History Main / Cincinnatus

22nd Sep '16 1:29:10 PM Gamermaster
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** VideoGame/SuikodenI'' and ''[[VideoGame/SuikodenII II]]'' are both examples of this. In the first, the Hero leads a [[LaResistance popular uprising]] to overthrow TheEmpire, and after it succeeds, he's offered the position of President of the newly formed Republic. In the sequel, you can find him in a small border town... fishing. One of his lieutenants has taken the role of President of Toran. Hero 2 potentially follows his example: I believe one of the possible endings actually has him taking up the mantle of the reformed Jowston Alliance, but the Best Ending has him turn away from the power, instead leaving power to his strategist and heading off to go WalkingTheEarth with his sister and best friend.

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** VideoGame/SuikodenI'' ''VideoGame/SuikodenI'' and ''[[VideoGame/SuikodenII II]]'' are both examples of this. In the first, the Hero leads a [[LaResistance popular uprising]] to overthrow TheEmpire, and after it succeeds, he's offered the position of President of the newly formed Republic. In the sequel, you can find him in a small border town... fishing. One of his lieutenants has taken the role of President of Toran. Hero 2 potentially follows his example: I believe one of the possible endings actually has him taking up the mantle of the reformed Jowston Alliance, but the Best Ending has him turn away from the power, instead leaving power to his strategist and heading off to go WalkingTheEarth with his sister and best friend.
9th Sep '16 9:36:57 AM Morgenthaler
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It's TruthInTelevision: not only did it happen with Cincinnatus, but all succeeding Roman ''dictators'' ("he who dictates [orders]") also willingly gave up power before or at the end of the prescribed six months, up to and throughout the Punic Wars. It is only with Sulla, after the office had not been used for over a hundred years, that any Roman attempted to abuse the dictatorship. Even Sulla, while abusing his dictatorial power in many ways and having arranged to not have a time limit on his dictatorship, still stepped down after a year. The first ''successful'' attempt to defy this tradition came without the actual ([[JustTheFirstCitizen specific]]) title of dictator, and resulted in the creation of TheRomanEmpire.

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It's TruthInTelevision: not only did it happen with Cincinnatus, but all succeeding Roman ''dictators'' ("he who dictates [orders]") also willingly gave up power before or at the end of the prescribed six months, up to and throughout the Punic Wars. It is only with Sulla, after the office had not been used for over a hundred years, that any Roman attempted to abuse the dictatorship. Even Sulla, while abusing his dictatorial power in many ways and having arranged to not have a time limit on his dictatorship, still stepped down after a year. The first ''successful'' attempt to defy this tradition came without the actual ([[JustTheFirstCitizen specific]]) title of dictator, and resulted in the creation of TheRomanEmpire.
UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire.
4th Sep '16 6:27:40 PM Jhonny
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** It's easy to forget due to the long line of historians with Southern sympathies smearing his presidency (which is currently reevaluated by historians as decent and even great in fields like race relations), but UsefulNotes/UllyssesSGrant had a PopularityPolynomial going on during his own lifetime. He was immensely popular from emerging as a UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar commander to the end of his first term (he ran for reelection with only token opposition), but suffered greatly due to the economic downturn during his second term. Out of office he regained the favor of many Americans and wanted to give a third term a try, but the Republican Party bigwigs flatly refused citing the example of Washington. There being no meaningful primaries that was that.

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** It's easy to forget due to the long line of historians with Southern sympathies smearing his presidency (which is currently reevaluated by historians as decent and even great in fields like race relations), but UsefulNotes/UllyssesSGrant UsefulNotes/UlyssesSGrant had a PopularityPolynomial going on during his own lifetime. He was immensely popular from emerging as a UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar commander to the end of his first term (he ran for reelection with only token opposition), but suffered greatly due to the economic downturn during his second term. Out of office he regained the favor of many Americans and wanted to give a third term a try, but the Republican Party bigwigs flatly refused citing the example of Washington. There being no meaningful primaries that was that.
4th Sep '16 6:26:16 PM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

**It's easy to forget due to the long line of historians with Southern sympathies smearing his presidency (which is currently reevaluated by historians as decent and even great in fields like race relations), but UsefulNotes/UllyssesSGrant had a PopularityPolynomial going on during his own lifetime. He was immensely popular from emerging as a UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar commander to the end of his first term (he ran for reelection with only token opposition), but suffered greatly due to the economic downturn during his second term. Out of office he regained the favor of many Americans and wanted to give a third term a try, but the Republican Party bigwigs flatly refused citing the example of Washington. There being no meaningful primaries that was that.
4th Sep '16 6:16:47 PM Jhonny
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* Juan Carlos I of Spain. Handpicked by the infamous dictator Francisco Franco to succeed him. During Franco's rule he seemed to be a loyal supporter and destined to continue Franco's policies. All the insiders believed it would be business as usual after Franco was dead. Once Franco was in the ground and Juan had become King of Spain and received the absolute power of his predecessor, he voluntarily used that power to turn Spain into a constitutional monarchy with a Westminster-style Parliament, knowingly and willingly reducing himself to a figurehead in the process. And ''then'', he personally browbeat into submission the officers who attempted a coup to return to the good old Franco days. He was almost universally popular throughout much of his reign, but he ultimately stepped down in 2014 mostly due to age, but also because some people were outraged that he had gone big game hunting.

to:

* Juan Carlos I of Spain. Handpicked by the infamous dictator Francisco Franco to succeed him. During Franco's rule he seemed to be a loyal supporter and destined to continue Franco's policies. All the insiders believed it would be business as usual after Franco was dead. Once Franco was in the ground and Juan had become King of Spain and received the absolute power of his predecessor, he voluntarily used that power to turn Spain into a constitutional monarchy with a Westminster-style Parliament, knowingly and willingly reducing himself to a figurehead in the process. And ''then'', he personally browbeat into submission the officers who attempted a coup to return to the good old Franco days. He was almost universally popular throughout much of his reign, but he ultimately stepped down in 2014 mostly due to age, but also because some people were outraged that he had gone big game hunting.hunting - pretty much the first "scandal" of his entire reign.



* Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (lit. "Father of Turks") was an officer in the Turkish military who parlayed his victories against Allied forces (especially at Gallipoli) and during the course of Turkey's post-war border clashes with The Etente (chiefly France, but also Britain) and her somewhat ruthless no-holds-barred war with Greece (which involved cheery ethnic cleansing like that seen in Smyrna) he became Turkey's Generalissimo. After the wars were concluded he made the country semi-democratic, making himself the first Prime Minister and first Speaker of Parliament - but he gave up those titles in just a few years. Though he remained President (a ceremonial role) for the rest of his life, his role in politics limited to a sort of 'oversight' function (to root out unconstitutional or corrupt politicians) that the Turkish Military continues to oversee to this day in the spirit of 'Kemalism'. The military has executed five coups to this end (1960, '71, '81,'97, and the failed 2016 coup), but they've always handed all power back to democratically-elected representatives within a few years and the idea of the military actually running the country would be unthinkable. Turkish votes very nearly made Ataturk the "Man of the Century" in a [[http://www.time.com/time/time100/time100poll.html Time poll]] for the same title.
** It's also interesting to note that the cult of personality around Ataturk didn't really manifest until ''after'' his death. He certainly wanted to be admired and for Turkey to follow his example, but there's no indication that he wanted the quasi-religious level of worship that Kemalism has turned into.

to:

* Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Atatürk (lit. "Father of Turks") was an officer in the Turkish military who parlayed his victories against Allied forces (especially at Gallipoli) and during the course of Turkey's post-war border clashes with The Etente (chiefly France, but also Britain) and her somewhat ruthless no-holds-barred war with Greece (which involved cheery ethnic cleansing like that seen in Smyrna) he became Turkey's Generalissimo. After the wars were concluded he made the country semi-democratic, making himself the first Prime Minister and first Speaker of Parliament - but he gave up those titles in just a few years. Though he remained President (a ceremonial role) for the rest of his life, his role in politics limited to a sort of 'oversight' function (to root out unconstitutional or corrupt politicians) that the Turkish Military continues to oversee to this day in the spirit of 'Kemalism'. The military has executed five coups to this end (1960, '71, '81,'97, and the failed 2016 coup), but they've always handed all power back to democratically-elected representatives within a few years and the idea of the military actually running the country would be unthinkable. Turkish votes very nearly made Ataturk Atatürk the "Man of the Century" in a [[http://www.time.com/time/time100/time100poll.html Time poll]] for the same title.
** It's also interesting to note that the cult of personality around Ataturk Atatürk didn't really manifest until ''after'' his death. He certainly wanted to be admired and for Turkey to follow his example, but there's no indication that he wanted the quasi-religious level of worship that Kemalism has turned into. On the other hand, when Atatürk made a law requiring every Turk to get a Western style surname, he could not resist the temptation of taking "Atatürk" - father of all Turks. Turkish surnames are mostly immodest, though "Özdemir" for example means "pure iron".
4th Sep '16 6:12:25 PM Jhonny
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* Juan Carlos I of Spain. Handpicked by the infamous dictator Francisco Franco to succeed him. During Franco's rule he seemed to be a loyal supporter and destined to continue Franco's policies. All the insiders believed it would be business as usual after Franco was dead. Once Franco was in the ground and Juan had become King of Spain and received the absolute power of his predecessor, he voluntarily used that power to turn Spain into a constitutional monarchy with a Westminster-style Parliament, knowingly and willingly reducing himself to a figurehead in the process. And ''then'', he personally browbeat into submission the officers who attempted a coup to return to the good old Franco days.

to:

* Juan Carlos I of Spain. Handpicked by the infamous dictator Francisco Franco to succeed him. During Franco's rule he seemed to be a loyal supporter and destined to continue Franco's policies. All the insiders believed it would be business as usual after Franco was dead. Once Franco was in the ground and Juan had become King of Spain and received the absolute power of his predecessor, he voluntarily used that power to turn Spain into a constitutional monarchy with a Westminster-style Parliament, knowingly and willingly reducing himself to a figurehead in the process. And ''then'', he personally browbeat into submission the officers who attempted a coup to return to the good old Franco days. He was almost universally popular throughout much of his reign, but he ultimately stepped down in 2014 mostly due to age, but also because some people were outraged that he had gone big game hunting.
30th Aug '16 8:03:18 PM JapaneseTeeth
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'': In "Gauntlet of Fire", Spike manages to successfully win the title of Dragonlord, potentially making him one of the powerful (politically speaking, at least) characters in the show. He uses this ultimate authority to give all of one (relatively unimportant) order [[note]]Specifically, he orders another dragon who had bullied him to go back home, and give a hug to every dragon he met on the way[[/note]] before abdicating and passing the title over to someone else, as his main motivation for becoming Dragonlord in the first place was largely to make sure that a jerk didn't end up with the position and the power it confers.
11th Aug '16 11:34:24 PM PaulA
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* In LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'' series, Aral Vorkosigan was appointed regent for the child emperor, and a lot of people expected him to appoint himself emperor at some point. Instead, he ceded power to the emperor when he came of age and even donated a small fortune out of his own pocket to charity, so he'd leave the position of regent with the same level as wealth as he had when he was appointed. He did subsequently become Prime Minister rather than just going home, but not to keep power, only in order to have something to do (because retirement and Aral Vorkosigan Do Not Mix).

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* In LoisMcMasterBujold's Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'' series, Aral Vorkosigan was appointed regent for the child emperor, and a lot of people expected him to appoint himself emperor at some point. Instead, he ceded power to the emperor when he came of age and even donated a small fortune out of his own pocket to charity, so he'd leave the position of regent with the same level as wealth as he had when he was appointed. He did subsequently become Prime Minister rather than just going home, but not to keep power, only in order to have something to do (because retirement and Aral Vorkosigan Do Not Mix).
26th Jul '16 8:51:27 PM blerg223
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* Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (lit. "Father of Turks") was an officer in the Turkish military who parlayed his victories against Allied forces (especially at Gallipoli) and during the course of Turkey's post-war border clashes with The Etente (chiefly France, but also Britain) and her somewhat ruthless no-holds-barred war with Greece (which involved cheery ethnic cleansing like that seen in Smyrna) he became Turkey's Generalissimo. After the wars were concluded he made the country semi-democratic, making himself the first Prime Minister and first Speaker of Parliament - but he gave up those titles in just a few years. Though he remained President (a ceremonial role) for the rest of his life, his role in politics limited to a sort of 'oversight' function (to root out unconstitutional or corrupt politicians) that the Turkish Military continues to oversee to this day in the spirit of 'Kemalism'. The military has executed four coups to this end (1960, '71, '81, and '97), but they've always handed all power back to democratically-elected representatives within a few years and the idea of the military actually running the country would be unthinkable. The potential for another military coup is credited by some for keeping the currently-ruling Islamic party from interfering with Turkey's tradition of secular government. Turkish votes very nearly made Ataturk the "Man of the Century" in a [[http://www.time.com/time/time100/time100poll.html Time poll]] for the same title.

to:

* Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (lit. "Father of Turks") was an officer in the Turkish military who parlayed his victories against Allied forces (especially at Gallipoli) and during the course of Turkey's post-war border clashes with The Etente (chiefly France, but also Britain) and her somewhat ruthless no-holds-barred war with Greece (which involved cheery ethnic cleansing like that seen in Smyrna) he became Turkey's Generalissimo. After the wars were concluded he made the country semi-democratic, making himself the first Prime Minister and first Speaker of Parliament - but he gave up those titles in just a few years. Though he remained President (a ceremonial role) for the rest of his life, his role in politics limited to a sort of 'oversight' function (to root out unconstitutional or corrupt politicians) that the Turkish Military continues to oversee to this day in the spirit of 'Kemalism'. The military has executed four five coups to this end (1960, '71, '81, '81,'97, and '97), the failed 2016 coup), but they've always handed all power back to democratically-elected representatives within a few years and the idea of the military actually running the country would be unthinkable. The potential for another military coup is credited by some for keeping the currently-ruling Islamic party from interfering with Turkey's tradition of secular government.unthinkable. Turkish votes very nearly made Ataturk the "Man of the Century" in a [[http://www.time.com/time/time100/time100poll.html Time poll]] for the same title.
28th Apr '16 3:41:48 PM FordPrefect
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* Juan Carlos I of Spain. Handpicked by the infamous dictator Francisco Franco to succeed him. During Franco's rule he seemed to be a loyal supporter and destined to continue Franco's policies. All the insiders believed it would be business as usual after Franco was dead. Once Franco was in the ground and Juan had become King of Spain and received the absolute power of his predecessor, he voluntarily used that power to turn Spain into a constitutional monarchy with a Westminster-style Parliament, knowingly and willingly reducing himself to a figurehead in the process. And ''then'', he personally browbeat the officers who attempted a coup to return to the good old Franco days into submission.

to:

* Juan Carlos I of Spain. Handpicked by the infamous dictator Francisco Franco to succeed him. During Franco's rule he seemed to be a loyal supporter and destined to continue Franco's policies. All the insiders believed it would be business as usual after Franco was dead. Once Franco was in the ground and Juan had become King of Spain and received the absolute power of his predecessor, he voluntarily used that power to turn Spain into a constitutional monarchy with a Westminster-style Parliament, knowingly and willingly reducing himself to a figurehead in the process. And ''then'', he personally browbeat into submission the officers who attempted a coup to return to the good old Franco days into submission.days.



* Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (lit. "Father of Turks") was an officer in the Turkish military who parlayed his victories against Allied forces (especially at Gallipoli) and during the course of Turkey's post-war border clashes with The Etente (chiefly France, but also Britain) and her somewhat ruthless no-holds-barred war with Greece (which involved cheery ethnic cleansing like that seen in Smyrna) he became Turkey's Generalissimo. After the wars were concluded he made the country semi-democratic, making himself the first Prime Minister and first Speaker of Parliament - but he gave up those titles in just a few years. Though he remained President (a ceremonial role) for the rest of his life, his role in politics limited to a sort of 'oversight' function (to root out unconstitutional or corrupt politicans) that the Turkish Military continues to oversee to this day in the spirit of 'Kemalism'. The military has executed four coups to this end (1960, '71, '81, and '97), but they've always handed all power back to democratically-elected representatives within a few years and the idea of the military actually running the country would be unthinkable. The potential for another miliary coup is credited by some for keeping the currently-ruling Islamic party from interfering with Turkey's tradition of secular government. Turkish votes very nearly made Ataturk the "Man of the Century" in a [[http://www.time.com/time/time100/time100poll.html Time poll]] for the same title.

to:

* Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (lit. "Father of Turks") was an officer in the Turkish military who parlayed his victories against Allied forces (especially at Gallipoli) and during the course of Turkey's post-war border clashes with The Etente (chiefly France, but also Britain) and her somewhat ruthless no-holds-barred war with Greece (which involved cheery ethnic cleansing like that seen in Smyrna) he became Turkey's Generalissimo. After the wars were concluded he made the country semi-democratic, making himself the first Prime Minister and first Speaker of Parliament - but he gave up those titles in just a few years. Though he remained President (a ceremonial role) for the rest of his life, his role in politics limited to a sort of 'oversight' function (to root out unconstitutional or corrupt politicans) politicians) that the Turkish Military continues to oversee to this day in the spirit of 'Kemalism'. The military has executed four coups to this end (1960, '71, '81, and '97), but they've always handed all power back to democratically-elected representatives within a few years and the idea of the military actually running the country would be unthinkable. The potential for another miliary military coup is credited by some for keeping the currently-ruling Islamic party from interfering with Turkey's tradition of secular government. Turkish votes very nearly made Ataturk the "Man of the Century" in a [[http://www.time.com/time/time100/time100poll.html Time poll]] for the same title.
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