History Main / ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve

24th May '17 12:30:52 PM Theriocephalus
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* The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' campaign setting ''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}}'' revolves around the idea that belief shapes the planes. It can also move mountains, as the beliefs of the inhabitants of an area determines it's actual geographic location.
** Exploited several times in the video game ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment''; for example, the player at one point unlocks a memory of a previous incarnation who had just debated a man into the conclusion that he did not exist, [[PuffOfLogic which caused him to vanish]].

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* The ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' campaign setting ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
**
''TabletopGame/{{Planescape}}'' revolves around the idea that belief shapes the planes. It can also quite literally move mountains, as the beliefs of the inhabitants of an area determines it's determine its actual geographic location.
**
location. Exploited several times in the video game ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment''; for example, the player at one point unlocks a memory of a previous incarnation who had just debated a man into the conclusion that he did not exist, [[PuffOfLogic which caused him to vanish]].
24th May '17 12:19:49 PM Theriocephalus
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** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', one family of vampires have developed the ability to resist religious symbols (as well as most things that vampires are traditionally vulnerable to) through extensive psychological conditioning. [[spoiler:This later backfires when their conditioning wears off under the influence of a witch, but the study that went into it leads to them being able to recognize -- and as a result be affected by -- "hundreds of the damned holy things! They're everywhere! Every religion has a different one!"]]a his concept is later expanded on by the Black Ribbon Society of {{Vegetarian Vampire}}s, which provided a better integration within a multicultural modern city.

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** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', one family of vampires have developed the ability to resist religious symbols (as well as most things that vampires are traditionally vulnerable to) through extensive psychological conditioning. [[spoiler:This later backfires when their conditioning wears off under the influence of a witch, but the study that went into it leads to them being able to recognize -- and as a result be affected by -- "hundreds of the damned holy things! They're everywhere! Every religion has a different one!"]]a his one!"]]. This concept is later expanded on by the Black Ribbon Society of {{Vegetarian Vampire}}s, which provided a better integration within a multicultural modern city.
24th May '17 12:18:34 PM Theriocephalus
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** ''Discworld/SmallGods'' describes in detail how gods come into existence and become powerful -and what happens when their followers lose genuine faith. Om, the main god in the story, despite his massive religion, was down to one sincere believer and one atheist who was almost as good because he ''very specifically'' [[HollywoodAtheist didn't believe in Om]].
** "Belief" is stated as a very powerful force on the Discworld - if enough people believe something to be true, it will become true, however there are limits. The rules have never been fully stated, but it appears there needs to be a "space" that makes it somewhat reasonable such a thing could be true (hence the non-existence of the Give-The-Dean-A-Big-Bag-Of-Money goblin). In ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'' the mess of [[CrossoverCosmology multiple combined mythologies]] that made up the religion of Djelibeybi, much of which was self-contradictory, and a lot of which could be contradicted by simple observation, only became true when the kingdom was pushed into an alternate reality with an even lower reality threshold than the Disc.

to:

** ''Discworld/SmallGods'' describes in detail how gods come into existence and become powerful -and -- and what happens when their followers lose genuine faith. Om, the main god in the story, despite his massive religion, was down to one sincere believer and one atheist who was almost as good because he ''very specifically'' [[HollywoodAtheist didn't believe in Om]].
** "Belief" is stated as a very powerful force on the Discworld - -- if enough people believe something to be true, it will become true, however there are limits. The rules have never been fully stated, but it appears there needs to be a "space" that makes it somewhat reasonable such a thing could be true (hence the non-existence of the Give-The-Dean-A-Big-Bag-Of-Money goblin). In ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'' the mess of [[CrossoverCosmology multiple combined mythologies]] that made up the religion of Djelibeybi, much of which was self-contradictory, and a lot of which could be contradicted by simple observation, only became true when the kingdom was pushed into an alternate reality with an even lower reality threshold than the Disc.



** Mistress Weatherwax does this on many occasions, usually boxing the ears of said fairies. She doesn't believe in DEATH, because it's like believing in the postman.
*** Witches and Wizards generally take the same attitude about Gods. They ''know'' the Gods are there, so there's no call to go ''believing'' in them.

to:

** Mistress Weatherwax does this on many occasions, usually boxing the ears of said fairies. She doesn't believe in DEATH, Death, because it's like believing in the postman.
***
postman. Witches and Wizards wizards generally take the same attitude about Gods. They ''know'' the Gods are there, so there's no call to go ''believing'' in them.



** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', one family of vampires have developed the ability to resist religious symbols (as well as most things that vampires are traditionally vulnerable to) through extensive psychological conditioning. [[spoiler:This later backfires when their conditioning wears off under the influence of a witch, but the study that went into it leads to them being able to recognize - and as a result be affected by - "hundreds of the damned holy things! They're everywhere! Every religion has a different one!"]]
*** Later expanded into the Black Ribbon Society, which provided a better integration with a multicultural modern city
** The ''New Discworld Companion'' has as Watch standard gear, "One holy symbol of recruit's choice, vampires, for the discouragement of. One Critique of Pure Reason, vampires, for the discouragement of (Freethinker's option)." This was before a vampire ''joined'' the Watch...

to:

** In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', one family of vampires have developed the ability to resist religious symbols (as well as most things that vampires are traditionally vulnerable to) through extensive psychological conditioning. [[spoiler:This later backfires when their conditioning wears off under the influence of a witch, but the study that went into it leads to them being able to recognize - -- and as a result be affected by - -- "hundreds of the damned holy things! They're everywhere! Every religion has a different one!"]]
*** Later
one!"]]a his concept is later expanded into on by the Black Ribbon Society, Society of {{Vegetarian Vampire}}s, which provided a better integration with within a multicultural modern city
city.
** The ''New Discworld Companion'' has as Watch standard gear, gear "One holy symbol of recruit's choice, vampires, for the discouragement of. One Critique of Pure Reason, vampires, for the discouragement of (Freethinker's option)." This was before a vampire ''joined'' the Watch...



*** A group of people (the entire crew of a ship) who are assumed to be Omnians (as they live in Omnia) but know full well that it's all rubbish get a completely different afterlife from all the other Omnians. They decide to go looking for the afterlifes of those foreign gods they've heard of, where you get food, wine, and women for all eternity.
** ''Draco nobilis'', the noble dragon, is a species so dependent on magic for survival that when the Discworld's magical ambiance declined to its present level, they were forced to retreat to a new habitat: the human imagination. At present they can only become real in a magic-saturated locale where an imaginative human visualizes them, as Twoflower and the Wyrmberg's ruling family do in ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', and the Elucidated Brothers do in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards''.

to:

*** ** A group of people (the entire crew of a ship) who are assumed to be Omnians (as they live in Omnia) but know full well that it's all rubbish get a completely different afterlife from all the other Omnians. They decide to go looking for the afterlifes of those foreign gods they've heard of, where you get food, wine, and women for all eternity.
** ''Draco nobilis'', the noble dragon, is a species so dependent on magic for survival that when the Discworld's magical ambiance declined to its present level, they were forced to retreat to a new habitat: the human imagination. At present they can only become real in a magic-saturated locale where an imaginative human visualizes them, as Twoflower and the Wyrmberg's ruling family do in ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', and the Elucidated Brothers do in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards''.''Discworld/GuardsGuards'', with the resulting dragons "feeding" off of the powerful magic fields of Wyrmberg and the Unseen University, respectively.



* A variant occurs in the ''Literature/HaroldShea'' stories by Creator/LSpragueDeCamp and Fletcher Pratt, in which it's possible to travel to another world by believing in the logical principles that govern that world. The place you're going was real to begin with (even though [[AllMythsAreTrue they're all based on mythology or literature]]), but believing the right things makes it accessible to your senses.
** The inverse also works: The scientist in the team doesn't believe in any of this and thus makes a fine AntiMagic weapon.

to:

* A variant occurs in the ''Literature/HaroldShea'' stories by Creator/LSpragueDeCamp and Fletcher Pratt, in which it's possible to travel to another world by believing in the logical principles that govern that world. The place you're going was real to begin with (even though [[AllMythsAreTrue they're all based on mythology or literature]]), but believing the right things makes it accessible to your senses.
**
senses. The inverse also works: The the scientist in the team doesn't believe in any of this and thus makes a fine AntiMagic weapon.



* Da Orks in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' subconsciously generate a mild psychic field, its strength directly proportional to the amount of "boyz" present, so if enough Orks believe in something then reality is given a swift kick in the balls and told to follow the proper, Orky way of doing things. While it won't cause a stick to be able to shoot bullets if an Ork believes it will, Ork belief in "[[LawOfChromaticSuperiority da red wuns go fasta]]" really ''does'' make vehicles painted red move slightly faster, and because Orks believe that [[LargeAndInCharge the biggest Ork is in charge]] an Ork will ''actually grow'' in response to other Orks following him.
** While Orks can't make a stick fire bullets, their powers are able to make a lot of things that shouldn't work shoot bullets. Most of their "shooterz" are little more than boxes filled with gears and bullets that are in the general shapes of guns, and Orks have been known to make ships without fuel fly across solar systems.

to:

* Da ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'':
** The
Orks in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' subconsciously generate a mild psychic field, its strength directly proportional to the amount of "boyz" present, so if enough Orks believe in something then reality is given a swift kick in the balls and told to follow the proper, Orky way of doing things. While it won't cause a stick to be able to shoot bullets if an Ork believes it will, Ork belief in that "[[LawOfChromaticSuperiority da red wuns ones go fasta]]" really ''does'' make vehicles painted red move slightly faster, and because Orks believe that [[LargeAndInCharge the biggest Ork is in charge]] an Ork will ''actually grow'' in response to other Orks following him.
** While
him, and while Orks can't make a stick fire bullets, their powers are able to make a lot of things that shouldn't work shoot bullets. Most of their "shooterz" "shootaz" are little more than boxes filled with gears and bullets that are in the general shapes of guns, and Orks have been known to make ships without fuel fly across solar systems.



*** In one of the Gaunt's Ghosts novels, the eponymous commissar has no problems commandeering an ork buggy beyond the fact that it was designed for a significantly stronger being and as such lacks power steering. Another example is that of a unit of Ork-hunter Imperial Guard who will often loot Ork guns and use them, again with no problems. The general idea is that Ork technology does work, and the Orks' psychic power simply makes it work better.
*** This sometimes even works against the Orks. Their mortal enemy [[Characters/Warhammer40000ImperialGuard Sebastian Yarrick]], despite being as badass as a human could possibly be in the horrifying 40K universe, REALLY should be dead just by weight of age and everything he's endured making his body give out, even with advanced future medicine. But he's accomplished so much against the Orks that they believe he's an unkillable monster, ergo...

to:

*** In one of the Gaunt's Ghosts ''Gaunt's Ghosts'' novels, the eponymous commissar has no problems commandeering an ork Ork buggy beyond the fact that it was designed for a significantly stronger being and as such lacks power steering. Another example is that of a unit of Ork-hunter Imperial Guard Guardsmen who will often loot Ork guns and use them, again with no problems. The general idea is that Ork technology does work, and the Orks' psychic power simply makes it work better.
*** This sometimes even works against the Orks. Their mortal enemy [[Characters/Warhammer40000ImperialGuard Sebastian Yarrick]], despite being as badass as a human could possibly be in the horrifying 40K ''40K'' universe, REALLY should be dead just by weight of age and everything he's endured making his body give out, even with advanced future medicine. But he's accomplished so much against the Orks that they believe he's an unkillable monster, ergo...
24th May '17 12:04:46 PM Theriocephalus
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* In the ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' fic ''[[http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/main-category/exalted/535011-glorious-solar-saber-fiction?_=1433129311611 Glorious Solar Saber]]'', a Sidereal invokes this trope while teaching. He closes a student's eyes, telling her that he's going to throw her a spear. The student obediently reaches out, catching the weapon- and realizes that it was conjured by her own Essence. She expected to grasp a solid weapon, and her soul obliged.

to:

* In the ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'' fic ''[[http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/main-category/exalted/535011-glorious-solar-saber-fiction?_=1433129311611 Glorious Solar Saber]]'', a Sidereal invokes this trope while teaching. He closes a student's eyes, telling her that he's going to throw her a spear. The student obediently reaches out, catching the weapon- weapon -- and realizes that it was conjured by her own Essence. She expected to grasp a solid weapon, and her soul obliged.
19th May '17 7:41:55 AM Kakai
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* In ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'', enough people following a calendar will cause o it manifest RealityWarping properties, enabling the setting's FunctionalMagic. The easiest way to do AntiMagic is to introduce a new calendar, as exotics work differently under different time and date systems.
19th May '17 1:35:02 AM Alas_Poor_Donny
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*** This actually extends to when the normal people _aren't_ directly observing a spell, too, the immediate impact just isn't as acute. Nature isn't actually natural, it's a carefully constructed useful lie that the Technocracy taught to the mortals because how arbitrary and chaotic things were was getting annoying. For instance, there's not actually any such thing as gravity: you fall at 9.8 m/s2 near the earth's surface because that idea is engraved on the Sleeper unconscious by a wizard-run education system.
17th May '17 11:04:07 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* A key point in the ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series, where entities from [[AllMythsAreTrue virtually every mythology ever]] exist, specifically because people believe in them.
** The [[VideoGame/{{Persona 2}} second installment]] of the spinoff ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' series takes this to far greater extremes, where rumors you start [[InfallibleBabble actually become true]].
** ShinMegamiTenseiIVApocalypse specifies that only humans have this ability, which is why all those galaxy-suplexing gods are so fixated on a single blue speck with a bunch of bacteria-like shit-throwing apes running around.

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* A key point in the ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series, where entities from [[AllMythsAreTrue virtually every mythology ever]] exist, exist specifically because people believe in them.
** The [[VideoGame/{{Persona 2}} second installment]] of the spinoff ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' ''[[Franchise/ShinMegamiTenseiPersona Persona]]'' series takes this to far greater extremes, where rumors you start [[InfallibleBabble actually become true]].
** ShinMegamiTenseiIVApocalypse ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIVApocalypse'' specifies that only humans have this ability, which is why all those galaxy-suplexing gods are so fixated on a single blue speck with a bunch of bacteria-like shit-throwing apes running around.
6th May '17 5:52:22 PM DrFraud
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* In ''Yuletide Legends: The Brothers Claus'' Mrs. Claus states that if children stop believing in Santa then Christmas will never come.
16th Apr '17 6:56:24 PM nombretomado
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** The Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse has "the Beings" in Peter David's ''StarTrekNewFrontier'' series, who gained power from worship and fear, and inverted when it turned out the most powerful among them was so because he gained power from peoples' belief in ''themselves''. In the novel ''Gods Above'', the only way for the crew to defeat them is to be truly fearless.

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** The Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse has "the Beings" in Peter David's ''StarTrekNewFrontier'' ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier'' series, who gained power from worship and fear, and inverted when it turned out the most powerful among them was so because he gained power from peoples' belief in ''themselves''. In the novel ''Gods Above'', the only way for the crew to defeat them is to be truly fearless.
13th Apr '17 9:15:41 PM Fireblood
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* The LogicalFallacy known as ''argumentum ad populum'' implies this. For some reason that doesn't stop people from using it, even though the implications should be obvious.

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* The LogicalFallacy known as ''argumentum ''[[AppealToPopularity argumentum ad populum'' populum]]'' implies this. For some reason that doesn't stop people from using it, even though the implications should be obvious.
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