History Main / CapcomSequelStagnation

7th Feb '16 8:25:39 PM nombretomado
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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by [[Music/OverClockedReMix OverClocked ReMix]]. ** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' (''Street Fighter Zero'' in Japan and Asia), the prequel game that followed ''II'', also got its own series of updates and pseudo-sequels. The original was immediately followed by ''Alpha 2'', which added alternate versions of certain characters for its U.S. release (namely Evil Ryu, EX Zangief, and EX Dhalsim). ''Alpha 2'' was then re-released in Japan and Asia as ''Zero 2 Alpha'', which had all the extra characters from the U.S. release, plus "EX" versions of the rest of the ''Street Fighter II'' cast. ''Zero 2 Alpha'' was then ported to home consoles as ''Alpha 2 Gold'', which added an extra character to the mix: the Shadaloo version of Cammy (who previously appeared in ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter''), although she was initially only playable in the Versus and Training modes. Then ''Alpha 3'' came and the home versions of that game added even more characters (eventually bringing back the entire ''Street Fighter II'' roster). The Dreamcast version of ''Alpha 3'', subtitled ''Sakyo Dojo'', was [[RecursiveAdaptation backported]] to the arcade as ''Zero 3 Upper'' in Japan, a title used for the later GameBoyAdvance port (''Alpha 3 Upper''), which added three characters from ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2MarkOfTheMillennium Capcom vs. SNK 2]]'' (Maki, Yun, and Eagle). This all culminated with the PlayStationPortable version, ''Alpha 3 MAX'', which has all the extra characters from the previous versions, plus Ingrid (from ''VideoGame/CapcomFightingEvolution''). This isn't even counting ''Street Fighter Alpha Anthology'', a compilation of the arcade version of the ''Alpha'' games, along with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', ''Alpha 3 Upper'', and a Versus/Training mode-only game titled ''Hyper Street Fighter Alpha'' that pits versions of nearly every character from all the above games (the characters who appear in the portable versions of ''Alpha 3'' weren't included). ** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' was a bit more modest in its sequels compared to ''II'' and ''Alpha'', mainly due to its relative unpopularity at the time of its release. The original was titled ''Street Fighter III: New Generation'', which was followed by ''Street Fighter III 2nd Impact: Giant Attack'', and ''Street Fighter III 3rd Strike: Fight for the Future''. In terms of home versions, the first two were released exclusively for the Dreamcast in a two-in-one compilation titled ''Street Fighter III: Double Impact'', while ''3rd Strike'' got a stand-alone release for the Dreamcast, followed by PlayStation2 and Xbox ports which helped expose the series a bit. ** The ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' [=3D=] spin-off series consisted of four arcade games (''EX'', ''EX Plus'', ''[=EX2=]'', and ''[=EX2=] Plus''), two PlayStation ports (''EX Plus Alpha'' and ''[=EX2=] Plus''), and a PlayStation2-exclusive final installment (''[=EX3=]'').
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** Some of the home versions are titled differently as well. The Super NES received a two-in-one compilation of ''Champion Edition'' and ''Hyper Fighting'' titled ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', taking its title from the Japanese version of ''Hyper Fighting'' (but without the apostrophe-like prime symbol they use to represent the word "Dash" over there), while the Sega Genesis counterpart of that same compilation is titled ''Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition'' (otherwise known as ''Street Fighter II Dash Plus'' in Japan). Then we got ''Street Fighter Collection'' and ''Street Fighter Collection 2'', a compilation of all five games for the PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation and Sega Saturn, although covered in reversed order (the first one has both ''Super'' games and a bonus disc with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', while the second contains the original three); ''Super Street Fighter II X for Matching Service'', an online-compatible version of ''Super Turbo'' for the Sega Dreamcast released only in Japan via mail order (making it one of the most sought after versions of the series); ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo Revival'', a [[PortingDisaster watered down]] GameBoyAdvance version of ''Super Turbo''; ''Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition'', a modified version of ''Super Turbo'' that allows players to use any character from the five different iterations of ''Street Fighter II''; and finally ''Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix'', a remake of ''Super Turbo'' that replaces the original graphics and music with artwork by UDON and music remixes by [[Music/OverClockedReMix OverClocked ReMix]]. ** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' (''Street Fighter Zero'' in Japan and Asia), the prequel game that followed ''II'', also got its own series of updates and pseudo-sequels. The original was immediately followed by ''Alpha 2'', which added alternate versions of certain characters for its U.S. release (namely Evil Ryu, EX Zangief, and EX Dhalsim). ''Alpha 2'' was then re-released in Japan and Asia as ''Zero 2 Alpha'', which had all the extra characters from the U.S. release, plus "EX" versions of the rest of the ''Street Fighter II'' cast. ''Zero 2 Alpha'' was then ported to home consoles as ''Alpha 2 Gold'', which added an extra character to the mix: the Shadaloo version of Cammy (who previously appeared in ''VideoGame/XMenVsStreetFighter''), although she was initially only playable in the Versus and Training modes. Then ''Alpha 3'' came and the home versions of that game added even more characters (eventually bringing back the entire ''Street Fighter II'' roster). The Dreamcast version of ''Alpha 3'', subtitled ''Sakyo Dojo'', was [[RecursiveAdaptation backported]] to the arcade as ''Zero 3 Upper'' in Japan, a title used for the later GameBoyAdvance port (''Alpha 3 Upper''), which added three characters from ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2MarkOfTheMillennium Capcom vs. SNK 2]]'' (Maki, Yun, and Eagle). This all culminated with the PlayStationPortable UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable version, ''Alpha 3 MAX'', which has all the extra characters from the previous versions, plus Ingrid (from ''VideoGame/CapcomFightingEvolution''). This isn't even counting ''Street Fighter Alpha Anthology'', a compilation of the arcade version of the ''Alpha'' games, along with ''Alpha 2 Gold'', ''Alpha 3 Upper'', and a Versus/Training mode-only game titled ''Hyper Street Fighter Alpha'' that pits versions of nearly every character from all the above games (the characters who appear in the portable versions of ''Alpha 3'' weren't included). ** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' was a bit more modest in its sequels compared to ''II'' and ''Alpha'', mainly due to its relative unpopularity at the time of its release. The original was titled ''Street Fighter III: New Generation'', which was followed by ''Street Fighter III 2nd Impact: Giant Attack'', and ''Street Fighter III 3rd Strike: Fight for the Future''. In terms of home versions, the first two were released exclusively for the Dreamcast in a two-in-one compilation titled ''Street Fighter III: Double Impact'', while ''3rd Strike'' got a stand-alone release for the Dreamcast, followed by PlayStation2 UsefulNotes/PlayStation2 and Xbox ports which helped expose the series a bit. ** The ''VideoGame/StreetFighterEX'' [=3D=] spin-off series consisted of four arcade games (''EX'', ''EX Plus'', ''[=EX2=]'', and ''[=EX2=] Plus''), two PlayStation [=PlayStation=] ports (''EX Plus Alpha'' and ''[=EX2=] Plus''), and a PlayStation2-exclusive UsefulNotes/PlayStation2-exclusive final installment (''[=EX3=]'').

* ''[[VideoGame/{{Raiden}} Raiden IV]]'' has gotten several updates now, starting with the {{Xbox360}} port. A patch was also released as downloadable on XboxLiveArcade, followed by the [=NESiCAxLive=] version for the arcades. The newest update, titled ''Raiden IV: Overkill'', is stated for release on PlayStationNetwork.
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* ''[[VideoGame/{{Raiden}} Raiden IV]]'' has gotten several updates now, starting with the {{Xbox360}} port. A patch was also released as downloadable on XboxLiveArcade, followed by the [=NESiCAxLive=] version for the arcades. The newest update, titled ''Raiden IV: Overkill'', is stated for release on PlayStationNetwork.UsefulNotes/PlayStationNetwork.
15th Jan '16 9:15:15 AM case
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* ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' pretty much fell into this, hardly changing at all and going up and down in quality by the game in general (up to a total of 12 games in just a few years so far). Even the better ones suffer from one simple issue: They are too similar to each other to justify buying more than one. Oddly enough, no other ''Mario Party'' title was released after game 8, which was back in 2007. With HudsonSoft (who helped develop the series) being merged with Konami and Nintendo releasing ''Wii Party'' in 2010 (which was basically ''Mario Party'' with Miis instead of Mario characters), many people assumed that the ''Mario Party'' franchise was dead.\\
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* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'': ** ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' pretty much fell into this, hardly changing at all and going up and down in quality by the game in general (up to a total of 12 games in just a few years so far). Even the better ones suffer from one simple issue: They are too similar to each other to justify buying more than one. Oddly enough, no other ''Mario Party'' title was released after game 8, which was back in 2007. With HudsonSoft (who helped develop the series) being merged with Konami and Nintendo releasing ''Wii Party'' in 2010 (which was basically ''Mario Party'' with Miis instead of Mario characters), many people assumed that the ''Mario Party'' franchise was dead.\\
9th Jan '16 11:34:41 AM Prfnoff
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* Capcom made two licensed fighters based on ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', developed by the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' team for the same arcade hardware. Not surprisingly, the second adds little to the first except for a bunch of newly playable characters.
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* Capcom made two licensed fighters based on ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', developed by the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' team for the same arcade hardware. Not surprisingly, the second ''VideoGame/JoJosBizarreAdventureHeritageForTheFuture'' adds little to the first its predecessor ''[=JoJo=]'s Venture'' except for a bunch of newly playable characters.
9th Jan '16 11:24:17 AM Prfnoff
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* Capcom made two licensed fighters based on ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', developed by the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' team for the same arcade hardware. Not surprisingly, this trope fully applies, with the second adding little to the first except for a bunch of newly playable characters.
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* Capcom made two licensed fighters based on ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', developed by the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' team for the same arcade hardware. Not surprisingly, this trope fully applies, with the second adding adds little to the first except for a bunch of newly playable characters.
9th Jan '16 11:22:59 AM Prfnoff
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* Capcom made two licensed fighters based on ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'', developed by the ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIII'' team for the same arcade hardware. Not surprisingly, this trope fully applies, with the second adding little to the first except for a bunch of newly playable characters.
31st Dec '15 9:15:29 AM Scraggle
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* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' seems to be falling victim to this. While each game adds new content, some games are nothing more than expansions. The 3 main games are set in different locations, with new monsters, new weapon types, and in Tri's case some monsters and weapon types were taken out in favor of all new content. However, in the expansions, commonly given the subtitle "G", the biggest changes are to the weapon types to make them more balanced, and there are usually no more than a few new monsters that aren't just ''palette swaps''.
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* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' seems to be falling victim to this. While each game adds new content, some games are nothing more than expansions. The 3 main games are set in different locations, with new monsters, new weapon types, and in Tri's case some monsters and weapon types were taken out in favor of all new content. However, in the expansions, commonly given the subtitle "G", the biggest changes are to the weapon types to make them more balanced, and there are usually no more than a few new monsters that aren't just ''palette swaps''. This, however, is less a problem in the West in the case of the 4th generation, as the ''G'' version of ''Monster Hunter 4'' (which was localized as ''Ultimate'') was the first iteration of that particular generation that was released in the West (the first ''Monster Hunter 4'' didn't even end up localized). Time will only tell if this ends up being the case for future generations.
27th Dec '15 4:15:55 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Skullgirls}}'' initially parodied this trope when they would release (free) patches for the game, code-naming the patches things like "Slightly Different Edition", "More Different Edition", etc. as a way to reference fighting games that played this trope straight. But then, [[TroubledProduction due to a bit of legal trouble with Konami and a de-listing of the game on console versions]], the team was forced to actually re-release the game as ''Skullgirls Encore'', which is essentially the original game with the latest balance patch and [[DownloadableContent Squigly]] available. It still counts as a free patch to those who already bought the original game though.
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* ''{{Skullgirls}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' initially parodied this trope when they would release (free) patches for the game, code-naming the patches things like "Slightly Different Edition", "More Different Edition", etc. as a way to reference fighting games that played this trope straight. But then, [[TroubledProduction due to a bit of legal trouble with Konami and a de-listing of the game on console versions]], the team was forced to actually re-release the game as ''Skullgirls Encore'', which is essentially the original game with the latest balance patch and [[DownloadableContent Squigly]] available. It still counts as a free patch to those who already bought the original game though.
7th Dec '15 4:47:51 PM Hossmeister
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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The original trilogy was released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, a DS version was made of all three games, which were now released internationally. Other than remastered music, improved coloring on the sprites and an added case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were more or less the same. Later, all three games were made available on WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no other significant differences. It's now also on the Appstore (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). Aside from improved graphics, again, no difference. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, but, once more, no difference.
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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The original trilogy VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightTrilogy was released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, a DS version was made of all three games, which were now released internationally. Other than remastered music, improved coloring on the sprites and an added case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were more or less the same. Later, all three games were made available on WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no other significant differences. It's now also on the Appstore (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). Aside from improved graphics, again, no difference. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, but, once more, no difference.
30th Nov '15 11:10:32 AM case
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However, it was revealed in E3 2011 that a 9th ''Mario Party'' game was being developed for the Wii, and it has indeed broken the cycle. Released in 2012, there was a 5 year gap from the previous game and it shows. The game is no longer about stars, coins, items, or playing a minigame after every turn. Instead, mini-stars are collected to determine who wins and they are obtained in many ways so games can be tight instead of being constantly random. Luck-based events were reduced greatly and the new board mechanics that have players traveling as one instead of individually creates strategy in turn order and dice use. Minigames are around, but they only occur from landing on certain spaces.
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However, it was revealed in E3 2011 that a 9th ''Mario Party'' game was being developed for the Wii, and it has indeed broken the cycle. Released in 2012, there was a 5 year gap from the previous game and it shows. The game is no longer about stars, coins, items, or playing a minigame after every turn. Instead, mini-stars are collected to determine who wins and they are obtained in many ways so games can be tight instead of being constantly random. Luck-based events were reduced greatly and the new board mechanics that have players traveling as one instead of individually creates strategy in turn order and dice use. Minigames are around, but they only occur from landing on certain spaces. Then ''Mario Party 10'' was given lukewarm reviews for [[HereWeGoAgain being too similar]] to ''9''.
30th Nov '15 9:46:53 AM case
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** The core ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' series got somewhat hit with this during the ''New'' era. To demonstrate, ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'' has four gameplay styles. The first style covers two games [[note]]''Super Mario Bros.'' and ''The Lost Levels'', with the style named after the former[[/note]], the next two cover one game each [[note]]''Super Mario Bros. 3'' for the second and ''Super Mario World'' for the third[[/note]], and the last style covers all four of the ''New'' games[[note]]''New Super Mario Bros.'', ''New Super Mario Bros. Wii'', ''New Super Mario Bros. 2'', and ''New Super Mario Bros. U'', with the style named after the last one[[/note]] by itself. Granted, each of those games introduced new power-ups, set pieces, and gimmicks.
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