History Main / CharacterClassSystem

11th Sep '17 8:04:12 AM brolaf
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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.

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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.


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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.
29th Aug '17 12:30:51 PM HalcyonDayz
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* ''VideoGame/SouthParkTheStickOfTruth'' has four classes available, Warrior; Mage, Thief and Jew (which is something of a cross between a Monk and a Paladin, and inflicts more damage at low health). However, unlike a lot of RPGs, the class only determines what the New Kid's special attacks are. They can equip any weapon or armor they wish, though some have effects that are a little more beneficial to one class than the others.

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* ''VideoGame/SouthParkTheStickOfTruth'' has four classes available, Warrior; Mage, Thief and Jew (which is something of a cross between a Monk and a Paladin, and inflicts more damage at low health). However, unlike a lot of RPGs, [=RPGs=], the class only determines what the New Kid's special attacks are. They can equip any weapon or armor they wish, though some have effects that are a little more beneficial to one class than the others.
4th Aug '17 3:01:46 PM Nevermore2002
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* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and Arcanist.

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* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and Arcanist. The expansion will add the Inquisitor and the Necromancer.
14th Jul '17 9:25:47 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.

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* Creator/PalladiumBooks's Megaversal system uses character classes, though the exact system varies slightly by specific game.
** Most Palladium games such as
''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's have O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s. s.
** ''TabletopGame/PalladiumFantasy'' has players select an O.C.C.s and a race, much like the classic ''Dungeons and Dragons'' class and race system.
26th Apr '17 2:01:23 PM Kafkesque
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' takes a slightly different approach: games such as ''[[TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and [[TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' basically had classes be bundles of preferred skills that the characters got substantial initial bonuses to, and leveling up your classes' preferred skills contributed to leveling up your character. Characters could also choose a set of skills to make a custom class if none of the premade ones appealed. ''[[TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' [[AvertedTrope did away with classes altogether]] in favor of pure skill leveling, and ''[[TheElderScrollsOnline Online]]'' went for more of a SkillTree approach (albeit class skill trees are [[SubvertedTrope only three out of many more skill trees available to your character]]).

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' takes a slightly different approach: games such as ''[[TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and [[TheElderScrollsIVOblivion ''[[TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' basically had classes be bundles of preferred skills that the characters got substantial initial bonuses to, and leveling up your classes' preferred skills contributed to leveling up your character. Characters could also choose a set of skills to make a custom class if none of the premade ones appealed. ''[[TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' [[AvertedTrope did away with classes altogether]] in favor of pure skill leveling, and ''[[TheElderScrollsOnline Online]]'' went for more of a SkillTree approach (albeit class skill trees are [[SubvertedTrope only three out of many more skill trees available to your character]]).
26th Apr '17 1:56:29 PM Kafkesque
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[[folder:Western RPGs]]

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[[folder:Western RPGs]][=RPGs=]]]



* ''{{VideoGame/Diablo}}''

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* ''{{VideoGame/Diablo}}''''{{VideoGame/Diablo}}'' likes to change it up. Each class has a unique SkillTree within the system of its own game, and some equipment can only be equipped by certain classes.
** The first ''Diablo'' had [[FighterMageThief Warrior, Rogue, and Sorcerer]].
** ''VideoGame/DiabloII'' had Barbarian, Amazon, Necromancer, Sorceress, and Paladin, and later [[ExpansionPack added]] Assassin and Druid.
** ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'' brought back the Barbarian alongside Demon Hunter, Monk, Witch Doctor and Wizard, [[ExpansionPack later adding]] Crusader and bringing back the Necromancer.


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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' takes a slightly different approach: games such as ''[[TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and [[TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' basically had classes be bundles of preferred skills that the characters got substantial initial bonuses to, and leveling up your classes' preferred skills contributed to leveling up your character. Characters could also choose a set of skills to make a custom class if none of the premade ones appealed. ''[[TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' [[AvertedTrope did away with classes altogether]] in favor of pure skill leveling, and ''[[TheElderScrollsOnline Online]]'' went for more of a SkillTree approach (albeit class skill trees are [[SubvertedTrope only three out of many more skill trees available to your character]]).
9th Mar '17 5:28:28 PM Totema
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[[/folder]]
9th Mar '17 5:28:08 PM Totema
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* OlderThanFeudalism: Roman gladiators were typically trained in specific fighting styles that were meant to counter each other in interesting ways. The earlier examples divide gladiators into Retiarii (lightly armored, wielding a trident and a net) and Secutores (heavily armored, wielding a short sword). As the gladiatorial games evolved, the "class system" became more and more complex, adding in a wider variety of matchups to keep crowds entertained.
3rd Nov '16 12:24:11 AM TheFantasyChronicler
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* ''VideoGame/{{Destiny}}'' has three classes each of which has three subclasses.
2nd Nov '16 11:09:56 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.
* A staple of ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' as well, at least after the first game (where there was only one character in your party).



* A staple of ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' as well, at least after the first game (where there was only one character in your party).
* Completely inverted in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''; the main character can use every ability in the game, and a character's class is based off the abilities they use, rather than the other way around. Using only item arts, for example, will change Rush to a class that does extra damage with items. Different character classes have different bonuses, so it can be worth only using certain skills in order to obtain a desired class.



* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' games have 5-10 Completely inverted in ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant''; the main character can use every ability in the game, and a character's class is based off the abilities they use, rather than the other way around. Using only item arts, for example, will change Rush to a class that does extra damage with items. Different character classes that determine your starting character stats and equipment. From there, you're free have different bonuses, so it can be worth only using certain skills in order to [[PointBuildSystem enhance]] and equip your character however you want.obtain a desired class.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series has had a class system since the beginning, though how many classes there are (from seven in ''Battlefield 2'', to four from ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' onwards) and how customizable they are varies by game.
* The ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series, starting from ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', uses classes for its multiplayer, though unlike the above, each class's weapons, equipment, and whatnot are entirely decided by the player. ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' notably also includes customizable classes for the singleplayer campaign mode.



* The ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series, starting from ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', uses classes for its multiplayer, though unlike the above, each class's weapons, equipment, and whatnot are entirely decided by the player. ''VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps2'' notably also includes customizable classes for the singleplayer campaign mode.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series has had a class system since the beginning, though how many classes there are (from seven in ''Battlefield 2'', to four from ''VideoGame/BattlefieldBadCompany 2'' onwards) and how customizable they are varies by game.



* The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' primarily use a PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', a spinoff of d20, is one as well.
* The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' primarily use a PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Earthdawn}}'' calls them Disciplines. They're somewhat more fleshed out than in many cases, with social context given, as well as how the worldviews of different disciplines work together (or don't). Also, if you act against your discipline (wizards not thinking things through if they have the time, beastmasters hurting animals that aren't attacking them), you may lose some of your powers.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' starts with the FighterMageThief archetype and expands from it. Glaives are the Fighter, equally capable of being built as a heavily armored BadassNormal or a FragileSpeedster. Nanos are the Mage, who uses the power of numenera to work what amount to miracles. Jacks are the Thief, whose name comes from "jack-of-all-trades" and have a lot of tricks to make them the setting's skillmonkeys. The CRPG ''VideoGame/TormentTidesOfNumenera'' uses the ''Numenera'' GameSystem.

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* ** ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'', a spinoff of d20, is one as well.
* The ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]]'' and ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' primarily use a PointBuildSystem, but a [[TabletopGame/WerewolfTheApocalypse werewolf's Auspice]], [[TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade vampire's Clan]], [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening mage's Path]], and so on are class-like in that they define particular strengths, weaknesses, and predispositions.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Earthdawn}}'' calls them Disciplines. They're somewhat more fleshed out than in many cases, with social context given, as well as how the worldviews of different disciplines work together (or don't). Also, if you act against your discipline (wizards not thinking things through if they have the time, beastmasters hurting animals that aren't attacking them), you may lose some of your powers. \n* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' starts with the FighterMageThief archetype and expands from it. Glaives are the Fighter, equally capable of being built as a heavily armored BadassNormal or a FragileSpeedster. Nanos are the Mage, who uses the power of numenera to work what amount to miracles. Jacks are the Thief, whose name comes from "jack-of-all-trades" and have a lot of tricks to make them the setting's skillmonkeys. The CRPG ''VideoGame/TormentTidesOfNumenera'' uses the ''Numenera'' GameSystem.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Numenera}}'' starts with the FighterMageThief archetype and expands from it. Glaives are the Fighter, equally capable of being built as a heavily armored BadassNormal or a FragileSpeedster. Nanos are the Mage, who uses the power of numenera to work what amount to miracles. Jacks are the Thief, whose name comes from "jack-of-all-trades" and have a lot of tricks to make them the setting's skillmonkeys. The CRPG ''VideoGame/TormentTidesOfNumenera'' uses the ''Numenera'' GameSystem.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'' has a system that can get a bit confusing at times. There's O.C.C.s (Occupational Character Class), as well as R.C.C.s (Racial Character Class) for non-human characters. Where it gets confusing is that sometimes a character's R.C.C. doubles as his O.C.C, and sometimes a player has to pick an O.C.C. as well as an R.C.C. Then there's P.C.C.s, for Psychic Character class, but that terminology is barely ever used in the books since functionally they're no different from O.C.C.s.



* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and Arcanist.
* ''VideoGame/MarvelAvengersAlliance'' has six general classes: Blaster, Scrapper, Infiltrator, Bruiser, Tactician, or Generalist. Other than Generalist, each is [[TacticalRockPaperScissors strong against one class and weak against another]]. Heroes have a native character class; Agents may switch between them at will with a change of uniform. Some alternate costumes also provide an alternate class.



* ''VideoGame/MarvelAvengersAlliance'' has six general classes: Blaster, Scrapper, Infiltrator, Bruiser, Tactician, or Generalist. Other than Generalist, each is [[TacticalRockPaperScissors strong against one class and weak against another]]. Heroes have a native character class; Agents may switch between them at will with a change of uniform. Some alternate costumes also provide an alternate class.

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* ''VideoGame/MarvelAvengersAlliance'' has six general classes: Blaster, Scrapper, Infiltrator, Bruiser, Tactician, or Generalist. Other than Generalist, each is [[TacticalRockPaperScissors strong against ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic'' have gone through several variations of class systems and classes over the games. The first five games had a basic class system (chose one class when you create a character, that is that character's class), ''VI'' and weak against another]]. Heroes ''VII'' had two-step linear upgrade-able classes (''VII'' split at the final upgrade in design but not in play, as the final class promotion for each class depended on which side you aligned with, and for the most part weren't all that different from the counterpart), ''VIII'' consolidated race and class into one choice and only had a single class upgrade step, ''IX'' split both back and had each class promotion be a genuine choice (starting from basic Might or Magic and then branching out towards the old, more specialised, classes), and ''X'' had each race have a native character class; Agents may switch between them at will with a change of uniform. Some alternate costumes also provide an alternate class.one Might and one Magic class that could be upgraded twice.



* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has quite an extensive system where the classes are further subdivided by ability selection and {{PVP}}/non-PVP and restricted by race and faction. Many of its classes stem from units in ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}''.



* ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic'' have gone through several variations of class systems and classes over the games. The first five games had a basic class system (chose one class when you create a character, that is that character's class), ''VI'' and ''VII'' had two-step linear upgrade-able classes (''VII'' split at the final upgrade in design but not in play, as the final class promotion for each class depended on which side you aligned with, and for the most part weren't all that different from the counterpart), ''VIII'' consolidated race and class into one choice and only had a single class upgrade step, ''IX'' split both back and had each class promotion be a genuine choice (starting from basic Might or Magic and then branching out towards the old, more specialised, classes), and ''X'' had each race have one Might and one Magic class that could be upgraded twice.



* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist and Arcanist.

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* ''VideoGame/GrimDawn'' ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has 6 classes, although you can dual-class anytime after level 10, which result in a new class name. The core quite an extensive system where the classes are Soldier, Demolitionist, Shaman, Nightblade, Occultist further subdivided by ability selection and Arcanist.{{PVP}}/non-PVP and restricted by race and faction. Many of its classes stem from units in ''VideoGame/{{Warcraft}}''.



* ''Literature/TheTrueGame'' features twelve different inborn magical "talents".[[note]]The full list is [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]], [[{{Seers}} precognition]], [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], [[PowerFloats self-levitation]], [[TeleportationTropes self-teleportation]], [[HealingHands healing]], [[AnimateDead raising the dead]], {{telepathy}}, [[PlayingWithFire pyrokinesis]], [[EnergyAbsorption storing energy for use by others]], and [[MindManipulation beguiling others to follow you]].[[/note]] These are mixed in myriad combinations to create literally hundreds of character classes like Herald, Bonewalker, and King, used in the chess-like battles of the setting. People without a talent (normal humans) are called "pawns".

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* ''Literature/TheTrueGame'' features twelve different inborn magical "talents".[[note]]The full list is [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]], [[{{Seers}} precognition]], [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], [[PowerFloats self-levitation]], [[TeleportationTropes self-teleportation]], [[HealingHands healing]], [[AnimateDead raising the dead]], {{telepathy}}, [[PlayingWithFire pyrokinesis]], [[EnergyAbsorption storing energy for use by others]], The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users and [[MindManipulation beguiling others to follow you]].[[/note]] These are mixed thieves appear in myriad combinations to create literally hundreds of character classes like Herald, Bonewalker, all four novels, and King, used clerics appear in the chess-like battles of first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in the setting. People without a talent (normal humans) are called "pawns".original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.



* The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users and thieves appear in all four novels, and clerics appear in the first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in the original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.

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* The ''Literature/DreamPark'' series: Warriors, magic users ''Literature/TheTrueGame'' features twelve different inborn magical "talents".[[note]]The full list is [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]], [[{{Seers}} precognition]], [[MindOverMatter telekinesis]], [[PowerFloats self-levitation]], [[TeleportationTropes self-teleportation]], [[HealingHands healing]], [[AnimateDead raising the dead]], {{telepathy}}, [[PlayingWithFire pyrokinesis]], [[EnergyAbsorption storing energy for use by others]], and thieves appear [[MindManipulation beguiling others to follow you]].[[/note]] These are mixed in all four novels, myriad combinations to create literally hundreds of character classes like Herald, Bonewalker, and clerics appear King, used in the first and third. Engineers feature prominently in Dream Park, as do scouts in California Voodoo. Multi-class characters turn up in chess-like battles of the original novel (Holly Frost) and the California Voodoo tournament.setting. People without a talent (normal humans) are called "pawns".
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