History Main / CluelessAesop

22nd May '17 9:09:47 PM TheGreenHerring
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** It also happens InUniverse in "[[Recap/SouthParkS1E7Pinkeye Pinkeye]]" when Cartman, for wearing a [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] costume to school, is forced to watch a documentary about Hitler to learn why that was wrong--except it just says Hitler was "[[{{Understatement}} a very naughty man]]", without explaining why. Because of this, Cartman likes him even more and imagines himself as Hitler.

to:

** It also happens InUniverse in "[[Recap/SouthParkS1E7Pinkeye Pinkeye]]" when Cartman, [[FatBastard Cartman]], for wearing a [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] costume to school, is forced to watch a documentary about Hitler to learn why that was wrong--except in order to not scare its kid audience too much, it just says Hitler was "[[{{Understatement}} a very naughty man]]", without explaining why. Because of this, Cartman [[VillainProtagonist Cartman]] [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing likes him even more more]] and [[ImagineSpot imagines himself himself]] [[AdolfHitlarious as Hitler.Hitler]].
21st May '17 8:08:46 PM TheGreenHerring
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** It also happens InUniverse in "[[Recap/SouthParkS1E7Pinkeye Pinkeye]]" when Cartman, for wearing a [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] costume to school, is forced to watch a documentary about Hitler to learn why that was wrong--except it just says Hitler was "[[{{Understatement}} a very naughty man]]", without explaining why. Because of this, Cartman likes him even more and imagines himself as Hitler.
17th May '17 8:15:43 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The only episode that tops that one in the "{{Fanservice}} with tacked-on Aesop" category is the two-part "Mork vs. The Necrotons". In a nutshell, Mork gets captured by the titular aliens, whose leader is played by [[MsFanservice Raquel Welch]]. Innuendo, both visual and spoken abounds, so much that even Mr. [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Get-shit-past-the-radar]] himself later on said that it made him uncomfortable. And the message at the end was... ThePowerOfFriendship. Yeah.

to:

** The only episode that tops that one in the "{{Fanservice}} with tacked-on Aesop" category is the two-part "Mork vs. The Necrotons". In a nutshell, Mork gets captured by the titular aliens, whose leader is played by [[MsFanservice Raquel Welch]]. Innuendo, both visual and spoken abounds, spoken, abounds so much that even Mr. [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Get-shit-past-the-radar]] Get-Shit-Past-the-Radar]] himself later on said that it made him uncomfortable. And the message at the end was... ThePowerOfFriendship. Yeah.



-->"Dad, I had a feeling today."
-->"Well, ''don't'', son."
* ''Podcast/RiffTrax'' has continued ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'''s tradition on that score, like with their commentary on the short "[[http://www.rifftrax.com/ondemand/drugs-are Drugs Are Like That]]", a parade of dubious and contradictory metaphors for drugs. At different points in the short, for example, habitual behavior (such as hair twirling) and spontaneity (represented by making a minor change to a Lego-block machine) both become drug-use analogues.

to:

-->"Dad, I had a feeling today."\\
"Well, ''don't'', son.
"
-->"Well, ''don't'', son."
* ''Podcast/RiffTrax'' has continued ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'''s ''[=MST3K=]'''s tradition on that score, like with their commentary on the short "[[http://www.rifftrax.com/ondemand/drugs-are Drugs Are Like That]]", a parade of dubious and contradictory metaphors for drugs. At different points in the short, for example, habitual behavior (such as hair twirling) and spontaneity (represented by making a minor change to a Lego-block machine) both become drug-use analogues.



** "The Outcast", a well-intentioned episode in which a member of a race of asexual aliens and Riker fall in love. Though the episode was intended as a defense of LGBT people, Riker's love interest was played by a woman. In fact, ''all'' the 'asexual' aliens were played by women, because you know it wouldn't do for Riker's {{Love Interest|s}} to look like a man. (Okay, it ''is'' [[ShownTheirWork scientifically accurate]] because the only vertebrates we know of who can [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parthenogenesis reproduce asexually]] are [[OneGenderRace all female]]). This actually annoyed [[Creator/JonathanFrakes Jonathan "Riker" Frakes]] a bit, but the producers didn't have the balls to have the [[strike:hot babe]] androgynous alien played by a guy. As Cracked.com put it: "The episode's message ends up completely garbled. Intended as a condemnation of homophobia, the episode instead comes off as the story of one woman's brave quest for cock in the face of lesbian tyranny." What's worse is that at one point, the {{Love Interest|s}} decides she identifies as female solely based on the fact that she [[UnfortunateImplications finds a male attractive]]...
** "Eye of the Beholder" is a bizarre and curiously awkward attempt at an anti-suicide PSA, but they botch it by trying to have it both ways. The first act treats the suicide of a RedShirt completely seriously, exploring it from all angles, explaining how those that kill themselves often show no obvious signs of distress. It's fairly effective, sort of a forerunner of the subject's similar treatment on an episode of ''Series/HouseMD'' And then they completely botch it by {{handwav|e}}ing the uncharacteristic suicide as being the result of PsychicPowers gone awry, using it as another pit stop in the Worf/Troi ShipTease. One wonders if the writers held the opinion that no one would seriously want to kill themselves in the MarySueTopia that is the 24th Century (given Gene Roddenberry's idealization of it, he at least likely ''did'' think that). This carries some potential UnfortunateImplications when you think about the prevalence of suicide in the present day...

to:

** "The Outcast", a well-intentioned episode in which a member of a race of asexual aliens and Riker fall in love. Though the episode was intended as a defense of LGBT people, Riker's love interest was played by a woman. In fact, ''all'' the 'asexual' aliens were played by women, because you know it wouldn't do for Riker's {{Love Interest|s}} to look like a man. (Okay, [[note]]Okay, it ''is'' [[ShownTheirWork scientifically accurate]] because the only vertebrates we know of who can [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parthenogenesis reproduce asexually]] are ''are'' [[OneGenderRace all female]]). female]].[[/note]] This actually annoyed [[Creator/JonathanFrakes Jonathan "Riker" Frakes]] a bit, but the producers didn't have the balls to have the [[strike:hot babe]] androgynous alien played by a guy. As Cracked.com put it: "The episode's message ends up completely garbled. Intended as a condemnation of homophobia, the episode instead comes off as the story of one woman's brave quest for cock in the face of lesbian tyranny." What's worse is that at one point, the {{Love Interest|s}} decides she identifies as female solely based on the fact that she [[UnfortunateImplications finds a male attractive]]...
** "Eye of the Beholder" is a bizarre and curiously awkward attempt at an anti-suicide PSA, but they botch it by trying to have it both ways. The first act treats the suicide of a RedShirt completely seriously, exploring it from all angles, explaining how those that kill themselves often show no obvious signs of distress. It's fairly effective, sort of a forerunner of the subject's similar treatment on an episode of ''Series/HouseMD'' much later. And then they completely botch it by {{handwav|e}}ing the uncharacteristic suicide as being the result of PsychicPowers gone awry, using it as another pit stop in the Worf/Troi ShipTease. One wonders if the writers held the opinion that no one would seriously want to kill themselves in the MarySueTopia that is the 24th Century (given Gene Roddenberry's idealization of it, he at least likely ''did'' think that). This carries some potential UnfortunateImplications when you think about the prevalence of suicide in the present day...day.



* ''Series/DiffrentStrokes'' decided to tackle sexual predators in the two-parter "The Bicycle Man". In the story, Arnold (Gary Coleman) wants a bicycle. After becoming friends with Mr. Horton, the owner of the bicycle shop, over part one, he, and his friend [[LongLostUncleAesop Dudley]] (''Diff'rent Strokes''' recurring VerySpecialEpisode scapegoat), start spending time with Horton in the back room where he lives. After [[{{Squick}} riding on Mr. Horton's back]] and playing "Neptune, God of the Sea," Horton offers them some alcohol (which only makes Arnold worried that he might be caught with it on his breath) and sits them down to watch some cartoons. "That mouse just lost his drawers! [audience laughter]" Yeah, so after enjoying a nice X-rated cartoon, Arnold is uncomfortable enough to leave. Dudley wants to stay, and Arnold goes home. After letting slip what happened, Mr. Drummond calls the police. They arrive right as Horton is about to... uh... begin. Dudley appears on screen drugged with tranquilizers and shirtless. Then they have a couch conversation about how important it is to tell an adult about such things. While this is admittedly far more direct and open than the "bad touch" [=PSas=] of the 90s, there is laughter throughout the episodes right up to when Mr. Drummond calls the police. Yes, even during the set-up to the molestation. That must have been the most awkward studio audience ever.

to:

* ''Series/DiffrentStrokes'' decided to tackle sexual predators in the two-parter "The Bicycle Man". In the story, Arnold (Gary Coleman) wants a bicycle. After becoming friends with Mr. Horton, the owner of the bicycle shop, over part one, he, and his friend [[LongLostUncleAesop Dudley]] (''Diff'rent Strokes''' recurring VerySpecialEpisode scapegoat), start spending time with Horton in the back room where he lives. After [[{{Squick}} riding on Mr. Horton's back]] and playing "Neptune, God of the Sea," Horton offers them some alcohol (which only makes Arnold worried that he might be caught with it on his breath) and sits them down to watch some cartoons. "That mouse just lost his drawers! [audience laughter]" Yeah, so after enjoying a nice X-rated cartoon, Arnold is uncomfortable enough to leave. Dudley wants to stay, and Arnold goes home. After letting slip what happened, Mr. Drummond calls the police. They arrive right as Horton is about to... uh... begin. Dudley appears on screen drugged with tranquilizers and shirtless. Then they have a couch conversation about how important it is to tell an adult about such things. While this is admittedly far more direct and open than the "bad touch" [=PSas=] of the 90s, there is laughter throughout the episodes right up to when Mr. Drummond calls the police. Yes, even during the set-up to the molestation. That must have been the most awkward studio audience ever. Making it worse is that Shavar Ross (Dudley) came out later saying he was repeatedly molested by a family friend during the show's run.



* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obiDOc2kM5Q The world's creepiest ventriloquist dummy and the world's worst ventriloquist say don't look at dirty pictures.]] Not that they tell the 6-8 year old audience what "dirty pictures" ''are''. To add insult to injury, the ventriloquist was ''arrested'' for [[{{Hypocrite}} not only having child porn in his possession]], but [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/30/ronald-brown-child-porn_n_3676727.html also actually conspiring]] to kidnap, rape, murder and [[ImAHumanitarian eat a child.]]

to:

* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obiDOc2kM5Q The world's creepiest ventriloquist dummy and the world's worst ventriloquist say don't look at dirty pictures.]] Not that they tell the 6-8 year old audience what "dirty pictures" ''are''. To add insult to injury, the ventriloquist was later ''arrested'' for [[{{Hypocrite}} not only having child porn in his possession]], but [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/30/ronald-brown-child-porn_n_3676727.html also actually conspiring]] to kidnap, rape, murder and [[ImAHumanitarian eat a child.]]
8th May '17 6:44:31 AM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be 'apolitical' will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce even seemingly reasonable people, and so instead it reads like a generic "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgivable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]] (while the book paints him in an apologetic light). Many other plot details (like having Scarlet Witch, a Romani, join the fascists) combine to give the impression that the writers are just too clueless about the subject to talk sensitively about an ideology that, within living memory, killed millions of people.

to:

* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be an 'apolitical' story focusing on giving Cap a fall and a redemption arc will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up fascism. Instead of being a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough storyline about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce how even seemingly reasonable people, and so people can be seduced by hate, it is instead it reads like only written as a generic standard "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgivable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]] (while value]]. The vagueness of the book paints him on what Hydra actually believes is nullified by the extensive PuttingOnTheReich imagery, and, as Captain America was created by two Jewish men to promote their anti-Nazi views, many fans find the idea of Cap sieg-heiling to be abhorrent CanonDefilement even if it was in an apologetic light). a less superficial storyline. Many other plot details (like having Scarlet Witch, a Romani, join the fascists) fascists), and the accidental white supremacist imagery created by having Fash-Cap wielding Mjollnir (Thor's Hammer being a symbol used by many real-world hate groups), combine to give the impression that the writers are just too clueless about the subject to talk sensitively about an ideology that, within living memory, killed millions of people.
7th May '17 6:04:09 PM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be 'apolitical' will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce even seemingly reasonable people, and so instead it reads like a generic "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgivable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]] (while the book paints him in an apologetic light). Many other plot details (like having the Jewish Holocaust survivor Magneto join the fascists) combine to give the impression that the writers are just too clueless about the subject to talk sensitively about an ideology that, within living memory, killed millions of people.

to:

* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be 'apolitical' will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce even seemingly reasonable people, and so instead it reads like a generic "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgivable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]] (while the book paints him in an apologetic light). Many other plot details (like having the Jewish Holocaust survivor Magneto Scarlet Witch, a Romani, join the fascists) combine to give the impression that the writers are just too clueless about the subject to talk sensitively about an ideology that, within living memory, killed millions of people.
6th May '17 4:47:29 PM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which famous Nazi-puncher Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be 'apolitical' will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce even good people, and so instead it reads like a generic "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgiveable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]].

to:

* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which famous Nazi-puncher Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be 'apolitical' will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce even good seemingly reasonable people, and so instead it reads like a generic "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgiveable unforgivable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]].value]] (while the book paints him in an apologetic light). Many other plot details (like having the Jewish Holocaust survivor Magneto join the fascists) combine to give the impression that the writers are just too clueless about the subject to talk sensitively about an ideology that, within living memory, killed millions of people.
6th May '17 4:23:36 PM pinkdalek
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A forgiving criticism of the controversial "Hydra [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Cap]]" storyline in ''Secret Empire'', in which famous Nazi-puncher Captain America is revealed to be a secret fascist, is that any book intended by its creator to be 'apolitical' will struggle to say anything intelligent about politics. While the story touches on the events leading to Cap picking up a Hydra flier, the book can't talk honestly enough about actual fascist ideology or politics to explain what it is about hate cults that can seduce even good people, and so instead it reads like a generic "[[FaceHeelTurn hero seemingly turns evil]]" comic book plot, with Cap doing unforgiveable things for [[{{Superdickery}} shock value]].
29th Apr '17 8:39:53 AM Mineboot45
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There was a Public Service Announcement at a local TV station which used its puppet mascot and tried to explain the difference between "good touching" and "bad touching". The trouble is, they used footage from WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes cartoons while they were talking about "good touching"... including WesternAnimation/BugsBunny's cross-dressing smooches on Elmer Fudd, and multiple shots of Pepe Le Pew. Someone clearly wasn't paying enough attention when that PSA was made....

to:

* There was a Public Service Announcement at a local TV station which used its puppet mascot and tried to explain the difference between "good touching" and "bad touching". The trouble is, they used footage from WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' cartoons while they were talking about "good touching"... including WesternAnimation/BugsBunny's cross-dressing smooches on Elmer Fudd, and multiple shots of Pepe Le Pew. Someone clearly wasn't paying enough attention when that PSA was made....
28th Apr '17 1:21:22 PM KingZeal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Both Creator/MarvelComics and Creator/DCComics have attempted at times to invoke such tropes as the "pro-active superhero teams" (see Creator/RobLiefeld's ''ComicBook/XForce'' and ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'') as well as question whether or not the world "needs" superheroes (''ComicBook/KingdomCome''). The problem with "pro-active" heroes is that any supervillain on the loose is either in hiding or too powerful for the heroes to currently handle; "pro-active" heroes would either be doing exactly what heroes do already (fight bad guys who aren't hidden or protected) or [[PreCrimeArrest attacking otherwise innocent people for things they haven't done yet]]. And the problem with asking if the world "needs" superheroes, is that both Marvel and DC '''sell superhero works and products'''. At ''best'', such stories will end with "[[SmugSuper superheroes suck]] but we still need them" because to do otherwise would be admitting '''that their characters and stories are pointless'''. Such stories also suffer from FantasticAesop--obviously the world doesn't ''literally'' "need" superheroes, because our world keeps turning without them. You can certainly argue that certain problems in the world today could benefit from powerful and/or incorruptible heroes to curb them, but at the same time comics are usually LikeRealityUnlessNoted anyway--so [[PowerfulYetHelpless they aren't]] even solving [[ReedRichardsIsUseless those problems]] in ''their'' worlds. You could also argue that the Marvel or DC Universes need heroes, because they also have supervillains and {{Galactic Conqueror}}s and supernatural quantum anomalies, but that's not really relevant to RealLife.

to:

* Both Creator/MarvelComics and Creator/DCComics have attempted at times to invoke such tropes as the "pro-active superhero teams" (see Creator/RobLiefeld's ''ComicBook/XForce'' and ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'') as well as question whether or not the world "needs" superheroes (''ComicBook/KingdomCome''). The problem with "pro-active" heroes is that any supervillain on the loose is either in hiding or too powerful for the heroes to currently handle; "pro-active" heroes would either be doing exactly what heroes do already (fight bad guys who aren't hidden or protected) or [[PreCrimeArrest attacking otherwise innocent people for things they haven't done yet]]. And the problem with asking if the world "needs" superheroes, is that both Marvel and DC '''sell superhero works and products'''. At ''best'', such stories will end with "[[SmugSuper superheroes suck]] but we still need them" because to do otherwise would be admitting '''that their characters and stories are pointless'''. Such stories also suffer from FantasticAesop--obviously the world doesn't ''literally'' "need" superheroes, because our world keeps turning without them. You can certainly argue that certain problems in the world today could benefit from powerful and/or incorruptible heroes to curb them, but at the same time comics are usually LikeRealityUnlessNoted anyway--so [[PowerfulYetHelpless [[PowerfulAndHelpless they aren't]] even solving [[ReedRichardsIsUseless those problems]] in ''their'' worlds. You could also argue that the Marvel or DC Universes need heroes, because they also have supervillains and {{Galactic Conqueror}}s and supernatural quantum anomalies, but that's not really relevant to RealLife.
28th Apr '17 1:20:51 PM KingZeal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Both Creator/MarvelComics and Creator/DCComics have attempted at times to invoke such tropes as the "pro-active superhero teams" (see Creator/RobLiefeld's ''ComicBook/XForce'' and ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'') as well as question whether or not the world "needs" superheroes (''ComicBook/KingdomCome''). The problem with "pro-active" heroes is that any supervillain on the loose is either in hiding or too powerful for the heroes to currently handle; "pro-active" heroes would either be doing exactly what heroes do already (fight bad guys who aren't hidden or protected) or [[PreCrimeArrest attacking otherwise innocent people for things they haven't done yet]]. And the problem with asking if the world "needs" superheroes, is that both Marvel and DC '''sell superhero works and products'''. At ''best'', such stories will end with "[[SmugSuper superheroes suck]] but we still need them" because to do otherwise would be admitting '''that their characters and stories are pointless'''. Such stories also suffer from FantasticAesop--obviously the world doesn't ''literally'' "need" superheroes, because our world keeps turning without them. You can certainly argue that certain problems in the world today could benefit from powerful and/or incorruptible heroes to curb them, but at the same time comics are usually LikeRealityUnlessNoted anyway--so they aren't even solving those problems in ''their'' worlds. You could also argue that the Marvel or DC Universes need heroes, because they also have supervillains and {{Galactic Conqueror}}s and supernatural quantum anomalies, but that's not really relevant to RealLife.

to:

* Both Creator/MarvelComics and Creator/DCComics have attempted at times to invoke such tropes as the "pro-active superhero teams" (see Creator/RobLiefeld's ''ComicBook/XForce'' and ''ComicBook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'') as well as question whether or not the world "needs" superheroes (''ComicBook/KingdomCome''). The problem with "pro-active" heroes is that any supervillain on the loose is either in hiding or too powerful for the heroes to currently handle; "pro-active" heroes would either be doing exactly what heroes do already (fight bad guys who aren't hidden or protected) or [[PreCrimeArrest attacking otherwise innocent people for things they haven't done yet]]. And the problem with asking if the world "needs" superheroes, is that both Marvel and DC '''sell superhero works and products'''. At ''best'', such stories will end with "[[SmugSuper superheroes suck]] but we still need them" because to do otherwise would be admitting '''that their characters and stories are pointless'''. Such stories also suffer from FantasticAesop--obviously the world doesn't ''literally'' "need" superheroes, because our world keeps turning without them. You can certainly argue that certain problems in the world today could benefit from powerful and/or incorruptible heroes to curb them, but at the same time comics are usually LikeRealityUnlessNoted anyway--so [[PowerfulYetHelpless they aren't aren't]] even solving [[ReedRichardsIsUseless those problems problems]] in ''their'' worlds. You could also argue that the Marvel or DC Universes need heroes, because they also have supervillains and {{Galactic Conqueror}}s and supernatural quantum anomalies, but that's not really relevant to RealLife.
This list shows the last 10 events of 833. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CluelessAesop