History Main / CavalryOfficer

30th Jun '16 2:31:36 PM margdean56
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This is partly because it usually was more expensive to serve in the cavalry than in other arms of service because they wore more [[BlingOfWar glamourous dress]] and had to pay for their own horses - and as a cavalryman you generally could expect to lose at least one or two horses in the course of a campaign. Add to this a tendency of cavalry officers to look upon themselves as a continuation of of the knights of old in more modern times, and you see why in many films set in historic wars a Cavalry Officer tends to be more strict in the appliance of military rituals and codes of honour - when you have a duel scene, there is often a cavalry officer involved - and also more likely to indulge in a spendthrift "aristocratic" lifestyle including gambling, womanizing, racing and various eccentricities to a larger extent than officers of other services. In this context it is worth recalling that both the positive "chivalrous" and the negative "cavalier" are derived from a French root meaning "horseman".

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This is partly because it usually was more expensive to serve in the cavalry than in other arms of service because they wore more [[BlingOfWar glamourous glamorous dress]] and had to pay for their own horses - -- and as a cavalryman you generally could expect to lose at least one or two horses in the course of a campaign. Add to this a tendency of cavalry officers to look upon themselves as a continuation of of the knights of old in more modern times, and you see why in many films set in historic wars a Cavalry Officer tends to be more strict in the appliance of military rituals and codes of honour - -- when you have a duel scene, there is often a cavalry officer involved - -- and also more likely to indulge in a spendthrift "aristocratic" lifestyle including gambling, womanizing, racing and various eccentricities to a larger extent than officers of other services. In this context it is worth recalling that both the positive "chivalrous" and the negative "cavalier" are derived from a French root meaning "horseman".
29th Jun '16 5:36:21 PM MaskedAndDangerous
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* Captain "Give-Em-Hell" Stokes of Django Wexler's Literature/TheShadowCampaigns series. Despite his well known enthusiasm, he's generally considered competent, coming to the aid of the heroes while hollering at the top of his lungs at several points in the books.
3rd Jun '16 11:36:04 PM Doug86
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In some ways the Cavalry Officer survived the death of cavalry as an important force on the battlefield, and that his heritage continued in the age of industrialized warfare. For instance, once UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne became dominated by trench warfare, quite a number of cavalry officers joined the nascent air service to become fighter pilots, the most famous one being former uhlan officer Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, the RedBaron. This probably helped contribute to air combat acquiring its "chivalric" image. Later on, many British cavalry regiments were re-equipped with tanks instead of horses, but cavalry traditions and modes of thinking persisted. British military historian Corelli Barnett blamed these factors, which for instance led to a tendency to neglect co-operation between armour, mechanized infantry, and artillery, for many British reverses in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. Other cavalry units were equipped with armoured cars or helicopters.

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In some ways the Cavalry Officer survived the death of cavalry as an important force on the battlefield, and that his heritage continued in the age of industrialized warfare. For instance, once UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI became dominated by trench warfare, quite a number of cavalry officers joined the nascent air service to become fighter pilots, the most famous one being former uhlan officer Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, the RedBaron. This probably helped contribute to air combat acquiring its "chivalric" image. Later on, many British cavalry regiments were re-equipped with tanks instead of horses, but cavalry traditions and modes of thinking persisted. British military historian Corelli Barnett blamed these factors, which for instance led to a tendency to neglect co-operation between armour, mechanized infantry, and artillery, for many British reverses in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Other cavalry units were equipped with armoured cars or helicopters.
12th Nov '15 8:21:31 PM DeisTheAlcano
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-->You're wrong there. They aren't forgotten because they haven't died. They're living right out there, Collingwood and the rest. And they'll keep on living as long as the regiment lives. The pay is $13 a month and their diet is beans and hay. It may be horsemeat before this campaign is over. They fight over cards or rotgut whiskey but share the last drop in their canteens. Their faces may change, the names. But they're there. They're the regiment, the regular army--now and fifty years from now.
-->Kirby Yorke's [[ToAbsentFriends tribute to comrades]] from ''Film/FortApache''

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\n-->You're ->''"You're wrong there. They aren't forgotten because they haven't died. They're living right out there, Collingwood and the rest. And they'll keep on living as long as the regiment lives. The pay is $13 a month and their diet is beans and hay. It may be horsemeat before this campaign is over. They fight over cards or rotgut whiskey but share the last drop in their canteens. Their faces may change, the names. But they're there. They're the regiment, the regular army--now and fifty years from now.
-->Kirby Yorke's
now."''
-->-- '''Kirby Yorke'''
[[ToAbsentFriends paying tribute to comrades]] from his comrades]], ''Film/FortApache''
27th Sep '15 12:15:45 PM Morgenthaler
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-->Kirby Yorke's [[ToAbsentFriends tribute to comrades]] from FortApache

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-->Kirby Yorke's [[ToAbsentFriends tribute to comrades]] from FortApache
''Film/FortApache''
28th Jun '15 3:05:58 AM Chabal2
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* ''ComicBook/LesTuniquesBleues'' is about two cavalrymen both in the WildWest and during the CivilWar. The only one who's really typical is Captain Stark, who knows how to do one thing only ("CHAAAAAAAARRRGGGEEEEE!!!"), much to the dismay of his underlings (he once led a charge with a grand total of three men including himself).
23rd Apr '15 3:30:14 AM jormis29
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* General Hans Joachim von Zieten (1699-1786), colonel-in-chief of a Prussian hussar regiment was renowned as a leader of light cavalry; his propensity for ambushing the enemy earned him the sobriquet "Zieten aus dem Busch" (Zieten from the bush). However, he also subverted the trope somewhat, being a pious Lutheran of exemplary morals and also a competent leader of entire armies - when FrederickTheGreat had to leave on other business, he usually entrusted his army to him. One measure of his excellence as a ''leader'' as opposed to a mere fighter was that he is said to have drawn his sabre in anger just once during the entire UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar, even though he led plenty of charges, ambushes etc. (On one reconnaissance he and a few others were surprised by a group of Austrian cavalrymen, compelling him to literally cut his way through).

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* General Hans Joachim von Zieten (1699-1786), colonel-in-chief of a Prussian hussar regiment was renowned as a leader of light cavalry; his propensity for ambushing the enemy earned him the sobriquet "Zieten aus dem Busch" (Zieten from the bush). However, he also subverted the trope somewhat, being a pious Lutheran of exemplary morals and also a competent leader of entire armies - when FrederickTheGreat UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat had to leave on other business, he usually entrusted his army to him. One measure of his excellence as a ''leader'' as opposed to a mere fighter was that he is said to have drawn his sabre in anger just once during the entire UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar, even though he led plenty of charges, ambushes etc. (On one reconnaissance he and a few others were surprised by a group of Austrian cavalrymen, compelling him to literally cut his way through).
6th Apr '15 8:12:41 AM Menshevik
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* The hero of Theodor Fontane's novel ''Schach von Wuthenow'' (which was also filmed) is an officer of an elite Prussian horse guards regiment, the Gens d'armes, the aristocratic officers of which were notorious for their arrogance and boisterousness. As it is set on the eve of the catastrophic defeat of 1806, there is a sense of dark foreboding.

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* The hero of Theodor Fontane's Creator/TheodorFontane's novel ''Schach von Wuthenow'' (which was also filmed) is an officer of an elite Prussian horse guards regiment, the Gens d'armes, the aristocratic officers of which were notorious for their arrogance and boisterousness. As it is set on the eve of the catastrophic defeat of 1806, there is a sense of dark foreboding.
28th Mar '15 12:38:07 PM mongol
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The Cavalry Officer serves as the leader of a group of mounted soldiers. Although by no means restricted to the genre, he appears especially as a stock character in Western fiction. Given the ridiculously huge nature of the American west, cavalry forces were the [[JustForPun workhorses]] of military forces trying to control the frontier. The Cavalry Officer is typically a professional soldier but may also be represented by anyone in control of mounted civilian or paramilitary forces (such as Texas Rangers, for example).

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The Cavalry Officer serves as is the leader of a group of mounted soldiers. Although by no means restricted to the genre, he appears especially as a stock character in Western fiction. Given the ridiculously huge nature of the American west, cavalry forces were the [[JustForPun workhorses]] of military forces trying to control the frontier. The Cavalry Officer is typically a professional soldier but may also be represented by anyone in control of mounted civilian or paramilitary forces (such as Texas Rangers, for example).
1st Feb '15 3:23:03 PM Smiffy
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* ''Film/{{Utu}}'' (1983): Lt. Elliot (heroic) and Col. Elliot (villainous).
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