History Main / ClassicalMusic

23rd May '18 7:18:58 AM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The '''Later Twentieth Century''' to the '''Present''' -- during which all the tendencies of the earlier part of the twentieth century were pushed even further. During the 1960s, the mainstream classical music world was heavily influenced by the Darmstadt School, whose members, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez, pushed the serialism of Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern to its extreme. Edgard Varese, a major influence on Music/FrankZappa, began to experiment with electronic music while other composers began to use scales different from the traditional twelve tone equal temperament scale. Iannis Xenakis pioneered the use of mathematical modelling in music. Meanwhile, minimalist composers such as Steve Reich and Philip Glass experimented with music that used very few basic elements, often repeated with variations. In the 1970s and 1980s, composers such as Alfred Schnittke and Luciano Berio began to write polystylistic pieces that drew on many prior musical traditions in a {{postmodern}} way. The boundaries between popular and classical music began to blur; for example, John Cale, violist of [[Music/VelvetUnderground the Velvet Underground]],[[note]]The only reason that Cale had gone to New York (and thus met Music/LouReed) in the first place was to study classical viola[[/note]] was associated with the minimalist La Monte Young, and Music/TheBeatles were influenced by Stockhausen. It should be noted that classically trained musicians playing in other styles does not automatically make what they're playing 'classical'. Lately, the classical music world has seen a resurgence in the popularity of music combining a romantic feel with modern techniques, written by such composers as John Corigliano, and Einojuhani Rautavaara. Other notable composers include Music/JohnCage, Morton Feldman, Giacinto Scelsi and Music/TwoStepsFromHell. As in the early twentieth century, there isn't any truly representative music, but the Sinfonia of Luciano Berio might be a good place to start.

to:

* The '''Later Twentieth Century''' to the '''Present''' -- during which all the tendencies of the earlier part of the twentieth century were pushed even further. During the 1960s, the mainstream classical music world was heavily influenced by the Darmstadt School, whose members, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez, pushed the serialism of Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern to its extreme. Edgard Varese, a major influence on Music/FrankZappa, began to experiment with electronic music while other composers began to use scales different from the traditional twelve tone equal temperament scale. Iannis Xenakis pioneered the use of mathematical modelling in music. Meanwhile, minimalist composers such as Steve Reich Music/SteveReich and Philip Glass Music/PhilipGlass experimented with music that used very few basic elements, often repeated with variations. In the 1970s and 1980s, composers such as Alfred Schnittke and Luciano Berio began to write polystylistic pieces that drew on many prior musical traditions in a {{postmodern}} way. The boundaries between popular and classical music began to blur; for example, John Cale, violist of [[Music/VelvetUnderground the Velvet Underground]],[[note]]The only reason that Cale had gone to New York (and thus met Music/LouReed) in the first place was to study classical viola[[/note]] was associated with the minimalist La Monte Young, and Music/TheBeatles were influenced by Stockhausen. It should be noted that classically trained musicians playing in other styles does not automatically make what they're playing 'classical'. Lately, the classical music world has seen a resurgence in the popularity of music combining a romantic feel with modern techniques, written by such composers as John Corigliano, and Einojuhani Rautavaara. Other notable composers include Music/JohnCage, Morton Feldman, Giacinto Scelsi and Music/TwoStepsFromHell. As in the early twentieth century, there isn't any truly representative music, but the Sinfonia of Luciano Berio might be a good place to start.
19th May '18 8:03:50 AM Someoneman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: '''''[[FandomBerserkButton Not!]]'''''

to:

* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: '''''[[FandomBerserkButton Not!]]''''''''''Not!'''''
8th Feb '18 6:57:33 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The '''[[TheCavalierYears Baroque Era]]''' (c. 1600 to c. 1760) -- Still a lot of church music, but the patron model became more dominant as wealthy nobles and royalty found even more time and opportunity to indulge in fancy music for the heck of it. For a stereotypical Baroque sound, look for anything by Music/JohannSebastianBach. Famous works include the Music/ToccataAndFugueInDMinor by the aforementioned Bach,[[note]] Or possibly not; many musicologists believe that he didn't compose the piece at all, or at most arranged it from the work of another composer.[[/note]] the [[PachelbelsCanon Canon in D]] by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zM6YogGkc Johann Pachelbel]] (which uses a much copied [[PachelbelsCanonProgression chord progression]]) and the ''Messiah'' oratorio by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel (which includes the famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfiAsWR4qU Hallelujah Chorus]]"). The concerto (a piece where a solo instrument or small group of instruments alternates passages with a larger orchestra) became a major compositional form during this period, as composers like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCdNs9qFtic Girolamo Frescobaldi]] began to focus much more of their attention to instrumental writing. This was also the period in which the common-practice tonality came into, well, common practice. Other common features in this era include terraced dynamics (the music is either loud or soft, with few crescendos or diminuendos or so forth), and a reduction in polyphonic density (so that the words and the melodic lines come through much clearer), often to the point of actual homophony (simply having a melody on top of a harmonic accompaniment). Additionally, the early Baroque was when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9105NkJxjGA Claudio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb9nCKAQVyA Monteverdi]], arguably the most important composer (along with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWVQjZ499yM Heinrich]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw Schütz]]) in the transition from the Renaissance to the Baroque, wrote what is widely considered the first great {{opera}}, ''L'Orfeo''. A few of the many other notable Baroque composers include [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLUIC84nYTk Johann Jakob Froberger]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj33HliB5v0 François Couperin]], [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_uP0RtyJ1k Jan Dismas Zelenka]], [[Music/AntonioVivaldi Antonio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwGJt0q-kRA Vivaldi]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxzRQ8KbMcY Jean-Philippe Rameau]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yhd-dpC_7o Domenico Scarlatti]]. Though the harpsichord predates the Baroque, it is stereotypically associated with this era; if you hear a piece of classical music and there's a harpsichord in it, there's a good chance it's a Baroque piece, though the instrument was still in use during the early Classical period, and some modern era composers, like Elliot Carter, have also used it.

to:

* The '''[[TheCavalierYears Baroque Era]]''' (c. 1600 to c. 1760) -- Still a lot of church music, but the patron model became more dominant as wealthy nobles and royalty found even more time and opportunity to indulge in fancy music for the heck of it. For a stereotypical Baroque sound, look for anything by Music/JohannSebastianBach. Famous works include the Music/ToccataAndFugueInDMinor by the aforementioned Bach,[[note]] Or possibly not; many musicologists believe that he didn't compose the piece at all, or at most arranged it from the work of another composer.[[/note]] the [[PachelbelsCanon [[Music/PachelbelsCanon Canon in D]] by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zM6YogGkc Johann Pachelbel]] (which uses a much copied [[PachelbelsCanonProgression chord progression]]) and the ''Messiah'' oratorio by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel (which includes the famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfiAsWR4qU Hallelujah Chorus]]"). The concerto (a piece where a solo instrument or small group of instruments alternates passages with a larger orchestra) became a major compositional form during this period, as composers like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCdNs9qFtic Girolamo Frescobaldi]] began to focus much more of their attention to instrumental writing. This was also the period in which the common-practice tonality came into, well, common practice. Other common features in this era include terraced dynamics (the music is either loud or soft, with few crescendos or diminuendos or so forth), and a reduction in polyphonic density (so that the words and the melodic lines come through much clearer), often to the point of actual homophony (simply having a melody on top of a harmonic accompaniment). Additionally, the early Baroque was when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9105NkJxjGA Claudio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb9nCKAQVyA Monteverdi]], arguably the most important composer (along with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWVQjZ499yM Heinrich]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw Schütz]]) in the transition from the Renaissance to the Baroque, wrote what is widely considered the first great {{opera}}, ''L'Orfeo''. A few of the many other notable Baroque composers include [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLUIC84nYTk Johann Jakob Froberger]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj33HliB5v0 François Couperin]], [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_uP0RtyJ1k Jan Dismas Zelenka]], [[Music/AntonioVivaldi Antonio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwGJt0q-kRA Vivaldi]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxzRQ8KbMcY Jean-Philippe Rameau]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yhd-dpC_7o Domenico Scarlatti]]. Though the harpsichord predates the Baroque, it is stereotypically associated with this era; if you hear a piece of classical music and there's a harpsichord in it, there's a good chance it's a Baroque piece, though the instrument was still in use during the early Classical period, and some modern era composers, like Elliot Carter, have also used it.



* LohengrinAndMendelssohn: Classical music always lends a classy and romantic feel to your wedding. If it's not one of those pieces, it's probably PachelbelsCanon.

to:

* LohengrinAndMendelssohn: Classical music always lends a classy and romantic feel to your wedding. If it's not one of those pieces, it's probably PachelbelsCanon.Music/PachelbelsCanon.
7th Jan '18 10:11:13 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The '''[[{{Romanticism}} Romantic Era]]''' (or '''Romantic Period''')[[note]]"Romantic" in the original sense of "fiery and passionate" (literally, "in the manner of the Romans"), not the Victorian sense of "soppy and sentimental"[[/note]] (c. 1810 to c. 1910) -- Composers started pushing the limits of their styles and instruments. Sounds became lusher, textures denser, harmonies became more chromatic, orchestras bigger, and music more dramatic than ever before. The sustaining pedal on the piano (the one that holds notes down without having to keep your fingers on the keys) became popular. Famous composers included Music/FryderykChopin (Fantaisie-Impromptu, "Revolutionary" Étude), Music/FranzLiszt (''Dante Sonata''), Music/JohannesBrahms ("Brahms's Lullaby", ''Ein Deutsches Requiem''), Music/RichardWagner ("Music/RideOfTheValkyries" is from one of his operas. His style set the standards for epic film music through today), Music/PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky (''Theatre/TheNutcracker'' {{ballet}}) amongst others. (Beethoven is often considered to be a Romantic composer; for instance, the Fifth Symphony.) Programme music (telling a story or depicting scenes, as opposed to abstract music) and music reminiscent of particular folk styles became popular. Some people consider Beethoven to be the first Romantic Era composer as he started or inspired many of the trends to come in this period. It's also important to note that the Romantic style never really ''goes away''. Music/SergeiRachmaninoff] and Music/EdwardElgar were essentially romantics, yet wrote most of their music in the 20th century. Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/JohnWilliams are romantic to their very bones, although they aren't always considered true 'classical Composers' due to their focus on musicals and film music, as well as simpler styles. This is not pretension, like some would say, just a fact of cataloguing.

to:

* The '''[[{{Romanticism}} Romantic Era]]''' (or '''Romantic Period''')[[note]]"Romantic" in the original sense of "fiery and passionate" (literally, "in the manner of the Romans"), not the Victorian sense of "soppy and sentimental"[[/note]] (c. 1810 to c. 1910) -- Composers started pushing the limits of their styles and instruments. Sounds became lusher, textures denser, harmonies became more chromatic, orchestras bigger, and music more dramatic than ever before. The sustaining pedal on the piano (the one that holds notes down without having to keep your fingers on the keys) became popular. Famous composers included Music/FryderykChopin (Fantaisie-Impromptu, "Revolutionary" Étude), Music/FranzLiszt (''Dante Sonata''), Music/JohannesBrahms ("Brahms's Lullaby", ''Ein Deutsches Requiem''), Music/RichardWagner ("Music/RideOfTheValkyries" is from one of his operas. His style set the standards for epic film music through today), Music/PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky (''Theatre/TheNutcracker'' {{ballet}}) amongst others. (Beethoven is often considered to be a Romantic composer; for instance, the Fifth Symphony.) Programme music (telling a story or depicting scenes, as opposed to abstract music) and music reminiscent of particular folk styles became popular. Some people consider Beethoven to be the first Romantic Era composer as he started or inspired many of the trends to come in this period. It's also important to note that the Romantic style never really ''goes away''. Music/SergeiRachmaninoff] and Music/EdwardElgar were essentially romantics, yet wrote most of their music in the 20th century. Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/JohnWilliams Music/JohnWilliams are romantic to their very bones, although they aren't always considered true 'classical Composers' due to their focus on musicals and film music, as well as simpler styles. This is not pretension, like some would say, just a fact of cataloguing.
29th Dec '17 1:10:21 AM Cryoclaste
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The '''Later Twentieth Century''' to the '''Present''' -- during which all the tendencies of the earlier part of the twentieth century were pushed even further. During the 1960s, the mainstream classical music world was heavily influenced by the Darmstadt School, whose members, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez, pushed the serialism of Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern to its extreme. Edgard Varese, a major influence on Music/FrankZappa, began to experiment with electronic music while other composers began to use scales different from the traditional twelve tone equal temperament scale. Iannis Xenakis pioneered the use of mathematical modelling in music. Meanwhile, minimalist composers such as Steve Reich and Philip Glass experimented with music that used very few basic elements, often repeated with variations. In the 1970s and 1980s, composers such as Alfred Schnittke and Luciano Berio began to write polystylistic pieces that drew on many prior musical traditions in a {{postmodern}} way. The boundaries between popular and classical music began to blur; for example, John Cale, violist of [[Music/VelvetUnderground the Velvet Underground]],[[note]]The only reason that Cale had gone to New York (and thus met Music/LouReed) in the first place was to study classical viola[[/note]] was associated with the minimalist La Monte Young, and Music/TheBeatles were influenced by Stockhausen. It should be noted that classically trained musicians playing in other styles does not automatically make what they're playing 'classical'. Lately, the classical music world has seen a resurgence in the popularity of music combining a romantic feel with modern techniques, written by such composers as John Corigliano, and Einojuhani Rautavaara. Other notable composers include Music/JohnCage, Morton Feldman, Giacinto Scelsi and TwoStepsFromHell. As in the early twentieth century, there isn't any truly representative music, but the Sinfonia of Luciano Berio might be a good place to start.

to:

* The '''Later Twentieth Century''' to the '''Present''' -- during which all the tendencies of the earlier part of the twentieth century were pushed even further. During the 1960s, the mainstream classical music world was heavily influenced by the Darmstadt School, whose members, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez, pushed the serialism of Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern to its extreme. Edgard Varese, a major influence on Music/FrankZappa, began to experiment with electronic music while other composers began to use scales different from the traditional twelve tone equal temperament scale. Iannis Xenakis pioneered the use of mathematical modelling in music. Meanwhile, minimalist composers such as Steve Reich and Philip Glass experimented with music that used very few basic elements, often repeated with variations. In the 1970s and 1980s, composers such as Alfred Schnittke and Luciano Berio began to write polystylistic pieces that drew on many prior musical traditions in a {{postmodern}} way. The boundaries between popular and classical music began to blur; for example, John Cale, violist of [[Music/VelvetUnderground the Velvet Underground]],[[note]]The only reason that Cale had gone to New York (and thus met Music/LouReed) in the first place was to study classical viola[[/note]] was associated with the minimalist La Monte Young, and Music/TheBeatles were influenced by Stockhausen. It should be noted that classically trained musicians playing in other styles does not automatically make what they're playing 'classical'. Lately, the classical music world has seen a resurgence in the popularity of music combining a romantic feel with modern techniques, written by such composers as John Corigliano, and Einojuhani Rautavaara. Other notable composers include Music/JohnCage, Morton Feldman, Giacinto Scelsi and TwoStepsFromHell.Music/TwoStepsFromHell. As in the early twentieth century, there isn't any truly representative music, but the Sinfonia of Luciano Berio might be a good place to start.
23rd Dec '17 10:08:29 PM Scifimaster92
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Music/MauriceJarre
23rd Dec '17 9:19:06 PM Scifimaster92
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Music/MichaelKamen
22nd Dec '17 10:28:07 PM Scifimaster92
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Music/HowardShore
4th Nov '17 2:22:32 PM MasterofGalaxies4628
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** ''Music/SchweigtStillePlaudertNicht''
16th Sep '17 3:44:33 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The '''[[TheRenaissance Renaissance]]''' (1400s--1600s) -- Characterized by densely polyphonic vocal music (and we do mean ''dense'', like this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3FJxDsa-5k 40-part motet by Thomas Tallis]]) in styles that we might find hard to relate to today, although most find it more approachable than the medieval stuff. Though a lot of the music was composed for churches, secular forms such as the madrigal and the chanson (much of it composed for wealthy patrons) were also widespread, to the point where the differences between secular and religious music became blurred, much to the consternation of clergymen. Major figures include [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV8Php5wwcI Guillaume Dufay]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUAgAF4Khmg Josquin des Prez]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR4YSBDqRyg Nicolas Gombert]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SJlEQi2t40 Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syb39Ky64Yg Giaches De Wert]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_F1OuMeVSw Carlo Gesualdo]], among many, many others. This period is also the first to have an appreciable amount of surviving instrumental music, much of it quite complex, for both [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1RVRatBA94 solo]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iAoNkZ_4nc ensemble]].

to:

* The '''[[TheRenaissance '''[[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance Renaissance]]''' (1400s--1600s) -- Characterized by densely polyphonic vocal music (and we do mean ''dense'', like this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3FJxDsa-5k 40-part motet by Thomas Tallis]]) in styles that we might find hard to relate to today, although most find it more approachable than the medieval stuff. Though a lot of the music was composed for churches, secular forms such as the madrigal and the chanson (much of it composed for wealthy patrons) were also widespread, to the point where the differences between secular and religious music became blurred, much to the consternation of clergymen. Major figures include [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV8Php5wwcI Guillaume Dufay]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUAgAF4Khmg Josquin des Prez]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR4YSBDqRyg Nicolas Gombert]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SJlEQi2t40 Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syb39Ky64Yg Giaches De Wert]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_F1OuMeVSw Carlo Gesualdo]], among many, many others. This period is also the first to have an appreciable amount of surviving instrumental music, much of it quite complex, for both [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1RVRatBA94 solo]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iAoNkZ_4nc ensemble]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 153. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ClassicalMusic