History Main / CelibateHero

9th Jun '18 12:21:24 AM pretzelbetty
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Kagemori Mamoru of ''Anime/KageKaraMamoru'', he believes that "Love Is a Distraction" mainly because the girl that he is assigned to is so dimwitted at times that she would [[TooDumbToLive not survive]] without his constant protection and that going out with a girl would detract from his duty. [[KnightTemplarParent His parents]], on the other hand would argue, that Mamoru also has a special duty to find a girlfriend so he can get married and give them some grandchildren so the family tradition can be carried on.

to:

* Kagemori Mamoru of ''Anime/KageKaraMamoru'', he believes that "Love Is a Distraction" mainly because the girl that he is assigned to is so dimwitted at times that she would [[TooDumbToLive not survive]] without his constant protection and that going out with a girl would detract from his duty. [[KnightTemplarParent His parents]], on the other hand hand, would argue, argue that Mamoru also has a special duty to find a girlfriend so he can get married and give them some grandchildren so the family tradition can be carried on.



* ComicBook/LuckyLuke, being a lonesome cowboy who keeps moving and rarely stays anywhere more time than it's required to solve a case, has absolutely no interest for women or any relationships, though unlike Tintin, the subject is aborted; in "La Fiancé de Lucky Luke" especially, Luke mentions his opinion about both marriage and love, making it clear he is, not only uninterested, but almost repulsed (to the point he almost refuses a mission that consists in escorting a large group of women, fearing they might attempt advances on him... and they do). Notably, he has a female PlatonicLifePartners with [[{{Tomboy}} Calamity Jane]].

to:

* ComicBook/LuckyLuke, being a lonesome cowboy who keeps moving and rarely stays anywhere more time than it's required to solve a case, has absolutely no interest for women or any relationships, though unlike Tintin, the subject is aborted; in "La Fiancé de Lucky Luke" especially, Luke mentions his opinion about both marriage and love, making it clear he is, not only uninterested, but almost repulsed (to the point he almost refuses a mission that consists in escorting a large group of women, fearing they might attempt advances on him... and they do). Notably, he has a female PlatonicLifePartners with PlatonicLifePartner in [[{{Tomboy}} Calamity Jane]].
7th Jun '18 2:36:54 PM ScroogeMacDuck
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:FanFiction]]

to:

[[folder:FanFiction]][[folder:Fan Works]]
* Hermione in ''Fanfic/TheParselmouthOfGryffindor''. In her own words, she has "more important things to do than play romance with the other kids", and, while she is definitely not {{Asexual}}, intentionally puts off dating until ''after'' she's turned legally adult, finished her studies, and [[BreadEggsMilkSquick stopped the murderous maniac running amok]].
7th Jun '18 1:48:19 PM VulgarBee
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ash Ketchum from ''Anime/Pokemon'' is usually considered a ChasteHero with good reason, he could also he considered this. He knows what romance is, and has had a crush in the show, Giselle from the episode School of Hard Knocks, so he could be interpreted as a CelibateHero, seeing any relationship as a distraction from becoming the greatest Pokemon master.

to:

* Ash Ketchum from ''Anime/Pokemon'' ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' is usually considered a ChasteHero with good reason, he could also he considered this. He knows what romance is, and has had a crush in the show, Giselle from the episode School of Hard Knocks, so he could be interpreted as a CelibateHero, seeing any relationship as a distraction from becoming the greatest Pokemon master.
7th Jun '18 12:55:16 PM TheAmazingBlachman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** To which degree it happened also varied upon incarnation. The trait was especially pronounced with the Seventh Doctor, something which the ExpandedUniverse acknowledged by making it a sure-fire sign that Seven was ''really'' NotHimself if he suddenly started fancying someone.

to:

** To which degree it happened also varied upon incarnation. The trait was especially pronounced with the Seventh Doctor, something which the ExpandedUniverse acknowledged by making it a sure-fire sign that Seven was ''really'' NotHimself if he suddenly started fancying someone. Upon encountering River Song in a ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' story, Seven says that he can clearly sense that she will somehow hold great meaning to him in his future, but the only reasons as to why he can think of is that she is either going to be his "dearest friend" or "darkest enemy"; he simply cannot think of any other possibility. The truth of course, is that he is going to marry her as the Eleventh Doctor.
7th Jun '18 12:44:20 PM TheAmazingBlachman
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** To which degree it happened also varied upon incarnation. The trait was especially pronounced with the Seventh Doctor, something which the ExpandedUniverse acknowledged by making it a sure-fire sign that Seven was ''really'' NotHimself if he suddenly started fancying someone.
7th Jun '18 5:50:17 AM NickHunter26
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* As surprising as it may seem, Epicurus and his philosophy [[UsefulNotes/Epicureanism]] advises to be this. Indeed while judging pleasure to be the highest good, Epicurus made a classification of pleasure: 1) The natural and necessary ones (eating and sleeping), 2) The natural but unnecessary (sex) and 3) The unnecessary and unnatural (power and politics). Giving that accoding to Epicurus sex fits the second type and that he himself never married and had no children, it's pretty clear that he encouraged people to be single.

to:

* As surprising as it may seem, Epicurus and his philosophy [[UsefulNotes/Epicureanism]] {{UsefulNotes/Epicureanism}} advises to be this. Indeed while judging pleasure to be the highest good, Epicurus made a classification of pleasure: 1) The natural and necessary ones (eating and sleeping), 2) The natural but unnecessary (sex) and 3) The unnecessary and unnatural (power and politics). Giving that accoding to Epicurus sex fits the second type and that he himself never married and had no children, it's pretty clear that he encouraged people to be single.
7th Jun '18 5:47:59 AM NickHunter26
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Philosophy]]
* As surprising as it may seem, Epicurus and his philosophy [[UsefulNotes/Epicureanism]] advises to be this. Indeed while judging pleasure to be the highest good, Epicurus made a classification of pleasure: 1) The natural and necessary ones (eating and sleeping), 2) The natural but unnecessary (sex) and 3) The unnecessary and unnatural (power and politics). Giving that accoding to Epicurus sex fits the second type and that he himself never married and had no children, it's pretty clear that he encouraged people to be single.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Philosophy]]
* As surprising as it may seem, Epicurus and his philosophy [[UsefulNotes/Epicureanism]] advises to be this. Indeed while judging pleasure to be the highest good, Epicurus made a classification of pleasure: 1) The natural and necessary ones (eating and sleeping), 2) The natural but unnecessary (sex) and 3) The unnecessary and unnatural (power and politics). Giving that accoding to Epicurus sex fits the second type and that he himself never married and had no children, it's pretty clear that he encouraged people to be single.
[[/folder]]
7th Jun '18 5:47:19 AM NickHunter26
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Philosophy]]
* As surprising as it may seem, Epicurus and his philosophy [[UsefulNotes/Epicureanism]] advises to be this. Indeed while judging pleasure to be the highest good, Epicurus made a classification of pleasure: 1) The natural and necessary ones (eating and sleeping), 2) The natural but unnecessary (sex) and 3) The unnecessary and unnatural (power and politics). Giving that accoding to Epicurus sex fits the second type and that he himself never married and had no children, it's pretty clear that he encouraged people to be single.
[[/folder]]
31st May '18 5:51:06 PM DonaldthePotholer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Opera]]
* The title character of Music/RichardWagner's ''Parsifal'', based on the old legend.
** Well, yes and no. In his own opera, he is, but in the later-set though earlier-written ''Lohengrin'', the title character is Parsifal's son.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Radio]]
* ''Radio/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet''
** Averted to various degrees in later adaptations of ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet''; in the TV series Britt Reid was cast more as a rich playboy/publisher, and given the occasional LoveInterest while Kato remained a celibate sidekick. This was probably an artifact of the [[DramaticHalfHour series format]]; as a half hour series it would be difficult to shoehorn a romantic subplot into a show which could barely fit the action/adventure main plot within its runtime. Totally averted in the NOW Comics adaptation of ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet'', which pretty well paired off almost all of the various Green Hornets and Katos with more-or-less permanent {{Love Interest}}s.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Mythology] and Religion]

to:

[[folder:Opera]]
* The title character of Music/RichardWagner's ''Parsifal'', based on the old legend.
** Well, yes and no. In his own opera, he is, but in the later-set though earlier-written ''Lohengrin'', the title character is Parsifal's son.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Radio]]
* ''Radio/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet''
** Averted to various degrees in later adaptations of ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet''; in the TV series Britt Reid was cast more as a rich playboy/publisher, and given the occasional LoveInterest while Kato remained a celibate sidekick. This was probably an artifact of the [[DramaticHalfHour series format]]; as a half hour series it would be difficult to shoehorn a romantic subplot into a show which could barely fit the action/adventure main plot within its runtime. Totally averted in the NOW Comics adaptation of ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet'', which pretty well paired off almost all of the various Green Hornets and Katos with more-or-less permanent {{Love Interest}}s.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Mythology] Mythology and Religion]Religion]]



[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' gives us the Chastity disadvantage, giving your Celibate Hero functional rules for what that entails.
** Humorous footnote: The Eunuch disadvantage was also available (to males) in earlier editions, but its value was dropped from 5 points to a 1-point 'quirk' because too many MinMaxing players were taking it.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' [[CrapsackWorld doesn't have heroes]], but does have universal celibacy due to hormone suppressants in the food supply. Some citizens do get off the suppressants, mostly either (a) High Programmers or (b) Troubleshooters stuck Outdoors during a mission and forced to eat natural food long enough for them to wear off. Some of these citizens end up going back on them ''voluntarily'' so they can concentrate on not getting killed. It's that kind of game.
* One Feat offering in the ''Tabletopgame/DungeonsAndDragons'' suppliment ''Book of Exalted Deeds'' is Vow of Chastity, which gives a Player Character benefits, so long as he or she remains chaste. This Feat is a prequisite for two Prestige Classes (one of which is female-only and involves gaining a unicorn as your companion, naturally).

to:

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
[[folder:Opera]]
* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' gives us The title character of Music/RichardWagner's ''Parsifal'', based on the Chastity disadvantage, giving your Celibate Hero functional rules for what that entails.
old legend.
** Humorous footnote: The Eunuch disadvantage was also available (to males) in earlier editions, Well, yes and no. In his own opera, he is, but its value was dropped from 5 points to a 1-point 'quirk' because too many MinMaxing players were taking it.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' [[CrapsackWorld doesn't have heroes]], but does have universal celibacy due to hormone suppressants
in the food supply. Some citizens do get off later-set though earlier-written ''Lohengrin'', the suppressants, mostly either (a) High Programmers or (b) Troubleshooters stuck Outdoors during a mission and forced to eat natural food long enough for them to wear off. Some of these citizens end up going back on them ''voluntarily'' so they can concentrate on not getting killed. It's that kind of game.
* One Feat offering in the ''Tabletopgame/DungeonsAndDragons'' suppliment ''Book of Exalted Deeds''
title character is Vow of Chastity, which gives a Player Character benefits, so long as he or she remains chaste. This Feat is a prequisite for two Prestige Classes (one of which is female-only and involves gaining a unicorn as your companion, naturally).Parsifal's son.



[[folder:Theatre]]
* The {{MrsHawking}} play series: the deductive genius titular character Victoria Hawking is, according to WordOfGod, [[http://www.mrshawking.com/our-ace-heroine/ an aromantic asexual.]]

to:

[[folder:Theatre]]
[[folder:Radio]]
* The {{MrsHawking}} play series: ''Radio/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet''
** Averted to various degrees in later adaptations of ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet''; in
the deductive genius titular character Victoria Hawking is, according TV series Britt Reid was cast more as a rich playboy/publisher, and given the occasional LoveInterest while Kato remained a celibate sidekick. This was probably an artifact of the [[DramaticHalfHour series format]]; as a half hour series it would be difficult to WordOfGod, [[http://www.mrshawking.com/our-ace-heroine/ an aromantic asexual.]]shoehorn a romantic subplot into a show which could barely fit the action/adventure main plot within its runtime. Totally averted in the NOW Comics adaptation of ''Franchise/TheGreenHornet'', which pretty well paired off almost all of the various Green Hornets and Katos with more-or-less permanent {{Love Interest}}s.


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' gives us the Chastity disadvantage, giving your Celibate Hero functional rules for what that entails.
** Humorous footnote: The Eunuch disadvantage was also available (to males) in earlier editions, but its value was dropped from 5 points to a 1-point 'quirk' because too many MinMaxing players were taking it.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' [[CrapsackWorld doesn't have heroes]], but does have universal celibacy due to hormone suppressants in the food supply. Some citizens do get off the suppressants, mostly either (a) High Programmers or (b) Troubleshooters stuck Outdoors during a mission and forced to eat natural food long enough for them to wear off. Some of these citizens end up going back on them ''voluntarily'' so they can concentrate on not getting killed. It's that kind of game.
* One Feat offering in the ''Tabletopgame/DungeonsAndDragons'' suppliment ''Book of Exalted Deeds'' is Vow of Chastity, which gives a Player Character benefits, so long as he or she remains chaste. This Feat is a prequisite for two Prestige Classes (one of which is female-only and involves gaining a unicorn as your companion, naturally).
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Theatre]]
* The {{MrsHawking}} play series: the deductive genius titular character Victoria Hawking is, according to WordOfGod, [[http://www.mrshawking.com/our-ace-heroine/ an aromantic asexual.]]
[[/folder]]
27th May '18 11:52:20 AM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Genuine [[KingArthur Arthurian]] example: Sir Gawain shares the bed of the Green Knight's lady night after night, but doesn't take advantage, as that would violate the laws of Chivalry and Hospitality. This display of virtue saves his life.
** Probably from the same root story: Pwyll, from the First Branch of the Mabinogion, chastely shares a bed with Arawn's wife, despite being flawlessly disguised as Arawn himself, which results in a lasting friendship between the two men.
* Ged, the protagonist for most of the ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series, is celibate because he is a mage. This accounts for a complete lack of romance in the first three books, even when a pairing up, first with his friend's sister and then with Tenar, looked to be inevitable. All the mages in Earthsea are celibate by rule, in theory because they will lose their power unless they are chaste, though the truth of this belief is not exactly confirmed. It's implied in ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'' (by a village witch, who may not be the most reliable source) that wizards use some sort of spell to render themselves asexual, or possibly just make it easier to be completely celibate. She doesn't go into details. Later on Ged mentions he just didn't think of it or feel any urge [[spoiler:until he lost his powers]].
* Joshua, an angel from ''Literature/DoraWilkSeries'' has never seen to be interested in women or men (apart from Dora, but he CantHaveSexEver with her) and is still a virgin. He explains that with angels being absurdly fertile, it's quite possible that after first or second intercourse he'd have child and have to settle down, which he doesn't want to do.
* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'', the eponymous character from the original novel and short story collections, considers "Love is a Distraction" to be his watchwords -- so much so that he can quite easily be read as both aromantic ''and'' {{asexual}}.
** This aspect of his character is often removed in adaptations with the PromotionToLoveInterest of Irene Adler, whom Holmes showed grudging respect for after her one appearance in canon.
* Enjolras, from ''Literature/LesMiserables'' also has "Love is a Distraction" taken to extremes, as evidenced by his introduction and by his reply, when one of the others is commenting on how the others all have mistresses, of Patria.

to:

* Genuine [[KingArthur Arthurian]] example: Sir Gawain shares In ''[[Literature/TheGrailQuest 1356]]'', we have the bed Sire Roland de Verrec, who as a boy had a vision of the Green Knight's lady night after night, but doesn't take advantage, as that would violate the laws of Chivalry Virgin Mary, and Hospitality. This display of virtue saves is determined to remain chaste until he marries. Other men mock him for his life.
** Probably from the same root story: Pwyll, from the First Branch of the Mabinogion, chastely shares a bed with Arawn's wife, despite being flawlessly disguised as Arawn himself, which results in a lasting friendship between the two men.
* Ged, the protagonist for most of the ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series, is celibate because he is a mage. This accounts for a complete lack of romance in the first three books, even when a pairing up, first with his friend's sister and then with Tenar, looked to be inevitable. All the mages in Earthsea are celibate by rule, in theory because they will lose their power unless they are chaste,
virginity, though the truth of this belief is not exactly confirmed. It's implied in ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'' (by a village witch, who may not be the most reliable source) that wizards use some sort of spell to render themselves asexual, or possibly just make it easier to be completely celibate. She doesn't go into details. Later on Ged mentions he just didn't think of it or feel any urge [[spoiler:until he lost his powers]].
* Joshua,
face -- he is an angel from ''Literature/DoraWilkSeries'' has never seen to be interested in women or men (apart from Dora, but he CantHaveSexEver with her) undefeated tournament champion and is still a virgin. He explains that with angels being absurdly fertile, it's quite possible that after first or second intercourse he'd have child and have to settle down, which he doesn't want to do.
* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'', the eponymous character from the original novel and short story collections, considers "Love is a Distraction" to be his watchwords -- so much so that he can quite easily be read as both aromantic ''and'' {{asexual}}.
** This aspect of his character is often removed
utterly lethal in adaptations with the PromotionToLoveInterest of Irene Adler, whom Holmes showed grudging respect for after her one appearance in canon.
* Enjolras, from ''Literature/LesMiserables'' also has "Love is a Distraction" taken to extremes, as evidenced by his introduction and by his reply, when one of the others is commenting on how the others all have mistresses, of Patria.
battle.



* Raistlin Majere, antihero of the ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' books. Actively manipulating the lovesick, annoying Crysania to his advantage, he resists the temptation to actually do anything with her because A) it's beneath a mage of his stature, B) he can't afford to be distracted from his "Overthrow the Gods for No Good Reason" project, and C) he had sex once before and was crap at it. And, though it's not explicitly stated, suspicions are that, were he to actually try anything as physically vigorous as sex with Crysania, he'd probably just wind up coughing blood all over her and collapsing into a heap, which, whatever way you look at it, isn't very romantic. There is possibly some inconsistency over whether Raistlin actually ever had sex or not. The Legends trilogy very strongly implies that he did, with one of Caramon's ex-girlfriends but ''The Soulforge'', which covers the time period it would have happened equally strongly implies he remained a virgin (there is a girl, again a lover of Caramon and there appears to be budding mutual affection but... well read it yourselves).
** There was a short story called "Raistlin's Daughter", which implied he may have had a daughter, in the more or less conventional way and was [[LaserGuidedAmnesia magically made to forget the experience]]. Interestingly the entire story is treated as an in-universe rumour and when Raistlin encounters a girl claiming to be his daughter in ''Dragons of Summer Flame'' he drolly comments on his bad luck at sleeping with a beautiful woman and not remembering it. For the record the girl in question is not his daughter, much to the relief of his nephew [[KissingCousins Palin]].
* In ''Literature/{{Lamb}}'', Joshua was told by an angel that he could never "know" a woman, but never explained exactly was meant by that. Josh and Biff take it in the Biblical sense, and so Joshua remains celibate his whole life (though Biff gets around enough for the both of them).
* ''Literature/TheObsidianTrilogy'', written by Creator/MercedesLackey and James Mallory, features a hero who remains chaste and celibate -- virginal and unmarried, respectively -- for a year and a day in return for his life being saved by a unicorn. The penalty for breaking his vow, since his life was saved, will be death by goring. While the first woman he meets is his sister, and the next woman he finds himself intrigued by is the queen of the elves and happily married, the third woman he is attracted to is neither attached nor unattractive nor uninterested in him...
** This case also gets an interesting treatment in that the unicorn [[spoiler: apparently ''becomes'' fertile (or non-celibate) because of the hero's year of celibacy. The hero and unicorn's parting at the end of the series states that the hero no longer needs to be celibate, but that the unicorn won't have to be either!]]
* According to Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''Honeymouth'' short story, you can be a cussing, hard-drinking mercenary who rides a unicorn into battle and still be able to satisfy a full whorehouse each night, not to mention being satisfied yourself. [[spoiler:Apparently the unicorn's radar can't distinguish between those who are ''still technically'' virgins and those who are truly chaste.]]
* Franchise/DocSavage is determinedly uninterested in romance. It is remarked in the first book that "He had long ago made up his mind that women were to play no part in his career" and spends every interaction with Monaja (the most beautiful women he ever met) trying to get her to lose interest. He's smart enough to foist interaction with women on his companions for the most part, but seems profoundly uncomfortable when this is not possible.
* Taken way, way to the extreme in the Creator/LeoTolstoy novella ''The Kreutzer Sonata''. Not only does the protagonist kill his wife in a jealous rage, but he makes the argument that one should renounce sex in any circumstance, including marriage, and that the subsequent death of the species would mark humanity's highest moral achievement. The fact that this story is more or less an AuthorTract brings it perilously close to {{Squick}}. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voluntary_Human_Extinction_Movement People are already working on this.]]
* Harry Dresden from ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' spends a heck of a lot of the novels not getting any, and being quite bitter about it. Though he's given a few chances, he never takes them because they generally come with a lot of baggage (e.g. she's a lust demon, or his underage apprentice), and he refuses to enter into a relationship which isn't pure and based on love, and he also doesn't want to bring anyone else into his dangerous world if he can help it. The fact that his first girlfriend was [[spoiler: brainwashed into trying to kill him, and whom he thought for years he had killed]] and his second girlfriend [[spoiler: got turned into a vampire because of his involvement with her]] may have something to do with it. Although even with that track record, succubi making fun of how pathetic your sex life is has got to hurt. It gets to the point where it turns out Harry's latest love interest, [[spoiler: Anastasia Luccio]], was [[spoiler: [[MindRape psychically mind-controlled into being attracted to him]].]]
** Having [[spoiler: Carlos, who until that point certainly talked a good game,]] outed as a virgin by said succubus must have taken some of the sting out of it (or at least given him an ample means of redirecting the mockery). It also makes him another example, though his reason (for that matter, whether it's a conscious choice or just lack of opportunity) isn't explored.

to:

* Raistlin Majere, antihero ''Literature/TheApprenticeRogue'': One of the ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' books. Actively manipulating the lovesick, annoying Crysania to a Black Knight's vows is celibacy.
* John Galt in ''Atlas Shrugged''. The book spends so much time on
his advantage, he resists the temptation to actually do anything with her because A) perfection and how Dagny Taggart is his only perfect woman, it's beneath a mage of his stature, B) he can't afford impossible to be distracted from his "Overthrow imagine him just having sex for the Gods for No Good Reason" project, and C) he hell of it. This also applies to Dagny's other lovers. She had sex once before and was crap at it. And, though it's not explicitly stated, suspicions are that, were he to actually try anything as physically vigorous as sex with Crysania, he'd probably just wind up coughing blood all over her both Francisco and collapsing into a heap, which, whatever way you look at it, isn't very romantic. There is possibly some inconsistency over whether Raistlin actually ever had sex or not. The Legends trilogy very strongly implies that he did, with one of Caramon's ex-girlfriends but ''The Soulforge'', Hank Reardon. Reardon hated his sexual urges which covers drove him to his frigid wife and Dagny was Francisco's first. It's difficult to imagine them moving on and settling for someone else.
* Rao Raghunth in
the time period it would have happened equally strongly implies he remained ''Literature/BelisariusSeries'' was not a virgin (there is a girl, again a lover of Caramon and there appears to be budding mutual affection but... well read it yourselves).
** There was a short story called "Raistlin's Daughter", which implied he may have had a daughter, in the more or less conventional way and was [[LaserGuidedAmnesia magically made to forget the experience]]. Interestingly the entire story is treated as an in-universe rumour and
when Raistlin encounters a girl claiming to be his daughter in ''Dragons of Summer Flame'' he drolly comments on his bad luck at sleeping with a beautiful woman and not remembering it. For the record the girl in question is not his daughter, much to the relief of his nephew [[KissingCousins Palin]].
* In ''Literature/{{Lamb}}'', Joshua
married Shakuntala, but he had abstained for ages waiting for her. Shakuntala, however, [[VirginPower was told by an angel indeed a virgin]]. After marrying, she [[InsatiableNewlyweds makes up for lost time]] quite well.
* Creator/PGWodehouse's [[Literature/JeevesAndWooster Bertie Wooster]] eventually comes to realize
that he could never "know" a woman, but never explained exactly was meant by that. Josh and Biff take it in the Biblical sense, and so Joshua remains celibate his whole life (though Biff gets around enough for the both of them).
* ''Literature/TheObsidianTrilogy'', written by Creator/MercedesLackey and James Mallory, features a hero who remains chaste and celibate -- virginal and unmarried, respectively -- for a year and a day in return for his life being saved by a unicorn. The penalty for breaking his vow, since his life was saved, will be death by goring. While the first woman he meets
is his sister, and the next woman he finds himself intrigued by is the queen of the elves and happily married, the third woman he is attracted to is neither attached nor unattractive nor uninterested in him...
** This case also gets an interesting treatment in that the unicorn [[spoiler: apparently ''becomes'' fertile (or non-celibate) because of the hero's year of celibacy. The hero and unicorn's parting at the end of the series states that the hero no longer needs to be celibate, but that the unicorn won't have to be either!]]
* According to Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''Honeymouth'' short story, you can be a cussing, hard-drinking mercenary who rides a unicorn into battle and still be able to satisfy a full whorehouse each night, not to mention being satisfied yourself. [[spoiler:Apparently the unicorn's radar can't distinguish between those who are ''still technically'' virgins and those who are truly chaste.]]
* Franchise/DocSavage is determinedly uninterested in romance. It is remarked in the first book that "He had long ago made up his mind that women were to play no part in his career" and spends every interaction
far happier with Monaja (the most beautiful women he ever met) trying to get her to lose interest. He's smart enough to foist interaction with women on his companions for the most part, but seems profoundly uncomfortable when this is not possible.
* Taken way, way to the extreme in the Creator/LeoTolstoy novella ''The Kreutzer Sonata''. Not only does the protagonist kill his wife in a jealous rage, but he makes the argument that one should renounce sex in any circumstance, including marriage,
quiet bachelorhood and that the subsequent death of the species would mark humanity's highest moral achievement. The fact that this story is more or less an AuthorTract brings it perilously close to {{Squick}}. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voluntary_Human_Extinction_Movement People are already working on this.]]
* Harry Dresden from ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'' spends a heck of a lot of the novels not getting any, and being quite bitter about it. Though he's given a few chances, he never takes them because they generally come with a lot of baggage (e.g. she's a lust demon, or his underage apprentice), and he refuses to enter into a
its accompanying HeterosexualLifePartner relationship which isn't pure and based on love, and he also doesn't want to bring anyone else into his dangerous world if he can help it. The fact that his first girlfriend was [[spoiler: brainwashed into trying to kill him, and whom he thought for years he had killed]] and his second girlfriend [[spoiler: got turned into a vampire because of his involvement with her]] may have something to do with it. Although even with that track record, succubi making fun of how pathetic your sex life is has got to hurt. It gets to the point where it turns out Harry's latest love interest, [[spoiler: Anastasia Luccio]], was [[spoiler: [[MindRape psychically mind-controlled into being attracted to him]].]]
** Having [[spoiler: Carlos, who until that point certainly talked a good game,]] outed as a virgin by said succubus must have taken some of the sting out of it (or at least given him an ample means of redirecting the mockery). It also makes him another example, though his reason (for that matter, whether it's a conscious choice or just lack of opportunity) isn't explored.
Jeeves.



* Prince Rupert is very much a Celibate Hero in Creator/SimonRGreen's ''Literature/BlueMoonRising'', so much so that he even rides a {{Unicorn}} and is rather defensive about it. The reason for this is that as a second son he isn't allowed to be sexually active in case of Dynastic complications. This is a minor [[TruthInTelevision Truth In Literature]], as many younger sons of nobility were packed off to the priesthood for much the same reason in the middle ages, and it had about the same level of effectiveness then as it does in the book.
* Pinkie Brown of ''Literature/BrightonRock'' is a celibate villain, being thoroughly squicked by sexuality and femininity as a result of his [[FreudianExcuse childhood]]. He mentions having considered becoming a [[SinisterMinister priest]] instead of a crook, and this is [[ItMakesSenseInContext entirely plausible]] given his characterization.
* In the ''Literature/{{Confessions}}'', Alypius is one of the most moral of Augustine's young friends and eventually becomes a celibate bishop. The call of celibacy comes easily to Alypius since he had a repulsive sexual experience when he was quite young and has maintained chastity since then.



* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** The ideal of both the Night's Watch and the Kingsguard is this. (Technically the vow only states "father no children" with regard to that, but the implications are clear and [[WordOfGod Martin himself]] has said that both are supposed to be celibate.) [[TheOathbreaker The practice]], on the other hand...
** Jon Snow gave a shot at this, refusing to go to the whorehouses when the other boys on the Wall did, refusing advances (all to obey the rules of the Night Watch). Didn't work out so well for him. Samwell Tarly was likewise forcibly thrown into his LoveInterest's bed.
** Knowing of the faultiness of such a pledge, the slave traders who own The Unsullied castrate the slaves for just this purpose. The slave trader proudly points out that while the Night's Watch and Kingsguard ''claim'' celibacy, The Unsullied are the only ones who are truly, well, unsullied.
* [[AuthorTract Every single main character]] of Creator/HPLovecraft's stories is too busy being chased by tentacled monsters and/or slowly losing his sanity to get involved in any kind of romantic and/or sexual relationship.
* Joscelin Verreuil in the ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'' series is sworn to celibacy as part of his vows as a Cassiline monk. Played up for much angst in the second book, but he and Phedre are finally together for the third book.
* In the Literature/KateDaniels novels by Ilona Andrews, Kate remains celibate for much of her adult life. Partly because she thinks friends and lovers will distract her from her mission in life, partly because everyone close to her dies violently (her mother, her father, her mentor, and her friend), partly because [[CantHaveSexEver sex would expose her secrets]], partly because any guy powerful enough to protect himself from [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies the skeletons in her closet]] probably didn't get that kind of power by being ethical, but mostly just because she's afraid of being hurt or rejected.
* [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Drizzt]] in Bob Salvatore's TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms novel series followed this trope for some time. He wasn't interested in casual sex. His first contact with sex was witnessing a graduation ritual for female priests, that involves the summoning of a 5-meter-tall demon. His first and so far only girlfriend was once involved with his presumed-dead best friend; and things got complicated when he was rescued from hell. Eventually, Drizzt allowed himself to love, and started getting some regularly. [[spoiler:[[StuffedInTheFridge Then she died.]]]]
* SolomonKane is a devout Puritan and remains celibate because of his religious convictions.
** Which is not accurate, since Puritans believed God wanted everyone to have (marital) sex.
** Solomon Kane knew the "kisses" of a "deathless queen in a city old as Death," and compares her with Lilith (this refers to the attempted seduction by Nakari, a vampiric -- or at least very bloodthirsty -- queen of a lost African city). The same poem (''Solomon Kane's Homecoming'') implies that he had an old lover at home whom he was hoping to return to.

to:

* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** The ideal of both
Franchise/DocSavage is determinedly uninterested in romance. It is remarked in the Night's Watch first book that "He had long ago made up his mind that women were to play no part in his career" and the Kingsguard is this. (Technically the vow only states "father no children" spends every interaction with regard to that, but the implications are clear and [[WordOfGod Martin himself]] has said that both are supposed to be celibate.) [[TheOathbreaker The practice]], on the other hand...
** Jon Snow gave a shot at this, refusing to go to the whorehouses when the other boys on the Wall did, refusing advances (all to obey the rules of the Night Watch). Didn't work out so well for him. Samwell Tarly was likewise forcibly thrown into his LoveInterest's bed.
** Knowing of the faultiness of such a pledge, the slave traders who own The Unsullied castrate the slaves for just this purpose. The slave trader proudly points out that while the Night's Watch and Kingsguard ''claim'' celibacy, The Unsullied are the only ones who are truly, well, unsullied.
* [[AuthorTract Every single main character]] of Creator/HPLovecraft's stories is too busy being chased by tentacled monsters and/or slowly losing his sanity
Monaja (the most beautiful women he ever met) trying to get involved in any kind of romantic and/or sexual relationship.
* Joscelin Verreuil in the ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'' series is sworn to celibacy as part of his vows as a Cassiline monk. Played up for much angst in the second book, but he and Phedre are finally together for the third book.
* In the Literature/KateDaniels novels by Ilona Andrews, Kate remains celibate for much of
her adult life. Partly because she thinks friends and lovers will distract her from her mission in life, partly because everyone close to her dies violently (her mother, her father, her mentor, and her friend), partly because [[CantHaveSexEver sex would expose her secrets]], partly because any guy powerful lose interest. He's smart enough to protect himself foist interaction with women on his companions for the most part, but seems profoundly uncomfortable when this is not possible.
* Joshua, an angel
from [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies the skeletons in her closet]] probably didn't get that kind of power by being ethical, but mostly just because she's afraid of being hurt or rejected.
* [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Drizzt]] in Bob Salvatore's TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms novel series followed this trope for some time. He wasn't
''Literature/DoraWilkSeries'' has never seen to be interested in casual sex. His women or men (apart from Dora, but he CantHaveSexEver with her) and is still a virgin. He explains that with angels being absurdly fertile, it's quite possible that after first contact or second intercourse he'd have child and have to settle down, which he doesn't want to do.
* ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}''
** Raistlin Majere, antihero of the books, is a Celibate Hero. Actively manipulating the lovesick, annoying Crysania to his advantage, he resists the temptation to actually do anything
with her because A) it's beneath a mage of his stature, B) he can't afford to be distracted from his "Overthrow the Gods for No Good Reason" project, and C) he had sex once before and was witnessing crap at it. And, though it's not explicitly stated, suspicions are that, were he to actually try anything as physically vigorous as sex with Crysania, he'd probably just wind up coughing blood all over her and collapsing into a graduation ritual for female priests, heap, which, whatever way you look at it, isn't very romantic. There is possibly some inconsistency over whether Raistlin actually ever had sex or not. The Legends trilogy very strongly implies that involves he did, with one of Caramon's ex-girlfriends but ''The Soulforge'', which covers the summoning time period it would have happened equally strongly implies he remained a virgin (there is a girl, again a lover of Caramon and there appears to be budding mutual affection but... well read it yourselves).
** There was a short story called "Raistlin's Daughter", which implied he may have had a daughter, in the more or less conventional way and was [[LaserGuidedAmnesia magically made to forget the experience]]. Interestingly the entire story is treated as an in-universe rumour and when Raistlin encounters a girl claiming to be his daughter in ''Dragons of Summer Flame'' he drolly comments on his bad luck at sleeping with a beautiful woman and not remembering it. For the record the girl in question is not his daughter, much to the relief of his nephew [[KissingCousins Palin]].
* In the ''Literature/DreambloodDuology'', everyone living and serving in the Hetawa is supposed to swear off sex, which includes both protagonists of ''The Killing Moon'', Ehiru and Nijiri.
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'':
** Harry Dresden spends a heck
of a 5-meter-tall demon. His lot of the novels not getting any, and being quite bitter about it. Though he's given a few chances, he never takes them because they generally come with a lot of baggage (e.g. she's a lust demon, or his underage apprentice), and he refuses to enter into a relationship which isn't pure and based on love, and he also doesn't want to bring anyone else into his dangerous world if he can help it. The fact that his first and so far only girlfriend was once involved [[spoiler: brainwashed into trying to kill him, and whom he thought for years he had killed]] and his second girlfriend [[spoiler: got turned into a vampire because of his involvement with his presumed-dead best friend; and things her]] may have something to do with it. Although even with that track record, succubi making fun of how pathetic your sex life is has got complicated when he to hurt. It gets to the point where it turns out Harry's latest love interest was rescued from hell. Eventually, Drizzt allowed himself [[spoiler:psychically mind-controlled into being attracted to love, and started getting him.]]
** Having [[spoiler: Carlos, who until that point certainly talked a good game,]] outed as a virgin by said succubus must have taken
some regularly. [[spoiler:[[StuffedInTheFridge Then she died.]]]]
of the sting out of it (or at least given him an ample means of redirecting the mockery). It also makes him another example, though his reason (for that matter, whether it's a conscious choice or just lack of opportunity) isn't explored.
* SolomonKane Ged, the protagonist for most of the ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series, is a devout Puritan and remains celibate because he is a mage. This accounts for a complete lack of romance in the first three books, even when a pairing up, first with his religious convictions.
** Which
friend's sister and then with Tenar, looked to be inevitable. All the mages in Earthsea are celibate by rule, in theory because they will lose their power unless they are chaste, though the truth of this belief is not accurate, since Puritans believed God wanted everyone to have (marital) sex.
** Solomon Kane knew
exactly confirmed. It's implied in ''Literature/{{Tehanu}}'' (by a village witch, who may not be the "kisses" most reliable source) that wizards use some sort of a "deathless queen in a city old as Death," and compares her with Lilith (this refers spell to the attempted seduction by Nakari, a vampiric -- render themselves asexual, or at least very bloodthirsty -- queen possibly just make it easier to be completely celibate. She doesn't go into details. Later on Ged mentions he just didn't think of a it or feel any urge [[spoiler:until he lost African city). The same poem (''Solomon Kane's Homecoming'') implies that he had an old lover at home whom he was hoping to return to.his powers]].



* Prince Rupert is very much a Celibate Hero in Creator/SimonRGreen's ''Literature/BlueMoonRising'', so much so that he even rides a {{Unicorn}} and is rather defensive about it. The reason for this is that as a second son he isn't allowed to be sexually active in case of Dynastic complications. This is a minor [[TruthInTelevision Truth In Literature]], as many younger sons of nobility were packed off to the priesthood for much the same reason in the middle ages, and it had about the same level of effectiveness then as it does in the book.
* John from Creator/ManlyWadeWellman's 'Literature/SilverJohn' stories, until he meets and weds his true love Evadare. Given John's strong Christian coloring, this is probably a rare modern example of a hero celibate by belief system.
* Pinkie Brown of ''Literature/BrightonRock'' is a celibate villain, being thoroughly squicked by sexuality and femininity as a result of his [[FreudianExcuse childhood]]. He mentions having considered becoming a [[SinisterMinister priest]] instead of a crook, and this is [[ItMakesSenseInContext entirely plausible]] given his characterization.
* Sergeant Jean in ''Literature/SevenMenOfGascony'' doesn't seem to have any interest in such things although it is not said why. One character speculates that he is {{Asexual}} though it is more fun to think that he had a lover in the past and never got over her.
* Emilio Sandoz in ''Literature/TheSparrow''. All the Jesuits on the Rakhat mission are.
* Lord Meren, from Lynda Robinson's ancient Egyptian mysteries, has avoided serious romantic relationships since his wife passed away, having been so deeply in love with her that other women don't measure up. He has casual sex on occasion because it's normal social practice for noblemen, but the only woman he's emotionally attracted to is loaded down with political baggage that would compromise his objectivity as the Eyes of Pharaoh.
* [[TheMedic Medicine Cats]] in ''[[Literature/WarriorCats Warriors]]'' have to take a vow to never have kittens. [[spoiler: Not that it stops them.]] Subverted with Mudfur. He's already a father while he was a medicine cat, but he already had kits with Brightsky when he was a warrior. But after her death and the deaths of three of their kits, THEN he became a medicine cat.
* In Jack Campbell's ''Literature/TheLostFleet'', there is exactly one woman in the fleet that it would not be improper for Geary to have a relationship with. Then she learns her husband might be alive. There is plenty of {{UST}} between him and a subordinate, [[LovedINotHonourMore but they aren't even allowed by regulations to talk about it.]] [[spoiler:Until the Lost Fleet ceases to be lost, at which point Geary applies his Rule-Fu to the problem and TheyDo.]]
* Orual, the narrator and main character of ''Literature/TillWeHaveFaces'', rather obliquely mentions near the end of the novel that she never lost her virginity. This is partly because as queen regnant she would have to give up her power to her husband if she ever married, partly because she has a rather negative view of romantic love thanks to one sister's shallowness and the other's being MarriedToAGod, and partly because she's convinced that she's so ugly no man would ever be attracted to her, queen or not.
* Rao Raghunth in the ''Literature/BelisariusSeries'' was not a virgin when he married Shakuntala, but he had abstained for ages waiting for her. Shakuntala, however, [[VirginPower was indeed a virgin]]. After marrying, she [[InsatiableNewlyweds makes up for lost time]] quite well.
* In ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' Katniss Everdeen is this, not wanting to bring another child into the CrapsackWorld. [[spoiler:However, as the world gets better thanks to her actions, she eventually gives up her virginity in the final chapter of the book.]]



* In ''[[Literature/TheGrailQuest 1356]]'', we have the Sire Roland de Verrec, who as a boy had a vision of the Virgin Mary, and is determined to remain chaste until he marries. Other men mock him for his virginity, though not to his face -- he is an undefeated tournament champion and utterly lethal in battle.
* Michael in ''Literature/RedeemingLove'' fits this trope for the first half of the novel: hes still a virgin at the age of 26, and remains so [[ChastityCouple for several months into his marriage to the heroine]] (because he feels that the emotional connection formed during sex is crucial, and as a [[BrokenBird former prostitute]] she is [[LieBackAndThinkOfEngland unable to make that connection]]). He does eventually break out of this role and they ''very eventually'' end up HappilyMarried, with a healthy helping of of GoodPeopleHaveGoodSex [[spoiler:and BabiesEverAfter]].

to:

* In ''[[Literature/TheGrailQuest 1356]]'', we have Maggie from ''Literature/{{Firstborn}}'' mates with another magpie but leaves him not soon after their children leave the Sire Roland de Verrec, who as nest. She falls [[InterspeciesRomance for a boy had a vision bluebird]] not soon afterwards but her affections are unrequited. Maggie spends the rest of the Virgin Mary, and is determined to remain chaste until he marries. Other men mock him for his virginity, though not to his face -- he is an undefeated tournament champion and utterly lethal book single.
* [[Literature/TheLegendOfDrizzt Drizzt]]
in battle.
* Michael in ''Literature/RedeemingLove'' fits
Bob Salvatore's TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms novel series followed this trope for the some time. He wasn't interested in casual sex. His first half of the novel: hes still contact with sex was witnessing a virgin at the age of 26, and remains so [[ChastityCouple graduation ritual for several months into his marriage to the heroine]] (because he feels female priests, that involves the emotional connection formed during sex is crucial, summoning of a 5-meter-tall demon. His first and as a [[BrokenBird former prostitute]] she is [[LieBackAndThinkOfEngland unable to make that connection]]). He does eventually break out of this role and they ''very eventually'' end up HappilyMarried, so far only girlfriend was once involved with a healthy helping of of GoodPeopleHaveGoodSex [[spoiler:and BabiesEverAfter]].his presumed-dead best friend; and things got complicated when he was rescued from hell. Eventually, Drizzt allowed himself to love, and started getting some regularly. [[spoiler:Then she died.]]



* Also from Lackey Tarma in the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Vows and Honor]] books is a Swordsworn, sworn to serve her people's Goddess as a warrior. In this case, rather than force her servants to torture themselves, the Goddess simply removes their ability to feel sexual desire entirely. This is particularly good for Tarma, who became Swordsworn in the aftermath of being [[RapeAsBackstory gang raped]] by the people who killed her clan.
* ''Literature/TheApprenticeRogue'': One of a Black Knight's vows is celibacy.
* An [[AntiHero antiheroic]] example can be found in ''[[Literature/RieselTalesTwoHunters Riesel Tales: Two Hunters]]''. Ramy Dusotes, one of the two eponymous [[BountyHunter hunters]], actively avoids romance due to the disturbingly high number of perverts and sexual predators on [[WretchedHive Riesel]] (which includes her business partner [[TheCasanova Runge Margavo]]). Discounting her [[{{Tomboy}} tomboyishness]], she deliberately avoids wearing makeup or feminine clothes and retains a fairly pudgy figure in order to strengthen her barrier against Riesel's shallow lechers.
* Creator/PGWodehouse's [[Literature/JeevesAndWooster Bertie Wooster]] eventually comes to realize that he is far happier with his quiet bachelorhood and its accompanying HeterosexualLifePartner relationship with Jeeves.
* In the ''Literature/JacobsLadderTrilogy'', Perceval took a vow of celibacy due to viewing romance as a distraction from her duty.
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': Brother Neuro was raised to be celibate all his life and claims to be above such "dust mind" concerns as getting laid. [[HormoneAddledTeenager His teenage body disagrees]] so he has to resist the temptation daily.
* John Galt in ''Atlas Shrugged''. The book spends so much time on his perfection and how Dagny Taggart is his only perfect woman, it's impossible to imagine him just having sex for the hell of it. This also applies to Dagny's other lovers. She had sex with both Francisco and Hank Reardon. Reardon hated his sexual urges which drove him to his frigid wife and Dagny was Francisco's first. It's difficult to imagine them moving on and settling for someone else.
* In the ''Literature/DreambloodDuology'', everyone living and serving in the Hetawa is supposed to swear off sex, which includes both protagonists of ''The Killing Moon'', Ehiru and Nijiri.



* Maggie from ''Literature/{{Firstborn}}'' mates with another magpie but leaves him not soon after their children leave the nest. She falls [[InterspeciesRomance for a bluebird]] not soon afterwards but her affections are unrequited. Maggie spends the rest of the book single.

to:

* Maggie from ''Literature/{{Firstborn}}'' mates with According to Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''Honeymouth'' short story, you can be a cussing, hard-drinking mercenary who rides a unicorn into battle and still be able to satisfy a full whorehouse each night, not to mention being satisfied yourself. [[spoiler:Apparently the unicorn's radar can't distinguish between those who are ''still technically'' virgins and those who are truly chaste.]]
* In ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' Katniss Everdeen is this, not wanting to bring
another magpie but leaves him not soon after their children leave child into the nest. She falls [[InterspeciesRomance for a bluebird]] not soon afterwards but CrapsackWorld. [[spoiler:However, as the world gets better thanks to her affections are unrequited. Maggie spends actions, she eventually gives up her virginity in the rest final chapter of the book single.book.]]
* In the ''Literature/JacobsLadderTrilogy'', Perceval took a vow of celibacy due to viewing romance as a distraction from her duty.
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': Brother Neuro was raised to be celibate all his life and claims to be above such "dust mind" concerns as getting laid. [[HormoneAddledTeenager His teenage body disagrees]] so he has to resist the temptation daily.
* In the Literature/KateDaniels novels by Ilona Andrews, Kate remains celibate for much of her adult life. Partly because she thinks friends and lovers will distract her from her mission in life, partly because everyone close to her dies violently (her mother, her father, her mentor, and her friend), partly because [[CantHaveSexEver sex would expose her secrets]], partly because any guy powerful enough to protect himself from [[ItsNotYouItsMyEnemies the skeletons in her closet]] probably didn't get that kind of power by being ethical, but mostly just because she's afraid of being hurt or rejected.
* Taken way, way to the extreme in the Creator/LeoTolstoy novella ''The Kreutzer Sonata''. Not only does the protagonist kill his wife in a jealous rage, but he makes the argument that one should renounce sex in any circumstance, including marriage, and that the subsequent death of the species would mark humanity's highest moral achievement. The fact that this story is more or less an AuthorTract brings it perilously close to {{Squick}}. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voluntary_Human_Extinction_Movement People are already working on this.]]
* Joscelin Verreuil in the ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'' series is sworn to celibacy as part of his vows as a Cassiline monk. Played up for much angst in the second book, but he and Phedre are finally together for the third book.
* In ''Literature/{{Lamb}}'', Joshua was told by an angel that he could never "know" a woman, but never explained exactly was meant by that. Josh and Biff take it in the Biblical sense, and so Joshua remains celibate his whole life (though Biff gets around enough for the both of them).
* Enjolras, from ''Literature/LesMiserables'' also has "Love is a Distraction" taken to extremes, as evidenced by his introduction and by his reply, when one of the others is commenting on how the others all have mistresses, of Patria.
* In Jack Campbell's ''Literature/TheLostFleet'', there is exactly one woman in the fleet that it would not be improper for Geary to have a relationship with. Then she learns her husband might be alive. There is plenty of {{UST}} between him and a subordinate, [[LovedINotHonourMore but they aren't even allowed by regulations to talk about it.]] [[spoiler:Until the Lost Fleet ceases to be lost, at which point Geary applies his Rule-Fu to the problem and They Do.]]
* [[AuthorTract Every single main character]] of Creator/HPLovecraft's stories is too busy being chased by tentacled monsters and/or slowly losing his sanity to get involved in any kind of romantic and/or sexual relationship.
* ''Literature/TheObsidianTrilogy'', written by Creator/MercedesLackey and James Mallory, features a hero who remains chaste and celibate -- virginal and unmarried, respectively -- for a year and a day in return for his life being saved by a unicorn. The penalty for breaking his vow, since his life was saved, will be death by goring. While the first woman he meets is his sister, and the next woman he finds himself intrigued by is the queen of the elves and happily married, the third woman he is attracted to is neither attached nor unattractive nor uninterested in him. This case also gets an interesting treatment in that the unicorn [[spoiler: apparently ''becomes'' fertile (or non-celibate) because of the hero's year of celibacy. The hero and unicorn's parting at the end of the series states that the hero no longer needs to be celibate, but that the unicorn won't have to be either!]]
* Michael in ''Literature/RedeemingLove'' fits this trope for the first half of the novel: hes still a virgin at the age of 26, and remains so [[ChastityCouple for several months into his marriage to the heroine]] (because he feels that the emotional connection formed during sex is crucial, and as a [[BrokenBird former prostitute]] she is [[LieBackAndThinkOfEngland unable to make that connection]]). He does eventually break out of this role and they ''very eventually'' end up HappilyMarried, with a healthy helping of of GoodPeopleHaveGoodSex [[spoiler:and BabiesEverAfter]].
* An [[AntiHero antiheroic]] example can be found in ''[[Literature/RieselTalesTwoHunters Riesel Tales: Two Hunters]]''. Ramy Dusotes, one of the two eponymous [[BountyHunter hunters]], actively avoids romance due to the disturbingly high number of perverts and sexual predators on [[WretchedHive Riesel]] (which includes her business partner [[TheCasanova Runge Margavo]]). Discounting her [[{{Tomboy}} tomboyishness]], she deliberately avoids wearing makeup or feminine clothes and retains a fairly pudgy figure in order to strengthen her barrier against Riesel's shallow lechers.
* Lord Meren, from Lynda Robinson's ancient Egyptian mysteries, has avoided serious romantic relationships since his wife passed away, having been so deeply in love with her that other women don't measure up. He has casual sex on occasion because it's normal social practice for noblemen, but the only woman he's emotionally attracted to is loaded down with political baggage that would compromise his objectivity as the Eyes of Pharaoh.
* Sergeant Jean in ''Literature/SevenMenOfGascony'' doesn't seem to have any interest in such things although it is not said why. One character speculates that he is {{Asexual}} though it is more fun to think that he had a lover in the past and never got over her.
* ''Literature/SherlockHolmes'', the eponymous character from the original novel and short story collections, considers "Love is a Distraction" to be his watchwords -- so much so that he can quite easily be read as both aromantic ''and'' {{asexual}}. This aspect of his character is often removed in adaptations with the PromotionToLoveInterest of Irene Adler, whom Holmes showed grudging respect for after her one appearance in canon.
* John from Creator/ManlyWadeWellman's 'Literature/SilverJohn' stories, until he meets and weds his true love Evadare. Given John's strong Christian coloring, this is probably a rare modern example of a hero celibate by belief system.
* Literature/SolomonKane is a devout Puritan and remains celibate because of his religious convictions.
** Which is not accurate, since Puritans believed God wanted everyone to have (marital) sex.
** Solomon Kane knew the "kisses" of a "deathless queen in a city old as Death," and compares her with Lilith (this refers to the attempted seduction by Nakari, a vampiric -- or at least very bloodthirsty -- queen of a lost African city). The same poem (''Solomon Kane's Homecoming'') implies that he had an old lover at home whom he was hoping to return to.
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':
** The ideal of both the Night's Watch and the Kingsguard is this. (Technically the vow only states "father no children" with regard to that, but the implications are clear and [[WordOfGod Martin himself]] has said that both are supposed to be celibate.) [[TheOathbreaker The practice]], on the other hand...
** Jon Snow gave a shot at this, refusing to go to the whorehouses when the other boys on the Wall did, refusing advances (all to obey the rules of the Night Watch). Didn't work out so well for him. Samwell Tarly was likewise forcibly thrown into his LoveInterest's bed.
** Knowing of the faultiness of such a pledge, the slave traders who own The Unsullied castrate the slaves for just this purpose. The slave trader proudly points out that while the Night's Watch and Kingsguard ''claim'' celibacy, The Unsullied are the only ones who are truly, well, unsullied.
%%* Emilio Sandoz in ''Literature/TheSparrow''. All the Jesuits on the Rakhat mission are.
* Orual, the narrator and main character of ''Literature/TillWeHaveFaces'', rather obliquely mentions near the end of the novel that she never lost her virginity. This is partly because as queen regnant she would have to give up her power to her husband if she ever married, partly because she has a rather negative view of romantic love thanks to one sister's shallowness and the other's being MarriedToAGod, and partly because she's convinced that she's so ugly no man would ever be attracted to her, queen or not.
* [[TheMedic Medicine Cats]] in ''[[Literature/WarriorCats Warriors]]'' have to take a vow to never have kittens. [[spoiler: Not that it stops them.]] Subverted with Mudfur. He's already a father while he was a medicine cat, but he already had kits with Brightsky when he was a warrior. But after her death and the deaths of three of their kits, THEN he became a medicine cat.
* Also from Lackey Tarma in the [[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Vows and Honor]] books is a Swordsworn, sworn to serve her people's Goddess as a warrior. In this case, rather than force her servants to torture themselves, the Goddess simply removes their ability to feel sexual desire entirely. This is particularly good for Tarma, who became Swordsworn in the aftermath of being [[RapeAsBackstory gang raped]] by the people who killed her clan.



[[folder: Religion and Mythology]]

to:

[[folder: Religion Mythology] and Mythology]]Religion]


Added DiffLines:

* Myth/KingArthur:
** Sir Gawain shares the bed of the Green Knight's lady night after night, but doesn't take advantage, as that would violate the laws of Chivalry and Hospitality. This display of virtue saves his life.
** Probably from the same root story: Pwyll, from the First Branch of the Mabinogion, chastely shares a bed with Arawn's wife, despite being flawlessly disguised as Arawn himself, which results in a lasting friendship between the two men.
This list shows the last 10 events of 358. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CelibateHero