History Main / CardboardPrison

22nd Feb '17 2:15:22 PM margdean56
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* This trope is largely averted in real life. There's a great number of people that based their assumptions that any "especially dangerous" criminal could easily get out of any prison, when [[RealityIsUnrealistic it's really quite far from the truth]]. All it takes is a few high profile escapes, and that security is based on the assumption that it can fail, and putting in as many safeguards in to prevent it. Guards must go through an exhaustive background check, and their training has a high attrition rate for a reason. Also, some, such as military corrections officers, have a way of minimizing the risk of an inside job through simply rotating them to a different facility every few years.

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* This trope is largely averted in real life. There's a A great number of people that based their assumptions assume that any "especially dangerous" criminal could easily get out of any prison, when [[RealityIsUnrealistic it's really quite far from the truth]]. All it takes is a few high profile escapes, and that security is based on the assumption that it can fail, and putting in as many safeguards in to prevent it. Guards must go through an exhaustive background check, and their training has a high attrition rate for a reason. Also, some, such as military corrections officers, have a way of minimizing the risk of an inside job through simply rotating them to a different facility every few years.



* Creator/{{Socrates}} was supposedly put in one of these. He was put on trial for what amounted to asking lawyers really hard questions in public and making them look dumb. He was sentenced to either pay a small fine or death. They only wanted to publicly best him and were surprised when he chose death and tried to make an escape easy, so people wouldn't see them as murderers. The cell was left unlocked, guards would take frequent breaks, and he could have almost definitely have had a student bribe his way out, but never did for two reasons. The first is his philosophy on the issue and inevitability of him avoiding the situation again, and the second is that he saw it as an argument; by being executed, [[ThanatosGambit he proved the lawyers unjust]].

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* Creator/{{Socrates}} was supposedly put in one of these. He was put on trial for what amounted to asking lawyers really hard questions in public and making them look dumb. He was sentenced to either pay a small fine or death. They only wanted to publicly best him and were surprised when he chose death and death. They tried to make an escape easy, so people wouldn't see them as murderers. The cell was left unlocked, guards would take frequent breaks, and he could have almost definitely have had a student bribe his way out, but never did for two reasons. The first is his philosophy on the issue and the inevitability of him avoiding the situation occurring again, and the second is that he saw it as an argument; by being executed, [[ThanatosGambit he proved the lawyers unjust]].



* During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, a French POW made a deal with the guards of his prison camp -- he would be "allowed" to escape the camp to visit his family back in occupied France (with the guards giving him false documents, skipping him during roll call, tasking one of their own to sleep in his bunk and generally looking the other way), and in return he had to promise that he would come back, and bring some rationed delicatessen (wine, cheese, cutlery, etc.) for everyone. ''He did''. ''Several times''. Not as surprising as it first appears. Most camps for French [=PoWs=] and forced labour where small affairs somewhere out in the country close to the farms they worked. The camps themselves were guarded by the (newly-drafted) farmers from these farms who were too old or too sick for frontline duty. So you have gaurds who often shared their meals and always their work with those they guarded (and rumours suggest there were also quite a few 'family matters' binding them together). Under such circumstances it is not too hard to see how such a thing could happen.

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* During UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, a French POW made a deal with the guards of his prison camp -- he would be "allowed" to escape the camp to visit his family back in occupied France (with the guards giving him false documents, skipping him during roll call, tasking one of their own to sleep in his bunk and generally looking the other way), and in return he had to promise that he would come back, and bring some rationed delicatessen delicacies (wine, cheese, cutlery, etc.) for everyone. ''He did''. ''Several times''. Not as surprising as it first appears. Most camps for French [=PoWs=] and forced labour where were small affairs somewhere out in the country close to the farms they worked. The camps themselves were guarded by the (newly-drafted) farmers from these farms who were too old or too sick for frontline duty. So you have gaurds guards who often shared their meals and always their work with those they guarded (and rumours suggest there were also quite a few 'family matters' binding them together). Under such circumstances it is not too hard to see how such a thing could happen.
22nd Feb '17 2:04:46 PM margdean56
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** ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' spoofs it, as the protagonist, Moist von Lipwig, discovers that he has the perfect means to escape his cell with some effort, using his spoon to scrape old plaster off the bricks. After days of effort he manages to get several bricks off -- only to discover a brand new brick wall behind it, along with a fresh spoon. Lord Vetinari believes that it gives the prisoners some much-needed exercise, and keeps their minds off from their impending execution.

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** ''Discworld/GoingPostal'' spoofs it, as the protagonist, Moist von Lipwig, discovers that he has the perfect means to escape his cell with some effort, using his spoon to scrape old plaster off the bricks. After days of effort he manages to get several bricks off -- only to discover a brand new brick wall behind it, along with a fresh spoon. Lord Vetinari believes that it gives the prisoners some much-needed exercise, and keeps their minds off from their impending execution.
21st Feb '17 1:07:10 PM LadyJaneGrey
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** The ghost containment unit is particularly unreliable. The marshmallow man might as well have been meeting with a parole officer. And yet it's actually very secure from the inside. Most of the break outs are some idiot (Slimer) shutting it down.

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** The ghost containment unit is particularly unreliable. The marshmallow man might as well have been meeting with a parole officer. (Although in fairness, two of the episodes with him involved the team ''letting'' him out.) And yet it's actually very secure from the inside. Most of the break outs are some idiot (Slimer) (like Slimer) shutting it down.down. Some powerful ghosts escape after a minion from the outside springs them, or a crisis with multiple ghosts endangers machinery.
** Egon tried several times to beef up the security. He placed a backup generator that would kick in in case of a blackout, but the first time it was needed, said blackout was caused by ghosts that could possess machinery. Another time, the Containment Unit ''itself'' was possessed. Egon once installed a fingerprint ID system to prevent an intruder from shutting it down, but that was abandoned after a demon possessed Peter in order to do it.
24th Jan '17 3:02:00 AM ShorinBJ
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* Iron Heights Penitentiary is one of these in ''{{Series/Arrow}}'', in grand comic book tradition. They lose ''at least'' four inmates per season and, in keeping with Starling's ViceCity nature, they put a higher premium on covering up their screw-ups then they do on fixing them.

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* Iron Heights Penitentiary is one of these in ''{{Series/Arrow}}'', in grand comic book tradition. They lose ''at least'' four inmates per season and, in keeping with Starling's ViceCity nature, they put a higher premium on covering up their screw-ups then they do on fixing them. And that's leaving aside the inmates being recruited for the Suicide Squad.
16th Jan '17 10:01:14 PM Alas_Poor_Donny
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* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', in every edition prior to fifth, actually keeping any player character in a jail cell required ignoring the standard difficulties and statistics listed in the manual, as there is essentially nothing that a character cannot eventually bypass with repeated attempts and in many editions even an excellent lock requires only a moderately good roll by an untrained character to pick unless more gold than the entire listed wealth of the city has been spent on magical reinforcement.
21st Dec '16 11:13:00 PM BattleMaster
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See also UnsafeHaven, where instead of a prison being laughably easy to break out, a sanctuary is laughably easy to break ''in.''

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Often involves TheGuardsMustBeCrazy. See also UnsafeHaven, where instead of a prison being laughably easy to break out, a sanctuary is laughably easy to break ''in.''
15th Dec '16 9:58:11 PM Ohio9
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* In ''RiseOfTheTombRaider'', Lara Croft is captured by Trinity soldiers and thrown in a prison so old and dilapidated that she's easily able to escape within seconds. Of course, it also helps that Trinity didn't bother posting any guards in the prison, and they conveniently left her equipment right outside her cell.

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* In ''RiseOfTheTombRaider'', ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'', Lara Croft is captured by Trinity soldiers and thrown in a prison so old and dilapidated that she's easily able to escape within seconds. Of course, it also helps that Trinity didn't bother posting any guards in the prison, and they conveniently left her equipment right outside her cell.
10th Dec '16 5:38:44 PM KrspaceT
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* [[ComicBook/NickSpencersCaptainAmerica Sam Wilson]] actually quipped about a pool for how long S.H.I.E.L.D can actually hold a villain (this case being Crossbones and he said two weeks). Given that he and Maria Hill were in the midst of a bit of a spat at the time, it's not quite sure how serious he was about it given that Sam's neither the most serious nor most joking of heroes.
8th Dec '16 7:15:41 AM Ohio9
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* In ''RiseOfTheTombRaider'', Lara Croft is captured by Trinity soldiers and thrown in a prison so old and dilapidated that she's easily able to escape within seconds. Of course, it also helps that Trinity didn't bother posting any guards in the prison, and they conveniently left her equipment right outside her cell.
5th Dec '16 11:42:56 AM AnonFangeekGirl
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* Syndrome's prison in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' doesn't work for long on Violet, because she can block the electricity holding her suspended with her force fields.
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