History Main / CapcomSequelStagnation

2nd Dec '16 8:50:57 PM bowserbros
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2nd Dec '16 8:49:28 PM bowserbros
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** Then came Funimation's infamous Orange Brick box sets, which [[BlatantLies supposedly]] feature remastered and improved footage along with the now-standard English dub and Japanese track. In practice, the picture is (badly) cropped from 4:3 to 16:9 (losing 20% of the picture and introducing terrible artifacting into what remains) and then "[[DigitalDestruction remastered]]" by an automated process that resulted in incredibly inaccurate colors and even more artifacting. On the (faintly) bright side, they're really, ''really'' cheap, and they include both a 5.1 English dub track with the Faulconer music and a 2.0 stereo track with the English dub over the original Japanese music in addition to the Japanese audio track with subtitles. ''Anime/DragonBall'' and ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' received similar treatment in the Blue and Brown Boxes respectively, although they aren't quite as bad due to retaining the original 4:3 aspect ratio.
** Finally, Funimation released the Dragon Boxes of ''Z'', which ''actually'' feature a new and superior film transfer in the original aspect ratio, an English dub track with original Japanese music, a Japanese audio track with subtitles, and little to no censorship, representing the first and (so far) only time the full run of ''Z'' has been available on home video in the U.S. with no censorship and good picture quality. The only thing they're (arguably) missing is an audio track with the Faulconer score, for those who have nostalgia for such things. The down sides? They started out being relatively expensive compared to the dirt-cheap Orange Bricks, and as a limited release, they went out of print and are now sometimes hard-to-find at a reasonable price. They were available concurrently with the Orange Bricks. Funimation hinted at plans to release the movies, ''Dragon Ball'', and ''GT'' in similar editions, but this never came to fruition.
** Around this same time, ''Anime/DragonBallKai'' was announced, an extensive re-edit and remaster of ''Z'' with most of the filler cut out, a new score, some partial re-animation, a new opening and ending, and new Japanese and English dubs that feature many, but not all, of the voice actors from ''Z''. In particular, Linda Young's controversial take on Freeza's English voice is replaced by a more faithful rendition by Chris Ayres. This is available in both DVD and Blu-Ray editions and was, for a time, available concurrently with ''both'' the Orange Bricks and the Dragon Boxes.
*** Partway through ''Kai'''s run, it came to light that the new score by Kenji Yamamoto included instances of blatant plagiarism of other musicians' work. The entire score was replaced by the original ''Z'' score by Shunsuke Kikuchi in subsequent print runs of the DVD and Blu-Ray releases.

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** Then came Funimation's infamous Orange Brick DVD box sets, colloquially known as the "Orange Bricks", which [[BlatantLies supposedly]] feature remastered and improved footage along with the now-standard English dub and Japanese track. In practice, the picture is (badly) cropped from 4:3 to 16:9 (losing 20% of the picture and introducing terrible artifacting into what remains) and then "[[DigitalDestruction remastered]]" by an automated process that resulted in incredibly inaccurate colors and even more artifacting. On the (faintly) bright side, they're really, ''really'' cheap, and they include both a 5.1 English dub track with the Faulconer music and a 2.0 stereo track with the English dub over the original Japanese music in addition to the Japanese audio track with subtitles. The ''Anime/DragonBall'' and ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' received similar treatment in the Blue Bricks and Brown Boxes respectively, although they aren't quite as bad due to retaining the original 4:3 aspect ratio.
ratio (though ''Dragon Ball'' is slightly zoomed in to push damaged areas of the film print offscreen).
** Finally, Toei Animation and Funimation released the Dragon Boxes "Dragon Box" DVD set of ''Z'', which ''actually'' feature a new and superior film transfer in the original aspect ratio, ratio. Additionally, the Funimation release includes an English dub track with original Japanese music, a Japanese audio track with subtitles, and little to no censorship, representing the first and (so far) only time the full run of ''Z'' has been available on home video in the U.S. with no censorship and good picture quality. The only thing they're (arguably) missing is an audio track with the Faulconer score, for those who have nostalgia for such things. The down sides? They started out being relatively expensive compared to the dirt-cheap Orange Bricks, and as a limited release, they went out of print and are now sometimes hard-to-find at a reasonable price. They were available concurrently with the Orange Bricks. Funimation hinted at plans to release the movies, ''Dragon Ball'', and ''GT'' in similar editions, but this never came to fruition.
** Around this same time, ''Anime/DragonBallKai'' was announced, an extensive re-edit and remaster of ''Z'' with most of the filler cut out, a new score, some partial re-animation, a new opening and ending, and new Japanese and English dubs that feature many, but not all, of the voice actors from ''Z''. In particular, Linda Young's controversial take on Freeza's English voice is replaced by a more faithful rendition by Chris Ayres. Creator/ChrisAyres. This is available in both DVD and Blu-Ray Blu-ray editions and was, for a time, available concurrently with ''both'' the Orange Bricks and the Dragon Boxes.
*** Partway through ''Kai'''s run, it came to light that the new score by Kenji Yamamoto included instances of blatant plagiarism of other musicians' work. The entire score was replaced by the original ''Z'' score by Shunsuke Kikuchi in subsequent print runs of the DVD and Blu-Ray Blu-ray releases.



*** Funimation's "Level Set" Blu-rays, which feature remasters that arguably surpass the Dragon Boxes in terms of visual quality; unlike the Brick sets, which used Digital Video Noise Reduction to automatically remove dust and film grain, the Level Sets were remastered by hand, touching up each frame to remove visible dust and print damage. Uniquely, this version ''preserved'' the film grain like the Dragon Boxes did, rather than remove it. Unfortunately, this release was cancelled after just two volumes and was replaced with a Blu-ray version of the Orange Bricks; turns out, manually remastering a show is ''really'' expensive.



** ''{{Film/Aliens}}'' had its theatrical version, an alternate version that aired on {{Creator/CBS}} which integrated deleted footage of the xenomorphs attacking the Operations building (while also cutting out most of the profanity), and the "Special Edition" that integrated most of the remaining deleted scenes, which was made in 1992 made not released until the DVD version in 1999. The Blu-Ray version of the film also notably tweaks several scenes, including Ripley's LockAndLoadMontage while flying to the atmosphere processor and the continuity error of Lance Henriksen's lower body being seen in the hole when he reaches out to hold on to Carrie Henn's character.

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** ''{{Film/Aliens}}'' had its theatrical version, an alternate version that aired on {{Creator/CBS}} which integrated deleted footage of the xenomorphs Xenomorphs attacking the Operations building (while also cutting out most of the profanity), and the "Special Edition" that integrated most of the remaining deleted scenes, which was made in 1992 made not released until the DVD version in 1999. The Blu-Ray version of the film also notably tweaks several scenes, including Ripley's LockAndLoadMontage while flying to the atmosphere processor and the continuity error of Lance Henriksen's lower body being seen in the hole when he reaches out to hold on to Carrie Henn's character.



*** The 2004 [=DVDs=] come with the added bonus of carrying the first home release of the unmodified Original Trilogy since the VHS and [=LaserDisc=] versions. However, because this release is simply pulled from [=LaserDisc=] copies of the films, the quality is noticeably bad. Fans like to refer to this version as the [[FunWithAcronyms "GOUT" (George's Original Unaltered Theatrical version)]] release.



** The Four Hour Rough Cut that was shown to studio executives and people involved with the production.
** Original workprint version (1982, 113 minutes) shown to audience test previews in Denver and Dallas in March 1982. It was also seen in 1990 and 1991 in Los Angeles and San Francisco as a Director's Cut without the approval of director Creator/RidleyScott. Negative responses to the test previews led to the modifications resulting in the U.S. theatrical version, while positive response to the showings in 1990 and 1991 pushed the studio to approve work on an official director's cut. It was re-released as a 5-disc Ultimate Edition in 2007.

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** The Four Hour Rough Cut four-hour rough cut that was shown to studio executives and people involved with the production.
** Original The original workprint version (1982, 113 minutes) shown to audience test previews in Denver and Dallas in March 1982. It was also seen in 1990 and 1991 in Los Angeles and San Francisco as a Director's Cut without the approval of director Creator/RidleyScott. Negative responses to the test previews led to the modifications resulting in the U.S. theatrical version, while positive response to the showings in 1990 and 1991 pushed the studio to approve work on an official director's cut. It was re-released as a 5-disc Ultimate Edition in 2007.



** The International Cut (1982, 117 minutes) also known as the "Criterion Edition" or uncut version, included more violent action scenes than the U.S. theatrical version. Although initially unavailable in the U.S. and distributed in Europe and Asia via theatrical and local Warner Home Video laserdisc releases, it was later released on VHS and Criterion Collection laserdisc in North America, and re-released in 1992 as a "10th Anniversary Edition".

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** The International Cut (1982, 117 minutes) also known as the "Criterion Edition" or uncut version, included more violent action scenes than the U.S. theatrical version. Although initially unavailable in the U.S. and distributed in Europe and Asia via theatrical and local Warner Home Video laserdisc [=LaserDisc=] releases, it was later released on VHS and Criterion Collection laserdisc [=LaserDisc=] in North America, and re-released in 1992 as a "10th Anniversary Edition".



** The Creator/RidleyScott-approved (1992, 116 minutes) Director's Cut; prompted by the unauthorized 19901991 workprint theatrical release and made available on VHS and laserdisc in 1993, and on DVD in 1997. Significant changes from the theatrical version include: removal of Deckard's voice-over, insertion of a unicorn sequence and removal of the studio-imposed happy ending. Ridley did provide extensive notes and consultation to Warner Bros. through film preservationist Michael Arick who was put in charge of creating the Director's Cut.

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** The Creator/RidleyScott-approved (1992, 116 minutes) Director's Cut; prompted by the unauthorized 19901991 workprint theatrical release and made available on VHS and laserdisc [=LaserDisc=] in 1993, and on DVD in 1997. Significant changes from the theatrical version include: removal of Deckard's voice-over, insertion of a unicorn sequence and removal of the studio-imposed happy ending. Ridley did provide extensive notes and consultation to Warner Bros. through film preservationist Michael Arick who was put in charge of creating the Director's Cut.



* Samsung has a tendency to issue UpdatedRerelease of the preceiding Android smartphones after releasing a new model. The Galaxy S has the Plus model and whopping 3 dual-SIM revisions, S II has the Plus model, S III has the Neo model, the [=S4=] have the rugged Active version ''released in the same year'', and the [=S5=] has the Neo model again. The [=S6=] and [=S7=] is released in the normal, Edge, and Active model ([=S6=] also includes the larger Edge+ model). The larger Note devices suffer similar things: the Galaxy Note 3 was followed by a nerfed model called Neo with worse camera, display, and storage. Goes more blatant with the Note 10.1 tablet where the updated model is called ''2014 Edition''. Of note, other Android vendors do similar things as well.

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* Samsung has a tendency to issue UpdatedRerelease of the preceiding preceding Android smartphones after releasing a new model. The Galaxy S has the Plus model and whopping 3 dual-SIM revisions, S II has the Plus model, S III has the Neo model, the [=S4=] have the rugged Active version ''released in the same year'', and the [=S5=] has the Neo model again. The [=S6=] and [=S7=] is released in the normal, Edge, and Active model ([=S6=] also includes the larger Edge+ model). The larger Note devices suffer similar things: the Galaxy Note 3 was followed by a nerfed model called Neo with worse camera, display, and storage. Goes more blatant with the Note 10.1 tablet where the updated model is called ''2014 Edition''. Of note, other Android vendors do similar things as well.
5th Nov '16 6:59:56 PM WillKeaton
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** The core ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' series got somewhat hit with this during the ''New'' era. To demonstrate, ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'' has four gameplay styles. The first style covers two games [[note]]''Super Mario Bros.'' and ''The Lost Levels'', with the style named after the former[[/note]], the next two cover one game each [[note]]''Super Mario Bros. 3'' for the second and ''Super Mario World'' for the third[[/note]], and the last style covers all four of the ''New'' games[[note]]''New Super Mario Bros.'', ''New Super Mario Bros. Wii'', ''New Super Mario Bros. 2'', and ''New Super Mario Bros. U'', with the style named after the last one[[/note]] by itself. Granted, each of those games introduced new power-ups, set pieces, and gimmicks.

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** The core ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros'' series got somewhat hit with this during the ''New'' era. To demonstrate, ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'' has four gameplay styles. The first style covers two games [[note]]''Super games,[[note]]''Super Mario Bros.'' and ''The Lost Levels'', with the style named after the former[[/note]], former[[/note]] the next two cover one game each [[note]]''Super Mario Bros. 3'' for the second and ''Super Mario World'' for the third[[/note]], and the last style covers all four of the ''New'' games[[note]]''New Super Mario Bros.'', ''New Super Mario Bros. Wii'', ''New Super Mario Bros. 2'', and ''New Super Mario Bros. U'', with the style named after the last one[[/note]] by itself. Granted, each of those games introduced new power-ups, set pieces, and gimmicks.
5th Nov '16 6:59:14 PM WillKeaton
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* [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI The original]] ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' has been released on the NES, {{MSX}}2, UsefulNotes/WonderSwan Color, [=PlayStation=], Game Boy Advance, mobile phones, PSP, Wii Virtual Console, [=PlayStation=] Network, and iPhone and iPod Touch. Each release has seen a handful of gameplay tweaks and a bonus dungeon or two, but the game is the same. With the exception of the Wii release, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' has seen a release on all of those platforms too, often bundled together with the first game. It too, basically the same game with a bonus dungeon added.

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* [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI The original]] ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' has been released on the NES, {{MSX}}2, UsefulNotes/WonderSwan Color, [=PlayStation=], Game Boy Advance, mobile phones, PSP, Wii Virtual Console, [=PlayStation=] Network, and iPhone and iPod Touch. Each release has seen a handful of gameplay tweaks and a bonus dungeon or two, but the game is the same. With the exception of the Wii release, ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'' has seen a release on all of those platforms too, often bundled together with the first game. It too, is basically the same game with a bonus dungeon added.
5th Nov '16 6:58:40 PM WillKeaton
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* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' is also starting to feel like this; All of the major plot points for the series (from the beginning to the end) have all been covered except the ultimate battle mentioned in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow Aria of Sorrow]]'', which Konami seems keen on avoiding for more "let's have some random dick revive Dracula for shiggles" storylines to avoid having to close the series.

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* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' is also starting to feel like this; this. All of the major plot points for the series (from the beginning to the end) have all been covered except the ultimate battle mentioned in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow Aria of Sorrow]]'', which Konami seems keen on avoiding for more "let's have some random dick revive Dracula for shiggles" storylines to avoid having to close the series.
5th Nov '16 6:58:10 PM WillKeaton
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** Capcom went into [[SelfDeprecation full self-aware parody mode]] for their ''Dead Rising 3'' DLC announced at E3 2014, titled ''[[http://youtu.be/N5Plhv_mPT4?t=1m7s Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha]]''.

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** Capcom went into [[SelfDeprecation full self-aware parody mode]] for their ''Dead Rising 3'' DLC announced at E3 2014, titled ''[[http://youtu.be/N5Plhv_mPT4?t=1m7s Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha]]''.Alpha.]]''
5th Nov '16 6:57:50 PM WillKeaton
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* Somewhat averted by the classic ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' formula. Each new game demands a brand new set of eight robot masters to fight, and along with those new bosses come new weapons to play with, new levels with new artwork and tile sets, and a new story. While this [[MissionPackSequel rigid formula]] has kept the series from growing or expanding (''VideoGame/MegaMan7'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan8 8]]'' in particular were way too short, give the consoles they were released on), it also acts as a failsafe, ensuring that each new ''Mega Man'' game will not be terribly derivative of its predecessors. For the most part it works, as ''VideoGame/MegaMan9'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan10 10]]'' can attest, but it's not foolproof. ''VideoGame/MegaMan5'' invokes stagnation by offering the player a poor assortment of weapons and pretending the {{big bad}} isn't Dr. Wily again, while ''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' does it by thoughtlessly plastering instant-death spikes everywhere and [[HijackedByGanon shoehorning Sigma in at the last second]].

to:

* Somewhat averted by the classic ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' formula. Each new game demands a brand new set of eight robot masters to fight, and along with those new bosses come new weapons to play with, new levels with new artwork and tile sets, and a new story. While this [[MissionPackSequel rigid formula]] has kept the series from growing or expanding (''VideoGame/MegaMan7'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan8 8]]'' in particular were way too short, give given the consoles they were released on), it also acts as a failsafe, ensuring that each new ''Mega Man'' game will not be terribly derivative of its predecessors. For the most part it works, as ''VideoGame/MegaMan9'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan10 10]]'' can attest, but it's not foolproof. ''VideoGame/MegaMan5'' invokes stagnation by offering the player a poor assortment of weapons and pretending the {{big bad}} isn't Dr. Wily again, while ''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' does it by thoughtlessly plastering instant-death spikes everywhere and [[HijackedByGanon shoehorning Sigma in at the last second]].
25th Sep '16 1:42:05 PM ShivaIndis
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* ''VideoGame/LunarTheSilverStar'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'', originally released for the UsefulNotes/SegaCD, were remade for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and UsefulNotes/PlayStation. The first game was remade again for the GameBoyAdvance and then for the PSP. The ''{{Lunar}}'' franchise has produced various side games, but no ''proper'' third installment yet, since ''Lunar: Dragon Song'' was a dull retread of much of the first game.

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* ''VideoGame/LunarTheSilverStar'' and its sequel ''VideoGame/LunarEternalBlue'', originally released for the UsefulNotes/SegaCD, were remade for the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn and UsefulNotes/PlayStation. The first game was remade again for the GameBoyAdvance and then for the PSP. The ''{{Lunar}}'' ''Franchise/{{Lunar}}'' franchise has produced various side games, but no ''proper'' third installment yet, since ''Lunar: Dragon Song'' was a dull retread of much of the first game.
29th Aug '16 11:13:09 PM CaptainReynolds6
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** Hilariously [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in a piece of envelope art shown in ''[=GamePro=]'' magazine in an early 1990s issue (years before ''Street Fighter III'' came out), which featured a couple of ''Series/SesameStreet'' parodies. One of them showed Bert and Ernie with a Capcom representative trying to count to three. The Capcom rep counts by rattling off the various versions of Street Fighter released up to that point ("''Street Fighter'', ''Street Fighter II'', ''Street Fighter II': Champion Edition'', ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', ''Street Fighter II': Hyper Fighting'', ''Super Street Fighter II''..."). Ernie's reaction to this is putting a gun to his head, saying "I give up," and Bert's is [[HeadDesk banging his head on a nearby desk]].

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** Hilariously [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in a piece of envelope art shown in ''[=GamePro=]'' magazine in an early 1990s issue (years before ''Street Fighter III'' came out), which featured a couple of ''Series/SesameStreet'' parodies. One of them showed Bert and Ernie with a Capcom representative trying to count to three. The Capcom rep counts three - by rattling off the various versions of Street Fighter released up to that point ("''Street Fighter'', ''Street Fighter II'', ''Street Fighter II': Champion Edition'', ''Street Fighter II Turbo'', ''Street Fighter II': Hyper Fighting'', ''Super Street Fighter II''..."). Ernie's reaction to this is putting a gun to his head, saying "I give up," and Bert's is [[HeadDesk banging his head on a nearby desk]].
22nd Aug '16 8:03:38 PM Prometheus117
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** ''VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch given a full retail release. The next major overhaul is called "''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralfiction BlazBlue: Centralfiction]]''".

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** ''VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. The Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next major overhaul is called "''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralfiction BlazBlue: Centralfiction]]''".game, ''VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralfiction''.
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