History Main / CluelessMystery

4th Jan '18 5:09:09 PM MichaelKatsuro
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*** There's also a major and obvious-in-hindsight clue given in the penultimate chapter where the police sum up the evidence: namely, that [[spoiler:the gun was found outside of Wargrave's room, instead of in the room where Vera -- seemingly the last owner of it and the last person alive on the island -- hanged herself]]. Most readers are unlikely to spot this clue during their first reading, however, as the police unwittingly bark up the wrong tree entirely (and by extension, the unknowing reader too) by not even ''considering'' that [[spoiler:anyone outside of Armstrong, Blore, Lombard, or Vera could have been the murderer, even when they systematically prove it impossible that any of these four could have done it]].

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*** ** There's also a major and obvious-in-hindsight clue given in the penultimate chapter where the police sum up the evidence: namely, that [[spoiler:the gun was found outside of Wargrave's room, instead of in the room where Vera -- seemingly Vera--seemingly the last owner of it and the last person alive on the island -- hanged herself]]. Most readers are unlikely to spot this clue during their first reading, however, as the police unwittingly bark up the wrong tree entirely (and by extension, the unknowing reader too) by not even ''considering'' that [[spoiler:anyone outside of Armstrong, Blore, Lombard, or Vera could have been the murderer, even when they systematically prove it impossible that any of these four could have done it]].



* One Literature/EncyclopediaBrown vs Bugs Meany caper was titled "The Case of The Missing Clues".
** This one is something of a [[SubvertedTrope subversion,]] though. The client in the mystery is a boy who has been selling fresh fruit from a stand on the side of the road; Bugs comes by every day and demands a generous helping of fruit for free, claiming that he is offering "protection" for the boy. On the day that Encyclopedia takes the case, Bugs makes off with a bag of cherries. When Encyclopedia and his client enter Bugs's clubhouse, they find him with an empty bag, but Bugs claims that he bought the cherries elsewhere, and has been eating them since he got back to his hideout. Encyclopedia investigates, and immediately determines that Bugs is lying. The mystery is how he knew, and the solution reveals that [[ConvictionByContradiction if Bugs had been eating the cherries in the clubhouse, there would be stems and pits lying on the floor]], and as there aren't any, he must have made up the story and eaten the fruit on his way there. So yes, the mystery is literally clueless--but in this case, [[FridgeBrilliance the absence of clues is the clue!]]

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* One Literature/EncyclopediaBrown vs Bugs Meany caper was titled "The Case of The Missing Clues".
**
Clues". This one is something of a [[SubvertedTrope subversion,]] though. The client in the mystery is a boy who has been selling fresh fruit from a stand on the side of the road; Bugs comes by every day and demands a generous helping of fruit for free, claiming that he is offering "protection" for the boy. On the day that Encyclopedia takes the case, Bugs makes off with a bag of cherries. When Encyclopedia and his client enter Bugs's clubhouse, they find him with an empty bag, but Bugs claims that he bought the cherries elsewhere, and has been eating them since he got back to his hideout. Encyclopedia investigates, and immediately determines that Bugs is lying. The mystery is how he knew, and the solution reveals that [[ConvictionByContradiction if Bugs had been eating the cherries in the clubhouse, there would be stems and pits lying on the floor]], and as there aren't any, he must have made up the story and eaten the fruit on his way there. So yes, the mystery is literally clueless--but in this case, [[FridgeBrilliance the absence of clues is the clue!]]
1st Jan '18 12:48:18 PM Wyvernil
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** Case [[spoiler:5]] is not ordinarily solvable. The workings of it are revealed afterwards, but it is intentionally a Clueless Mystery to both the protagonist and the player.

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** Case [[spoiler:5]] is not ordinarily solvable. The workings of it are revealed afterwards, but it is intentionally a Clueless Mystery to both the protagonist and the player. [[spoiler:This is because the case was faked by the mastermind themselves; they had become desperate to get rid of the protagonists and fabricated a murder to pin it on them. The sixth case is devoted to unearthing the truth, as well as the mastermind's true identity.]]
19th Dec '17 6:26:50 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/VeronicaMars'' pulled this with Lily's murderer. To quote [[TVTrash Rowdy C]]:

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* ''Series/VeronicaMars'' pulled this with Lily's murderer. To quote [[TVTrash [[WebVideo/TVTrash Rowdy C]]:
18th Aug '17 2:58:08 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' is sometimes accused of this, since one of the major parts of figuring out the culprit in a mystery--the motive--isn't revealed until the murderer [[MotiveRant rants about it to the party]] during the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon. That lack of a foreseeable reason for the killings is one of the main reasons why TheReveal comes right out of left field (unless the player is particularly GenreSavvy or metagaming).

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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' is sometimes accused of this, since one of the major parts of figuring out the culprit in a mystery--the motive--isn't revealed until the murderer [[MotiveRant rants about it to the party]] during the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon. That lack of a foreseeable reason for the killings is one of the main reasons why TheReveal comes right out of left field (unless the player is particularly GenreSavvy or metagaming).
6th Aug '17 2:07:07 AM TheNicestGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/TheWire'' is not big on whodunnits--in fact, the detectives use the term for cases they really, really don't want to work--but there is one particular murder that plays out like this. In season four, Kima investigates the death of a witness. The case sprawls across multiple episodes; examines motives, suspects, and forensics; becomes a political hot potato; and even helps to get a mayor elected. After she's stumped, Kima goes back to look at the crime scene one last time, and she works out that the killing was an accident, and the killer didn't even realize he'd done it. Not only is the culprit unhinted at until the last few moments, the audience never even gets to see them. On the other hand, if you consider just that brief final run at the case, the show does [[FairplayWhodunnit play fair]] with the clues Kima spots and her line of reasoning.
6th Aug '17 1:40:29 AM TheNicestGuy
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* In the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Elementary, Dear Data", this trope causes Data's initial attempts at a Sherlock Holmes holodeck adventure to be disappointing. At first, all the holodeck does is present Holmes' actual cases or mashups of them, and Data solves them instantly because he has them all memorized. It's only after the participants ask for an ''original'' Holmes-like mystery that Data engages in actual investigation and deduction.
12th Jul '17 8:59:40 PM Luc
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* The Literature/LordPeterWimsey novel ''Five Red Herrings'' is an edge case, with some people holding it's a FairPlayMystery (although a devilishly challenging one) and others holding that it's this. The detailed inventory of the victim's painting kit is the sticking point -- the reader is never explicitly told what Wimsey noticed about it that gave him the information he needed to identify the murderer, but the list of what ''is there'' is missing an item that ''should be there''. The dispute hinges on whether it's fair to expect the reader to know what items an oil painter absolutely would have in his kit when he's going out to paint a landscape, or not.

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* The Literature/LordPeterWimsey novel ''Five Red Herrings'' is an edge case, with some people holding it's a FairPlayMystery (although a devilishly challenging one) and others holding that it's this. The detailed inventory of the victim's painting kit is the sticking point -- the reader is never explicitly told what Wimsey noticed about it that gave him the information he needed to identify the murderer, but the list of what ''is there'' is missing an item that ''should be there''. The dispute hinges on whether it's fair to expect the reader to know what items an oil painter absolutely would have in his kit when he's going out to paint a landscape, or not. (On the Fair Play side, we're told the relevant conclusion well before the conclusion: That the scene was set up by the killer, something is missing, and that the missing item is only really important in that it indicates the scene was set.)
4th Jun '17 8:33:33 AM thatother1dude
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* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': This trope has gradually crept into the central plot in regards to the circumstances of [[spoiler: Pink Diamond's]] death. After seemingly getting our answer in the end of season 4 with Jasper's revelation that it was [[spoiler: Rose Quartz]] who shattered her, the question has been reopened as of the ''Wanted'' arc, wherein the luckless Zircon assigned to make [[spoiler: Steven's case before the Diamonds]] comes to the [[EurekaMoment Sudden Realization]] that the official story is completely full of holes, and that it simply wouldn't have been possible for her to get close enough to strike, at least not without [[spoiler: one of the other Diamonds]] being in on the conspiracy.
2nd Jun '17 8:29:22 PM CaptainCapsase
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'': This trope has gradually crept into the central plot in regards to the circumstances of [[spoiler: Pink Diamond's]] death. After seemingly getting our answer in the end of season 4 with Jasper's revelation that it was [[spoiler: Rose Quartz]] who shattered her, the question has been reopened as of the ''Wanted'' arc, wherein the luckless Zircon assigned to make [[spoiler: Steven's case before the Diamonds]] comes to the [[EurekaMoment Sudden Realization]] that the official story is completely full of holes, and that it simply wouldn't have been possible for her to get close enough to strike, at least not without [[spoiler: one of the other Diamonds]] being in on the conspiracy.
30th Apr '17 4:42:29 PM Luc
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*** To be mildly fair to Doyle, some of the examples are '''almost''' "fair play", in that we have ''almost'' all the evidence that Holmes has; in The Hound of the Baskervilles, for example, the fact that Holmes fixates on the portrait, and yet it looks nothing like either of the contemporary Baskervilles we know about, along with the evidence we have that indicates that there is a human being involved in the "haunting", gives us a strong hint that [[spoiler:we've met somebody who closely resembles the portrait]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CluelessMystery