History Main / CluelessAesop

9th Feb '16 1:46:10 PM chopshop
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* The infamous remake of ''Film/TheWickerMan'', according to the director, was meant as a feminist treatise told through a PersecutionFlip. His supposed intention was to show what patriarchal values would be like if reversed. The actual result is a bizarre movie about [[StrawFeminist a bunch of insane women]] torturing Creator/NicholasCage. One gets the sense that the director didn't really understand the subject matter. The concept of tackling sexism in a ''Wicker Man'' remake is an odd one in and of itself; the original film was about a ''religious'' cult, not the weird psycho-misandrists the remake depicts.
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* The infamous remake of ''Film/TheWickerMan'', according to the director, was meant as a feminist treatise told through a PersecutionFlip. His supposed intention was to show what patriarchal values would be like if reversed. The actual result is a bizarre movie about [[StrawFeminist a bunch of insane women]] torturing Creator/NicholasCage.Creator/NicolasCage. One gets the sense that the director didn't really understand the subject matter. The concept of tackling sexism in a ''Wicker Man'' remake is an odd one in and of itself; the original film was about a ''religious'' cult, not the weird psycho-misandrists the remake depicts.

* ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDlt'' infamously attempted to do a serious story arc about one of the main characters suffering a miscarriage. In a goofy TwoGamersOnACouch comic that features things like a holiday called "Wintereenmas" and a robot made out of X-Boxes. Needless to say this is not an environment conducive to a serious discussion about the impact of miscarriage on people's lives. The result is "[[{{Narm}} sad]]" scenes such as Ethan showing how excited he was to have a child by revealing that he made a tiny PlayStation controller for babies to use.
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* ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDlt'' ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDel'' infamously attempted to do a serious story arc about one of the main characters suffering a miscarriage. In a goofy TwoGamersOnACouch comic that features things like a holiday called "Wintereenmas" and a robot made out of X-Boxes. Needless to say this is not an environment conducive to a serious discussion about the impact of miscarriage on people's lives. The result is "[[{{Narm}} sad]]" scenes such as Ethan showing how excited he was to have a child by revealing that he made a tiny PlayStation controller for babies to use.
9th Feb '16 1:44:14 PM chopshop
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Added DiffLines:
* The infamous remake of ''Film/TheWickerMan'', according to the director, was meant as a feminist treatise told through a PersecutionFlip. His supposed intention was to show what patriarchal values would be like if reversed. The actual result is a bizarre movie about [[StrawFeminist a bunch of insane women]] torturing Creator/NicholasCage. One gets the sense that the director didn't really understand the subject matter. The concept of tackling sexism in a ''Wicker Man'' remake is an odd one in and of itself; the original film was about a ''religious'' cult, not the weird psycho-misandrists the remake depicts.

Added DiffLines:
* ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDlt'' infamously attempted to do a serious story arc about one of the main characters suffering a miscarriage. In a goofy TwoGamersOnACouch comic that features things like a holiday called "Wintereenmas" and a robot made out of X-Boxes. Needless to say this is not an environment conducive to a serious discussion about the impact of miscarriage on people's lives. The result is "[[{{Narm}} sad]]" scenes such as Ethan showing how excited he was to have a child by revealing that he made a tiny PlayStation controller for babies to use.
27th Jan '16 12:36:10 PM NNinja
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Broken Aesop, not Clueless.
* Every episode of ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' had a sendoff message. One in particular showed a bunch of kids getting into a fight and the rangers delivering a message about not resorting to violence... even though that's precisely what they do in just about every episode, whenever they need to fight the VillainOfTheWeek.
11th Jan '16 11:05:11 AM Tuckerscreator
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* ''Film/TheGarbagePailKidsMovie'' was an attempt to turn a line of trading cards -- which were ''deliberately'' intended to be [[{{Gorn}} violent]] [[BlackComedy and thoroughly disgusting]] -- into an Aesop about [[WhatMeasureIsANonCute appreciating those who look different]]. It worked out about as well as you'd expect throwing AnAesop into a film based on ''Garbage Pail Kids'' would be. Bonus points for its being a BrokenAesop: the titular characters are just as ugly on the inside (some have even [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation interpreted the Kids as being incarnations of the Seven Deadly Sins]]) -- but hey, they sure sang a catchy song about teamwork, right? ** While robbing a shop!
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* ''Film/TheGarbagePailKidsMovie'' was an attempt to turn a line of trading cards -- which were ''deliberately'' intended to be [[{{Gorn}} violent]] [[BlackComedy and thoroughly disgusting]] -- into an Aesop about [[WhatMeasureIsANonCute appreciating those who look different]]. It worked out about as well as you'd expect throwing AnAesop into a film based on ''Garbage Pail Kids'' would be. Bonus points for its being a BrokenAesop: the titular characters are just as ugly on the inside (some have even [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation interpreted the Kids as being incarnations of the Seven Deadly Sins]]) -- but hey, they sure sang a catchy song about teamwork, right? ** right? While robbing a shop!
6th Jan '16 4:42:16 AM TheSnowSquirrel
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* While most of the Circle Time interstitials that used to air on Playhouse Disney (now Disney Junior) could get simple aesops across to their target audience of preschoolers pretty well, the lesson to be learned from the saga of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIA0XmnspHo Crying Jack]] doesn't make much sense in relation to the problem at hand in the live-action segment. A youngster is unhappy because she doesn't know what to draw, so the host of the segments tells the story about Crying Jack. The story details a happy-go-lucky boy who, for no stated reason, suddenly decides to cry as much as he can, and ultimately he cries so much that he turns himself into a [[BodyHorror giant walking and crying mouth]]. The fact that Jack just starts crying for literally no reason makes the moral of the story (possibly intended to be a "crying and being fussy won't do you any good" type of moral) come off more like "[[SpaceWhaleAesop Never cry or else you run the risk of turning yourself into a giant crying mouth]]". Whichever the case was, neither of the aesops really relate much to the kid's WritersBlock-induced conundrum.
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* While most of the Circle Time interstitials that used to air on Playhouse Disney (now Disney Junior) could get simple aesops across to their target audience of preschoolers pretty well, the lesson to be learned from the saga of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIA0XmnspHo Crying Jack]] doesn't make much sense in relation to the problem at hand in the live-action segment. A youngster is unhappy because she doesn't know what to draw, so the host of the segments tells the story about Crying Jack. The story details a happy-go-lucky boy who, for no stated reason, suddenly decides to cry as much as he can, and ultimately he cries so much that he turns himself into a [[BodyHorror giant walking and crying mouth]]. The fact that Jack just starts crying for literally no reason makes the moral of the story (possibly intended to be a "crying and being fussy "getting too upset won't do you any good" solve your problems" type of moral) [[note]] Or "It's bad to ever express any sadness/negativity!" which is ''not'' the kind of aesop you want a vulnerable young audience to see in a time where depressive disorders can stem from hiding negative thoughts out of shame or fear have been brought to light.[[/note]] come off more like "[[SpaceWhaleAesop Never cry or else you run the risk of turning yourself into a giant crying mouth]]". Whichever the case was, neither of the aesops really relate much to the kid's WritersBlock-induced conundrum.
1st Jan '16 5:23:10 AM Slave
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** Although {{Word Of God}} has stated that the message is less anti war/violence and more deconstructing what it means to play war as videogames. A clearer message to take from it would be "There are no unfallible heroes in real warfare", "You can't always single handedly save the day" or "Nobody would be able to act like a character in a standard war shooter and remain unscathed".
22nd Dec '15 4:58:05 AM Hanz
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* ''[[VideoGame/RyuGaGotoku Yakuza 4]]'' has a sidequest where orphaned kids who were separated from their illegal immigrant parents when said parents were deported are spraying graffiti to express their hate for Japan. Tanimura and Zhao pull them aside for an important lesson: Is it the fault of the clearly flawed process for dealing with illegal immigrants? Nope. Is it the fault of the hostile, zero-tolerance mentality that the Japanese people have towards illegal immigrants? Nope. Is it their parent's fault for thoughtlessly putting themselves at risk for this situation to begin with? Nope. IT'S NO ONE'S FAULT! SO JUST STICK YOUR NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE AND FORGET ALL ABOUT IT! Never mind the kids who will fall victim to the same situation that you're in someday, and that you, as a casualty, are in the perfect position to be an activist.
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* ''[[VideoGame/RyuGaGotoku Yakuza 4]]'' ''Videogame/{{Yakuza}} 4'' has a sidequest where orphaned kids who were separated from their illegal immigrant parents when said parents were deported are spraying graffiti to express their hate for Japan. Tanimura and Zhao pull them aside for an important lesson: Is it the fault of the clearly flawed process for dealing with illegal immigrants? Nope. Is it the fault of the hostile, zero-tolerance mentality that the Japanese people have towards illegal immigrants? Nope. Is it their parent's fault for thoughtlessly putting themselves at risk for this situation to begin with? Nope. IT'S NO ONE'S FAULT! SO JUST STICK YOUR NOSE TO THE GRINDSTONE AND FORGET ALL ABOUT IT! Never mind the kids who will fall victim to the same situation that you're in someday, and that you, as a casualty, are in the perfect position to be an activist.
20th Dec '15 4:39:23 PM pku
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** The series also glosses over the difficulties of raising a child by having Renesmee never cry and grow into adulthood abnormally fast. It's easy to avoid abortion in a world where your baby is immortal and will be able to take care of herself after only a couple of years. *** To be honest, the Catholic Church would probably [[TakeAThirdOption put it up for debate]] whether or not the kid is actually alive in the first place. After all, it's a Dhampir. Otherwise, with its natural near-invincibility, an 'abortion' might not actually kill it, and it could simply grow up slightly stunted for the first few years of life.
16th Dec '15 8:24:18 AM wrm5
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!!!In general: * Often, in cartoons meant for children, there will be a story where the rival girls will talk smack about a major female character behind her back. The end of the episode invariably has the rival girls being called out or punished somehow, with the Aesop being that you shouldn't spread rumors. This still happens in real life, as if the real lesson being learned is "Bringing down another girl will make you popular ''as long as you don't get caught!''" * Any attempt to educate children about molestation is likely to stumble into this territory, as the message is couched behind vague terms. See the "Sonic Sez" example below. * When a cartoon does an episode about PeerPressure (especially in relation to drugs), the "friends" pressuring the hero are usually brand new characters, belonging to a "bad" crowd. Said episode usually ends with the hero realizing "they weren't my real friends," and returning to his usual Scooby Gang. This misses the whole point of peer pressure in real life; kids are getting pressured to do bad things by the people who ''are'' their real friends, who they've known and trusted for months or years. Instead of trying to teach kids to ditch any friend who isn't a straight arrow, it would make more sense to teach them how to simply say "no" to their friends, while still remaining friends. * Many shows try to push the BeYourself moral like this. One kid ([[AlwaysFemale usually a girl]]) will admire a certain trend or person and try to imitate either or. This leads to the kid's friends and maybe family acting in dissaproval, driving said protagonist [[StatusQuoIsGod back to normal.]] While the Aesop they're trying to get across is "Your loved ones like you just the way you are," the lesson looks like "If you're inspired by something that makes you want to re-invent yourself -''purely'' for your own desires- everyone you love will give you grief for it. [[BrokenAesop Do what other people want and revert to the way you were.]] " * Bullying is ''the'' aesop that no animated work can seem to handle in a serious context. Except for very rare instances in animated works bullies are either pure evil monsters or victims of abuse themselves which drive them to villainy (which determines whether they'll be defeated/humiliated or [[HeelFaceTurn reformed]] by episode's end). In real life this is rarely the case: bullies are people rather than plot devices and thus very rarely driven by such superficial motives, making 99% of the aesops fall flat on their face. Many is the time the episode will try to say "tell an adult" as if that is the end-all fix-all for bullying which more often than not makes the problem worse in real life (and if it was that simple to solve bullying wouldn't be an issue), while simultaneously decrying and outright demonizing the bullied children who try to stand up for themselves as a case of HeWhoFightsMonsters out of fear that saying otherwise could be misinterpreted as "go kick the bully's ass". Unfortunately bullying is such a commonplace part of childhood that most if not all Aesop-driven shows feel compelled to have one (or several) "the bully" episodes, almost all of which end on a happy note only made possible by a series of unlikely and unrealistic occurances. !!!Specific works:
15th Dec '15 7:08:39 PM wrm5
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Sinkhole.
* [[Series/WalkerTexasRanger "Walker told me I have AIDS."]]
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* [[Series/WalkerTexasRanger ''Series/WalkerTexasRanger'': "Walker told me I have AIDS."]]
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