History Main / CluelessMystery

18th Aug '17 2:58:08 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' is sometimes accused of this, since one of the major parts of figuring out the culprit in a mystery--the motive--isn't revealed until the murderer [[MotiveRant rants about it to the party]] during the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon. That lack of a foreseeable reason for the killings is one of the main reasons why TheReveal comes right out of left field (unless the player is particularly GenreSavvy or metagaming).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' is sometimes accused of this, since one of the major parts of figuring out the culprit in a mystery--the motive--isn't revealed until the murderer [[MotiveRant rants about it to the party]] during the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon. That lack of a foreseeable reason for the killings is one of the main reasons why TheReveal comes right out of left field (unless the player is particularly GenreSavvy or metagaming).
6th Aug '17 2:07:07 AM TheNicestGuy
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* ''Series/TheWire'' is not big on whodunnits--in fact, the detectives use the term for cases they really, really don't want to work--but there is one particular murder that plays out like this. In season four, Kima investigates the death of a witness. The case sprawls across multiple episodes; examines motives, suspects, and forensics; becomes a political hot potato; and even helps to get a mayor elected. After she's stumped, Kima goes back to look at the crime scene one last time, and she works out that the killing was an accident, and the killer didn't even realize he'd done it. Not only is the culprit unhinted at until the last few moments, the audience never even gets to see them. On the other hand, if you consider just that brief final run at the case, the show does [[FairplayWhodunnit play fair]] with the clues Kima spots and her line of reasoning.
6th Aug '17 1:40:29 AM TheNicestGuy
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* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Elementary, Dear Data", this trope causes Data's initial attempts at a Sherlock Holmes holodeck adventure to be disappointing. At first, all the holodeck does is present Holmes' actual cases or mashups of them, and Data solves them instantly because he has them all memorized. It's only after the participants ask for an ''original'' Holmes-like mystery that Data engages in actual investigation and deduction.
12th Jul '17 8:59:40 PM Luc
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* The Literature/LordPeterWimsey novel ''Five Red Herrings'' is an edge case, with some people holding it's a FairPlayMystery (although a devilishly challenging one) and others holding that it's this. The detailed inventory of the victim's painting kit is the sticking point -- the reader is never explicitly told what Wimsey noticed about it that gave him the information he needed to identify the murderer, but the list of what ''is there'' is missing an item that ''should be there''. The dispute hinges on whether it's fair to expect the reader to know what items an oil painter absolutely would have in his kit when he's going out to paint a landscape, or not.

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* The Literature/LordPeterWimsey novel ''Five Red Herrings'' is an edge case, with some people holding it's a FairPlayMystery (although a devilishly challenging one) and others holding that it's this. The detailed inventory of the victim's painting kit is the sticking point -- the reader is never explicitly told what Wimsey noticed about it that gave him the information he needed to identify the murderer, but the list of what ''is there'' is missing an item that ''should be there''. The dispute hinges on whether it's fair to expect the reader to know what items an oil painter absolutely would have in his kit when he's going out to paint a landscape, or not. (On the Fair Play side, we're told the relevant conclusion well before the conclusion: That the scene was set up by the killer, something is missing, and that the missing item is only really important in that it indicates the scene was set.)
4th Jun '17 8:33:33 AM thatother1dude
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* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': This trope has gradually crept into the central plot in regards to the circumstances of [[spoiler: Pink Diamond's]] death. After seemingly getting our answer in the end of season 4 with Jasper's revelation that it was [[spoiler: Rose Quartz]] who shattered her, the question has been reopened as of the ''Wanted'' arc, wherein the luckless Zircon assigned to make [[spoiler: Steven's case before the Diamonds]] comes to the [[EurekaMoment Sudden Realization]] that the official story is completely full of holes, and that it simply wouldn't have been possible for her to get close enough to strike, at least not without [[spoiler: one of the other Diamonds]] being in on the conspiracy.
2nd Jun '17 8:29:22 PM CaptainCapsase
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* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': This trope has gradually crept into the central plot in regards to the circumstances of [[spoiler: Pink Diamond's]] death. After seemingly getting our answer in the end of season 4 with Jasper's revelation that it was [[spoiler: Rose Quartz]] who shattered her, the question has been reopened as of the ''Wanted'' arc, wherein the luckless Zircon assigned to make [[spoiler: Steven's case before the Diamonds]] comes to the [[EurekaMoment Sudden Realization]] that the official story is completely full of holes, and that it simply wouldn't have been possible for her to get close enough to strike, at least not without [[spoiler: one of the other Diamonds]] being in on the conspiracy.
30th Apr '17 4:42:29 PM Luc
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*** To be mildly fair to Doyle, some of the examples are '''almost''' "fair play", in that we have ''almost'' all the evidence that Holmes has; in The Hound of the Baskervilles, for example, the fact that Holmes fixates on the portrait, and yet it looks nothing like either of the contemporary Baskervilles we know about, along with the evidence we have that indicates that there is a human being involved in the "haunting", gives us a strong hint that [[spoiler:we've met somebody who closely resembles the portrait]].
28th Apr '17 4:09:10 PM Iknewwhothekillerwas
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* Any time that Jason is not the killer in a Franchise/FridayThe13th movie, the audience is not given any sort of clue as to who the killer is. In the first movie, the killer isn't one of the many red herrings, is never mentioned, and isn't seen until the reveal. [[spoiler: The killer is the mother of a child who drowned at camp. The drowning is mentioned along with some other incidents, but she, herself, is never mentioned. When her hands are seen wielding a knife, they are actually the hands of one of the male crew members working on the film, so that even gender cannot be determined.]]

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* Any time that Jason is not the killer in a Franchise/FridayThe13th ''Franchise/FridayThe13th'' movie, the audience is not given any sort of clue as to who the killer is. In the first movie, the killer [[spoiler: isn't one of the many red herrings, is never mentioned, and isn't seen until the reveal. [[spoiler: The killer is the mother of a child who drowned at camp. The drowning is mentioned along with some other incidents, but she, herself, is never mentioned. When her hands are seen wielding a knife, they are actually the hands of one of the male crew members working on the film, so that even gender cannot be determined.]]
28th Apr '17 5:42:41 AM Iknewwhothekillerwas
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* Any time that Jason is not the killer in a Franchise/FridayThe13th movie, the audience is not given any sort of clue as to who the killer is. In the first movie, the killer isn't one of the many red herrings, is never mentioned, and isn't seen until the reveal. [[spoiler: The killer is the mother of a child who drowned at camp. The drowning is mentioned along with some other incidents, but she, herself, is never mentioned. When her hands are seen wielding a knife, they are actually the hands of one of the male crew members working on the film, so that even gender cannot be determined.]]
24th Mar '17 10:06:51 AM KamenRiderOokalf
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** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/WhatsNewScoobyDoo?'' that took place in Greece. At the end of the episode, Velma explains all the evidence that suggested that the archaeologist was behind the centaur attacks, and unmasks the creature to reveal... a woman that she doesn't know. (The audience does; she was the archaeologist's partner who appeared in the teaser before Mystery Inc. ever showed up.) Velma immediately starts complaining that this shouldn't count against her perfect record.

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** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/WhatsNewScoobyDoo?'' ''WesternAnimation/WhatsNewScoobyDoo'' that took place in Greece. At the end of the episode, Velma explains all the evidence that suggested that the archaeologist was behind the centaur attacks, and unmasks the creature to reveal... a woman that she doesn't know. (The audience does; she was the archaeologist's partner who appeared in the teaser before Mystery Inc. ever showed up.) Velma immediately starts complaining that this shouldn't count against her perfect record.
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