History Main / CloningBlues

20th Jul '17 12:55:42 PM ironballs16
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* In ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Unlimited'', ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} learns that the now-villainous Professor Hamilton took genetic samples of her to create a murderously sociopathic clone of Supergirl, named Galatea. However, Hamilton modified the clone to be an older version of Supergirl to make her tougher. Furthermore, Galatea is also a homage to the later copy of Supergirl, Power Girl, as noted by her white costume with [[{{Stripperiffic}} a chest hole intended to show off her cleavage]], as well as her more developed...[[MostCommonSuperPower musculature]].

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* In ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Unlimited'', ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} learns that the now-villainous Professor Hamilton took genetic samples of her to create a murderously sociopathic clone of Supergirl, named Galatea. However, Hamilton modified the clone to be an older version of Supergirl to make her tougher. Furthermore, Galatea is also a homage to the later copy of Supergirl, Power Girl, as noted by her white costume with [[{{Stripperiffic}} a chest hole intended to show off her cleavage]], CleavageWindow, as well as her more developed...[[MostCommonSuperPower musculature]].



* ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until the woman asks which is the original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.

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* ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]].teleporters]] by way of cloning technology. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until the woman asks which is the original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.
20th Jul '17 12:53:26 PM ironballs16
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* {{Deconstructed}} in ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until the woman asks which is the original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.

to:

* {{Deconstructed}} in ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until the woman asks which is the original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.
20th Jul '17 12:52:24 PM ironballs16
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* ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until the woman asks which is the original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.

to:

* {{Deconstructed}} in ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until the woman asks which is the original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.
20th Jul '17 12:51:56 PM ironballs16
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* ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until it comes time to prove which is the original. Both, desperate to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist, enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed''', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.

to:

* ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until it comes time to prove the woman asks which is the original. Both, desperate original inventor. Both want to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist, scientist and enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed''', destroyed'', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.
20th Jul '17 12:50:39 PM ironballs16
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Added DiffLines:

* ''To Be'', a Canadian cartoon short by John Weldon, spotlighted on the extinct Cartoon Network show ''[[CanadaEh O Canada]]'' investigated the philosophical issue of [[{{Teleportation}} teleporters]]. In it, a scientist shows off to a crowd a teleporter that functions by making an exact copy of someone elsewhere then destroying the original. A woman in the crowd, horrified by this, suggests to the scientist that he test the moral ramifications of the process by stepping through himself, and delaying the destruction of the original by five minutes. Thus, the scientist has an exact clone. They find this wonderful and exciting, until it comes time to prove which is the original. Both, desperate to confirm that they are in fact the "real" scientist, enter into a heated chess match... until the woman reminds them (after one has won) that the original ''must be destroyed''', whereupon each claims to be the copy. After the issue is resolved and one scientist is zapped into nothingness, the scientist changes his mind about the usefulness of the teleporter. The woman feels guilty for what she'd done, basically killing someone to prove her point, and atones for this by stepping through the machine herself, claiming that her new copied self is free of guilt for what her original had done.
18th Jul '17 8:42:54 AM TheHeroHartmut
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** Superboy (Kon-El/Conner Kent) is a clone made from half-Superman's DNA, and half Lex Luthor's DNA (before this was revealed, there were some...''complications''). That's right, ''Superman and Lex Luthor technically had a kid.'' This is the stuff ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' shippers live for... Superman was dead at the time

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** Superboy (Kon-El/Conner Kent) is a clone made from half-Superman's DNA, and half Lex Luthor's DNA (before this was revealed, there were some...''complications''). That's right, ''Superman and Lex Luthor technically had a kid.'' This is the stuff ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' shippers live for... Superman was dead at the timetime.



** ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, being Franchise/{{Superman}}'s clone. Superman himself [[ThatThingIsNotMyChild is not pleased]].

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** ComicBook/{{Superboy}}, being Franchise/{{Superman}}'s clone. Superman himself [[ThatThingIsNotMyChild is not pleased]]. pleased]] at first. However, he does eventually come to see Superboy as a brother, even bestowing him with a Kryptonian name: 'Kon-El'.



-->'''Pinky:''' We have to go after him. For gosh sakes, he's your clone!
-->'''Brain:''' [[IHaveNoSon I have no clone.]]

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-->'''Pinky:''' We have to go after him. For gosh sakes, he's your clone!
-->'''Brain:'''
clone!\\
'''Brain:'''
[[IHaveNoSon I have no clone.]]
27th Jun '17 5:06:08 PM nombretomado
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** Some cultivars have had mutations in their clones -- meaning that there are actual variations within the cultivar, called "sports." The table on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gala_(apple) this page]] of TheOtherWiki lists sports of the Gala apple cultivar -- clones that look & taste different from the "parent" & have become their own cultivars in effect. Until they mutate again, sometimes back to the original phenotype!

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** Some cultivars have had mutations in their clones -- meaning that there are actual variations within the cultivar, called "sports." The table on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gala_(apple) this page]] of TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki lists sports of the Gala apple cultivar -- clones that look & taste different from the "parent" & have become their own cultivars in effect. Until they mutate again, sometimes back to the original phenotype!
25th Jun '17 10:03:47 PM Khathi
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Added DiffLines:

** Ornamental trees suffer from the same problem too. For example, the ever-popular "Somei-Yoshino" variety of the sakura tree (the common "white foam" type, planted all over the world) are essentially clones of the single mutant tree from the Somei village in the outskirts of the old Edo (now part of Toshima ward, Tokyo), where the gardeners has long worked on crossing the hardy local trees with the more elegant Kyoto varieties from Yoshino area. One of these hybrids produced the characteristic dense crown of almost purely white flowers, which were, however, virtually fruitless. Thus it still reproduced by grafting the cuttings of somei-yoshino cultivar onto the suitable local rootstocks.
17th Jun '17 2:17:44 AM RobTan
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->'''The Doctor:''' So, what's the plan?.\\

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->'''The --->'''The Doctor:''' So, what's the plan?.\\
11th Jun '17 5:27:24 PM SteveMB
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' episode "Kimitation Nation", Dr. Drakken creates an army of duplicates of Kim, Ron, and classmate Bonnie. When discussing it with Wade, she comments that cloning shouldn't work like that according to science class. He agrees; it's not "really" cloning, but they'll refer to it as such to simplify things. The clones were merely used in a FantasticAesop and killed off by soda. He'd originally wanted to clone Shego, but she had a no-cloning clause in her contract. When he kept pressing the issue, she [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere walked out on him]] for the rest of the episode.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' episode "Kimitation Nation", Dr. Drakken creates an army of duplicates of Kim, Ron, and classmate Bonnie. When discussing it with Wade, she comments that cloning shouldn't work like that according to science class. He agrees; it's not "really" cloning, but they'll refer to it as such to simplify things. The clones were merely used in a FantasticAesop and killed off by soda. He'd originally wanted to clone Shego, but she had [[NotInMyContract a no-cloning clause in her contract.contract]]. When he kept pressing the issue, she [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere walked out on him]] for the rest of the episode.
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