History Main / ClassicalMusic

7th Jan '18 10:11:13 AM nombretomado
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* The '''[[{{Romanticism}} Romantic Era]]''' (or '''Romantic Period''')[[note]]"Romantic" in the original sense of "fiery and passionate" (literally, "in the manner of the Romans"), not the Victorian sense of "soppy and sentimental"[[/note]] (c. 1810 to c. 1910) -- Composers started pushing the limits of their styles and instruments. Sounds became lusher, textures denser, harmonies became more chromatic, orchestras bigger, and music more dramatic than ever before. The sustaining pedal on the piano (the one that holds notes down without having to keep your fingers on the keys) became popular. Famous composers included Music/FryderykChopin (Fantaisie-Impromptu, "Revolutionary" Étude), Music/FranzLiszt (''Dante Sonata''), Music/JohannesBrahms ("Brahms's Lullaby", ''Ein Deutsches Requiem''), Music/RichardWagner ("Music/RideOfTheValkyries" is from one of his operas. His style set the standards for epic film music through today), Music/PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky (''Theatre/TheNutcracker'' {{ballet}}) amongst others. (Beethoven is often considered to be a Romantic composer; for instance, the Fifth Symphony.) Programme music (telling a story or depicting scenes, as opposed to abstract music) and music reminiscent of particular folk styles became popular. Some people consider Beethoven to be the first Romantic Era composer as he started or inspired many of the trends to come in this period. It's also important to note that the Romantic style never really ''goes away''. Music/SergeiRachmaninoff] and Music/EdwardElgar were essentially romantics, yet wrote most of their music in the 20th century. Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/JohnWilliams are romantic to their very bones, although they aren't always considered true 'classical Composers' due to their focus on musicals and film music, as well as simpler styles. This is not pretension, like some would say, just a fact of cataloguing.

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* The '''[[{{Romanticism}} Romantic Era]]''' (or '''Romantic Period''')[[note]]"Romantic" in the original sense of "fiery and passionate" (literally, "in the manner of the Romans"), not the Victorian sense of "soppy and sentimental"[[/note]] (c. 1810 to c. 1910) -- Composers started pushing the limits of their styles and instruments. Sounds became lusher, textures denser, harmonies became more chromatic, orchestras bigger, and music more dramatic than ever before. The sustaining pedal on the piano (the one that holds notes down without having to keep your fingers on the keys) became popular. Famous composers included Music/FryderykChopin (Fantaisie-Impromptu, "Revolutionary" Étude), Music/FranzLiszt (''Dante Sonata''), Music/JohannesBrahms ("Brahms's Lullaby", ''Ein Deutsches Requiem''), Music/RichardWagner ("Music/RideOfTheValkyries" is from one of his operas. His style set the standards for epic film music through today), Music/PyotrIlyichTchaikovsky (''Theatre/TheNutcracker'' {{ballet}}) amongst others. (Beethoven is often considered to be a Romantic composer; for instance, the Fifth Symphony.) Programme music (telling a story or depicting scenes, as opposed to abstract music) and music reminiscent of particular folk styles became popular. Some people consider Beethoven to be the first Romantic Era composer as he started or inspired many of the trends to come in this period. It's also important to note that the Romantic style never really ''goes away''. Music/SergeiRachmaninoff] and Music/EdwardElgar were essentially romantics, yet wrote most of their music in the 20th century. Creator/AndrewLloydWebber and Creator/JohnWilliams Music/JohnWilliams are romantic to their very bones, although they aren't always considered true 'classical Composers' due to their focus on musicals and film music, as well as simpler styles. This is not pretension, like some would say, just a fact of cataloguing.
29th Dec '17 1:10:21 AM Cryoclaste
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* The '''Later Twentieth Century''' to the '''Present''' -- during which all the tendencies of the earlier part of the twentieth century were pushed even further. During the 1960s, the mainstream classical music world was heavily influenced by the Darmstadt School, whose members, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez, pushed the serialism of Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern to its extreme. Edgard Varese, a major influence on Music/FrankZappa, began to experiment with electronic music while other composers began to use scales different from the traditional twelve tone equal temperament scale. Iannis Xenakis pioneered the use of mathematical modelling in music. Meanwhile, minimalist composers such as Steve Reich and Philip Glass experimented with music that used very few basic elements, often repeated with variations. In the 1970s and 1980s, composers such as Alfred Schnittke and Luciano Berio began to write polystylistic pieces that drew on many prior musical traditions in a {{postmodern}} way. The boundaries between popular and classical music began to blur; for example, John Cale, violist of [[Music/VelvetUnderground the Velvet Underground]],[[note]]The only reason that Cale had gone to New York (and thus met Music/LouReed) in the first place was to study classical viola[[/note]] was associated with the minimalist La Monte Young, and Music/TheBeatles were influenced by Stockhausen. It should be noted that classically trained musicians playing in other styles does not automatically make what they're playing 'classical'. Lately, the classical music world has seen a resurgence in the popularity of music combining a romantic feel with modern techniques, written by such composers as John Corigliano, and Einojuhani Rautavaara. Other notable composers include Music/JohnCage, Morton Feldman, Giacinto Scelsi and TwoStepsFromHell. As in the early twentieth century, there isn't any truly representative music, but the Sinfonia of Luciano Berio might be a good place to start.

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* The '''Later Twentieth Century''' to the '''Present''' -- during which all the tendencies of the earlier part of the twentieth century were pushed even further. During the 1960s, the mainstream classical music world was heavily influenced by the Darmstadt School, whose members, such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez, pushed the serialism of Arnold Schoenberg and his pupil Anton Webern to its extreme. Edgard Varese, a major influence on Music/FrankZappa, began to experiment with electronic music while other composers began to use scales different from the traditional twelve tone equal temperament scale. Iannis Xenakis pioneered the use of mathematical modelling in music. Meanwhile, minimalist composers such as Steve Reich and Philip Glass experimented with music that used very few basic elements, often repeated with variations. In the 1970s and 1980s, composers such as Alfred Schnittke and Luciano Berio began to write polystylistic pieces that drew on many prior musical traditions in a {{postmodern}} way. The boundaries between popular and classical music began to blur; for example, John Cale, violist of [[Music/VelvetUnderground the Velvet Underground]],[[note]]The only reason that Cale had gone to New York (and thus met Music/LouReed) in the first place was to study classical viola[[/note]] was associated with the minimalist La Monte Young, and Music/TheBeatles were influenced by Stockhausen. It should be noted that classically trained musicians playing in other styles does not automatically make what they're playing 'classical'. Lately, the classical music world has seen a resurgence in the popularity of music combining a romantic feel with modern techniques, written by such composers as John Corigliano, and Einojuhani Rautavaara. Other notable composers include Music/JohnCage, Morton Feldman, Giacinto Scelsi and TwoStepsFromHell.Music/TwoStepsFromHell. As in the early twentieth century, there isn't any truly representative music, but the Sinfonia of Luciano Berio might be a good place to start.
23rd Dec '17 10:08:29 PM Scifimaster92
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* Music/MauriceJarre
23rd Dec '17 9:19:06 PM Scifimaster92
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* Music/MichaelKamen
22nd Dec '17 10:28:07 PM Scifimaster92
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* Music/HowardShore
4th Nov '17 2:22:32 PM MasterofGalaxies4628
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** ''Music/SchweigtStillePlaudertNicht''
16th Sep '17 3:44:33 PM nombretomado
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* The '''[[TheRenaissance Renaissance]]''' (1400s--1600s) -- Characterized by densely polyphonic vocal music (and we do mean ''dense'', like this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3FJxDsa-5k 40-part motet by Thomas Tallis]]) in styles that we might find hard to relate to today, although most find it more approachable than the medieval stuff. Though a lot of the music was composed for churches, secular forms such as the madrigal and the chanson (much of it composed for wealthy patrons) were also widespread, to the point where the differences between secular and religious music became blurred, much to the consternation of clergymen. Major figures include [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV8Php5wwcI Guillaume Dufay]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUAgAF4Khmg Josquin des Prez]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR4YSBDqRyg Nicolas Gombert]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SJlEQi2t40 Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syb39Ky64Yg Giaches De Wert]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_F1OuMeVSw Carlo Gesualdo]], among many, many others. This period is also the first to have an appreciable amount of surviving instrumental music, much of it quite complex, for both [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1RVRatBA94 solo]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iAoNkZ_4nc ensemble]].

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* The '''[[TheRenaissance '''[[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance Renaissance]]''' (1400s--1600s) -- Characterized by densely polyphonic vocal music (and we do mean ''dense'', like this [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3FJxDsa-5k 40-part motet by Thomas Tallis]]) in styles that we might find hard to relate to today, although most find it more approachable than the medieval stuff. Though a lot of the music was composed for churches, secular forms such as the madrigal and the chanson (much of it composed for wealthy patrons) were also widespread, to the point where the differences between secular and religious music became blurred, much to the consternation of clergymen. Major figures include [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV8Php5wwcI Guillaume Dufay]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUAgAF4Khmg Josquin des Prez]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR4YSBDqRyg Nicolas Gombert]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SJlEQi2t40 Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syb39Ky64Yg Giaches De Wert]], and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_F1OuMeVSw Carlo Gesualdo]], among many, many others. This period is also the first to have an appreciable amount of surviving instrumental music, much of it quite complex, for both [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1RVRatBA94 solo]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iAoNkZ_4nc ensemble]].
14th Jul '17 5:33:00 PM Eksekk
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The dates which characterise 'classical music' are arguable; while some maintain that it began when norms about concepts such as rhythm and tonality began to be established -- around 1600 --, others extend it much farther back to include medieval art music. Some modern composers also believe that there is no longer any value in considering contemporary art music 'classical'.

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The dates which characterise 'classical music' are arguable; while some maintain that it began when norms about concepts such as rhythm and tonality began to be established -- around 1600 --, 1600, others extend it much farther back to include medieval art music. Some modern composers also believe that there is no longer any value in considering contemporary art music 'classical'.
28th Jun '17 9:47:05 AM Jeduthun
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* '''Medieval''' -- Voices only, or speculative instrumentation added by modern performers that is based on either written accounts or nebulous evidence like illustrations and song texts. Known instruments include pan flutes, recorders, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shawm shawms]], bagpipes, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemshorn gemshorns]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vielle vielles]], lutes, lyres, organ, trumpets, and a variety of simple percussion like drums and tamborines.

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* '''Medieval''' -- Voices only, or speculative instrumentation added by modern performers that is based on either written accounts or nebulous evidence like illustrations and song texts. Known instruments include pan flutes, recorders, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shawm shawms]], bagpipes, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemshorn gemshorns]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vielle vielles]], lutes, lyres, organ, trumpets, and a variety of simple percussion like drums and tamborines. (In other words, there was in fact a lot of instrumental music being created; it's just that very little of it survives in written form.)
28th Jun '17 9:35:23 AM Jeduthun
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* HarpoDoesSomethingFunny: The cadenza, at the high point of most concertos, is often indicated with a simple pause in the score with the expectation that the performer would make up a suitably impressive solo.
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