History Main / CluelessAesop

28th May '16 10:05:06 PM Chytus
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In one episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheRealAdventuresOfJonnyQuest'', a massive graveyard of elephant skeletons is discovered. Part of the plot revolves around elephants being poached for ivory. The kids want to reveal the graveyard's location to the world, since people could harvest the skeletons for their ivory instead of hunting living elephants. Although this would be only a temporary and imperfect solution, it would provide at least some respite for living elephants to bring their numbers back up so they wouldn't be as endangered anymore, and it would be better than doing nothing and just hoping humans stop being greedy. Naturally, the adults dismiss this, insisting that, first, humanity needs to lose its greed for ivory, proving just how naive the show could be.
27th May '16 1:48:30 PM KingLyger
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Lauren Faust has spoken about regretting the way the episode "Feeling Pinkie Keen" was handled. What was intended to be an Aesop about being open to different ideas and ways of perceiving the world, even if you don't particularly understand them (something that makes sense as there are a lot of things kids that age don't understand yet but are factually true - except that you can actually analyze said "things" as an adult properly to understand at least part of how they work, not to mention that there is a difference between perceiving the world in a subjective manner, through a certain ideology or subjective way of thinking, VS deducing logically and objectively what happens and how it does) instead unintentionally came off as, 'Atheists/Scientists/Skeptics are jerks and are demonstrably wrong.' Needless to say, however, this could more or less be a realistic scenario in the sense of how science and logic aren't always the best ways to come up with an answer. (Discussed: science - in the same sector as biology, physics, chemistry, mathematics etc. - is about searching for objective facts using logic and empirical evidence to help us deduce and affirm them; ideologies, morality and other subjective thought systems are not its concern, they are handled by branches such as philosophy, social studies, humanities...)
** Many fans also have a dislike of the episode "The Mysterious Mare Do Well" because of how terribly they feel it handles its own Aesop about humility. For context, Rainbow Dash, the brash member of the group, has gone into an ego streak and she gets shot down when a new hero, the e[[{{Pun}} pony]]mous Mare Do Well, arrives and performs some heroics of her own. Our first problem is that Applejack and Twilight seem to be the only ponies around who don't like Dash's ego trip -- the rest of the town ''adores'' Dash. Second, when Dash starts to fail, it's not because of her ego. Finally by the end, it's revealed that [[spoiler:it was Rainbow's own friends who were trying to teach her humility]]. The aesop could look clueless at best and [[BrokenAesop broken]] at worst.
** Probably not entirely clueless, but in the episode "Swarm of the Century," Pinkie's seemingly pointless quest for musical instruments turns out to be the perfect way to get rid of the town's parasprite infestation, and things would have gone a lot smoother if everyone had just helped her rather than wasting time on other methods, with the intended lesson that you should listen to your friends' ideas, even if they may not make complete sense to you. Except that Pinkie hardly makes any attempt to explain what she's doing; she mostly just demands everyone help her on a mission that doesn't seem to make sense at all, and expects them to go along with it just because she says so. Plus, one of those other methods almost works until Pinkie herself screws it up ''by not listening to her friends''. So the message becomes [[AccidentalAesop more about the importance of]] [[PoorCommunicationKills explaining yourself properly]]. Considering all things, however, this could more or less lead to a DoubleAesop, as Pinkie pointing out at the end how she tried to tell them when they wouldn't listen makes it evident that she did learn the importance of explaining herself properly. This borders on BrokenAesop when one remembers Pinkie Pie is actually ''asked'' what she knows about parasprites before setting off to find her first instrument and deliberately ignores the question.

to:

** Lauren Faust has spoken about regretting the way the episode "Feeling Pinkie Keen" was handled. What was The intended to aesop was "you should be an Aesop about being open to different ideas and ways of perceiving the world, even if you don't particularly understand them (something that makes sense as there are a lot of things kids that age don't understand yet but are factually true - except that you can actually analyze said "things" as an adult properly to understand at least part of how they work, not to mention that there is a difference between perceiving the world in a subjective manner, through a certain ideology or subjective way of thinking, VS deducing logically and objectively what happens and how it does) instead them." It unintentionally came off as, 'Atheists/Scientists/Skeptics as "Atheists/Scientists/Skeptics are jerks and are demonstrably wrong.' Needless to say, however, this " This could more or less be a realistic scenario in the sense of how science and logic aren't always the best ways to come up with an answer. (Discussed: science - answer, but considering it's being applied in the same sector as biology, physics, chemistry, mathematics etc. - is about searching for objective facts using logic a show that regularly uses magic and empirical evidence spells to help us deduce and affirm them; ideologies, morality and other subjective thought systems are not its concern, they are handled by branches such as philosophy, social studies, humanities...)
do a multitude of everyday tasks, it seemed like splitting hairs.
** Many fans also have a dislike of the episode "The Mysterious Mare Do Well" because of how terribly they feel it handles its own Aesop about humility. For context, Rainbow Dash, the brash member of the group, Dash has gone into an ego streak and she gets shot down when a new hero, the e[[{{Pun}} pony]]mous eponymous Mare Do Well, arrives and performs some heroics of her own. Our first problem is that Applejack and Twilight seem to be the only ponies around who don't like Dash's ego trip -- the rest of the town ''adores'' Dash. Second, when Dash starts to fail, it's not because of her ego. Finally by the end, it's revealed that [[spoiler:it was Rainbow's own friends who were trying to teach her humility]]. The aesop could look clueless at best and [[BrokenAesop broken]] at worst.
** Probably not entirely clueless, but in the episode "Swarm of the Century," Pinkie's seemingly pointless quest for musical instruments turns out to be the perfect way to get rid of the town's parasprite infestation, and things would have gone a lot smoother if everyone had just helped her rather than wasting time on other methods, with the methods. The intended lesson was that you should listen to your friends' ideas, even if they may not make complete sense to you. Except that [[PoorCommunicationKills Pinkie hardly makes any attempt to explain what she's doing; doing]]; she mostly just demands everyone help her on a mission that doesn't seem to make sense at all, and expects them to go along with it just because she says so. Plus, one of those other methods almost works until Pinkie herself screws it up ''by not listening to her friends''. So the message becomes [[AccidentalAesop more about the importance of]] [[PoorCommunicationKills of explaining yourself properly]]. Considering all things, however, this could more or less lead to a DoubleAesop, as Pinkie pointing out at the end how she tried to tell them when they wouldn't listen makes it evident that she did learn the importance of explaining herself properly. This borders on BrokenAesop when one remembers Pinkie Pie is actually ''asked'' what she knows about parasprites before setting off to find her first instrument and deliberately ignores the question.
14th May '16 3:49:16 PM treehugger0369
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** "Newbie Dash" tackles the adult and controversial concept of rookie hazing, embarrassing nicknames and name-calling. It goes about as smoothly as you'd expect in a TV-Y rated show based around friendship.
14th May '16 8:04:40 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ComicBook/{{X-Men}}:

to:

* ComicBook/{{X-Men}}:ComicBook/XMen:
6th May '16 10:06:55 PM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In retrospect, Mikhail Rasputin's quasi-introduction falls into this category by FridgeLogic-- Peter Corbeau compares his death to the real-life Apollo 1 fire... except that it was later revealed that Mikhail hadn't actually died, but had been sent to another dimension, gone insane, and come back as a supervillain. Addressing real-life disasters is hard in a comic that's so big on bringing people BackFromTheDead.

to:

** In retrospect, Mikhail Rasputin's quasi-introduction falls into this category by FridgeLogic-- FridgeLogic -- Peter Corbeau compares his death to the real-life Apollo 1 fire... except that it was later revealed that Mikhail hadn't actually died, but had been sent to another dimension, gone insane, and come back as a supervillain. Addressing real-life disasters is hard in a comic that's so big on bringing people BackFromTheDead.
5th May '16 11:19:41 PM GoldenSeals
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Note that this isn't always the fault of the writers. Any attempt to tackle serious subject matter honestly is problematic when the MoralGuardians are watching. This is often due to the fact that many attempts to deal with such serious subject matter will usually have said Guardians responding with outrage ''at its mere inclusion''! Yes, even if you are explicitly attempting to discourage it.

to:

Note that this isn't always the fault of the writers. Any attempt to tackle serious subject matter honestly is problematic when the MoralGuardians are watching. This is often due to the fact that because many attempts to deal with such serious subject matter will usually have said Guardians responding with outrage ''at its mere inclusion''! Yes, even if you are explicitly attempting to discourage it.
21st Apr '16 12:28:46 PM Ninja857142
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--->'''[=TheMysteriousMrEnter=]:''' In LaymansTerms, the moral is if you’re being bullied, you should just go to an adult and they’ll make everything okay, even though the adult in this situation, Applejack, did absolutely nothing throughout the whole episode. You know like when she probably saw Apple Bloom sleeping on the floor. I wonder how insulting this moral is to victims of bullying whose adults in their life could not or would not do jacks*** to stop their bullying problem. And yes, it happens, more often than you think, and more often than episodes like this would have you believe... So what's the one-size-fits-all solution? There is none. No two bullying situations are the same, and pretending that there's one answer that can solve it all really pisses me off. People, children and teens have been driven to suicide because the adults in their life would not or could not do anything about bullying. And suggesting that taking a stand against your bullying makes you a bully as well makes this awful moral even more difficult to stomach. Yes, telling an adult is the first thing you should do, but that's ''never'' where it ends. ''Ever.''

to:

--->'''[=TheMysteriousMrEnter=]:''' --->'''The Mysterious Mr. Enter:''' In LaymansTerms, the moral is if you’re being bullied, you should just go to an adult and they’ll make everything okay, even though the adult in this situation, Applejack, did absolutely nothing throughout the whole episode. You know like when she probably saw Apple Bloom sleeping on the floor. I wonder how insulting this moral is to victims of bullying whose adults in their life could not or would not do jacks*** to stop their bullying problem. And yes, it happens, more often than you think, and more often than episodes like this would have you believe... So what's the one-size-fits-all solution? There is none. No two bullying situations are the same, and pretending that there's one answer that can solve it all really pisses me off. People, children and teens have been driven to suicide because the adults in their life would not or could not do anything about bullying. And suggesting that taking a stand against your bullying makes you a bully as well makes this awful moral even more difficult to stomach. Yes, telling an adult is the first thing you should do, but that's ''never'' where it ends. ''Ever.''
13th Apr '16 2:03:25 PM NNinja
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Whenever the X-Men comics or adaptations deal with some sort of mutant "cure," it always implies that mutants who go through with the procedure are sell-outs betraying their peers. The intended Aesop is that you shouldn't give up the things that make you unique for the sake of fitting in, but the reason this fails is because A) Any decisions you make regarding your own body are personal and shouldn't be up for public debate, and B) Many mutants have powers that make it difficult or impossible for them to live normal lives, whether it's due to an inhuman appearance or having powers outside their control (hence why Rogue is almost always involved in such storylines). However, the aesop of "You have every right to change the things you don't like about yourself" is a bit harder to sell than "Be yourself even if it makes your life more difficult."
13th Apr '16 4:58:33 AM SSJMagus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''[[Anime/{{Naruto}} Naruto]]'' the story treats as if revenge is a bad thing as it will directly lead to the CycleOfRevenge, and in turn war. But rather than focusing on the reasonable example of warring factions (such as Sasuke seemingly killing Killer Bee which prompted the Raikage to seek revenge), most of the attention goes to the traditional loner villains like Orochimaru or [[spoiler: Obito]] who have no or next to no relationship ties to make the CycleOfRevenge take place at all. Just about every Akatsuki member is in it for themselves so the death of any one member only means a new position has opened up, despite how close Kabuto is to Orochimaru it's only really orriented professionally as Orochi's death only prompts Kabuto to snatch up some research notes, even Madara was considered an extremist by the other Uchiha. The moral is most strongly brought up in reference to Sasuke but the people who care about him the most know he's a dangerous criminal and aren't ones to go seeking revenge for his death either.

to:

* In ''[[Anime/{{Naruto}} Naruto]]'' the story treats as if revenge is a bad thing as it will directly lead to the CycleOfRevenge, and in turn war. But rather than focusing on the reasonable example of warring factions (such as Sasuke seemingly killing Killer Bee which prompted the Raikage to seek revenge), most of the attention goes to the traditional loner villains like Orochimaru or [[spoiler: Obito]] who have no or next to no relationship ties to make the CycleOfRevenge take place at all. Just about every Akatsuki member is in it for themselves so the death of any one member only means a new position has opened up, despite how close Kabuto is to Orochimaru it's only really orriented professionally as Orochi's Orochimaru's death only prompts Kabuto to snatch up some research notes, notes and try to copy and eventually surpass Orochimaru's achievements in MadScience, and even Madara was considered an extremist by the other Uchiha. The moral is most strongly brought up in reference to Sasuke but the people who care about him the most know he's a dangerous criminal and aren't ones to go seeking revenge for his death either.
7th Apr '16 9:18:31 AM NNinja
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[/folder]]

to:

[/folder]]
[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 732. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CluelessAesop