History Main / ClassicalMusic

11th May '16 10:48:04 AM Jeduthun
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Added DiffLines:

* StandardSnippet: Whether or not you've noticed them, you ''have'' heard tunes from the classical repertoire in the soundtracks of cartoons and movies and TV shows.
1st May '16 5:17:53 AM aye_amber
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* Music/GeorgesBizet

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* Music/GeorgesBizet''Georges Bizet''
21st Dec '15 7:54:54 PM Adept
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* The '''[[TheCavalierYears Baroque Era]]''' (c. 1600 to c. 1760) -- Still a lot of church music, but the patron model became more dominant as wealthy nobles and royalty found even more time and opportunity to indulge in fancy music for the heck of it. For a stereotypical Baroque sound, look for anything by Music/JohannSebastianBach. Famous works include the ''Music/ToccataAndFugueInDMinor'' by the aforementioned Bach, the ''[[PachelbelsCanon Canon in D]]'' by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zM6YogGkc Johann Pachelbel]] (which uses a much copied [[PachelbelsCanonProgression chord progression]]) and the ''Messiah'' oratorio by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel (which includes the famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfiAsWR4qU Hallelujah Chorus]]"). The concerto (a piece where a solo instrument or small group of instruments alternates passages with a larger orchestra) became a major compositional form during this period, as composers like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCdNs9qFtic Girolamo Frescobaldi]] began to focus much more of their attention to instrumental writing. This was also the period in which the common-practice tonality came into, well, common practice. Other common features in this era include terraced dynamics (the music is either loud or soft, with few crescendos or diminuendos or so forth), and a reduction in polyphonic density (so that the words and the melodic lines come through much clearer), often to the point of actual homophony (simply having a melody on top of a harmonic accompaniment). Additionally, the early Baroque was when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9105NkJxjGA Claudio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb9nCKAQVyA Monteverdi]], arguably the most important composer (along with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWVQjZ499yM Heinrich]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw Schütz]]) in the transition from the Renaissance to the Baroque, wrote what is widely considered the first great {{opera}}, ''L'Orfeo''. A few of the many other notable Baroque composers include [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLUIC84nYTk Johann Jakob Froberger]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj33HliB5v0 François Couperin]], [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bt8ku5SXM8w Jan Dismas Zelenka]], [[AntonioVivaldi Antonio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwGJt0q-kRA Vivaldi]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxzRQ8KbMcY Jean-Philippe Rameau]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yhd-dpC_7o Domenico Scarlatti]]. Though the harpsichord predates the Baroque, it is stereotypically associated with this era; if you hear a piece of classical music and there's a harpsichord in it, there's a good chance it's a Baroque piece, though the instrument was still in use during the early Classical period, and some modern era composers, like Elliot Carter, have also used it.

to:

* The '''[[TheCavalierYears Baroque Era]]''' (c. 1600 to c. 1760) -- Still a lot of church music, but the patron model became more dominant as wealthy nobles and royalty found even more time and opportunity to indulge in fancy music for the heck of it. For a stereotypical Baroque sound, look for anything by Music/JohannSebastianBach. Famous works include the ''Music/ToccataAndFugueInDMinor'' by the aforementioned Bach, the ''[[PachelbelsCanon Canon in D]]'' by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zM6YogGkc Johann Pachelbel]] (which uses a much copied [[PachelbelsCanonProgression chord progression]]) and the ''Messiah'' oratorio by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel (which includes the famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfiAsWR4qU Hallelujah Chorus]]"). The concerto (a piece where a solo instrument or small group of instruments alternates passages with a larger orchestra) became a major compositional form during this period, as composers like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCdNs9qFtic Girolamo Frescobaldi]] began to focus much more of their attention to instrumental writing. This was also the period in which the common-practice tonality came into, well, common practice. Other common features in this era include terraced dynamics (the music is either loud or soft, with few crescendos or diminuendos or so forth), and a reduction in polyphonic density (so that the words and the melodic lines come through much clearer), often to the point of actual homophony (simply having a melody on top of a harmonic accompaniment). Additionally, the early Baroque was when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9105NkJxjGA Claudio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb9nCKAQVyA Monteverdi]], arguably the most important composer (along with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWVQjZ499yM Heinrich]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw Schütz]]) in the transition from the Renaissance to the Baroque, wrote what is widely considered the first great {{opera}}, ''L'Orfeo''. A few of the many other notable Baroque composers include [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLUIC84nYTk Johann Jakob Froberger]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj33HliB5v0 François Couperin]], [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bt8ku5SXM8w Jan Dismas Zelenka]], [[AntonioVivaldi [[Music/AntonioVivaldi Antonio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwGJt0q-kRA Vivaldi]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxzRQ8KbMcY Jean-Philippe Rameau]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yhd-dpC_7o Domenico Scarlatti]]. Though the harpsichord predates the Baroque, it is stereotypically associated with this era; if you hear a piece of classical music and there's a harpsichord in it, there's a good chance it's a Baroque piece, though the instrument was still in use during the early Classical period, and some modern era composers, like Elliot Carter, have also used it.
25th Nov '15 3:56:54 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''[[TheCavalierYears Baroque Era]]''' (c. 1600 to c. 1760) -- Still a lot of church music, but the patron model became more dominant as wealthy nobles and royalty found even more time and opportunity to indulge in fancy music for the heck of it. For a stereotypical Baroque sound, look for anything by Music/JohannSebastianBach. Famous works include the ''Music/ToccataAndFugueInDMinor'' by the aforementioned Bach, the ''[[PachelbelsCanon Canon in D]]'' by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zM6YogGkc Johann Pachelbel]] (which uses a much copied [[PachelbelsCanonProgression chord progression]]) and the ''Messiah'' oratorio by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel (which includes the famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfiAsWR4qU Hallelujah Chorus]]"). The concerto (a piece where a solo instrument or small group of instruments alternates passages with a larger orchestra) became a major compositional form during this period, as composers like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCdNs9qFtic Girolamo Frescobaldi]] began to focus much more of their attention to instrumental writing. This was also the period in which the common-practice tonality came into, well, common practice. Other common features in this era include terraced dynamics (the music is either loud or soft, with few crescendos or diminuendos or so forth), and a reduction in polyphonic density (so that the words and the melodic lines come through much clearer), often to the point of actual homophony (simply having a melody on top of a harmonic accompaniment). Additionally, the early Baroque was when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9105NkJxjGA Claudio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb9nCKAQVyA Monteverdi]], arguably the most important composer (along with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw Heinrich]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvypMbkZje4 Schütz]]) in the transition from the Renaissance to the Baroque, wrote what is widely considered the first great {{opera}}, ''L'Orfeo''. A few of the many other notable Baroque composers include [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLUIC84nYTk Johann Jakob Froberger]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj33HliB5v0 François Couperin]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uofaL7L8kDI Jan Dismas Zelenka]], [[AntonioVivaldi Antonio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwGJt0q-kRA Vivaldi]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxzRQ8KbMcY Jean-Philippe Rameau]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yhd-dpC_7o Domenico Scarlatti]]. Though the harpsichord predates the Baroque, it is stereotypically associated with this era; if you hear a piece of classical music and there's a harpsichord in it, there's a good chance it's a Baroque piece, though the instrument was still in use during the early Classical period, and some modern era composers, like Elliot Carter, have also used it.

to:

* The '''[[TheCavalierYears Baroque Era]]''' (c. 1600 to c. 1760) -- Still a lot of church music, but the patron model became more dominant as wealthy nobles and royalty found even more time and opportunity to indulge in fancy music for the heck of it. For a stereotypical Baroque sound, look for anything by Music/JohannSebastianBach. Famous works include the ''Music/ToccataAndFugueInDMinor'' by the aforementioned Bach, the ''[[PachelbelsCanon Canon in D]]'' by [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zM6YogGkc Johann Pachelbel]] (which uses a much copied [[PachelbelsCanonProgression chord progression]]) and the ''Messiah'' oratorio by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel (which includes the famous "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfiAsWR4qU Hallelujah Chorus]]"). The concerto (a piece where a solo instrument or small group of instruments alternates passages with a larger orchestra) became a major compositional form during this period, as composers like [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCdNs9qFtic Girolamo Frescobaldi]] began to focus much more of their attention to instrumental writing. This was also the period in which the common-practice tonality came into, well, common practice. Other common features in this era include terraced dynamics (the music is either loud or soft, with few crescendos or diminuendos or so forth), and a reduction in polyphonic density (so that the words and the melodic lines come through much clearer), often to the point of actual homophony (simply having a melody on top of a harmonic accompaniment). Additionally, the early Baroque was when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9105NkJxjGA Claudio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb9nCKAQVyA Monteverdi]], arguably the most important composer (along with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw com/watch?v=HWVQjZ499yM Heinrich]] [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvypMbkZje4 com/watch?v=5sqhUsFRdIw Schütz]]) in the transition from the Renaissance to the Baroque, wrote what is widely considered the first great {{opera}}, ''L'Orfeo''. A few of the many other notable Baroque composers include [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLUIC84nYTk Johann Jakob Froberger]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj33HliB5v0 François Couperin]], [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uofaL7L8kDI com/watch?v=bt8ku5SXM8w Jan Dismas Zelenka]], [[AntonioVivaldi Antonio]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwGJt0q-kRA Vivaldi]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxzRQ8KbMcY Jean-Philippe Rameau]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yhd-dpC_7o Domenico Scarlatti]]. Though the harpsichord predates the Baroque, it is stereotypically associated with this era; if you hear a piece of classical music and there's a harpsichord in it, there's a good chance it's a Baroque piece, though the instrument was still in use during the early Classical period, and some modern era composers, like Elliot Carter, have also used it.
25th Nov '15 3:15:01 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''[[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]]''' -- c. 900 AD up until the end of the 14th century. Most of what has survived is monophonic vocal music, and much of that religious, the most notable style being [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0Rv5F88WYA Gregorian chant]] . But the most important compositions are the ''polyphonic'' vocal music (where multiple melodic lines are sung at once), which start showing up in writing from about 1000 AD onward; [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhqWgfGK1Xw Pérotin]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4D4O1eFVv4 W. de Wycombe]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Qatw5B3vc4 Philippe de Vitry]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsWZfPCK6aY Guillaume de Machaut]] are a few of the big names in this style. We also have several surviving examples of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVdA9t-AOfU secular]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYIFlAa5Bow songs]] from the latter part of the period, a good amount of it also polyphonic. By modern standards, it can be pretty weird: the common-practice tonality shows up long ''after'' the Medieval period.

to:

* The '''[[TheMiddleAges Middle Ages]]''' -- c. 900 AD up until the end of the 14th century. Most of what has survived is monophonic vocal music, and much of that religious, the most notable style being [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0Rv5F88WYA Gregorian chant]] . But the most important compositions are the ''polyphonic'' vocal music (where multiple melodic lines are sung at once), which start showing up in writing from about 1000 AD onward; [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhqWgfGK1Xw Pérotin]], [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4D4O1eFVv4 com/watch?v=sdol8PviWKw W. de Wycombe]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Qatw5B3vc4 Philippe de Vitry]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsWZfPCK6aY Guillaume de Machaut]] are a few of the big names in this style. We also have several surviving examples of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVdA9t-AOfU secular]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYIFlAa5Bow songs]] from the latter part of the period, a good amount of it also polyphonic. By modern standards, it can be pretty weird: the common-practice tonality shows up long ''after'' the Medieval period.
19th Nov '15 8:31:56 AM Jeduthun
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* OrchestralBombing



* PachelbelsCanonProgression



* PublicDomainSoundtrack: Since a lot of it is well over 100 years old, any copyright on those pieces expired long ago. [[note]]Note that this doesn't necessarily hold true for specific ''recordings'' of the pieces, which are more recent, or of newer published editions.[[/note]]

to:

* PublicDomainSoundtrack: Since a lot of it is well over 100 years old, any copyright on those pieces expired long ago. [[note]]Note that this doesn't necessarily hold true for specific ''recordings'' of the pieces, which are likely more recent, or of newer published editions.[[/note]]
14th Nov '15 11:53:46 AM Jeduthun
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* PublicDomainSoundtrack: Since a lot of it is well over 100 years old, the copyright expired long ago.

to:

* PublicDomainSoundtrack: Since a lot of it is well over 100 years old, the any copyright on those pieces expired long ago.ago. [[note]]Note that this doesn't necessarily hold true for specific ''recordings'' of the pieces, which are more recent, or of newer published editions.[[/note]]
20th Oct '15 6:34:10 AM Jeduthun
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Added DiffLines:

* MoodMotif


Added DiffLines:

* PlayingTheHeartStrings
19th Oct '15 3:12:43 PM Jeduthun
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* AtTheOperaTonight

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* AtTheOperaTonightAtTheOperaTonight: When nobs and snobs attend a classical performance because it makes them look "cultured."
* AvantGardeMusic: Music composed in the 20th century and later tends to skew this way, though it's worth noting that many earlier composers were also considered dissonant and edgy in their own time.



* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: [[AvertedTrope Not!]]

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* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: [[AvertedTrope Not!]]'''''[[AvertedTrope Not!]]'''''



* {{Harmony}}

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* {{Harmony}}{{Harmony}}: Classical composers are more or less the {{Trope Codifier}}s for the harmony we know and love today.



* ImpracticalMusicalInstrumentSkills

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* ImpracticalMusicalInstrumentSkillsImpracticalMusicalInstrumentSkills: Lots of compositions, especially concertos, call for some pretty mad performing chops.



* LohengrinAndMendelssohn

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* LohengrinAndMendelssohnLohengrinAndMendelssohn: Classical music always lends a classy and romantic feel to your wedding. If it's not one of those pieces, it's probably PachelbelsCanon.



* {{Opera}}



* PublicDomainSoundtrack
* RockMeAmadeus

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* PublicDomainSoundtrack
PublicDomainSoundtrack: Since a lot of it is well over 100 years old, the copyright expired long ago.
* RockMeAmadeusRockMeAmadeus: When classical themes show up in music from other genres.


Added DiffLines:

* TrueArtIsAncient: Yes, you will frequently hear music that is a few centuries old, if not older. Bonus points if you find a "Historically Informed Performance" played on painstakingly restored instruments from the time period. More recently composed music tends to take a while to catch on; ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'' is still sometimes referred to as "modern music" although it's over 100 years old!
10th Oct '15 10:39:32 PM Jeduthun
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!! Examples of classical composers and pieces with their own TV Tropes pages:

to:

!! Examples of Tropes associated with classical composers and pieces with their own TV Tropes pages:music:


Added DiffLines:

* AtTheOperaTonight
* BoleroEffect
* CartoonConductor
* ClassicalMusicIsBoring: [[AvertedTrope Not!]]
* CommonTime
* DramaticTimpani
* ElegantClassicalMusician
* EtherealChoir
* GratuitousForeignLanguage
* {{Harmony}}
* {{Improv}}: How cadenzas were originally meant to be played.
* ImpracticalMusicalInstrumentSkills
* {{Leitmotif}}
* LohengrinAndMendelssohn
* LonelyPianoPiece
* LoveTheme
* {{Modulation}}
* OrchestralVersion
* OminousLatinChanting
* {{Oratorio}}
* PublicDomainSoundtrack
* RockMeAmadeus
* ThemeAndVariations
* UncommonTime
[[/index]]

!! Examples of classical composers and pieces with their own TV Tropes pages:
[[index]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 131. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ClassicalMusic