History Main / CapcomSequelStagnation

23rd Mar '17 11:56:33 AM Meyers07TheTroper
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* Speaking of Microsoft, how much has Office 2016 changed from 2007? Not one bit internally, but 2010 introduces a new UI that's further redesigned to fit with Microsoft's "Modern" style UI in 2013 and 2016. While some versions of 2007 (particularly Enterprise) lacks DRM, from 2010 onwards Microsoft Office has tougher DRM though it didn't stop some people from breaking it.

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* Speaking of Microsoft, how much has Office 2016 changed from 2007? Not one bit internally, but 2010 introduces a new UI that's further redesigned to fit with Microsoft's "Modern" style UI in 2013 and 2016. While some versions of 2007 (particularly Enterprise) lacks DRM, from 2010 onwards Microsoft Office has tougher DRM though it didn't stop some people from breaking it.
23rd Mar '17 11:55:54 AM Meyers07TheTroper
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* On a very cursory level, Windows still looks like Windows 95. But analyze the codebase and you will see that about half of Windows 10 was introduced in Windows Vista. Yes, they had to ''arbitrarily '''change the major version''''' for Windows 10 (without doing much to deserve it, which is why they were able to offer the free upgrades) because having 8.1 be NT 6.3 internally was starting to become a disgrace.
* Speaking of Microsoft, how much has Office 2016 changed from 2007? Not one bit.

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* On a very cursory level, Windows still looks like Windows 95. But analyze the codebase and you will see that about half of Windows 10 was introduced in Windows Vista.Vista (and the most famous version since 2009, Windows 7, was essentially a more stable finalized, Vista). Yes, they had to ''arbitrarily '''change the major version''''' for Windows 10 (without doing much to deserve it, which is why they were able to offer the free upgrades) because having 8.1 be NT 6.3 internally was starting to become a disgrace.
* Speaking of Microsoft, how much has Office 2016 changed from 2007? Not one bit.bit internally, but 2010 introduces a new UI that's further redesigned to fit with Microsoft's "Modern" style UI in 2013 and 2016. While some versions of 2007 (particularly Enterprise) lacks DRM, from 2010 onwards Microsoft Office has tougher DRM though it didn't stop some people from breaking it.
21st Mar '17 2:48:46 PM LinTaylor
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* The ''VideoGame/GundamVsSeries'', developed by Capcom, has been zig-zagging the trope:

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* The ''VideoGame/GundamVsSeries'', originally developed by Capcom, has been zig-zagging the trope:



** Thankfully, the later games in the series avert this; ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED Alliance Vs. ZAFT]]'' boasts a drastic overhaul to the game engine, ''Gundam Vs. Gundam'' gains FanService points for covering the franchise's entire 30-year history, and each of those games has a sequel that greatly bolsters the roster and adds in an interesting Mission Mode. And then they announced ''Extreme Versus'', which is an overhaul of ''Gundam Vs. Gundam'' with [=PS3=]-level graphics (every other game in the series was Dreamcast/[=PS2=]-level).
** Unfortunately, shortly after ''Extreme'' got a console port, they announced ''Extreme Vs. Full Boost''. And when ''that'' got a console port, they unveiled ''Extreme Vs. Maxi Boost''. The roster of mobile suits is getting boosted with each installment (''Full Boost'' having nearly 120 Mobile Suits, counting DLC), but the game engine is largely unchanged save for some balance tweaks and slight changes to the SuperMode mechanic. Fans are beginning to get a little leery.

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** Thankfully, the later games in the series avert this; Next came ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED Alliance Vs. ZAFT]]'' boasts ZAFT]]'', which boasted a drastic overhaul to the game engine, and was likewise followed by ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDDestiny Alliance Vs. ZAFT II]]''; its home version added new content, including characters and machines from ''MobileSuitGundamSEEDCE73Stargazer'' and a new mission mode, and was labeled ''Alliance Vs. ZAFT II Plus''.
**
''Gundam Vs. Gundam'' gains FanService points for covering skipped further adaptations in favor of pure {{Fanservice}} by [[MegaCrossover crossing over]] all the franchise's entire 30-year history, and each of those games has a sequel that greatly bolsters ''Gundam'' series they could[[note]]but the roster was still limited to two characters from each show, except [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam the original]], which got four[[/note]]. The sequel, ''Gundam Vs. Gundam Next'' added a bunch of new characters (including many fan favorites); it was later ported to PSP as ''Gundam Vs. Gundam Next Plus'', gaining even more new characters and adds in an interesting Mission Mode. And then they a mission mode.
** At this point, development of the series was handed over to Bandai Namco, who
announced ''Extreme Versus'', which is an Vs.'', a new iteration of the series that upgraded the graphics to {{Playstation 3}}-level (Capcom's iterations always used the [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]]-level NAOMI board) and boasted a complete overhaul of the gameplay engine. However, the ''[=ExVs=]'' sub-series quickly fell into this, between console ports and sequels (''Full Boost'', ''Maxi Boost'', and ''Maxi Boost ON'') which simply added to the game's roster while only making minor tweaks to the game engine.
** Most recently, Bandai Namco announced an entirely new gamed simply titled
''Gundam Vs. Gundam'' Versus'' designed specifically for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 with [=PS3=]-level graphics (every other game in the series was Dreamcast/[=PS2=]-level).
** Unfortunately, shortly after ''Extreme'' got a console port, they announced ''Extreme Vs. Full Boost''. And when ''that'' got a console port, they unveiled ''Extreme Vs. Maxi Boost''. The roster of mobile suits is getting boosted
no arcade release; as with each installment (''Full Boost'' having nearly 120 Mobile Suits, counting DLC), but ''[=ExVs=]'', this iteration boasts upgraded current-gen graphics[[note]]courtesy of the game engine is largely unchanged save for some balance tweaks team that helped create the [[VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain FOX Engine]][[/note]] and slight big changes to gameplay. However, for the SuperMode mechanic. Fans are beginning to get most part the game is still mostly just a little leery.[=PS4=] version of the ''[=ExVs=]'' games.
15th Mar '17 6:25:38 PM nombretomado
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* [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI The original]] ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' has been released on the NES, {{MSX}}2, UsefulNotes/WonderSwan Color, [=PlayStation=], Game Boy Advance, mobile phones, PSP, Wii Virtual Console, [=PlayStation=] Network, and iPhone and iPod Touch. Each release has seen a handful of gameplay tweaks and a bonus dungeon or two, but the game is the same. With the exception of the Wii release, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' has seen a release on all of those platforms too, often bundled together with the first game. It too, is basically the same game with a bonus dungeon added.

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* [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI The original]] ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' has been released on the NES, {{MSX}}2, UsefulNotes/{{MSX2}}, UsefulNotes/WonderSwan Color, [=PlayStation=], Game Boy Advance, mobile phones, PSP, Wii Virtual Console, [=PlayStation=] Network, and iPhone and iPod Touch. Each release has seen a handful of gameplay tweaks and a bonus dungeon or two, but the game is the same. With the exception of the Wii release, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' has seen a release on all of those platforms too, often bundled together with the first game. It too, is basically the same game with a bonus dungeon added.
18th Jan '17 12:31:19 PM X2X
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* ''Dead Rising'' slid into this first with the release of ''Dead Rising 2 Case Zero'', ''Dead Rising 2'', ''Dead Rising: Cast West'', and ''Dead Rising 2: Off the Record'' all being released in a little over a year between the first and the last. ''Off The Record'' sees the reuse of the Fortune City setting, with an additional area, new weapon combinations and [[AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent switching the protagonist]] to Frank West in a "what if" scenario.
** Capcom went into [[SelfDeprecation full self-aware parody mode]] for their ''Dead Rising 3'' DLC announced at E3 2014, titled ''[[http://youtu.be/N5Plhv_mPT4?t=1m7s Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha.]]''
* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney trilogy]] was originally released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, DS versions of all three games were made, [[{{Woolseyism}} localized]], and released internationally. Other than remastered music, a larger aspect ratio, and a bonus case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were mostly the same. Later, all three games were made available on WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no significant differences. The trilogy was later released in one package on the iOS store (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). This collection featured improved graphics, and many [[PortingDisaster problems]]. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, with the only difference being a slightly touched-up script. In 2016, ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' got its iOS version. A benefit from this trope is that all these titles [[TropesAreNotBad are still in the market, well after their home consoles became outdated]].

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* ''Dead Rising'' slid into this first with the release of ''Dead Rising 2 ''VideoGame/DeadRising2: Case Zero'', ''Dead Rising 2'', ''Dead Rising: Cast West'', and ''Dead Rising 2: Off the Record'' all being released in a little over a year between the first and the last. ''Off The the Record'' sees the reuse of the Fortune City setting, with an additional area, new weapon combinations and [[AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent switching the protagonist]] to Frank West in a "what if" "WhatIf" scenario.
** Capcom went into [[SelfDeprecation full self-aware parody mode]] for their ''Dead Rising 3'' DLC announced at E3 2014, titled ''[[http://youtu.be/N5Plhv_mPT4?t=1m7s ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Plhv_mPT4#t=1m7s Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha.]]''
* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney trilogy]] was originally released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, DS versions of all three games were made, [[{{Woolseyism}} localized]], and released internationally. Other than remastered music, a larger aspect ratio, and a bonus case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were mostly the same. Later, all three games were made available on WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no significant differences. The trilogy was later released in one package on the iOS store (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). This collection featured improved graphics, and many [[PortingDisaster problems]]. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, with the only difference being a slightly touched-up script. In 2016, ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' got its iOS version. A benefit from this trope is that all these titles [[TropesAreNotBad [[TropesAreTools are still in on the market, well after their home consoles became outdated]].



* Creator/ArcSystemWorks fell into this with the ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' games -- ''Guilty Gear XX'', the third game in the series, was followed with ''Guilty Gear XX #Reload'' (one "new" character, rebalanced moves), ''Guilty Gear Isuka'' (a four-player spin-off), ''Guilty Gear XX Slash'' (two new characters, one of which is from ''Isuka'', and more rebalancing), then ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core'', which despite having no new characters has enough gameplay changes that they probably could have gotten away with calling it ''Guilty Gear X3'' if ''Reload'' and ''Slash'' hadn't existed. Then came ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core '''Plus''''', which fixes some glitches and adds a ton of extra features, including a story mode that takes place after the original ''XX''.

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* Creator/ArcSystemWorks fell into this with the ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' games -- ''Guilty Gear XX'', the third game in the series, was followed with by ''Guilty Gear XX #Reload'' (one "new" character, character [Robo-Ky], rebalanced moves), ''Guilty Gear Isuka'' (a four-player spin-off), ''Guilty Gear XX Slash'' (two new characters, one of which whom [A.B.A] is from ''Isuka'', and more rebalancing), then ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core'', which despite having no new characters has enough gameplay changes that they probably could have gotten away with calling it ''Guilty Gear X3'' if ''Reload'' and ''Slash'' hadn't existed. Then came ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core '''Plus''''', which fixes some glitches and adds a ton of extra features, including a story mode Story Mode that takes place after the original ''XX''.



*** Additionally, a true sequel (''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'') was released around the same time as ''Accent Core Plus'' (the new story in ''AC+'' leads into ''Overture'' in some aspects where Sol, Ky, and Dizzy are concerned). And a sequel to both that and ''GGXX'', ''Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-'' has now been released.
** And ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R'' was released in 2013. No new characters but rebalance, move adjustment, and tournament legalizing Justice and Kliff were the order of the day.
** In late May 2015, barely half a year out from ''Xrd''[='s=] console release in Japan and the United States, an update, ''Xrd -REVELATOR-'', was announced, featuring additional characters (including a returning Johnny, who was an [[NonPlayerCharacter NPC]] in ''-SIGN-''; Jam, Raven, and Dizzy would be added in later updates) and [[RemixedLevel new versions of pre-existing stages]] not unlike the various revisions to ''XX''. Like ''Accent Core Plus'', the story continues on from where ''-SIGN-'' left off.

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*** Additionally, a true sequel (''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'') was released around the same time as ''Accent Core Plus'' (the new story in ''AC+'' leads into ''Overture'' in some aspects where Sol, Ky, and Dizzy are concerned). And a sequel to both that and ''GGXX'', ''Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-'' has now been was later released.
** And ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core Plus R'' was released in 2013. No new characters but rebalance, rebalancing, move adjustment, and tournament legalizing Justice and Kliff were the order of the day.
** In late May 2015, barely half a year out from ''Xrd''[='s=] console release in Japan and the United States, an update, ''Xrd -REVELATOR-'', was announced, featuring additional characters (including a returning Johnny, who was an [[NonPlayerCharacter NPC]] in ''-SIGN-''; Jam, Raven, and Dizzy would be added in later future updates) and [[RemixedLevel new versions of pre-existing stages]] not unlike the various revisions to ''XX''. Like As with ''Accent Core Plus'', the story continues on from where ''-SIGN-'' left off.



* ''VideoGame/DoDonPachi'' has had no less than ''nine'' followups, all of them a MissionPackSequel at best. ''Creator/{{Cave}}'' in general has frequently done "Black Label" versions of their more popular games, with a few tweaks and occasionally some minor content additions

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* ''VideoGame/DoDonPachi'' has had no less than ''nine'' followups, all of them a MissionPackSequel at best. ''Creator/{{Cave}}'' in general has frequently done "Black Label" versions of their more popular games, with a few tweaks and occasionally some minor content additionsadditions.



** Ironically enough, [[BrokenBase going out of their way to make it "fresh" and "new" as far as the characters went created a massive backlash]], this mostly due to the fact they gave fan-favorite characters in the sixth game wildly different weapons and play mechanics, possibly even ruining their design to many. [[InternetBackdraft The end result was...not pretty.]] Also the sixth game was the final end result of their increasingly ludicrous anachronistic costumes, one could compare it to a suspension of disbelief breaking moment in a fantasy drama, or a wrestler intentionally breaking kayfabe. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks They simply went too far in all ways at once]], and rather than break the mold, broke the base. Also, unmentioned in the bullet above [[CrowningMomentOfFunny but vitally important to understand how little changed between games]], Xiahou Dun's cape. It didn't stop clipping through the horse's ass for SEVEN iterations. (if you include expansions) This is why the drastic changes hurt the broken part of the fanbase so much, it was the 90 foot 90 degree drop at the end of a slow and calm graded incline.
*** All this was however brought back to normal with the 7th game which toned down several of the character designs and managed to actually appease the fanbase by moving the storyline ending point further back in history, resulting in a shed-load of new characters. Fans are still irritated however at two characters still not being present after being removed in the sixth game(Pang De and Zuo Ci). Pang De eventually gets brought back in the 7th game's expansion pack. Zuo Ci would just return in the ''8th'' installment.

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** Ironically enough, [[BrokenBase going out of their way to make it "fresh" and "new" as far as the characters went created a massive backlash]], this mostly due to the fact they gave fan-favorite characters in the sixth game wildly different weapons and play mechanics, possibly even ruining their design to many. [[InternetBackdraft The end result was... not pretty.]] Also the sixth game was the final end result of their increasingly ludicrous anachronistic costumes, one could compare it to a suspension of disbelief breaking moment in a fantasy drama, or a wrestler intentionally breaking kayfabe.{{kayfabe}}. [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks They simply went too far in all ways at once]], and rather than break the mold, broke the base. Also, unmentioned in the bullet above [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments but vitally important to understand how little changed between games]], Xiahou Dun's cape. It didn't stop clipping through the horse's ass for SEVEN iterations. (if you include expansions) This is why the drastic changes hurt the broken part of the fanbase so much, it was the 90 foot 90 degree drop at the end of a slow and calm graded incline.
*** All this was however brought back to normal with the 7th game which toned down several of the character designs and managed to actually appease the fanbase by moving the storyline ending point further back in history, resulting in a shed-load of new characters. Fans are still irritated however at two characters still not being present after being removed in the sixth game(Pang game (Pang De and Zuo Ci). Pang De would be eventually gets brought back in the 7th game's expansion pack. pack, whereas Zuo Ci would just didn't return in until the ''8th'' installment.



** There are ''eight'' games featuring [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaI Simon Belmont]] fighting Dracula in 1691.
** The above point about the Battle of 1999 not yet receiving a game (despite the ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Sorrow]]'' titles, ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaCurseOfDarkness Curse of Darkness]]'', and even ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaJudgment Judgment]]'' hinting at it) is most likely the reason ''Castlevania'' [[AlternateContinuity started a second timeline]] with ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow Lords of Shadow]]''. However, that string of installments is set to conclude fairly soon itself, as ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadowMirrorOfFate Mirror of Fate]]'' (the sequel to ''Lords of Shadow'') will then tie into ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow2 Lords of Shadow 2]]'', which is set to wrap up the ''Lords of Shadow'' story.
* This happens all too often with Konami's {{rhythm game}}s, due to their very nature, since the many sequels are essentially a chance to play about 30~60 new songs.
** In the ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'' series, the first 5 main arcade titles went from just ''DDR'' to ''DDR 5th Mix''; ''3rd'' and ''4th'' also had updated ''Plus'' versions with a few more songs and features. Then it went to ''DDRMAX'', ''MAX2'', ''Extreme'', ''Supernova'', ''Supernova 2'', and now ''X'', ''X2'', and the almost truly Capcom-like ''X3 vs. 2nd Mix''.
** In the ''{{Beatmania}}'' series, it goes: ''BM'', ''BM 2nd'', ''BM 3rd'', ''BM Complete'', ''BM 4th'', ''BM 5th'', ''BM Complete 2'', ''BM Club'', ''BM feat. DCT'', ''BM Core Remix'', ''BM 6th UK Underground'', ''BM 7th Keepin Evolution'', ''BM The Final'', ''BMIIDX'', ''BMIIDX Club'', ''BMIIDX Substream'', ''BMIIDX 2nd'' through ''10th'', ''BMIIDX 11 Red'', ''BMIIDX 12'' ''Happy Sky, BMIIDX 13 Distorted'', ''BMIIDX 14 Gold'', ''BMIIDX 15 DJ Troopers'', ''BMIIDX 16 Empress'', ''BMIIDX 17 Sirius'', ''BMIIDX 18 Resort Anthem'', ''BMIIDX 19 Lincle''. And again, this only includes the main arcade series; not any of the home console versions, and not any of the arcade variants like ''Beatstage'' nor ''HipHopMania''.
** The strangest thing is that a game intended to change the gameplay up (albeit only slightly) didn't do quite well, that game being ''beatmaniaIII''. On that note, ''BMII'' is intended to be much the same back to ''BM'', albeit much more popular.
* Creator/BioWare has re-released countless compilations of ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' packages, one with each new expansion pack or sequel. ''Gold'', ''Platinum'', ''Diamond''.. ''Diamond'' was not the ultimate collection. ''[=NWN2=]'' and its expansions were then included in more collections. The same happened with older Infinity Engine games also. This is referenced in-universe as well, where Deekin's books about the events of the first game and expansions went through all the same compilations and re-releases as the game itself.

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** There are ''eight'' ''six'' games featuring Simon Belmont fighting Dracula in 1691: [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaI Simon Belmont]] fighting Dracula in 1691.
the original]] ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', ''Vampire Killer'', ''VideoGame/HauntedCastle'', ''VideoGame/SuperCastlevaniaIV'', ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChronicles Akumajō Dracula]]'', and ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaChronicles''.
** The above point about the Battle of 1999 not yet receiving a game (despite the ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow Sorrow]]'' titles, ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaCurseOfDarkness Curse of Darkness]]'', and even ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaJudgment Judgment]]'' hinting at it) is most likely the reason ''Castlevania'' [[AlternateContinuity started a second timeline]] with ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow Lords of Shadow]]''. However, that string of installments is set to conclude concluded fairly soon quickly itself, as ''[=LoS=]'' was followed by ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadowMirrorOfFate Mirror of Fate]]'' (the sequel to ''Lords of Shadow'') will then tie into and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow2 Lords of Shadow 2]]'', the latter of which is set to wrap wrapped up the ''Lords of Shadow'' story.
* This happens all too often with Konami's {{rhythm game}}s, due to their very nature, since the many sequels are essentially a chance to play about 30~60 30-60 new songs.
** In the ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolution'' series, the first 5 main arcade titles went from just ''DDR'' to ''DDR 5th Mix''; ''3rd'' and ''4th'' also had updated ''Plus'' versions with a few more songs and features. Then it went to ''DDRMAX'', ''MAX2'', ''[=MAX2=]'', ''Extreme'', ''Supernova'', ''Supernova 2'', and now ''X'', ''X2'', and the almost truly Capcom-like ''X3 vs. 2nd Mix''.
** In the ''{{Beatmania}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Beatmania}}'' series, it goes: ''BM'', ''BM 2nd'', ''BM 3rd'', ''BM Complete'', ''BM 4th'', ''BM 5th'', ''BM Complete 2'', ''BM Club'', ''BM feat. DCT'', ''BM Core Remix'', ''BM 6th UK Underground'', ''BM 7th Keepin Evolution'', ''BM The Final'', ''BMIIDX'', ''BMIIDX Club'', ''BMIIDX Substream'', ''BMIIDX 2nd'' through ''10th'', ''BMIIDX 11 Red'', ''BMIIDX 12'' ''Happy Sky, BMIIDX 13 Distorted'', ''BMIIDX 14 Gold'', ''BMIIDX 15 DJ Troopers'', ''BMIIDX 16 Empress'', ''BMIIDX 17 Sirius'', ''BMIIDX 18 Resort Anthem'', ''BMIIDX 19 Lincle''. And again, this only includes the main arcade series; series, not any of the home console versions, and not any of versions or the arcade variants like ''Beatstage'' nor ''HipHopMania''.
or ''Hip Hop Mania''.
** The strangest thing is that a the game intended to change the gameplay up (albeit only slightly) didn't do quite well, that game being ''beatmaniaIII''. On that note, ''BMII'' is ''beatmania III''. ''BMII'', which was intended to be much more of the same back to like the original ''BM'', albeit ended up much more popular.
popular than its successor.
* Creator/BioWare has re-released countless compilations of ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' packages, one with each new expansion pack or sequel. ''Gold'', ''Platinum'', ''Diamond''..''Diamond''... ''Diamond'' was not the ultimate collection. ''[=NWN2=]'' and its expansions were then included in more collections. The same happened with older Infinity Engine games also. This is referenced in-universe as well, where Deekin's books about the events of the first game and expansions went through all the same compilations and re-releases as the game itself.



* ''VideoGame/LunarTheSilverStar'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'', originally released for the UsefulNotes/SegaCD, were remade for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and UsefulNotes/PlayStation. The first game was remade again for the GameBoyAdvance and then for the PSP. The ''Franchise/{{Lunar}}'' franchise has produced various side games, but no ''proper'' third installment yet, since ''Lunar: Dragon Song'' was a dull retread of much of the first game.
* The third installment of the ''WanganMidnightMaximumTune'' series is suffering from this. First there was ''Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune 3''. Then came ''WMMT 3 DX'', which added a few new cars, one new song, a new course, and 20 more stages (as if 80 [[CrackIsCheaper wasn't]] [[ForcedLevelGrinding enough]]!). And ''then'' game ''WMMT 3 DX Plus'', which adds yet another course, more cars and four new songs (two of which are remixes).

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* ''VideoGame/LunarTheSilverStar'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'', originally released for the UsefulNotes/SegaCD, were remade for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and UsefulNotes/PlayStation. The first game was remade again for the GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance and then for the PSP. The ''Franchise/{{Lunar}}'' franchise has produced various side games, but no ''proper'' third installment yet, since ''Lunar: Dragon Song'' was a dull retread of much of the first game.
* The third installment of the ''WanganMidnightMaximumTune'' ''VideoGame/WanganMidnight Maximum Tune'' series is suffering from this. First there was ''Wangan Midnight Maximum Tune 3''. Then came ''WMMT 3 DX'', which added a few new cars, one new song, a new course, and 20 more stages (as if 80 [[CrackIsCheaper wasn't]] [[ForcedLevelGrinding enough]]!). And ''then'' game ''WMMT 3 DX Plus'', which adds yet another course, more cars and four new songs (two of which are remixes).
18th Jan '17 12:01:12 AM X2X
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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by Music/OverClockedReMix. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom ''still updates this game'': at the time of this writing, they have just announced ''Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers'' for the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster.

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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by Music/OverClockedReMix. Music/{{OverClocked ReMix}}. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom ''still updates this game'': at the time of this writing, writing (January 2017), they have just announced ''Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers'' for the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster.



* Creator/ArcSystemWorks fell into this with the ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' games - ''Guilty Gear XX'', the third game in the series, was followed with ''Guilty Gear XX #Reload'' (one "new" character, rebalanced moves), ''Guilty Gear Isuka'' (a four-player spin-off), ''Guilty Gear XX Slash'' (two new characters, one of which is from ''Isuka'', and more rebalancing), then ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core'', which despite having no new characters has enough gameplay changes that they probably could have gotten away with calling it ''Guilty Gear X3'' if ''Reload'' and ''Slash'' hadn't existed. And now there's ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core '''Plus''''', which fixes some glitches and adds a ton of extra features, including a story mode that takes place after the original ''XX''.

to:

* Creator/ArcSystemWorks fell into this with the ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' games - -- ''Guilty Gear XX'', the third game in the series, was followed with ''Guilty Gear XX #Reload'' (one "new" character, rebalanced moves), ''Guilty Gear Isuka'' (a four-player spin-off), ''Guilty Gear XX Slash'' (two new characters, one of which is from ''Isuka'', and more rebalancing), then ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core'', which despite having no new characters has enough gameplay changes that they probably could have gotten away with calling it ''Guilty Gear X3'' if ''Reload'' and ''Slash'' hadn't existed. And now there's Then came ''Guilty Gear XX Accent Core '''Plus''''', which fixes some glitches and adds a ton of extra features, including a story mode that takes place after the original ''XX''.



** In late May 2015, barely half a year out from ''Xrd''[='s=] console release in Japan and the United States, an update, ''Xrd -REVELATOR-'', was announced, featuring additional characters (including a returning Johnny, who was an [[NonPlayerCharacter NPC]] in ''-SIGN-'') and [[RemixedLevel new versions of pre-existing stages]] not unlike the various revisions to ''XX''. Like ''Accent Core Plus'', the story will continue on from where ''-SIGN-'' left off.

to:

** In late May 2015, barely half a year out from ''Xrd''[='s=] console release in Japan and the United States, an update, ''Xrd -REVELATOR-'', was announced, featuring additional characters (including a returning Johnny, who was an [[NonPlayerCharacter NPC]] in ''-SIGN-'') ''-SIGN-''; Jam, Raven, and Dizzy would be added in later updates) and [[RemixedLevel new versions of pre-existing stages]] not unlike the various revisions to ''XX''. Like ''Accent Core Plus'', the story will continue continues on from where ''-SIGN-'' left off.off.
** January 2017 saw the announcement of a second update known as ''REV 2''. Aside of the usual character rebalancing (including new moves for the existing cast) and roster expansion (one of the "new" fighters being series veteran Baiken, PromotedToPlayable from NPC status in ''-REVELATOR-'' much like Johnny and Dizzy before her), ''REV 2'' features new story scenarios, such as story Episodes for Jam, Raven, Haehyun, and Dizzy (who lacked them in the previous iteration). The game is slated for a Spring 2017 release in arcades, followed by a retail release on consoles and PC later in the year as both a downloadable add-on to the original ''-REVELATOR-'' and, [[NoExportForYou if you live in Japan]], a standalone physical and digital release for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4.



** ''VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next game, ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralfiction''.

to:

** ''VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma'' ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma BlazBlue: Chronophantasma]]'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next game, ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralfiction''.''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralFiction BlazBlue: Central Fiction]]''.
15th Jan '17 6:30:31 AM PeDaRoYs
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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by Music/OverClockedReMix. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom ''still updates this game'': at the time of this writing, they have just announced ''Ultra Street Fighter II'' for the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster.

to:

** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by Music/OverClockedReMix. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom ''still updates this game'': at the time of this writing, they have just announced ''Ultra Street Fighter II'' II: The Final Challengers'' for the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster.
14th Jan '17 8:01:31 AM PF
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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by [[Music/OverClockedReMix OverClocked ReMix]]. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom '''still updates this game''': at the time of this writing, they have just announced ''Ultra Street Fighter II'' for the Nintendo Switch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster. No, we're not kidding.

to:

** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by [[Music/OverClockedReMix OverClocked ReMix]]. Music/OverClockedReMix. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom '''still ''still updates this game''': game'': at the time of this writing, they have just announced ''Ultra Street Fighter II'' for the Nintendo Switch, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster. No, we're not kidding.roster.
13th Jan '17 5:55:25 AM Larkmarn
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* Atlus knows when they have a good hit: ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' has been released a total of three times: the original, ''Persona 3 FES'' (which admittedly added a new and very hard epilogue chapter), and ''Persona 3 Portable'' (which added a new female protagonist). The success of ''Persona 3'' prompted remakes of the original ''VideoGame/{{Persona}}'' game, along with ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}: Innocent Sin'', which was never released in the North America, for the PSP. ''VideoGame/DevilSurvivor'' was re-released with a new 8th day and new ending. To their credit, Atlus never just releases the same game, always adding something new to it, but it's still essentially the same plot.
** Though they seem to have learned their lesson when moving on with ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' (exploring the game via different mediums with ''Anime/Persona4TheAnimation'', [[VideoGame/Persona4Arena the fighting game]] and ''three'' [[SpinOff Spin-Offs]]--one of which is a RhythmGame), ''Persona 4: Golden'' is by far the worst example of this so far - aside from features involving wireless networking, a new character and some story elements, everything else so far is just for bells and whistles.
*** Ironically enough, both the anime and the fighting game got "sequels". Persona 4 Arena Ultimax fixes some issues, mess with balance, adds new characters, let's you play with shadows versions, a survival mode and a new campaign with an actual plot. Sure, those are a lot of changes but nothing a DLC couldn't do, it's almost the same game. And there's the new ''Anime/Persona4GoldenTheAnimation'', that isn't actually a sequel but retcons the older anime with the ''Golden'' game by giving Marie the spotlight.
12th Jan '17 11:39:50 PM BleuStar365
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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by [[Music/OverClockedReMix OverClocked ReMix]]. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom '''still updates this game''': at the time of this writing, they have just announced Ultra Street Fighter II for the Nintendo Switch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster. No, we're not kidding.

to:

** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by [[Music/OverClockedReMix OverClocked ReMix]]. Even now, 25 years later, Capcom '''still updates this game''': at the time of this writing, they have just announced Ultra ''Ultra Street Fighter II II'' for the Nintendo Switch, which adds [[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Evil Ryu]] and [[Anime/StreetFighterIITheAnimatedMovie Violent]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos Ken]] to the roster. No, we're not kidding.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CapcomSequelStagnation