History Main / ComesGreatResponsibility

31st Oct '17 6:14:22 PM PaulA
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* ''Film/TheSpecials'' has a CrowningMomentOfFunny associated with this:
-->'''[[Creator/JudyGreer Deadly Girl]]''': Ted might have been right about some things. Like drinking; last week I got drunk at a bar mitzvah, unthinkingly summoned forth demons and... they... ate a kid.

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* ''Film/TheSpecials'' has a CrowningMomentOfFunny associated with this:
-->'''[[Creator/JudyGreer Deadly Girl]]''':
plays it for laughs:
-->'''Deadly Girl:'''
Ted might have been right about some things. Like drinking; last week I got drunk at a bar mitzvah, unthinkingly summoned forth demons and... they... ate a kid.
31st Oct '17 6:13:25 PM PaulA
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* Used in the film version of "DiaryOfAWimpyKid" for the Safety Patrol.

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* Used in the film version of "DiaryOfAWimpyKid" ''Film/DiaryOfAWimpyKid'' for the Safety Patrol.
7th Sep '17 4:56:07 PM LinTaylor
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* Referenced by Takatora from ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'', who refers to it as ''noblesse oblige''.
** Later, [[spoiler: his brother]] deconstructs it while fighting him:

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* Referenced by Takatora ''Series/KamenRider'' has this baked into the premise thanks to Creator/ShotaroIshinomori's fondness for the PhlebotinumRebel trope. In every single series, the Riders' powers come from the same source as their enemies, but the Riders ''choose'' to do good with them. This got special notice in the [[PostScriptSeason Post-Script Episodes]] of ''Series/KamenRiderWizard'', where the villain tries to claim that the Riders [[AtLeastIAdmitIt hide behind a facade of "justice"]] [[NotSoDifferent but are no better than the monsters they slay]]; the Riders [[ShutUpHannibal counter]] by saying that they fight to protect humanity's peace and freedom against those who would destroy both, rather than for some arbitrary definition of justice.
** In
''Series/KamenRiderGaim'', who refers to it as Takatora Kureshima believes in this in the form of ''noblesse oblige''.
** Later,
oblige''; later in the series, [[spoiler: his brother]] deconstructs it while fighting him:they fight each other:


Added DiffLines:

** In ''Series/KamenRiderDrive'', [[SixthRanger Gou/Kamen Rider Mach]] uses the same [[TimeStandsStill Density Shift]] powers as the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Roidmudes]] to intimidate some criminals for information; Shinnosuke[=/=]Drive chews him out for this, saying that they have a responsibility to be better than that. It helps that Shinnosuke was a ByTheBookCop even before he became Drive.
31st Aug '17 10:43:21 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeIOrigins'' has [[TeamMom Wynne]] asking the PC point-blank what it means to be a Grey Warden, and the rest of the conversation is more or less Wynne's Uncle Ben moment.

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* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeIOrigins'' ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has [[TeamMom Wynne]] asking the PC point-blank what it means to be a Grey Warden, and the rest of the conversation is more or less Wynne's Uncle Ben moment.
31st Aug '17 10:42:47 AM Gosicrystal
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** Learning this is part of Good Delsin's CharacterDevelopment in ''VideoGame/InFAMOUSSecondSon''.
* Spoofed in VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}. After Ford Crueller teaches Raz how to use pyrokinesis, he tells him not to use it unless it's REALLY important, or unless it's REALLY funny. The dev team ensured it would [[RuleOfFunny always be funny]], [[strike:encouraging]] guaranteeing a [[IncrediblyLamePun flagrant]] [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential abuse of the power]].

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** * Learning this is part of Good Delsin's CharacterDevelopment in ''VideoGame/InFAMOUSSecondSon''.
* Spoofed in VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}.''VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}''. After Ford Crueller teaches Raz how to use pyrokinesis, he tells him not to use it unless it's REALLY important, or unless it's REALLY funny. The dev team ensured it would [[RuleOfFunny always be funny]], [[strike:encouraging]] guaranteeing a [[IncrediblyLamePun flagrant]] [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential abuse of the power]].



** However, this line is juxtaposed against Arthas resurrecting an undead dragon.

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** ::: However, this line is juxtaposed against Arthas resurrecting an undead dragon.



** The first game has [[TeamMom Wynne]] asking the PC point-blank what it means to be a Grey Warden, and the rest of the conversation is more or less Wynne's Uncle Ben moment.

to:

** The first game * ''VideoGame/DragonAgeIOrigins'' has [[TeamMom Wynne]] asking the PC point-blank what it means to be a Grey Warden, and the rest of the conversation is more or less Wynne's Uncle Ben moment.



* Similarly subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}''. The Outsider grants his gifts of magic to people purely because he finds them interesting and wants to see what they'd do with an extra catalyst. He even tells Corvo outright that what he choses to do with his newfound powers is entirely up to him.
** In a more meta sense, Corvo's (and the player's) actions throughout the game drastically alter the tone of the setting. It could thus be said that this trope is the entire game's [[AnAesop moral]].
* In ''[[VideoGame/AtelierMeruruTheApprenticeOfArland Atelier Meruru: The Apprentice of Arland]]'', [[spoiler:Meruru and the Masked G will [[ConversedTrope have a discussion]] about this if the player qualifies for the requirements of the Strongest Princess ending. Meruru is excited about being the "strongest princess," but comes to wonder just what power is and why it is or isn't important.]]

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* Similarly subverted in ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}''. ''VideoGame/{{Dishonored}}'':
**
The Outsider grants his gifts of magic to people purely because he finds them interesting and wants to see what they'd do with an extra catalyst. He even tells Corvo outright that what he choses to do with his newfound powers is entirely up to him.
** In a more meta sense, Corvo's (and the player's) actions throughout the game drastically alter the tone of the setting. It could thus be said that this trope is the entire game's [[AnAesop moral]].
* In ''[[VideoGame/AtelierMeruruTheApprenticeOfArland Atelier Meruru: The Apprentice of Arland]]'', ''VideoGame/AtelierMeruruTheApprenticeOfArland'', [[spoiler:Meruru and the Masked G will [[ConversedTrope have a discussion]] about this if the player qualifies for the requirements of the Strongest Princess ending. Meruru is excited about being the "strongest princess," but comes to wonder just what power is and why it is or isn't important.]]



* Also [[http://eheroes.smackjeeves.com/comics/1888400/to-be-used-only-for-good/ parodied]] in ''Webcomic/EverydayHeroes'', when Carrie gets Summer out of doing chores by using the power of her PuppyDogEyes.

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* Also [[http://eheroes.smackjeeves.com/comics/1888400/to-be-used-only-for-good/ parodied]] Parodied]] in ''Webcomic/EverydayHeroes'', when Carrie gets Summer out of doing chores by using the power of her PuppyDogEyes.
18th Aug '17 8:59:09 AM Julia1984
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* The philosophy of UsefulNotes/{{Objectivism}} devised by Creator/AynRand specifically defies this trope. Objectivism defines the pursuit of one's own material self-interest as morally good, and defines things which prevent people from doing so (such as the 'oppressive' idea that you should act to save the lives of others when you do not want to do that) as evil. To an Objectivist, one's degree of power does not alter this fundamental moral principle: with power, comes no responsibility to do anything but [[ItsAllAboutMe advance your own material greed]].

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* The philosophy of UsefulNotes/{{Objectivism}} devised by Creator/AynRand specifically defies this trope. Objectivism defines the pursuit of one's own material self-interest (without ever resorting to "force, fraud, or coercion") as morally good, and defines things which prevent people from doing so (such as the 'oppressive' "oppressive" idea that you should act to save the lives of others when you do not want to do that) as evil. To an Objectivist, one's degree of power does not alter this fundamental moral principle: with power, comes no responsibility to do anything but [[ItsAllAboutMe advance your own material greed]]. greed]] without resorting to "force, fraud, or coercion": [[Literature/AtlasShrugged "I swear ... that I will never live for the sake of another man, *nor ask another man to live for mine*"]] establishes that ''everyone'' has the same and no greater responsibility than to seek their own self-interest without violating the rights of others.
26th Jul '17 8:43:25 PM Glaurung
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* The [[UsefulNotes/EconomicTheories political-economic doctrine]] of [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies "Neoliberalism"]] also defies this trope, saying that when everyone acts selfishly and government does not force the powerful to help the weak (through taxing them to provide public education, road works, healthcare etc) and allows the powerful to prey upon the weak (through charging them rents for housing, utilities, transport, etc), the 'Invisible Hand' of 'The Free Market' perfectly ensures that the objectively 'valuable' and hardworking people in society become powerful/rich and the 'worthless' and lazy become weak/poor. In other words, Neoliberalism claims that when 'government gets out of the market' [[note]] [[AsYouKnow metaphorically speaking, of course,]] since a market can only exist if it is created by a government [[/note]] then the world operates according to LaserGuidedKarma. ComesGreatResponsibility is evil in the eyes of Neoliberalism because there is no such thing as "the undeserving poor": the 'Invisible Hand' perfectly allocates wealth, so poor people are poor because they are morally bankrupt and/or objectively worthless to the economy. Preventing the so-called "needy" from dying only hurts the economy and society as a whole.

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* The [[UsefulNotes/EconomicTheories political-economic doctrine]] of [[UsefulNotes/PoliticalIdeologies "Neoliberalism"]] Social Darwinism also defies this trope, saying that when everyone acts selfishly and government does not force the powerful to help the weak (through taxing them to provide public education, road works, healthcare etc) and allows the powerful to prey upon the weak (through charging them rents for housing, utilities, transport, etc), the 'Invisible Hand' of 'The Free Market' perfectly ensures that the objectively 'valuable' and hardworking people in society become powerful/rich and the 'worthless' and lazy become weak/poor. In other words, Neoliberalism Social Darwinism claims that when 'government gets out of the market' [[note]] [[AsYouKnow metaphorically speaking, of course,]] since a market can only exist if it is created by a government [[/note]] then the world operates according to LaserGuidedKarma. ComesGreatResponsibility is evil in the eyes of Neoliberalism Social Darwinism because there is no such thing as "the undeserving poor": the 'Invisible Hand' perfectly allocates wealth, so poor people are poor because they are morally bankrupt and/or objectively worthless to the economy. Preventing the so-called "needy" from dying only hurts the economy and society as a whole.
29th May '17 3:10:14 AM WikiGuardianAngel
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This was [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in an episode of ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'' where Samantha used her powers to do something but was seen by a mortal who wasn't supposed to see her. So she's considering "freezing" them until she can figure out what to do about it. But to do that, she would have to freeze others who would miss them if they weren't around for a few weeks while the person was gone, so they'd have to be frozen. She sort of realizes the ridiculousness of this when she considers maybe she should just freeze the entire human race, i.e. all mortals. Once you get started with potentially bad actions, each subsequent one becomes easier until you've crossed every line.

to:

This was [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in an episode of ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'' where Samantha used her powers to do something but was seen by a mortal who wasn't supposed to see her. So she's considering "freezing" them until she can figure out what to do about it. But to do that, she would have to freeze others who would miss them if they weren't around for a few weeks while the person was gone, so they'd have to be frozen. She sort of realizes the ridiculousness of this when she considers maybe she should just freeze the entire human race, i.e. all mortals. Once you get started with potentially bad actions, each subsequent one becomes easier until you've [[MoralEventHorizon crossed every line.
line]].



* The doctrine of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noblesse_oblige noblesse oblige]]'' teaches that the wealthy and powerful are expected to hold themselves to a higher standard and contribute more to society than ordinary citizens.
* The philosophy of UsefulNotes/{{Objectivism}} devised by Creator/AynRand specifically defies this trope. Objectivism defines the pursuit of one's own material self-interest as morally good, and defines things which prevent people from doing so (such as the 'oppressive' idea that you should act to save the lives of others when you do not want to do that) as evil. To an Objectivist, one's degree of power does not alter this fundamental moral principle: with power, comes no responsibility to do anything but advance your own material greed.

to:

* The doctrine of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noblesse_oblige noblesse oblige]]'' teaches that the wealthy and powerful are expected to hold themselves to a higher standard and contribute more to society than ordinary citizens.
those in less powerful or less fortunate positions.
* The philosophy of UsefulNotes/{{Objectivism}} devised by Creator/AynRand specifically defies this trope. Objectivism defines the pursuit of one's own material self-interest as morally good, and defines things which prevent people from doing so (such as the 'oppressive' idea that you should act to save the lives of others when you do not want to do that) as evil. To an Objectivist, one's degree of power does not alter this fundamental moral principle: with power, comes no responsibility to do anything but [[ItsAllAboutMe advance your own material greed.greed]].
29th May '17 2:32:54 AM WikiGuardianAngel
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In the hands of a poor writer, it is easy for this to turn into a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop or FantasticAesop. For instance, a character CursedWithAwesome powers and unable to enjoy them in any way, trapped in a life they didn't choose can easily become YouCantFightFate and HardWorkHardlyWorks, and is usually a one way ticket to {{Wangst}}-ville. It can also degenerate into the idea that [[PersonalGainHurts benefiting from one's own talents or skills is wrong]], and that [[BystanderSyndrome trying to help others will only end in disaster]], but that you are still [[SamaritanSyndrome obligated to do so]] even knowing that FailureIsTheOnlyOption.

to:

In the hands of a poor writer, it is easy for this to turn into a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop or FantasticAesop. For instance, a character CursedWithAwesome powers and unable to enjoy them in any way, trapped in a life they didn't choose can easily become YouCantFightFate and HardWorkHardlyWorks, and is usually a one way ticket to {{Wangst}}-ville. It can also degenerate into the idea that [[PersonalGainHurts benefiting from one's own talents or skills is wrong]], and that [[BystanderSyndrome trying to help others will only end in disaster]], but that you are still [[SamaritanSyndrome obligated to do so]] even knowing that FailureIsTheOnlyOption.
FailureIsTheOnlyOption. The weight of the responsibility of the said great powers is often why heroes have ChronicHeroSyndrome.



Outside the superhero genre, this is not often a trope relating to the main characters, but many a ReasonableAuthorityFigure is deeply aware of the responsibilities that come with his post. Indeed, one way to detect whether such a figure is good is how he regards the misery or deaths of the faceless masses; even not knowing any of them, the ReasonableAuthorityFigure will not regard them as AMillionIsAStatistic and if he must sacrifice them, will regard it as DirtyBusiness.

Contrasted by MugglePower and WithGreatPowerComesGreatPerks. If the said responsibility is insanity, see WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity.

to:

Outside the superhero genre, this is not often a trope relating to the main characters, but many a ReasonableAuthorityFigure is deeply aware of the responsibilities that come with his post. Indeed, one way to detect whether such a figure is good is how he regards the misery or deaths of the faceless masses; even not knowing any of them, the ReasonableAuthorityFigure will not regard them as AMillionIsAStatistic and if he [[TheNeedsOfTheMany must sacrifice them, them]], will regard it as DirtyBusiness.

Contrasted by MugglePower and WithGreatPowerComesGreatPerks. If the said responsibility is insanity, powers result in the character losing any sense of responsibility, see WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity.
29th May '17 2:22:30 AM WikiGuardianAngel
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* Parenting is a mundane but common expression of this. You made (or adopted) a kid - that's great! You have a HUGE degree of power over this younger, smaller person. However, with all that power comes a responsibility to make sure their physical and psychological needs are met and that they develop into an independent person over the course of the next twenty years.

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* Parenting is a mundane but common expression of this. You made (or adopted) a kid - that's great! You have a HUGE degree of power over this younger, smaller person. However, with all that power comes a responsibility to make sure their physical and psychological needs are met and that they develop into an independent independent, capable, socially functional and morally upstanding person capable of taking care of themselves and being considerate of others over the course of the next twenty years. years: In effect, you have ''the responsibility to develop you child into the best person you can make him be''.
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