History Main / CluelessAesop

5th Nov '17 12:24:41 PM BenOfHouston
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* Used in-universe in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'', "Over a Barrel". Pinkie Pie decides to sing a song about sharing in order to get the bison and the cowponies to get along and agree. They do agree... on this being the worst performance they'd ever seen. Brought up again when the bison are about to call off the attack, but Pinkie Pie celebrates by singing another verse, enraging them and causing them to attack anyway. In a more meta sense, the episode tries to create a scenario of irreconcilable differences illustrated with the bison (themed after Native Americans) and the ponies (themed after cowboys), but because it's a kids' show that discusses friendship and conflict resolution, there really ''is'' a satisfying compromise for all involved, and that requires the historical basis to be ''heavily'' sanitized to be appropriate for children.

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* Used in-universe in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'', "Over a Barrel". Pinkie Pie decides to sing a song about sharing in order to get the bison and the cowponies to get along and agree. They do agree... on this being the worst performance they'd ever seen. Brought up again when the bison are about to call off the attack, but Pinkie Pie celebrates by singing another verse, enraging them and causing them to attack anyway. In a more meta sense, the episode tries to create a scenario of irreconcilable differences illustrated with the bison (themed after Native Americans) and the ponies (themed after cowboys), but because it's a kids' show that discusses friendship and conflict resolution, there really ''is'' a satisfying compromise for all involved, involved (essentially, a lease agreement from Buffalo to Ponies), and that requires the historical basis to be ''heavily'' sanitized to be appropriate for children.
22nd Oct '17 8:45:48 AM starofjusticev21
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** At times it even becomes confused about the point of its presentation. A few episodes have Bibleman try to stress people need to pay attention to God and not to him, because he's just a person like everyone else. Not only is this mangled by most episodes having somebody specifically call Bibleman and ask him to solve a loved one's personal problems, the point of the show would seem to be making religious lessons more appealing to kids by having a cool hero who gets to use a lightsaber promoting them. It's a worthwhile message, but it falls flat coming out of the mouth of someone created to be an attention-grabbing mascot.

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** At times it even becomes confused about the point of its presentation. A few episodes have Bibleman try to stress people need to pay attention to God and not to him, because he's just a person like everyone else. Not only is this mangled by most episodes having somebody specifically call Bibleman and ask him to solve a loved one's personal problems, the point of the show would seem to be making religious lessons more appealing to kids by having a cool hero who gets to use a lightsaber promoting them. them [[note]] Which indeed ties right back to the episodes showing people calling Bibleman for help with someone's emotional troubles [[/note]]. It's a worthwhile message, but it falls flat apart coming out of the mouth of someone created to be an attention-grabbing mascot.
21st Oct '17 1:39:44 PM starofjusticev21
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* The religious kids show ''Series/{{Bibleman}}'' falls into the same trap as ''Captain Planet'' mentioned below in that it uses the superhero formula to lure in kids, but has the problems it tries to comment on caused by supervillains. Usually the imperiled kid of the episode is shot by a sin-inducing laser gun and starts acting badly out of the blue, doing nothing to address the kinds of real-life things that cause these behaviors the show is saying you need to avoid. There are a couple of episodes where the villain's influence exacerbates a problem the kid's established as already facing (I.e. the kid's faith is weakening because his parents won't stop fighting), but the show doesn't bother to do it consistently. And this is compounded by how Bibleman inevitably ends up afflicted by the same thing as the kid to show that he's just a human whose vulnerable to same things everyone else is, but as someone whose entire life is based around spiritual battles it's even more out of the blue for him.

to:

* The religious kids show ''Series/{{Bibleman}}'' falls into the same trap as ''Captain Planet'' mentioned below in that it uses the superhero formula to lure in kids, but has the problems it tries to comment on caused by supervillains. Usually the imperiled kid of the episode is shot by a sin-inducing laser gun and starts acting badly out of the blue, doing nothing to address the kinds of real-life things that cause these behaviors the show is saying you need to avoid. There are a couple of episodes where the villain's influence exacerbates a problem the kid's established as already facing (I.e. the kid's faith is weakening because his parents won't stop fighting), but the show doesn't bother to do it consistently. And this is compounded by how Bibleman inevitably ends up afflicted by the same thing as the kid to show that he's just a human whose who's vulnerable to the same things everyone else is, but as someone whose entire life is based around spiritual battles it's usually established even more poorly than for the kid he helps, losing the point.
** At times it even becomes confused about the point of its presentation. A few episodes have Bibleman try to stress people need to pay attention to God and not to him, because he's just a person like everyone else. Not only is this mangled by most episodes having somebody specifically call Bibleman and ask him to solve a loved one's personal problems, the point of the show would seem to be making religious lessons more appealing to kids by having a cool hero who gets to use a lightsaber promoting them. It's a worthwhile message, but it falls flat coming
out of the blue for him.mouth of someone created to be an attention-grabbing mascot.
10th Oct '17 12:41:00 PM CrowTR0bot
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* ''Film/TheyLive'' is an allegory for the evils of unchecked Capitalism and Reaganomics, depicting the rich and powerful, as well as members of the police force, as alien invaders infiltrating and subverting our society. Unfortunately, since aliens are, by definition, outsiders, many Neo-Nazis [[MisaimedFandom took this movie as a validation of their beliefs that Jews were running a secret cabal to brainwash society]], much to John Carpenter's chagrin.
6th Oct '17 6:32:34 AM WildKatGirl
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* A notorious PETA PSA showed a girl screaming at seeing her father beat her mother, an old woman scream as a pair of muggers attack her, a boy screaming as bullies mob him... and a fish opening its mouth as it's about to be cut up and cooked. The message was "Not all screams can be heard". Leaving aside the ''ludicrous'' comparison of a fish's suffering to a human's, what restaurant in its right mind would prepare a fish while it's ''still alive?''

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* A notorious PETA PSA showed a girl screaming at seeing her father beat her mother, an old woman scream as a pair of muggers attack her, a boy screaming as bullies mob him... and a fish opening its mouth as it's about to be cut up and cooked. The message was "Not all screams can be heard". Leaving aside the ''ludicrous'' comparison of a fish's suffering to a human's, what restaurant in its right mind would prepare a fish while it's ''still alive?''
5th Oct '17 8:15:03 PM starofjusticev21
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* The kids religious show ''Series/{{Bibleman}}'' falls into the same trap as ''Captain Planet'' mentioned below in that it uses the superhero formula to lure in kids, but has the problems it tries to comment on caused by supervillains. Usually the imperiled kid of the episode is shot by a sin-inducing laser gun and starts acting badly out of the blue, doing nothing to address the kinds of real-life things that cause these behaviors the show is saying you need to avoid. There are a couple of episodes where the villain's influence exacerbates a problem the kid's established as already facing, but the show doesn't bother to do it consistently.

to:

* The kids religious kids show ''Series/{{Bibleman}}'' falls into the same trap as ''Captain Planet'' mentioned below in that it uses the superhero formula to lure in kids, but has the problems it tries to comment on caused by supervillains. Usually the imperiled kid of the episode is shot by a sin-inducing laser gun and starts acting badly out of the blue, doing nothing to address the kinds of real-life things that cause these behaviors the show is saying you need to avoid. There are a couple of episodes where the villain's influence exacerbates a problem the kid's established as already facing, facing (I.e. the kid's faith is weakening because his parents won't stop fighting), but the show doesn't bother to do it consistently.consistently. And this is compounded by how Bibleman inevitably ends up afflicted by the same thing as the kid to show that he's just a human whose vulnerable to same things everyone else is, but as someone whose entire life is based around spiritual battles it's even more out of the blue for him.
5th Oct '17 8:01:17 PM starofjusticev21
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Added DiffLines:

* The kids religious show ''Series/{{Bibleman}}'' falls into the same trap as ''Captain Planet'' mentioned below in that it uses the superhero formula to lure in kids, but has the problems it tries to comment on caused by supervillains. Usually the imperiled kid of the episode is shot by a sin-inducing laser gun and starts acting badly out of the blue, doing nothing to address the kinds of real-life things that cause these behaviors the show is saying you need to avoid. There are a couple of episodes where the villain's influence exacerbates a problem the kid's established as already facing, but the show doesn't bother to do it consistently.
30th Sep '17 12:38:54 PM DesertDragon
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** Subverted in the later episode "Bart After Dark", whose apparent purpose was to redeem the show from the previous entry. When Marge finds out Bart was forced to work as a door man at a burlesque club as Homer's way of punishing him for damaging its property, she joins with the local MoralGuardians and works the town into a fury over the club's presence. However, it's clear that Marge is overreacting, and the club's owner -- an elegant older woman -- actually confronts her; the owner argues that she's been in Springfield for over fifty years and that she and her dancers have every right to be there. If anything makes this wander into "Clueless Aesop" territory, it's the occasional implication that the club is actually a ''whorehouse'', in which case Marge's anger would be much more justified.

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** Subverted in the later episode "Bart After Dark", whose apparent purpose was to redeem the show from the previous entry. When Marge finds out Bart was forced to work as a door man at a burlesque club as Homer's way of punishing him for damaging its property, she joins with the local MoralGuardians and works the town into a fury over the club's presence. However, it's clear that Marge is overreacting, and the club's owner -- an elegant older woman -- actually confronts her; the owner argues that she's been in Springfield for over fifty years and that she and her dancers have every right to be there. If anything makes this episode wander into "Clueless Aesop" territory, it's the occasional heavy implication that the club is actually a ''whorehouse'', ''brothel'', in which case Marge's anger would be much more justified.
30th Sep '17 12:36:21 PM DesertDragon
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** The episode "Homer's Night Out" has the aesop of "Exotic dancers are people too." Not a bad message, but the ''way'' it's conveyed is a sheer mess. Bart receives a toy spy camera and secretly takes a photo of Homer dancing with a stripper at a work party. The picture gets copied and passed around his friends at school and eventually makes its way into the adults' world (essentially [[OlderThanTheyThink it went viral before social media was a thing]]). Mr. Burns finds it and scolds Homer, claiming that he's making the power plant a hostile workplace for the female employees, [[TakeOurWordForIt even though we don't see anything happen to prove his claim]][[note]]on the other hand, [[ForTheEvulz Mr. Burns was probably just looking for an excuse to be a jerk to Homer again]][[/note]]; Marge also finds it and is ''utterly pissed'' and throws him out of the house. When he begs for her forgiveness, she claims that she's upset at him not for dancing with a stripper, but for letting Bart think it's okay to treat women like objects, forcing Homer to track the girl down to have her tell Bart that she's a person with a real name and real goals and interests. Three problems here: 1. Marge's reaction indicated jealousy rather than anger at Homer's parenting; claiming that he set a bad example came across as just an excuse to guilt-trip him, not the primary offense. 2. At no point was the dancer disrespected at the party. She was hired to perform, and none of the men present ever even touched her or verbally demeaned her in any way. 3. ''Homer had no idea Bart was there.'' If anyone had explaining to do, it was ''Bart'' for sneaking into an adult party where he might not understand the context of what was going on, and taking a photo of people in a compromising position without their consent.

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** The episode "Homer's Night Out" has the aesop of "Exotic dancers are people too." Not a bad message, but the ''way'' it's conveyed is a sheer mess. Bart receives a toy spy camera and secretly takes a photo of Homer dancing with a stripper at a work party. The picture gets copied and passed around his friends at school and eventually makes its way into the adults' world (essentially [[OlderThanTheyThink it went viral before social media was a thing]]). Mr. Burns finds it and scolds Homer, claiming that he's making the power plant a hostile workplace for the female employees, [[TakeOurWordForIt even though we don't see anything happen to prove his claim]][[note]]on the other hand, [[ForTheEvulz Mr. Burns was probably just looking for an excuse to be a jerk to Homer again]][[/note]]; Marge also finds it and is ''utterly pissed'' and throws him out of the house. When he begs for her forgiveness, she claims that she's upset at him not for dancing with a stripper, but for letting Bart think it's okay to treat women like objects, forcing Homer to track the girl down to have her tell Bart that she's a person with a real name and real goals and interests. Three problems here: 1. Marge's reaction indicated jealousy rather than anger She was mad at Homer's parenting; him ''before'' she knew Bart took the picture; claiming that he set a bad example came across as just an an excuse to guilt-trip him, not the primary offense.him when in reality she was jealous. 2. At no point was the dancer disrespected at the party. She was hired to perform, and none of the men present ever even touched her or verbally demeaned her in any way. 3. ''Homer had no idea Bart was there.'' If anyone had explaining to do, it was ''Bart'' for sneaking into an adult party where he might not understand the context of what was going on, and taking a photo of people in a compromising position without their consent.
21st Sep '17 8:56:53 AM ElSquibbonator
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* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' as a whole often falls victim to this trope, largely due to the fact that it chooses to depict pollution and other types of environmental destruction as being caused by supervillains who are doing it [[ForTheEvulz just to be dicks]] (with the occasional exception of Looten Plunder, though he had [[CorruptCorporateExecutive his own simplistic reason.), rather than ordinary people who aren't aware of their impact on the environment, or that it takes time to switch to renewable energy, or don't care when there's a lot of money being made in the process. For a non-environmental-related case, there's the infamous episode "[[UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland If It's Doomsday, It Must Be Belfast]]", which was meant to promote world peace. What it managed to do instead was become the single most offensive example of the {{Oireland}} trope, while also making [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles the struggle between Catholics and Protestants]] look like [[Theatre/WestSideStory The Jets against The Sharks]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQJrovKgrTw Highlights can be seen here]]. (And the comments. Dear God, the comments.) This episode was banned in Northern Ireland at the time it aired, and was met with ridicule from Northern Ireland's inhabitants after it was finally shown.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' as a whole often falls victim to this trope, largely due to the fact that it chooses to depict pollution and other types of environmental destruction as being caused by supervillains who are doing it [[ForTheEvulz just to be dicks]] (with the occasional exception of Looten Plunder, though he had [[CorruptCorporateExecutive his own simplistic reason.), Looten Plunder]]), rather than ordinary people who aren't aware of their impact on the environment, or that it takes time to switch to renewable energy, or don't care when there's a lot of money being made in the process. For a non-environmental-related case, there's the infamous episode "[[UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland If It's Doomsday, It Must Be Belfast]]", which was meant to promote world peace. What it managed to do instead was become the single most offensive example of the {{Oireland}} trope, while also making [[UsefulNotes/TheTroubles the struggle between Catholics and Protestants]] look like [[Theatre/WestSideStory The Jets against The Sharks]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQJrovKgrTw Highlights can be seen here]]. (And the comments. Dear God, the comments.) This episode was banned in Northern Ireland at the time it aired, and was met with ridicule from Northern Ireland's inhabitants after it was finally shown.
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