History Main / ChokePointGeography

23rd Apr '17 5:46:48 AM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:350:[[UsefulNotes/GrecoPersianWars http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/national_geographic_society_louis_s_glanzman.png]]]]
19th Feb '17 11:46:31 AM Morgenthaler
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19th Feb '17 11:38:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''WanderingHamster'', Bob and James have to pass through the Troll Mountains to get to Lord Broaste's castle the rest of the world.

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* In ''WanderingHamster'', ''VideoGame/WanderingHamster'', Bob and James have to pass through the Troll Mountains to get to Lord Broaste's castle the rest of the world.
14th Jan '17 7:16:40 PM nombretomado
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* The ''{{Lufia}}'' series uses this trope a lot. Caves feature stairs leading out (or in, depending on your perspective, but you only see the stairs once you're inside), and many caves are mandatory routes of travel from one place to another (without a ship or submarine), which would seem to make traveling with a wagon or any sort of vehicle difficult. Also, many of these caves appear to be dark and wet and leading horses or any wheeled vehicle down a slippery set of stairs in darkness is not conducive to safe travel (though there are monsters anyway, but a sword can't thwart the danger of slipping and breaking your leg). The argument could be made that the stairs are simply an abstraction, but they could have just as easily abstracted a gradual slope rather than clearly cut (and bumpy for wheeled travel) stone stairs.

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* The ''{{Lufia}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Lufia}}'' series uses this trope a lot. Caves feature stairs leading out (or in, depending on your perspective, but you only see the stairs once you're inside), and many caves are mandatory routes of travel from one place to another (without a ship or submarine), which would seem to make traveling with a wagon or any sort of vehicle difficult. Also, many of these caves appear to be dark and wet and leading horses or any wheeled vehicle down a slippery set of stairs in darkness is not conducive to safe travel (though there are monsters anyway, but a sword can't thwart the danger of slipping and breaking your leg). The argument could be made that the stairs are simply an abstraction, but they could have just as easily abstracted a gradual slope rather than clearly cut (and bumpy for wheeled travel) stone stairs.
21st Dec '16 12:23:19 PM BeerBaron
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* This is justified in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind''. The only way into Red Mountain, the source of the Blight, is through an inn/barracks/base filled with soldiers. It makes sense, because it's stopping the blight getting out. However, you can freely hover over the wall at any point if you have a levitate spell, which can be learned very early in the game. You don't even actually have to go inside the building; you just have to hit a couple of buttons to open the gate.

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* This is justified in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind''. The ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' with Ghostgate. It was intentionally constructed as the only way through the Ghostfence into Red Mountain, the source Mountain. It is full of the Blight, is through Temple's elite soldiers and contains an inn/barracks/base filled with soldiers. It makes sense, because it's stopping the blight getting out.inn/temple for pilgrims making a pilgrimage inside for religious purposes. However, you can freely hover over the wall at any point if you have a levitate spell, which can be learned very early in the game. You don't even actually have to go inside the building; you just have to hit a couple of buttons to open the gate. This makes sense, however, as the Ghostfence is meant to keep things from ''getting out''. Given that most of what is contained within are deranged monstrosities, even hitting a couple of buttons is beyond their abilities.
29th Oct '16 2:27:51 PM nombretomado
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* The overworld maps in ''GuildWars2'' aren't technically connected to each other, so geography is used to funnel the players to the portals that are used to travel to different areas.

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* The overworld maps in ''GuildWars2'' ''VideoGame/GuildWars2'' aren't technically connected to each other, so geography is used to funnel the players to the portals that are used to travel to different areas.
19th Aug '16 8:08:13 PM Doug86
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* The GIUK ('''G'''reenland, '''I'''celand, '''U'''nited '''K'''ingdom) gap in the North Atlantic was a key consideration in warplanning for both UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo and a speculative WorldWarThree for the British and later the Americans. Control of this gap (combined with British control of Gibraltar) meant that supplies and manpower from the US could traverse the Atlantic relatively safely to the UK or Western Europe - they could still be harrassed (as happened in World War Two) but large-scale interdiction by hostile powers would be nigh-impossible.

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* The GIUK ('''G'''reenland, '''I'''celand, '''U'''nited '''K'''ingdom) gap in the North Atlantic was a key consideration in warplanning for both UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and a speculative WorldWarThree WorldWarIII for the British and later the Americans. Control of this gap (combined with British control of Gibraltar) meant that supplies and manpower from the US could traverse the Atlantic relatively safely to the UK or Western Europe - they could still be harrassed (as happened in World War Two) but large-scale interdiction by hostile powers would be nigh-impossible.



* On a more tactical level, Thermopylae Pass was what allowed a severely outnumbered Greek army to hold up and inflict severe losses on the invading Persians during the second invasion of Greece before being overrun, buying enough time for Athens to be evacuated before the Persians could capture it. The pass being so narrow in an era where most combat was hand-to-hand meant that the Persians could not capitalize on their superior numbers. This tactic was repeated a few meters away and about 2400 years later by ANZAC troops in WorldWarII during the Nazi invasion of Greece, buying enough time for Allied units to withdraw.

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* On a more tactical level, Thermopylae Pass was what allowed a severely outnumbered Greek army to hold up and inflict severe losses on the invading Persians during the second invasion of Greece before being overrun, buying enough time for Athens to be evacuated before the Persians could capture it. The pass being so narrow in an era where most combat was hand-to-hand meant that the Persians could not capitalize on their superior numbers. This tactic was repeated a few meters away and about 2400 years later by ANZAC troops in WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII during the Nazi invasion of Greece, buying enough time for Allied units to withdraw.
17th Aug '16 7:44:01 AM megarockman
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* This is part of the reason the Caribbean is so associated with pirates during the Age of Exploration - treasure ships heading back to Spain from the New World must pass through here in order to be able to catch the mid-latitude westerly winds to get them back to Europe.
17th Aug '16 7:26:13 AM megarockman
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* On a more tactical level, Thermopylae Pass was what allowed a severely outnumbered Greek army to hold up and inflict severe losses on the invading Persians during the second invasion of Greece before being overrun, buying enough time for Athens to be evacuated before the Persians could capture it. The pass being so narrow in an era where most combat was hand-to-hand meant that the Persians could not capitalize on their superior numbers. This tactic was repeated a few meters and about 2400 years by ANZAC troops in WorldWarII during the Nazi invasion of Greece, buying enough time for Allied units to withdraw.

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* On a more tactical level, Thermopylae Pass was what allowed a severely outnumbered Greek army to hold up and inflict severe losses on the invading Persians during the second invasion of Greece before being overrun, buying enough time for Athens to be evacuated before the Persians could capture it. The pass being so narrow in an era where most combat was hand-to-hand meant that the Persians could not capitalize on their superior numbers. This tactic was repeated a few meters away and about 2400 years later by ANZAC troops in WorldWarII during the Nazi invasion of Greece, buying enough time for Allied units to withdraw.
17th Aug '16 7:25:42 AM megarockman
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* On a more tactical level, Thermopylae Pass was what allowed a severely outnumbered Greek army to hold up and inflict severe losses on the invading Persians during the second invasion of Greece before being overrun, buying enough time for Athens to be evacuated before the Persians could capture it.

to:

* On a more tactical level, Thermopylae Pass was what allowed a severely outnumbered Greek army to hold up and inflict severe losses on the invading Persians during the second invasion of Greece before being overrun, buying enough time for Athens to be evacuated before the Persians could capture it. The pass being so narrow in an era where most combat was hand-to-hand meant that the Persians could not capitalize on their superior numbers. This tactic was repeated a few meters and about 2400 years by ANZAC troops in WorldWarII during the Nazi invasion of Greece, buying enough time for Allied units to withdraw.
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