History Main / CharacterClassSystem

3rd Nov '16 12:24:11 AM TheFantasyChronicler
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* ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'' has three classes each of which has three subclasses.
2nd Nov '16 11:09:56 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.
* A staple of ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' as well, at least after the first game (where there was only one character in your party).



* A staple of ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' as well, at least after the first game (where there was only one character in your party).
* Completely inverted in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''; the main character can use every ability in the game, and a character's class is based off the abilities they use, rather than the other way around. Using only item arts, for example, will change Rush to a class that does extra damage with items. Different character classes have different bonuses, so it can be worth only using certain skills in order to obtain a desired class.



* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.

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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 Completely inverted in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''; the main character can use every ability in the game, and a character's class is based off the abilities they use, rather than the other way around. Using only item arts, for example, will change Rush to a class that does extra damage with items. Different character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free have different bonuses, so it can be worth only using certain skills in order to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.obtain a desired class.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series has had a class system since the beginning, though how many classes there are (from seven in ''Battlefield 2'', to four from ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' onwards) and how customizable they are varies by game.
* The ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series, starting from ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', uses classes for its multiplayer, though unlike the above, each class's weapons, equipment, and whatnot are entirely decided by the player. ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' notably also includes customizable classes for the singleplayer campaign mode.



* The ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series, starting from ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', uses classes for its multiplayer, though unlike the above, each class's weapons, equipment, and whatnot are entirely decided by the player. ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' notably also includes customizable classes for the singleplayer campaign mode.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series has had a class system since the beginning, though how many classes there are (from seven in ''Battlefield 2'', to four from ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' onwards) and how customizable they are varies by game.



* The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' primarily use a PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', a spinoff of d20, is one as well.
* The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' primarily use a PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Earthdawn}}'' calls them Disciplines. They're somewhat more fleshed out than in many cases, with social context given, as well as how the worldviews of different disciplines work together (or don't). Also, if you act against your discipline (wizards not thinking things through if they have the time, beastmasters hurting animals that aren't attacking them), you may lose some of your powers.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' starts with the FighterMageThief archetype and expands from it. Glaives are the Fighter, equally capable of being built as a heavily armored BadassNormal or a FragileSpeedster. Nanos are the Mage, who uses the power of numenera to work what amount to miracles. Jacks are the Thief, whose name comes from "jack-of-all-trades" and have a lot of tricks to make them the setting's skillmonkeys. The CRPG ''VideoGame/TormentTidesOfNumenera'' uses the ''Numenera'' GameSystem.

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* ** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', a spinoff of d20, is one as well.
* The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' primarily use a PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Earthdawn}}'' calls them Disciplines. They're somewhat more fleshed out than in many cases, with social context given, as well as how the worldviews of different disciplines work together (or don't). Also, if you act against your discipline (wizards not thinking things through if they have the time, beastmasters hurting animals that aren't attacking them), you may lose some of your powers. \n* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' starts with the FighterMageThief archetype and expands from it. Glaives are the Fighter, equally capable of being built as a heavily armored BadassNormal or a FragileSpeedster. Nanos are the Mage, who uses the power of numenera to work what amount to miracles. Jacks are the Thief, whose name comes from "jack-of-all-trades" and have a lot of tricks to make them the setting's skillmonkeys. The CRPG ''VideoGame/TormentTidesOfNumenera'' uses the ''Numenera'' GameSystem.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' starts with the FighterMageThief archetype and expands from it. Glaives are the Fighter, equally capable of being built as a heavily armored BadassNormal or a FragileSpeedster. Nanos are the Mage, who uses the power of numenera to work what amount to miracles. Jacks are the Thief, whose name comes from "jack-of-all-trades" and have a lot of tricks to make them the setting's skillmonkeys. The CRPG ''VideoGame/TormentTidesOfNumenera'' uses the ''Numenera'' GameSystem.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.



* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and Arcanist.
* ''VideoGame/MarvelAvengersAlliance'' has six general classes: Blaster, Scrapper, Infiltrator, Bruiser, Tactician, or Generalist. Other than Generalist, each is [[TacticalRockPaperScissors strong against one class and weak against another]]. Heroes have a native character class; Agents may switch between them at will with a change of uniform. Some alternate costumes also provide an alternate class.



* ''VideoGame/MarvelAvengersAlliance'' has six general classes: Blaster, Scrapper, Infiltrator, Bruiser, Tactician, or Generalist. Other than Generalist, each is [[TacticalRockPaperScissors strong against one class and weak against another]]. Heroes have a native character class; Agents may switch between them at will with a change of uniform. Some alternate costumes also provide an alternate class.

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* ''VideoGame/MarvelAvengersAlliance'' has six general classes: Blaster, Scrapper, Infiltrator, Bruiser, Tactician, or Generalist. Other than Generalist, each is [[TacticalRockPaperScissors strong against ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic'' have gone through several variations of class systems and classes over the games. The first five games had a basic class system (chose one class when you create a character, that is that character's class), ''VI'' and weak against another]]. Heroes ''VII'' had two-step linear upgrade-able classes (''VII'' split at the final upgrade in design but not in play, as the final class promotion for each class depended on which side you aligned with, and for the most part weren't all that different from the counterpart), ''VIII'' consolidated race and class into one choice and only had a single class upgrade step, ''IX'' split both back and had each class promotion be a genuine choice (starting from basic Might or Magic and then branching out towards the old, more specialised, classes), and ''X'' had each race have a native character class; Agents may switch between them at will with a change of uniform. Some alternate costumes also provide an alternate class.one Might and one Magic class that could be upgraded twice.



* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has quite an extensive system where the classes are further subdivided by ability selection and {{PVP}}/non-PVP and restricted by race and faction. Many of its classes stem from units in ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}''.



* ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic'' have gone through several variations of class systems and classes over the games. The first five games had a basic class system (chose one class when you create a character, that is that character's class), ''VI'' and ''VII'' had two-step linear upgrade-able classes (''VII'' split at the final upgrade in design but not in play, as the final class promotion for each class depended on which side you aligned with, and for the most part weren't all that different from the counterpart), ''VIII'' consolidated race and class into one choice and only had a single class upgrade step, ''IX'' split both back and had each class promotion be a genuine choice (starting from basic Might or Magic and then branching out towards the old, more specialised, classes), and ''X'' had each race have one Might and one Magic class that could be upgraded twice.



* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and Arcanist.

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* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core quite an extensive system where the classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist further subdivided by ability selection and Arcanist.{{PVP}}/non-PVP and restricted by race and faction. Many of its classes stem from units in ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}''.



* ''Literature/TheTrueGame'' features twelve different inborn magical "talents".[[note]]The full list is [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]], [[{{Seers}} precognition]], [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], [[PowerFloats self-levitation]], [[TeleportationTropes self-teleportation]], [[HealingHands healing]], [[AnimateDead raising the dead]], {{telepathy}}, [[PlayingWithFire pyrokinesis]], [[EnergyAbsorption storing energy for use by others]], and [[MindManipulation beguiling others to follow you]].[[/note]] These are mixed in myriad combinations to create literally hundreds of character classes like Herald, Bonewalker, and King, used in the chess-like battles of the setting. People without a talent (normal humans) are called "pawns".

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* ''Literature/TheTrueGame'' features twelve different inborn magical "talents".[[note]]The full list is [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]], [[{{Seers}} precognition]], [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], [[PowerFloats self-levitation]], [[TeleportationTropes self-teleportation]], [[HealingHands healing]], [[AnimateDead raising the dead]], {{telepathy}}, [[PlayingWithFire pyrokinesis]], [[EnergyAbsorption storing energy for use by others]], The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users and [[MindManipulation beguiling others to follow you]].[[/note]] These are mixed thieves appear in myriad combinations to create literally hundreds of character classes like Herald, Bonewalker, all four novels, and King, used clerics appear in the chess-like battles of first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in the setting. People without a talent (normal humans) are called "pawns".original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.



* The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users and thieves appear in all four novels, and clerics appear in the first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in the original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.

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* The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users ''Literature/TheTrueGame'' features twelve different inborn magical "talents".[[note]]The full list is [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]], [[{{Seers}} precognition]], [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], [[PowerFloats self-levitation]], [[TeleportationTropes self-teleportation]], [[HealingHands healing]], [[AnimateDead raising the dead]], {{telepathy}}, [[PlayingWithFire pyrokinesis]], [[EnergyAbsorption storing energy for use by others]], and thieves appear [[MindManipulation beguiling others to follow you]].[[/note]] These are mixed in all four novels, myriad combinations to create literally hundreds of character classes like Herald, Bonewalker, and clerics appear King, used in the first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in chess-like battles of the original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.setting. People without a talent (normal humans) are called "pawns".
28th Oct '16 7:11:32 PM Nevermore2002
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* ''VideoGame/TitanQuest'' has 9 masteries, although you can dual-class anytime after level 8, which result in a new class name. The core masteries are Warfare, Defense, Hunting, Nature, Rogue, Earth, Storm and Dream.

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* ''VideoGame/TitanQuest'' has 9 masteries, although you can dual-class anytime after level 8, which result in a new class name. The core masteries are Warfare, Defense, Hunting, Rogue, Nature, Rogue, Spirit, Earth, Storm and Dream.
27th Oct '16 3:23:57 PM Nevermore2002
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* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and SquishyWizard Arcanist.

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* ''VideoGame/TitanQuest'' has 9 masteries, although you can dual-class anytime after level 8, which result in a new class name. The core masteries are Warfare, Defense, Hunting, Nature, Rogue, Earth, Storm and Dream.
* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and SquishyWizard Arcanist.
27th Oct '16 3:21:52 PM Nevermore2002
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* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and SquishyWizard Arcanist.
8th Sep '16 7:20:36 PM Malady
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* The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users and thieves appear in all four novels, and clerics appear in the first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in the original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.
29th Aug '16 12:54:04 PM blackmage0
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* ''Literature/TheGam3'', being about a galaxy-spanning MMORPG, has Character Classes as a central element. All players have one or more classes, which opens paths to further specialized abilities.
** Each player is offered a game-chosen class following the tutorial, or may make their own choice of class (which is very expensive).
** Each class has a selection of Major Abilities, effectively sub-classes that further specialize the player. Only one may be chosen by a player.
** Access to additional classes is possible, and we do not yet know how common it is.
** Advancement in a class occurs not by levels, but by developing class-specific abilities and by completing [[{{Sidequest}} sidequests]] assigned by your class mentor, a stronger player who has chosen to guide your advancement.
25th Aug '16 10:01:54 AM intastiel
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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' is the most famous, and the TropeMaker.
** The third edition of D&D gave the world the TabletopGame/D20System, allowing other publishers to use the same general mechanics of the tabletop RPG UrExample. Many - but not all - d20 [=RPGs=] also used classes.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', a spinoff of d20, is one as well.
* Both ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' effectively use a class system, with your [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade clan]], [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse auspice]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAscension tradition]], etc acting as your class.

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' is the most famous, and the TropeMaker.
**
TropeMaker. The third edition of D&D gave the world the TabletopGame/D20System, allowing other publishers to use the same general mechanics of the tabletop RPG UrExample. Many - -- but not all - -- d20 [=RPGs=] also used use classes.
** * ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', a spinoff of d20, is one as well.
* Both ''TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness'' The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' effectively primarily use a class system, with your [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade clan]], PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse auspice]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAscension tradition]], etc acting as your class.werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.


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* The ''TabletopGame/{{Star Wars D20}}'' RPG uses a CharacterClassSystem for basic roles like Noble, Jedi, Scout, and so on, and adds {{Prestige Class}}es for more customization.
17th Aug '16 2:56:25 AM FelipeXicao
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A type of GameSystem where a character's abilities are determined by the class that they choose. Most common in RolePlayingGames, but recently it has begun appearing in other genres, particularly {{First Person Shooter}}s. A character class is defined by the abilities that it lends to a character -- as such, two different characters of the same class are theoretically interchangeable, in that they can play the same role in the game because of their similar abilities. However, character class systems have varying levels of CharacterCustomization -- ranging from characters of a given class being literally identical to having so much variety that character class is no longer even a good indicator of that character's abilities. Character class systems frequently include one or more {{Point Build System}}s as part of their rules to increase customizability.

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A type of GameSystem where a character's abilities are determined by the class that they choose. Most common in RolePlayingGames, but recently it has begun appearing in other genres, particularly {{First Person Shooter}}s.Shooter}}s and it's one of the main features of the subgenre HeroShooter. A character class is defined by the abilities that it lends to a character -- as such, two different characters of the same class are theoretically interchangeable, in that they can play the same role in the game because of their similar abilities. However, character class systems have varying levels of CharacterCustomization -- ranging from characters of a given class being literally identical to having so much variety that character class is no longer even a good indicator of that character's abilities. Character class systems frequently include one or more {{Point Build System}}s as part of their rules to increase customizability.
8th Aug '16 10:37:21 AM PixelKnight
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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', SBURB assigns each player character to a mythological role with the title [Class] of [Aspect] that determines their powers and shapes their personal quest arc within the session. Aspect determines what objects and forces within the game the player can influence and class determines the ways in which they can influence their aspect. For example, the Time aspect is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin but a Seer of Time will have influence primarily through comprehension of past and future events while a Knight of Time will manipulate time travel for combat purposes. Aspect and class definitions are not always immediately obvious from their names, as Light denotes [[WindsOfDestinyChange luck]] instead of [[LightEmUp literal light]], and Bards are highly destructive. While aspect seems to be largely innate player class is more closely tied to acquired personality traits--Thief characters tend towards pathological narcissism, Knights have a strong compulsion to protect others at all costs. There is in-game speculation about a possible underlying active/passive class stat and perceived gender bias in class assignment.

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'', SBURB assigns each player character to a mythological role with the title [Class] of [Aspect] that determines their powers and shapes their personal quest arc within the session. Aspect determines what objects and forces within the game the player can influence and class determines the ways in which they can influence their aspect. For example, the Time aspect is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin but a Seer of Time will have influence primarily through comprehension of past and future events while a Knight of Time will manipulate time travel for combat purposes. Aspect and class definitions are not always immediately obvious from their names, as Light denotes [[WindsOfDestinyChange luck]] instead of [[LightEmUp literal light]], and Bards are highly destructive. While aspect seems to be largely innate player class is more closely tied to acquired personality traits--Thief characters tend towards pathological narcissism, Knights have a strong compulsion tend to protect others at all costs. hide their true personality. There is in-game speculation about a possible underlying active/passive class stat "thing" and perceived gender bias in class assignment.
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