History Main / CelebrityEdition

1st Feb '16 6:10:43 PM navaash
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* All but one Japanese game show (''Series/PanelQuizAttack25'') use Japanese celebrities due to TV prize laws [[GameShowWinningsCap limiting civilian prizes to 2 million JPY (about US$25,000) per person and 10 million JPY total]].

to:

* All but one Japanese game show (''Series/PanelQuizAttack25'') use Japanese celebrities due to TV prize laws [[GameShowWinningsCap limiting civilian prizes to 2 million JPY (about US$25,000) US$16,000) per person and 10 million JPY total]].
29th Jan '16 5:36:29 PM GrammarNavi
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* It may be a RatingsStunt, typically done [[{{Sweeps}} during the months of November, February, and May when commercial rates are determined]] (and, in May, the television season generally ends).

to:

* It may be a RatingsStunt, typically done [[{{Sweeps}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Sweeps}} during the months of November, February, and May when commercial rates are determined]] (and, in May, the television season generally ends).
8th Jan '16 11:23:49 PM Gimere
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* ''Series/BullseyeUS'' changed on December 7, 1981 to ''Celebrity Bullseye'', which added a best-of-three format to the front game (leading to more straddling than there was prior to this point) and removed the prize package from Bonus Island. Interestingly, the show continued having returning champs, resulting in such celebs as Loanne Bishop and Creator/ErnestBorgnine racking up well over $30,000.

to:

* ''Series/BullseyeUS'' ''[[Series/BullseyeUS Bullseye]]'' changed on December 7, 1981 to ''Celebrity Bullseye'', which added a best-of-three format to the front game (leading to more straddling than there was prior to this point) and removed the prize package from Bonus Island. Interestingly, the show continued having returning champs, resulting in such celebs as Loanne Bishop and Creator/ErnestBorgnine racking up well over $30,000.



* ''Series/HotPotato'', in what is probably the best example of how it can go very, ''very'' wrong. Having aired at Noon for its first thirteen weeks, the show ousted its unique three-of-a-kind contestant teams ("...and WE'RE telegram singers!~") on April 23, 1984 in favor of solo players being paired with two celebrity teammates. The trouble with this was that the celebrities were usually comic actors or comedians who took their wisecracks more seriously than they did the game. The show was canned ten weeks later.
** It should be noted that there was an all-celebrity week during the first part of the show's run, but it was Miss Americas vs. "All-American Sportsmen" and hence stayed true to the three-of-a-kind format.

to:

* ''Series/HotPotato'', in what ''Series/HotPotato'' is probably the best example of how it this can go very, ''very'' wrong. Having aired at Noon for its first thirteen weeks, the show ousted its unique three-of-a-kind contestant teams ("...and WE'RE telegram singers!~") on April 23, 1984 in favor of solo players being paired with two celebrity teammates. The trouble with this was that the celebrities were usually comic actors or comedians who took their wisecracks more seriously than they did the game. The show was canned ten weeks later.
** It should be noted that there was an all-celebrity week during the first part of the show's run, but it was Miss Americas vs. "All-American Sportsmen" and hence stayed true to the three-of-a-kind format.



* Done every few weeks/months in ''Series/TheChase'', and usually shown on a Sunday rather than a weekday like the normal episodes.

to:

* Done every few weeks/months in on ''Series/TheChase'', and usually shown on a Sunday rather than a weekday like the normal episodes.
29th Oct '15 6:55:38 PM Gimere
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* It may be a "special edition" or occasional treat for the viewer (e.g., Richard Dawson's ''FamilyFeud'' primetime specials).

to:

* It may be a "special edition" or occasional treat for the viewer (e.g., Richard Dawson's ''FamilyFeud'' ''Series/FamilyFeud'' primetime specials).



* All but one Japanese game show (''Panel Quiz Attack 25'') use Japanese celebrities due to TV prize laws [[GameShowWinningsCap limiting civilian prizes to 2 million JPY (about US$25,000) per person and 10 million JPY total]].

to:

* All but one Japanese game show (''Panel Quiz Attack 25'') (''Series/PanelQuizAttack25'') use Japanese celebrities due to TV prize laws [[GameShowWinningsCap limiting civilian prizes to 2 million JPY (about US$25,000) per person and 10 million JPY total]].



* The Australian ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' had this with celebrities from ''DancingWithTheStars''.

to:

* The Australian ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' had this with celebrities from ''DancingWithTheStars''.''Series/DancingWithTheStars''.



* Subverted by ''Series/{{Distraction}}'', which used former ''BigBrother'' contestants.

to:

* Subverted by ''Series/{{Distraction}}'', which used former ''BigBrother'' ''Series/BigBrother'' contestants.



* ''[[DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' had several celebrity episodes (including one with Music/WeirdAlYankovic and [[TheIncredibleHulk Lou Ferrigno]]) playing against each other. Nickelodeon mounted a pilot on July 27, 1987 for a spinoff called ''Celebrity Double Dare'' hosted by Bruce Jenner with teams of celebrities (Scott Baio and Heidi Bohay) and adult contestants, but it never got past there and said pilot never aired.

to:

* ''[[DoubleDare1986 ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' had several celebrity episodes (including one with Music/WeirdAlYankovic and [[TheIncredibleHulk [[Series/TheIncredibleHulk Lou Ferrigno]]) playing against each other. Nickelodeon mounted a pilot on July 27, 1987 for a spinoff called ''Celebrity Double Dare'' hosted by Bruce Jenner with teams of celebrities (Scott Baio and Heidi Bohay) and adult contestants, but it never got past there and said pilot never aired.



* ''Series/HotPotato'', in what is probably the best example of how it can go very, very wrong. Having aired at Noon for its first thirteen weeks, the show ousted its unique three-of-a-kind contestant teams ("...and WE'RE telegram singers!~") on April 23, 1984 in favor of solo players being paired with two celebrity teammates. The trouble with this was that the celebrities were usually comic actors or comedians who took their wisecracks more seriously than they did the game. The show was canned ten weeks later.

to:

* ''Series/HotPotato'', in what is probably the best example of how it can go very, very ''very'' wrong. Having aired at Noon for its first thirteen weeks, the show ousted its unique three-of-a-kind contestant teams ("...and WE'RE telegram singers!~") on April 23, 1984 in favor of solo players being paired with two celebrity teammates. The trouble with this was that the celebrities were usually comic actors or comedians who took their wisecracks more seriously than they did the game. The show was canned ten weeks later.



** The WWE-themed episode of the NBC version, which was hilarious because almost everyone remained completely [[{{Kayfabe}} in character]] for the entire show, leading to such brilliant moments as Triple H refusing to vote out Stephanie who was at the time (in the strictest sense) his boss (as well as his wife) and the Big Show towering over Anne when he was eliminated.
*** The other WWE episode was just as hilarious if not more so. At one point, Stone Cold Steve Austin refused to vote out Debra, saying he couldn't vote out his wife. Later that episode, Bubba Ray Dudley cited the same reason for refusing to vote out his tag team partner D-Von.

to:

** The WWE-themed Wrestling/{{WWE}} themed episode of the NBC Creator/{{NBC}} version, which was hilarious because almost everyone remained completely [[{{Kayfabe}} in character]] for the entire show, leading to such brilliant moments as Triple H Wrestling/TripleH refusing to vote out Stephanie who was at the time (in the strictest sense) his boss (as well as his wife) and the Big Show Wrestling/TheBigShow towering over Anne when he was eliminated.
*** The other WWE episode was just as hilarious if not more so. At one point, Stone Cold Steve Austin Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin refused to vote out Debra, saying he couldn't vote out his wife. Later that episode, Bubba Ray Dudley cited the same reason for refusing to vote out his tag team partner D-Von.



* The original ''{{Series/Concentration}}'' had an annual Christmas episode where two celebrities, both dressed as Santa, would match dollar amounts for charity.

to:

* The original ''{{Series/Concentration}}'' ''Series/{{Concentration}}'' had an annual Christmas episode where two celebrities, both dressed as Santa, would match dollar amounts for charity.



* When the Bill Cullen edition of ''ThePriceIsRight'' did a ChannelHop from NBC to ABC in 1963, a celebrity was employed to play for members of the studio audience. Recently on the current show with Drew Carey, celebrities were used on special shows to help contestants win their pricing game.

to:

* When the Bill Cullen edition of ''ThePriceIsRight'' ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' did a ChannelHop from NBC to ABC in 1963, a celebrity was employed to play for members of the studio audience. Recently on the current show with Drew Carey, celebrities were used on special shows to help contestants win their pricing game.



* Downplayed by ''{{Series/Overhaulin}}''. The show has had celebrity "marks" (Ian Ziering, Lance Armstrong), but they aired as part of the normal season and the celebrities weren't treated any differently than non-celebrities. (Although Lance Armstrong's episode did get an independent DVD release due to his Livestrong charity.)

to:

* Downplayed by ''{{Series/Overhaulin}}''.''Series/{{Overhaulin}}''. The show has had celebrity "marks" (Ian Ziering, Lance Armstrong), but they aired as part of the normal season and the celebrities weren't treated any differently than non-celebrities. (Although Lance Armstrong's episode did get an independent DVD release due to his Livestrong charity.)
9th Sep '15 9:40:11 AM BKelly95
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Added DiffLines:

* Downplayed by ''{{Series/Overhaulin}}''. The show has had celebrity "marks" (Ian Ziering, Lance Armstrong), but they aired as part of the normal season and the celebrities weren't treated any differently than non-celebrities. (Although Lance Armstrong's episode did get an independent DVD release due to his Livestrong charity.)
23rd Aug '15 1:50:10 PM Prfnoff
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* ''BullseyeUS'' changed on December 7, 1981 to ''Celebrity Bullseye'', which added a best-of-three format to the front game (leading to more straddling than there was prior to this point) and removed the prize package from Bonus Island. Interestingly, the show continued having returning champs, resulting in such celebs as Loanne Bishop and Creator/ErnestBorgnine racking up well over $30,000.

to:

* ''BullseyeUS'' ''Series/BullseyeUS'' changed on December 7, 1981 to ''Celebrity Bullseye'', which added a best-of-three format to the front game (leading to more straddling than there was prior to this point) and removed the prize package from Bonus Island. Interestingly, the show continued having returning champs, resulting in such celebs as Loanne Bishop and Creator/ErnestBorgnine racking up well over $30,000.



* The ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' sketch "World Forum" had famous Communists Creator/KarlMarx, UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, UsefulNotes/CheGuevara and UsefulNotes/MaoZedong as contestants on a QuizShow about football teams.

to:

* The ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' sketch "World Forum" had famous Communists Creator/KarlMarx, UsefulNotes/VladimirLenin, UsefulNotes/CheGuevara and UsefulNotes/MaoZedong as contestants on a QuizShow about football UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball teams.
26th Jul '15 10:07:30 PM MichaelJ
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Added DiffLines:

**In one celebrity series, the "fastest finger" round whittled down the contestants until only Norm Macdonald was left. His question: "Put the following letters in order to spell a popular man's name. (A) N. (B) O. (C) R. (D) M." Macdonald took just over 9 seconds to get the answer.
1st Jul '15 10:21:32 AM FourthDerivative
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* It may be a RatingsStunt, typically done during the months of November, February, and May when commercial rates are determined (and, in May, the television season generally ends).

to:

* It may be a RatingsStunt, typically done [[{{Sweeps}} during the months of November, February, and May when commercial rates are determined determined]] (and, in May, the television season generally ends).
6th Jun '15 5:19:00 PM Prfnoff
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* ''[[BigBrother Celebrity Big Brother]]''

to:

* ''[[BigBrother ''[[Series/BigBrother Celebrity Big Brother]]''



* ''TradingSpaces'' had several episodes where neighboring celebrities swapped homes, donned smocks, and got spattered with paint under the guidance of a pair of interior designers. Mind you, this doesn't count the episode where Slash of Guns 'n' Roses just wandered in (because he was a friend of one of the couples) and got put to work sewing curtains.

to:

* ''TradingSpaces'' ''Series/TradingSpaces'' had several episodes where neighboring celebrities swapped homes, donned smocks, and got spattered with paint under the guidance of a pair of interior designers. Mind you, this doesn't count the episode where Slash of Guns 'n' Roses just wandered in (because he was a friend of one of the couples) and got put to work sewing curtains.



* A PoliticalCartoon in ''PrivateEye'' said that due to the UsefulNotes/GulfWar's blanket TV coverage, it would be followed by a Celebrity Gulf War.
* The ''SaturdayNightLive'' version of ''Celebrity Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', where the celebs were TooDumbToLive or downright sadistic towards Alex Trebek (played by Will Ferrell). The categories were hilarious easy stuff like "Automatic Points", "How Many Fingers Am I Holding Up?", "[[UsefulNotes/BarackObama Current Black Presidents]]", and "Colors That End In -Urple"...but that didn't stop the celebs from racking up insane halftime totals of -$50,000 or more. Recurring characters besides Trebek included {{Cloudcuckoolander}} Burt Reynolds (played by Norm [=MacDonald=]) and Trebek's sadistic arch-nemesis Sean Connery (played by Darryl Hammond).

to:

* A PoliticalCartoon in ''PrivateEye'' ''Magazine/PrivateEye'' said that due to the UsefulNotes/GulfWar's blanket TV coverage, it would be followed by a Celebrity Gulf War.
* The ''SaturdayNightLive'' ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' version of ''Celebrity Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', where the celebs were TooDumbToLive or downright sadistic towards Alex Trebek (played by Will Ferrell). The categories were hilarious easy stuff like "Automatic Points", "How Many Fingers Am I Holding Up?", "[[UsefulNotes/BarackObama Current Black Presidents]]", and "Colors That End In -Urple"...but that didn't stop the celebs from racking up insane halftime totals of -$50,000 or more. Recurring characters besides Trebek included {{Cloudcuckoolander}} Burt Reynolds (played by Norm [=MacDonald=]) and Trebek's sadistic arch-nemesis Sean Connery (played by Darryl Hammond).
29th Jan '15 5:11:11 PM Ccook1956
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Added DiffLines:

* When the Bill Cullen edition of ''ThePriceIsRight'' did a ChannelHop from NBC to ABC in 1963, a celebrity was employed to play for members of the studio audience. Recently on the current show with Drew Carey, celebrities were used on special shows to help contestants win their pricing game.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CelebrityEdition