History Main / CluelessAesop

27th Aug '16 5:11:53 PM nombretomado
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* Perhaps the best example: The barely remembered (or perhaps nicely repressed) Creator/DisneyChannel [[VerySpecialEpisode Special Presentation]], ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh: [[http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Too_Smart_for_Strangers Too Smart for Strangers]]''. Seeing the residents of the Hundred Acre Wood dole out advice to the kiddies on how to avoid being kidnapped and molested is stunningly fucked up in itself. If there is a list of characters who should never explain -- nor even be ''aware'' of -- child abuse, Pooh is easily at the top. But apparently, that wasn't bizarre enough for The DisneyChannel; instead of using the animated characters, they chose to use the unspeakably terrifying costumed characters from the show ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fYCnZB_X7M Welcome To Pooh Corner]]''. The whole thing seems coldly designed to scar a child's mind.

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* Perhaps the best example: The barely remembered (or perhaps nicely repressed) Creator/DisneyChannel [[VerySpecialEpisode Special Presentation]], ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh: [[http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Too_Smart_for_Strangers Too Smart for Strangers]]''. Seeing the residents of the Hundred Acre Wood dole out advice to the kiddies on how to avoid being kidnapped and molested is stunningly fucked up in itself. If there is a list of characters who should never explain -- nor even be ''aware'' of -- child abuse, Pooh is easily at the top. But apparently, that wasn't bizarre enough for The DisneyChannel; Creator/DisneyChannel; instead of using the animated characters, they chose to use the unspeakably terrifying costumed characters from the show ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fYCnZB_X7M Welcome To Pooh Corner]]''. The whole thing seems coldly designed to scar a child's mind.
21st Aug '16 7:48:52 AM pinkdalek
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* InUniverse, {{Discussed}} and ultimately subverted in ''WesternAnimation/BoJackHorseman'', when Sextina Aquafina releases a pop single attempting to bring attention to the right to choose abortion. With a hook of "get dat fetus, kill dat fetus, braap braap pew pew", lyrics like "I'm a baby killer, killing babies makes me horny", and a video featuring twerking nurses and Sextina spreadeagled on a phallic coathanger spaceship shooting at a baby resembling the Star Child from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', Diane - despite herself being pro-choice and having an abortion - complains about the tone and says that maybe it's just not appropriate to make a pop song about this sensitive issue. However, Sextina starts receiving comments from fans saying that the (intentionally funny) video helped them get through their own abortion, and Diane backs down, realising it's not about her.
21st Aug '16 5:59:52 AM Silverblade2
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* Enjoy this [[http://www.toplessrobot.com/2008/12/the_8_most_awkward_berenstain_bears_books.php list of awkward]] ''[[Literature/TheBerenstainBears Berenstain Bears]]'' books. Not all of them have Clueless Aesops, but remember, these books tend to be written for ''very'' young children.
* [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/10-great-childrens-books-for-people-who-hate-their-children/ This]] {{Website/Cracked}}.com list of '[[http://www.cracked.com/blog/10-great-childrens-books-for-people-who-hate-their-children/ Great Books for Traumatizing Children]]' appears to be mostly made up of Clueless Aesops. They range from {{anvilicious}} (''Literature/LatawnyaTheNaughtyHorseLearnsToSayNoToDrugs'') to [[UnfortunateImplications outright fucked up]] (''Literature/AlfiesHome'') to Nazi propaganda (''The Poodle-Pug-Dachshund-Pinscher''). Although, the last one does get its intended message across - it's just that [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop the message is horrible.]]
20th Aug '16 9:42:10 AM DesertDragon
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** Subverted in a later episode whose purpose seemed to redeem the show from the previous entry. When Marge finds out Bart was forced to work as a door man at a burlesque club as Homer's way of punishing him for damaging its property, she joins with the local MoralGuardians and works the town into a fury over the club's presence. However, it's clear that Marge was overreacting, and the club's owner--an elegant older woman--actually confronts her; the owner argues that she's been in Springfield for over fifty years and that she and her dancers have every right to be there.

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** Subverted in a later episode whose purpose seemed to redeem the show from the previous entry. When Marge finds out Bart was forced to work as a door man at a burlesque club as Homer's way of punishing him for damaging its property, she joins with the local MoralGuardians and works the town into a fury over the club's presence. However, it's clear that Marge was is overreacting, and the club's owner--an elegant older woman--actually confronts her; the owner argues that she's been in Springfield for over fifty years and that she and her dancers have every right to be there.
20th Aug '16 9:39:29 AM DesertDragon
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** Subverted in a later episode whose purpose seemed to redeem the show from the previous entry. When Marge finds out Bart was forced to work as a door man at a burlesque club as Homer's way of punishing him for damaging its property, she joins with the local MoralGuardians and works the town into a fury over the club's presence. However, it's clear that Marge was overreacting, and the club's owner--an elegant older woman--actually confronts her; the owner argues that she's been in Springfield for over fifty years and that she and her dancers have every right to be there.
20th Aug '16 9:19:06 AM DesertDragon
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** The episode "Homer's Night Out" has the aesop of "Exotic dancers are people too." Not a bad message, but the ''way'' it's conveyed is a sheer mess. Bart receives a toy spy camera and secretly takes a photo of Homer dancing with a stripper at a work party. The picture gets copied and passed around his friends at school and eventually makes its way into the adults' world (essentially it went viral before social media was a thing), and is found by Homer's boss and wife. Mr. Burns scolds him for his behavior, meanwhile Marge is ''utterly pissed'' and throws him out of the house. When he begs for her forgiveness, she claims that she's upset at him not for dancing with a stripper, but for letting Bart think it's okay to treat women like objects, forcing Homer to track the girl down to have her tell Bart that she's a person with a real name and real goals and interests. Three problems here: 1. Marge's reaction indicated jealousy rather than anger at Homer's parenting; claiming that he set a bad example came across as an excuse to guilt-trip him. 2. At no point was the dancer disrespected at the party. She was hired to perform, and none of the men present ever touched her or verbally demeaned her in any way. 3. ''Homer had no idea Bart was there.'' If anyone had explaining to do, it was ''Bart'' for sneaking into an adult party where he might not understand the context of what was going on, and taking a photo of people in a compromising position without their consent.

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** The episode "Homer's Night Out" has the aesop of "Exotic dancers are people too." Not a bad message, but the ''way'' it's conveyed is a sheer mess. Bart receives a toy spy camera and secretly takes a photo of Homer dancing with a stripper at a work party. The picture gets copied and passed around his friends at school and eventually makes its way into the adults' world (essentially it went viral before social media was a thing), and is found by Homer's boss and wife. Mr. Burns scolds him for his behavior, meanwhile Marge is ''utterly pissed'' and throws him out of the house. When he begs for her forgiveness, she claims that she's upset at him not for dancing with a stripper, but for letting Bart think it's okay to treat women like objects, forcing Homer to track the girl down to have her tell Bart that she's a person with a real name and real goals and interests. Three problems here: 1. Marge's reaction indicated jealousy rather than anger at Homer's parenting; claiming that he set a bad example came across as just an excuse to guilt-trip him.him, not the primary offense. 2. At no point was the dancer disrespected at the party. She was hired to perform, and none of the men present ever touched her or verbally demeaned her in any way. 3. ''Homer had no idea Bart was there.'' If anyone had explaining to do, it was ''Bart'' for sneaking into an adult party where he might not understand the context of what was going on, and taking a photo of people in a compromising position without their consent.
20th Aug '16 9:15:21 AM DesertDragon
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Added DiffLines:

** The episode "Homer's Night Out" has the aesop of "Exotic dancers are people too." Not a bad message, but the ''way'' it's conveyed is a sheer mess. Bart receives a toy spy camera and secretly takes a photo of Homer dancing with a stripper at a work party. The picture gets copied and passed around his friends at school and eventually makes its way into the adults' world (essentially it went viral before social media was a thing), and is found by Homer's boss and wife. Mr. Burns scolds him for his behavior, meanwhile Marge is ''utterly pissed'' and throws him out of the house. When he begs for her forgiveness, she claims that she's upset at him not for dancing with a stripper, but for letting Bart think it's okay to treat women like objects, forcing Homer to track the girl down to have her tell Bart that she's a person with a real name and real goals and interests. Three problems here: 1. Marge's reaction indicated jealousy rather than anger at Homer's parenting; claiming that he set a bad example came across as an excuse to guilt-trip him. 2. At no point was the dancer disrespected at the party. She was hired to perform, and none of the men present ever touched her or verbally demeaned her in any way. 3. ''Homer had no idea Bart was there.'' If anyone had explaining to do, it was ''Bart'' for sneaking into an adult party where he might not understand the context of what was going on, and taking a photo of people in a compromising position without their consent.
9th Aug '16 11:51:05 AM Kadorhal
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* Here's an example that doubles as a BrokenAesop: In the early 90's, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} ran several [=PSA's=] about the need to turn off the television and go outside. Around that exact same time, they ran a network promo depicting a kid being left alone on a baseball field, because all of his friends are ''in the living room watching Nick''.

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* Here's an example that doubles as a BrokenAesop: In the early 90's, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} ran several [=PSA's=] [=PSAs=] about the need to turn off the television and go outside. Around that exact same time, they ran a network promo depicting a kid being left alone on a baseball field, because all of his friends are ''in the living room watching Nick''.



* In ''Anime/{{Naruto}}'' the story treats as if revenge is a bad thing as it will directly lead to the CycleOfRevenge, and in turn war. But rather than focusing on the reasonable example of warring factions (such as Sasuke seemingly killing Killer Bee which prompted the Raikage to seek revenge), most of the attention goes to the traditional loner villains like Orochimaru or [[spoiler: Obito]] who have no or next to no relationship ties to make the CycleOfRevenge take place at all. Just about every Akatsuki member is in it for themselves so the death of any one member only means a new position has opened up, despite how close Kabuto is to Orochimaru it's only really orriented professionally as Orochimaru's death only prompts Kabuto to snatch up some research notes and try to copy and eventually surpass Orochimaru's achievements in MadScience, and even Madara was considered an extremist by the other Uchiha. The moral is most strongly brought up in reference to Sasuke but the people who care about him the most know he's a dangerous criminal and aren't ones to go seeking revenge for his death either.

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* In ''Anime/{{Naruto}}'' the story treats as if overall moral seems to be that revenge is a bad thing thing, as it will directly lead to the CycleOfRevenge, and in turn war. But rather than focusing on the reasonable example of warring factions (such as Sasuke seemingly killing Killer Bee Bee, which prompted the Raikage to seek revenge), most of the attention goes to the traditional loner villains like Orochimaru or [[spoiler: Obito]] [[spoiler:Obito]] who have no or next to no relationship ties to make the CycleOfRevenge cycle take place at all. Just about every Akatsuki member is in it for themselves so the death of any one member only means a new position has opened up, up; despite how close Kabuto is to Orochimaru it's only really orriented professionally oriented professionally, as Orochimaru's death only prompts Kabuto to snatch up some research notes and try to copy and eventually surpass Orochimaru's achievements in MadScience, MadScience; and even Madara was considered an extremist by the other Uchiha. The moral is most strongly brought up in reference to Sasuke Sasuke, but the people who care about him the most know ''know'' he's a dangerous criminal and aren't ones to go seeking revenge for his death either.



* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' introduced the character of Paul as Ash's main rival during the seasons set in Sinnoh. Paul and Ash had frequent disagreements, only to have other characters lecture Ash about how they should try to overlook their differences, because everyone is different and has their own ways of doing things which should be respected. Paul, however, was extremely aggressive without provocation and was also particularly cruel to his Pokemon, crueler than most of the clear-cut villains were; were it not for the forced Aesop Ash would have every right to judge him.

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* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' introduced the character of Paul as Ash's main rival during the seasons set in Sinnoh. Paul and Ash had frequent disagreements, only to have other characters lecture Ash about how they should try to overlook their differences, because everyone is different and has their own ways of doing things which should be respected. Paul, however, was extremely aggressive without provocation and was also particularly cruel to his Pokemon, Pokémon, crueler than most of the clear-cut villains were; were it not for the forced Aesop Aesop, Ash would have every right to judge him. him.
3rd Aug '16 9:40:55 AM DesertDragon
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** Perhaps the most infamous and obvious example was in the season 3 episode "I Kissed A Girl," which was supposed to be about LGBT acceptance after a lesbian character was rudely outed against her will in the previous episode. For starters, despite the title, there were no girls kissing. Rather than focusing on the actual lesbian character, the episode was made all about the atonement of the guy who outed her, which consisted entirely of suggesting the glee club do a "Lady Music" theme.

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** Perhaps the most infamous and obvious example was in the season 3 episode "I Kissed A Girl," which was supposed to be about LGBT acceptance after Santana was outed as a lesbian character was rudely outed against her will in the previous episode. For starters, despite the title, there were no girls kissing. Rather than focusing on the actual lesbian character, the episode was made all about the atonement of the Finn guy who outed her, which consisted entirely of suggesting the glee club do songs "by girls for girls."
** The previous episode where she was outed carried the aesop of "Don't out people against their will," but this too was lacking. First, Santana was an AlphaBitch who had spent the entire episode bullying Finn, so she was hardly the most sympathetic victim. Second, the outing happened after she was once again making fun of him, at which point he responded, "So when are you going to come out? Everybody knows you have feelings for Brittany..." Finn didn't make
a "Lady Music" theme.scene nor was he spreading this fact to everybody; he had angrily said the one thing he knew would unnerve her after he grew tired of her insults. It was ''someone else'', an unnamed girl looking over her shoulder, who overheard the conversation and told her uncle who was running for state representative against cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester. He ran a smear ad claiming that Sue was "harboring an open lesbian" (with Santana's picture) on the cheerleading team, and ''that'' was the moment Santana was outed. As you can see, the situation was a little more complicated than "Finn outed Santana," and yet that formed the basis of the next episode.


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** Coach Beiste coming out as female-to-male transgender and beginning the transition process was supposed to carry the message that you're never too old to come out and live openly and happily. The show was trying to cash in on growing transgender visibility in the media, but Beiste was ''already'' popular with transgender/genderqueer viewers for being a masculine cisgender straight woman, since she proved that gender expression isn't always cut-and-dry. Making her trans completely backfired since it carried the implication that all tomboys secretly want to be men.
22nd Jul '16 4:29:28 PM HighCrate
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* ''Film/ChasingAmy'' is very confused about what it's Aesop even is: "It's useless to try to change someone; orientation is fixed and can't be altered to suit your convenience." Wait, no, turns out she's conveniently [[BiTheWay bisexual]] after all. How about, "true love knows no barriers?" Wait, no, that's not it, because of course some people really ''are'' 100% gay. "Don't get all worked up because your girlfriend has an adventurous sexual past?" Well, no, that doesn't work, because she also lied about it every step of the way and then got indignant and DARVO about it and pretended her past had been an open book that he'd just never bothered to read. You know what, let's just give Silent Bob an awkward, tangentially-related monologue and call it a day.
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