History Main / CluelessMystery

4th Nov '16 7:36:23 PM Venatius
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* ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' uses this trope as a plot point. Even the characters can't agree on whether it's a FairPlayWhodunnit or a Clueless Mystery. Should be mentioned the trailer did say "No Knox. No Dine. No [[FairPlayWhodunnit Fair]]".

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* ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' uses this trope as a plot point. Even the characters can't agree on whether it's a FairPlayWhodunnit or a Clueless Mystery. Should be mentioned the trailer did say "No Knox. No Dine. No [[FairPlayWhodunnit Fair]]". [[spoiler: By the end, clues are abundant - but lacking any kind of final[[TheReveal reveal]], there's no ultimately correct way to interpret them.]]
10th Jul '16 12:39:00 AM MarcInGA
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* In the movie ''Air Force One'' after they regain control of the plane they are forced to make an insane mid-air escape. When a Secret Service agent refuses to go the end of the line to die so the others can live, someone yells at him "So ''you're'' the traitor!". He is but that refusal proves nothing. Furthermore, up to that point there's been no mention of a traitor among the hostages.


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* In an early episode of ''Mission: Impossible'' the team is close to fooling an enemy agent into thinking that he's on trial in his own country. A trial that will inevitably end in execution. To add to his sense of doom Steven Hill, as the brilliant team leader and planner, is presented to him as his meek and terrifyingly incompetent court-appointed lawyer. When an accident reveals the truth to him, he laughs at them and then says "And who would be the mastermind behind this scheme?" and successfully picks Hill.
3rd Jul '16 5:50:58 AM Adept
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* Both ''Manga/{{Doubt}}'' and ''Manga/{{Judge}}'' by Yoshiyuki Tonogai are big examples of this trope. With ''Doubt'', the explanation relies on [[spoiler: one character having a previously unhinted at psychic power that enabled her to control another the LoveInterest, a character who, for most of the story, the reader believes to be dead.]] ''Judge'' is even worse in this regard, as TheReveal is that [[spoiler: Hiro, the main character is the culprit. Only one very subtle moment hints that this is the case, while most of the story contradicts this, since the story is told from his perspective and thoughts and actions contradict his true nature, even referencing events that logically never happened.]]

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* Both ''Manga/{{Doubt}}'' and ''Manga/{{Judge}}'' by Yoshiyuki Tonogai are big examples of this trope. With ''Doubt'', the explanation relies on [[spoiler: one character having a previously unhinted at psychic power that enabled her to control another control the LoveInterest, a character and who, for most of the story, the reader believes to be dead.]] ''Judge'' is even worse in this regard, as TheReveal is that [[spoiler: Hiro, the main character is the culprit. Only one very subtle moment hints that this is the case, while most of the story contradicts this, since the story is told from his perspective perspective, and his thoughts and actions throughout the story contradict his true nature, even referencing events that logically never happened.nature.]]
13th Jun '16 1:48:39 AM PaulA
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* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's C. Auguste Dupin stories are all Clueless Mysteries. In ''The Murders in The Rue Morgue'', for example, the only clue Dupin and the readers ''both'' have is the testimony about "the shrill voice". Everything else that Dupin discovers the reader is completely unaware of.

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* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's C. Auguste Dupin Literature/CAugusteDupin stories are all Clueless Mysteries. In ''The Murders in The Rue Morgue'', for example, the only clue Dupin and the readers ''both'' have is the testimony about "the shrill voice". Everything else that Dupin discovers the reader is completely unaware of.
5th May '16 2:49:57 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'' uses this trope as a plot point. Even the characters can't agree on whether it's a FairPlayWhodunnit or a Clueless Mystery. Should be mentioned the trailer did say "No Knox. No Dine. No [[FairPlayWhodunnit Fair]]".

to:

* ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'' ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' uses this trope as a plot point. Even the characters can't agree on whether it's a FairPlayWhodunnit or a Clueless Mystery. Should be mentioned the trailer did say "No Knox. No Dine. No [[FairPlayWhodunnit Fair]]".
24th Apr '16 10:24:26 AM DoctorCooper
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** And in some of her work, it falls under ValuesDissonance when someone has a working class name but an upper class job, they did it.
* Margaret Maron's [[spoiler: Sand Sharks]] has this issue, though most of her books do not. In that book, however, the waiter did it. No, really.

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** And in some of her work, it falls under ValuesDissonance when someone has a working class name but an upper class job, they did it.
* Margaret Maron's [[spoiler: Sand Sharks]] has this issue, though most of her books do not. In that book, however, the [[spoiler:the waiter did it. No, really.really]].
4th Apr '16 3:10:25 AM GoblinCipher
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*** {{Invoked|Trope}} & {{inverted|Trope}} in one episode of the series that took place in Paris. The gang has been finding clues and Freddy remarks "Clues, but no suspects". Velma gives "the fashion designer who would do anything to push his label" (Tony Stickfinger), "the jealous roommate" (Bonnie Bjork), "that gothic gargoyle groupie" (Sonny, a present day Quasidimo). Daphne adds "that slimy sliver screen star that hang glides" (Guy L'Averton). Daphne sets a trap by disguising herself as her cousin, Dannica [=LeBlake=] for the Gargoyle but screws up with Sonny -- but the garygole turns out to be [[spoiler: Dannica [=LeBlake=] herself, who wanted get out of the model business and have a normal quiet life like Daphne. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by Velma who remarked, "If she only knew."]]

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*** {{Invoked|Trope}} & {{inverted|Trope}} in one episode of the series that took place in Paris. The gang has been finding clues and Freddy remarks "Clues, but no suspects". Velma gives "the fashion designer who would do anything to push his label" (Tony Stickfinger), "the jealous roommate" (Bonnie Bjork), "that gothic gargoyle groupie" (Sonny, a present day Quasidimo).Quasimodo). Daphne adds "that slimy sliver screen star that hang glides" (Guy L'Averton). Daphne sets a trap by disguising herself as her cousin, Dannica [=LeBlake=] for the Gargoyle but screws up with Sonny -- but the garygole turns out to be [[spoiler: Dannica [=LeBlake=] herself, who wanted get out of the model business and have a normal quiet life like Daphne. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by Velma who remarked, "If she only knew."]]
27th Dec '15 1:52:37 AM Koveras
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For example, Mr. Rich Guy has been killed. Characters A, B and C are established to have motives. Evidence points to characters A, C and also D, who doesn't have a motive but was suspiciously close by at the time of the murder. The real criminal however, is Character Z, who shows up in the last ten minutes as the [[TheButlerDidIt waiter]] serving the frustrated police officer his coffee. [[TheDogWasTheMastermind He hasn't appeared before (or he did, but just for 30 seconds), and he was never considered in the investigation,]] but the protagonist reveals him as the culprit as the audience wonders what the hell just happened.

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For example, Mr. Rich Guy has been killed. Characters A, B and C are established to have motives. Evidence points to characters A, C and also D, who doesn't have a motive but was suspiciously close by at the time of the murder. [[StrangerBehindTheMask The real criminal however, is Character Z, who shows up in the last ten minutes minutes]] as the [[TheButlerDidIt waiter]] serving the frustrated police officer his coffee. [[TheDogWasTheMastermind He hasn't appeared before (or he did, but just for 30 seconds), and he was never considered in the investigation,]] but the protagonist reveals him as the culprit as the audience wonders what the hell just happened.
2nd Dec '15 7:56:39 AM Anddrix
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* ''Literature/HushHush'' and its sequel, ''Crescendo'', both are this. In the first book, the villain ([[spoiler:Jules]]) makes so few appearances that it's difficult to remember he even exists. There's nothing at all to indicate that [[spoiler:he's the French nobleman that Patch enslaved in the prologue]] and the only one with any indication at all of being the villain is [[spoiler:actually TheDragon]]. In ''Crescendo'', the same holds true for [[spoiler:Rixon]]. His motives for trying to kill Nora are something he never showed the slightest bit of interest in before and his plan to kill her ([[spoiler:torment her for an undecided period of time with visions of her dead father]]) was so roundabout and [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim so needlessly complicated]] that it's virtually impossible to figure out who was the one trying to kill Nora, what his plan was, and why he was doing it.

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* ''Literature/HushHush'' and its sequel, ''Crescendo'', both are this. ''Literature/HushHush'':
**
In the first book, the villain ([[spoiler:Jules]]) makes so few appearances that it's difficult to remember he even exists. There's nothing at all to indicate that [[spoiler:he's the French nobleman that Patch enslaved in the prologue]] and the only one with any indication at all of being the villain is [[spoiler:actually TheDragon]].
**
In ''Crescendo'', the same holds true for [[spoiler:Rixon]]. His motives for trying to kill Nora are something he never showed the slightest bit of interest in before and his plan to kill her ([[spoiler:torment her for an undecided period of time with visions of her dead father]]) was so roundabout and [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim so needlessly complicated]] complicated that it's virtually impossible to figure out who was the one trying to kill Nora, what his plan was, and why he was doing it.
22nd Nov '15 10:47:51 PM EternityofSpirits
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* Both ''Manga/{{Doubt}}'' and ''Manga/{{Judge}}'' by Yoshiyuki Tonogai are big examples of this trope. With ''Doubt'', the explanation relies on [[spoiler: one character having a previously unhinted at psychic power that enabled her to control another the LoveInterest, a character who, for most of the story, the reader believes to be dead.]] ''Judge'' is even worse in this regard, as TheReveal is that [[spoiler: Hiro, the main character is the culprit. Only one very subtle moment hints that this is the case, while most of the story contradicts this, since the story is told from his perspective and thoughts and actions contradict his true nature, even referencing events that logically never happened.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CluelessMystery