xavier brushes it off. He's more commonly addressed by his professor title, or Charles by those who are close to him.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesMagneto Magneto]] is often referred to as Erik, although usually only by Xavier, Mystique, and Beast.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesMystique Mystique]] is frequently called Raven by Charles and Hank.
** Comicbook/{{Cyclops}}' codename is mentioned, but he mostly goes by Scott throughout all of the movies.
** Comicbook/JeanGrey and Comicbook/KittyPryde never use codenames in the films. While their comic counterparts went through a few over the years, they usually go by their birth names anyway (a rarity for superhero comics).
** Hank [=McCoy=] doesn't go by his codename Beast in ''Film/XMenTheLastStand''. He does eventually embrace the nickname that Havok bestows on him just before the climax of ''First Class'', however. In ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', Wolverine calls Hank (who has essentially retired from superheroics due to the X-Men having disbanded) Beast and "Beastie" several times to try and goad him into a fight. He's most often referred to by his given name, though.
** Storm is the lone aversion. She's almost always called by her code name in the films. The only time her real name Ororo is used is when Xavier introduces her to Wolverine, or when Beast greets her in the third film.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesDeadpool Deadpool]] is never referred to as "Deadpool" in ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', and is always called "Wade" or after his transformation "Weapon XI." The closest they ever get is Stryker calling the experimental procedure "The Deadpool." This is averted in his [[Film/{{Deadpool 2016}} solo film]] where he is referred to as such rather frequently.
** Bobby has no codename in the first movie, introduces himself to Wolverine as Iceman in the second film, and is then called Bobby throughout the rest of the series until a brief moment in which Pyro picks a fight.
** Colossus was referred to by his codename by Wolverine as they walked out of the Danger Room near the beginning of ''Film/XMenTheLastStand''. Beforehand, Wolverine calls him Tin-Man as a joke. He does go by Colossus in ''Film/{{Deadpool 2016}}'', along with the other X-Mansion resident that shows up, [[AwesomeMcCoolName Negasonic Teenage Warhead]].
** The name Nightcrawler is only mentioned in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'' when Kurt expounds about his time at the Munich circus. In ''Film/XMenApocalypse'', he is introduced in a cage fight as Nightcrawler, corrects Mystique when she calls him "Crawler," and Jean says his codename when she orders the X-Men to "grab hold of Nightcrawler," but mostly goes by Kurt.
** ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}} is never called by that name in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' and ''Film/XMenApocalypse''. He's known simply as Peter.
** Havok is said only once in ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', it's alluded to when Professor Xavier orders him to "Wreak havoc" in ''Film/XMenApocalypse'', but the name is only used once in this film when Mystique recounts their first mission. The rest of the time, he's just Alex.
** Warren Worthington III's codename Angel is never used in ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'', but he gets a big subversion in ''Apocalypse'', being referred to only as "Angel."
** ''Film/X2XMenUnited'': Lady Deathstrike is never used. Her real name (Yuriko) is only mentioned in passing.
** ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'': Subverted and played straight with Jimmy as his profile indeed shows his alternative alias of "Leech", but he's never called that by anyone, nor does he refer to himself as such.
** ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine''
*** Comicbook/{{Sabretooth}} is only called "Victor" throughout ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine''.
*** The Blob never gets called by that name. The best we get is a LampshadeHanging where he mistakes Logan's [[VerbalTic "bub"]] for that name, and sees it as an insult.
*** The name "Comicbook/{{Gambit}}" is used a few times, although it's stated to be a prison nickname he was given by Stryker's guards.
** ''Film/XMenFirstClass'':
*** Darwin from ''[[Film/XMenFirstClass First Class]]'' is actually a nickname which happens to fit his powers, and his real name (Armando) is never referenced.
*** It gets a bit tricky with Angel Salvadore (not to be confused with Warren Worthington III's Angel); in the comics, her real name ''and'' code name are both Angel, but she takes the codename "Tempest" when she loses her powers and gains PoweredArmor. In the movie, though, she explicitly states that Angel is a stage name.
** ''Film/TheWolverine'':
*** Played straight with the adamantium PoweredArmor that is not explicitly called Silver Samurai. The moniker of Silver Samurai was named after a suit of samurai armor that serves as a LegacyCharacter for the Yashida generations.
*** Played with for Viper, who never calls herself "the Viper" but does says she's ''a'' viper. For legal reasons, her other moniker "Madame Hydra" does not come up, due to Marvel owning the rights for {{ComicBook/HYDRA}}.
*** Played straight with The Hand (mainly linked to the Film/{{Daredevil}} / Film/{{Elektra}} franchise, and ownership of those rights reverted back to Marvel before the film was finished), who are referred to as "The Black Clan" and led by Harada.
*** Wolverine ''does'' use his codename, however.
---->'''Shingen''': What kind of monster are you?!\\
'''Logan''': [[TitleDrop The Wolverine!]]
** ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'': The Free Mutants never have their real names used (with the exception of Bishop). Of course, in the comics, he's a strange case; from the future and known ''only'' as Bishop for the longest time, he eventually took the name Lucas Bishop. Which we should consider his "real name," and if ''either'' is what his momma named him when he was born, is hard to know.
** ''Film/{{Deadpool|2016}}'': It's a plot point that villain Ajax is actually Francis, with the title character only calling him by the given name to mock Ajax afterwards. Subverted with his henchwoman Angel (Angel Dust in the comics), who never gets a proper name. Just for fun, Deadpool introduces himself to the taxi driver Dopinder as "[[TheNameIsBondJamesBond Pool, Dead]]." After that, Dopinder consistently refers to him as "Mr. Pool" and even adds him as a contact on his phone this way.
** ''Film/XMenApocalypse'':
*** [[Comicbook/{{Apocalypse}} The title villain]] is never called by anything other than given name En Sabah Nur, although there's a MythologyGag to [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the name he adopted in the comics]] ("Where ever this being was, he would always have four followers who he would imbue with power." "Like the Four HorsemenOfTheApocalypse.").
*** Subverted by Comicbook/{{Psylocke}}, who is only called by her codename.

to:

[[folder:X-Men Film Series]]
* This trope
[[folder:DC Extended Universe]]
** In ''Film/ManOfSteel'', Clark/Kal-El
is played with all over the place. Codenames are something of a plot point; it's shown that the concept of a "true name" began with Xavier's eponymous "[[Film/XMenFirstClass first class]]." However, it's originally used in playful jest and doesn't become serious until Magneto insists upon being never ''directly'' called by that name at the very end of the film. In later movies, a few mutants seem to adopt codenames as their "true names" as evidenced when Marie changes her name to Rogue or when Magneto asks John what his real name is Film/{{Superman}}. At one point, Lois almost says it before being cut off, and he starts calling himself Pyro. Other than that, the codenames are generally used as {{Mythology Gag}}s or {{Futureshadowing}}, and occasionally a soldier refers to differentiate between a person's "regular" self and his/her superhero/supervillain persona.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesWolverine Wolverine]] goes
him by the name Logan almost exclusively and even mocks people with codenames. Stryker seems to be the only one who wants to call him Wolverine, which was more of a military-style CodeName. In the first film, it is mentioned that "The Wolverine" is a nickname he uses in to the confusion of his cage-fighting career, and in ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', he's inspired to take commanding officer. Presumably the pseudonym by a Myth/{{Native American|Mythology}} folk-tale his girlfriend recounts to him.
** The code name [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesProfessorCharlesXavier Professor X]]
soldiers got it from Lois.
*** After averted. By ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Clark/Kal-El's superheroic alter-ego
is only used twice in both ''Film/XMenFirstClass'' and the ''Film/XMenFilmSeries'', and Xavier brushes it off. He's more commonly addressed by his professor title, or Charles by those who are close to him.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesMagneto Magneto]] is often
referred to as Erik, although usually only by Xavier, Mystique, and Beast.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesMystique Mystique]] is frequently called Raven by Charles and Hank.
** Comicbook/{{Cyclops}}' codename is mentioned, but he mostly goes by Scott throughout all of the movies.
** Comicbook/JeanGrey and Comicbook/KittyPryde never use codenames
Superman; this continues in the films. While their comic counterparts went through a few over the years, they usually go by their birth names anyway (a rarity for superhero comics).
** Hank [=McCoy=] doesn't go by his codename Beast in ''Film/XMenTheLastStand''. He does eventually embrace the nickname that Havok bestows on him just before the climax of ''First Class'', however. In ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', Wolverine calls Hank (who has essentially retired from superheroics due to the X-Men having disbanded) Beast and "Beastie" several times to try and goad him into a fight. He's most often referred to by his given name, though.
** Storm is the lone aversion. She's almost always called by her code name in the films. The only time her real name Ororo is used is when Xavier introduces her to Wolverine, or when Beast greets her in the third film.
** [[Characters/XMenFilmSeriesDeadpool Deadpool]] is never referred to as "Deadpool" in ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', and is always called "Wade" or after his transformation "Weapon XI." The closest they ever get is Stryker calling the experimental procedure "The Deadpool." This is averted in his [[Film/{{Deadpool 2016}} solo film]]
''Film/SuicideSquad2016'' where he is referred to as such rather frequently.
** Bobby has no codename in
the first movie, introduces himself to Wolverine as Iceman in the second film, and is then called Bobby throughout the rest of the series until a brief moment in which Pyro picks a fight.
** Colossus was referred to by his codename by Wolverine as they walked out of the Danger Room near the beginning of ''Film/XMenTheLastStand''. Beforehand, Wolverine calls him Tin-Man as a joke. He does go by Colossus in ''Film/{{Deadpool 2016}}'', along with the other X-Mansion resident that shows up, [[AwesomeMcCoolName Negasonic Teenage Warhead]].
** The
name Nightcrawler is only casually mentioned in ''Film/X2XMenUnited'' when Kurt expounds about his time at the Munich circus. In ''Film/XMenApocalypse'', he is introduced in a cage fight as Nightcrawler, corrects Mystique when she calls him "Crawler," and Jean says his codename when she orders the X-Men to "grab hold of Nightcrawler," but mostly goes by Kurt.
** ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}} is never called by that name in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' and ''Film/XMenApocalypse''. He's known simply as Peter.
** Havok is said only once in ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', it's alluded to when Professor Xavier orders him to "Wreak havoc" in ''Film/XMenApocalypse'', but the name is only used once in this film when Mystique recounts their first mission. The rest of the time, he's just Alex.
** Warren Worthington III's codename Angel is never used in ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'', but he gets a big subversion in ''Apocalypse'', being referred to only as "Angel."
** ''Film/X2XMenUnited'': Lady Deathstrike is never used. Her real name (Yuriko) is only mentioned in passing.
** ''Film/XMenTheLastStand'': Subverted and played straight with Jimmy as his profile indeed shows his alternative alias of "Leech", but he's never called that by anyone, nor does he refer to himself as such.
discussions.
** ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine''
*** Comicbook/{{Sabretooth}} is only
On the other hand, the film also features Anatoli Knyazev. who's never called "Victor" throughout ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine''.
***
[=KGBeast=], {{Justified|Trope}}. as The Blob never gets called by that name. The best we get is KGB has been disbanded a LampshadeHanging where he mistakes Logan's [[VerbalTic "bub"]] for that name, and sees it as an insult.
*** The name "Comicbook/{{Gambit}}" is used a few times, although it's stated to be a prison nickname he was given by Stryker's guards.
long time ago.
** ''Film/XMenFirstClass'':
*** Darwin from ''[[Film/XMenFirstClass First Class]]'' is actually a nickname which happens to fit his powers, and his real name (Armando) is never referenced.
*** It gets a bit tricky with Angel Salvadore (not to be confused with Warren Worthington III's Angel);
When Diana suits up in the comics, her real name ''and'' code name are both Angel, but she takes the codename "Tempest" when she loses her powers finale to battle Doomsday alongside Bruce and gains PoweredArmor. In the movie, though, she explicitly states that Angel is a stage name.
** ''Film/TheWolverine'':
*** Played straight with the adamantium PoweredArmor that is not explicitly called Silver Samurai. The moniker of Silver Samurai was named after a suit of samurai armor that serves as a LegacyCharacter for the Yashida generations.
*** Played with for Viper, who never calls herself "the Viper" but does says
Clark, she's ''a'' viper. For legal reasons, her other moniker "Madame Hydra" does not come up, due to Marvel owning the rights for {{ComicBook/HYDRA}}.
*** Played straight with The Hand (mainly linked to the Film/{{Daredevil}} / Film/{{Elektra}} franchise,
never given a codename. and ownership of those rights reverted back to Marvel before the film was finished), who are is only referred to as "The Black Clan" and led by Harada.
*** Wolverine ''does'' use his codename, however.
---->'''Shingen''': What kind of monster are you?!\\
'''Logan''': [[TitleDrop The Wolverine!]]
** ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'': The Free Mutants never have their real names used (with the exception of Bishop). Of course,
Wonder Woman in the comics, he's a strange case; from the future and known ''only'' as Bishop for the longest time, he eventually took the name Lucas Bishop. Which we should consider his "real name," and if ''either'' credits.
** Likewise, Bruce
is what his momma named him when he was born, is hard to know.
** ''Film/{{Deadpool|2016}}'': It's a plot point that villain Ajax is
only actually Francis, with called "Batman" once. when Perry [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall says that nobody would be interested in Clark Kent fighting the title character only calling him by Batman]], the given name other times it's some variation of "the Bat" to mock Ajax afterwards. Subverted with his henchwoman Angel (Angel Dust in the comics), who never gets a proper name. Just for fun, Deadpool introduces himself refer to the taxi driver Dopinder as "[[TheNameIsBondJamesBond Pool, Dead]]." After that, Dopinder consistently refers to him as "Mr. Pool" and even adds him as a contact on his phone this way.
him.
** ''Film/XMenApocalypse'':
*** [[Comicbook/{{Apocalypse}}
The title villain]] creature is never called by anything other than given name En Sabah Nur, although there's a MythologyGag to [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast "Doomsday," though Comicbook/LexLuthor uses the name he adopted in the comics]] ("Where ever this being was, he would always have four followers who he would imbue with power." "Like the Four HorsemenOfTheApocalypse.").
*** Subverted by Comicbook/{{Psylocke}}, who is only called by her codename.
term when describing its role.



[[folder: The Dark Knight Saga]]
* With the series angling for a less outlandish and more "grounded" depiction of the Batman mythos, the films naturally use this trope extensively:
** The Scarecrow is almost exclusively referred to by his last name Crane. The only times you ever hear the word "scarecrow" are 1) when one of Crane's victims, a delirious Carmine Falcone, utters the word over and over again, and 2) when Crane briefly calls himself "Scarecrow" while under the influence of his own gas.
** In Harvey Dent's case, the name Two-Face is used exactly once, in reference to an old, derisive nickname given to him by the corrupt cops he used to investigate.
** Creator/{{Anne Hathaway}}'s portrayal of Selina Kyle is never once even referred to as ComicBook/{{Catwoman}}, and out-of-universe, even early press releases only referred to her as "Selina Kyle," fueling speculation that she would not be using a costumed identity at all in the film. The only time "Catwoman" is ever close to being mentioned is a newspaper headline reading "The Cat Burglar Strikes Again" when Bruce is showing Alfred the background information he's pulled up on her. This may have become the best-known and most prominent example of the trope, to the point that various bloggers and reviews go out of their way to refer to the character as "Selina Kyle" and not "Catwoman". This makes sense when you consider [[Film/{{Catwoman}} the last time the character was referred to as "Catwoman" on screen]], and how hard it flopped.
-->[[http://www.mdjonline.com/view/full_story/19463316/article-REVIEW--Batman-saga-ends-with-%E2%80%98The-Dark-Knight-Rises%E2%80%99?instance=special%20_coverage_right_column "...cat burglar Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway)...She is essentially Catwoman, but is never addressed as such."]]
* Batman's vehicle, the Tumbler, is never referred to as the Batmobile, either the black version shown in the first two films or the unpainted Tumblers driven by Bane's mercenaries in the third. (This was also true in the 1989 film, when Batman tersely refers to the Batmobile as simply "the car"; the more famous title wasn't used until ''BatmanReturns'' three years later.) However, his motorcycle and flying craft both receive bat monikers: the Batpod and the Bat (as opposed to the usual comics names of Batplane or Batwing), respectively. If "sounding less silly" was the objective here, names like "Batpod" and "Tumbler" are a lateral move at best.
* The aversions in the series, meanwhile, are as follows:
** Batman and Ra's al Ghul are commonly referred to as such. Oddly enough, in the comics, Ra's al Ghul is essentially the character's real name (it's complicated) but in the movie [[spoiler:his real name is Henri Ducard]].
*** In Batman's case, the film uses a mix of "Batman" and "''the'' bat-man" to refer to him. The latter is generally less used in popular culture these days, but it sounds a tad bit less outlandish and treats the word "Batman" as less of a guy's nickname and more of a thing or a creature like "the snowman" or "the boogeyman," which fits in line with the whole angle of being a scary monster that terrorizes criminals.
** "SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker" has ''no'' known identity other than his Codename.
--->'''Gordon:''' Nothing. No matches on prints, DNA, dental. Clothing is custom, no labels. Nothing in his pockets but knives and lint. No name, no other alias.
** Like the Joker, Bane never has his true name revealed in ''The Dark Knight Rises'', and he goes by "Bane" exclusively, an element which is also true to the comics. It helps that, compared to names like "Mr. Freeze" or "the Mad Hatter", it's probably one of the easier names to use without raising too many eyebrows.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:(Non-MCU) Spider-Man Films]]
* An entire scene played for laughs in ''Film/SpiderMan2'' was dedicated to J. Jonah Jameson coming up with a good nickname for ComicBook/DoctorOctopus, only for him to mostly go by his real name or the nickname "Doc Ock" for most of the movie, as well as the real life advertising and merchandising.
* ComicBook/{{Venom}} is known only by his real name, Eddie Brock, throughout all of ''Film/SpiderMan3''. Similarly, Flint Marko is generally known by his real name for most of the film until a reporter calls him "the Sandman" during the final battle.
** In the novelization, the name is at least alluded to when Eddie taunts Spider-Man by saying that they are (in reference to himself in the symbiote) his "venom".
* While ComicBook/NormanOsborn was called "Green Goblin" multiple times in [[Film/SpiderMan1 the first movie]], when it came time for his son Harry to adopt that persona, the name was never uttered. In fact, promotional material called him ''New Goblin'', a name that was never used in the comics. The closest Harry comes to being known as the Green Goblin is when Peter mockingly calls him "Goblin Jr.". Harry himself strips most of the goblin styling out of the hardware, going for basic armor and a hoverboard in place of the spiky hang-glider (which [[FridgeBrilliance makes sense]], given that [[SpikesOfVillainy those spikes]] ''[[HoistByHisOwnPetard killed]]'' his father...).
* Averted in ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan''. The mutated Dr. Curt Connors is referred to as "the Lizard" several times. Spider-Man himself, of course, is another clear aversion.
** Played straight and averted in the [[Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan2 sequel]] though. Spider-Man is called such very frequently. Electro refers to himself as such even when he's just being tortured and continues to when he becomes a proper villain. [[spoiler:Harry,]] however, isn't called the Green Goblin at all. The Rhino gets very little screen time but is only identified by his civilian name (though he calls himself The Rhino). We also have "Felicia" but she doesn't become Black Cat within the film.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:DC Extended Universe]]
** In ''Film/ManOfSteel'', Clark/Kal-El is never ''directly'' called Film/{{Superman}}. At one point, Lois almost says it before being cut off, and a soldier refers to him by the nickname to the confusion of his commanding officer. Presumably the soldiers got it from Lois.
*** After averted. By ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Clark/Kal-El's superheroic alter-ego is commonly referred to as Superman; this continues in ''Film/SuicideSquad2016'' where the name is casually mentioned in discussions.
** On the other hand, the film also features Anatoli Knyazev. who's never called [=KGBeast=], {{Justified|Trope}}. as The KGB has been disbanded a long time ago.
** When Diana suits up in the finale to battle Doomsday alongside Bruce and Clark, she's never given a codename. and is only referred to as Wonder Woman in the credits.
** Likewise, Bruce is only actually called "Batman" once. when Perry [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall says that nobody would be interested in Clark Kent fighting the Batman]], the other times it's some variation of "the Bat" to refer to him.
** The creature is never called "Doomsday," though Comicbook/LexLuthor uses the term when describing its role.
[[/folder]]
25th Mar '17 8:56:50 PM dmcreif
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Jessica Jones and Luke Cage (below) hardly had them in the comics to begin with. In a flashback, Trish encourages Jessica to take up superheroics, suggesting she use the nickname "Jewel" (the codename in her comic backstory). Jessica shoots the idea down and says "Jewel is a stripper's name, a really slutty stripper. And if I wear that thing, you're gonna have to call me Cameltoe."

to:

** Jessica Jones and Luke Cage (below) hardly had them in the comics to begin with. In a flashback, Trish encourages Jessica to take up superheroics, suggesting she use the nickname "Jewel" (the codename in her comic backstory). Jessica shoots the idea down and says "Jewel is a stripper's name, a really slutty stripper. And if I wear that thing, you're gonna have to call me Cameltoe."" Kilgrave is quite disappointed that she's "just Jessica Jones" when asking for her superhero name.



%%** Not even established superheroes like the Avengers have their names stated when they're mentioned, instead being "the flag-waver" or "the big green guy".

to:

%%** ** Not even established superheroes like the Avengers have their names stated when they're mentioned, instead being with Jessica using sarcastic nicknames like "the flag-waver" or "the big green guy".



** Mariah Dillard doesn't go by "Black Mariah". Cottonmouth taunts her with that name once, and it [[BerserkButton sets her off]].

to:

** Mariah Dillard doesn't go by "Black Mariah". The one time that Cottonmouth taunts her with that name once, and name, it [[BerserkButton sets her off]].
25th Mar '17 2:24:58 AM rodneyAnonymous
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[[caption-width-right:350:...I thought [[CowboyBebopAtHisComputer his last name was]] [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "America"...]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:...I thought [[CowboyBebopAtHisComputer his last name was]] [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica "America"...]]]]
24th Mar '17 10:18:43 AM dmcreif
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* ''Series/IronFist2017'': Averted for Iron Fist himself, as the name is a proper title. While ComicBook/ColleenWing doesn't have her own codename in the comics, she does make a reference by calling herself "Daughter of the Dragon" in underground cage matches; which is the team name for [[ComicBook/DaughtersOfTheDragon her and Misty Knight as a duo]].

to:

* ''Series/IronFist2017'': Averted for Iron Fist himself, as the name Danny Rand. "Iron Fist" is a proper title. While ComicBook/ColleenWing doesn't title that was bestowed upon him. Played with for ComicBook/ColleenWing: she didn't have her own codename in the comics, she does make a reference by calling herself "Daughter of the Dragon" when participating in underground cage matches; which is the team name for [[ComicBook/DaughtersOfTheDragon her and Misty Knight as a duo]].
22nd Mar '17 11:25:04 AM DragonRanger
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** Played with for Elena Rodriguez. In the comics, she's ''Yolanda'' Rodriguez, with the nickname of "Yo-Yo" but the official codename of "Slingshot". In the show, she's still gets the nickname "Yo-Yo" despite the fact that it no longer links to her given name, but "Slingshot" is never used... until a series of web videos starring her came out, bearing the title ''WebVideo/AgentsOfSHIELDSlingshot''.

to:

** Played with for Elena Rodriguez. In the comics, she's ''Yolanda'' Rodriguez, with the nickname of "Yo-Yo" but the official codename of "Slingshot". In the show, she's she still gets the nickname "Yo-Yo" despite the fact that it no longer links to her given name, but "Slingshot" is never used... until a series of web videos starring her came out, bearing the title ''WebVideo/AgentsOfSHIELDSlingshot''. Even then, "Slingshot" still isn't used in-universe.



** Wilson Fisk is never called "Comicbook/TheKingpin" once in season 1, but he receives a few visual references to kings over the course of the first season (examples: on Ben Urich's corkboard, Fisk is represented by a ''King'' of Hearts playing card affixed by a white push''pin'', Detective Blake calls him "King Frickin' Kong"). It eventually comes into play in season 2 while he's in prison. Dutton, an inmate who runs the prison's underground economy, [[BullyingADragon tries to intimidate Fisk by claiming he's the kingpin of the joint.]] Fisk, of course, arranges his death at the hands of the Punisher, and then, as Dutton lies dying on a hospital bed, tells him, "In prison, there's only room for one kingpin," and officially takes the nickname for himself. Even then, the nickname doesn't really catch on, as whenever Fisk gets mentioned in ''Series/LukeCage2016'', it's only by his real name.

to:

** Wilson Fisk is never called "Comicbook/TheKingpin" once in season 1, the first season, but he does receives a few visual references to kings over the course of the first season (examples: on Ben Urich's corkboard, Fisk is represented by a ''King'' of Hearts playing card affixed by a white push''pin'', Detective Blake calls him "King Frickin' Kong"). It eventually comes into play in season 2 while he's in prison. Dutton, an inmate who runs the prison's underground economy, [[BullyingADragon tries to intimidate Fisk by claiming he's the kingpin of the joint.]] Fisk, of course, arranges his death at the hands of the Punisher, and then, as Dutton lies dying on a hospital bed, tells him, "In prison, there's only room for one kingpin," and officially takes the nickname for himself. Even then, the nickname doesn't really catch on, as whenever Fisk gets mentioned in ''Series/LukeCage2016'', it's only by his real name.



** Another cross-show example is Claire Temple, a CompositeCharacter with the comics character codenamed "Night Nurse". In five seasons across four shows so far, the codename has only been mentioned once when a gangster referred to her as such in ''Luke Cage''.



** Not even established superheroes like the Avengers have their names stated when they're mentioned, instead being "the flag-waver" or "the big green guy".

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** %%** Not even established superheroes like the Avengers have their names stated when they're mentioned, instead being "the flag-waver" or "the big green guy".



** Claire Temple is at one point during Diamondback's hostage situation offhandedly referred to as "Night Nurse", the character that she's combined with.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/IronFist2017'': Averted for Iron Fist himself, as the name is a proper title. While ComicBook/ColleenWing doesn't have her own codename in the comics, she does make a reference by calling herself "Daughter of the Dragon" in underground cage matches; which is the team name for [[ComicBook/DaughtersOfTheDragon her and Misty Knight as a duo]].
20th Mar '17 1:41:42 PM Green_lantern40
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** Wanda and Pietro Maximoff are never referred to as ComicBook/ScarletWitch and ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}}. The closest is when Tony refers to Wanda as "that little witch".

to:

** Wanda and Pietro Maximoff are never referred to as ComicBook/ScarletWitch and ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}}.ComicBook/{{Quicksilver}} by way of WritingAroundTrademarks[[note]]due to the cinematic rights to the mutant characters being owned by 20th Century Fox, whose X-films have actually introduced their ''own'' Quicksilver[[/note]]. The closest is when Tony refers to Wanda as "that little witch".
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