History Main / CapcomSequelStagnation

16th Feb '18 11:01:53 PM LinTaylor
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** At this point, development of the series was handed over to Bandai Namco, who announced ''Extreme Vs.'', a new iteration of the series that upgraded the graphics to UsefulNotes/Playstation3-level (Capcom's iterations always used the [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]]-level NAOMI board) and boasted a complete overhaul of the gameplay engine. However, the ''[=ExVs=]'' sub-series quickly fell into this, between console ports and sequels (''Full Boost'', ''Maxi Boost'', and ''Maxi Boost ON'') which simply added to the game's roster while only making minor tweaks to the game engine.

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** At this point, development of the series was handed over to Bandai Namco, who announced ''Extreme Vs.'', a new iteration of the series that upgraded the graphics to UsefulNotes/Playstation3-level (Capcom's iterations always used the [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]]-level NAOMI board) and boasted a complete overhaul of the gameplay engine. However, the ''[=ExVs=]'' sub-series quickly fell into this, between console ports and sequels (''Full Boost'', ''Maxi Boost'', and ''Maxi Boost ON'') which simply added to the game's roster while only making minor tweaks to the game engine. Then in early 2018 Bandai Namco announced ''Extreme Vs. 2''...
8th Feb '18 12:09:46 PM X2X
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** For a series with such a reputation for this trope, notably, ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'' will ''subvert'' this trope. At the moment, Capcom plans to release post-release content (i.e. characters) as updates instead.
*** Capcom did ultimately cave in January 2018 with its release of ''Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition'' (which features the 12 DLC characters from Seasons 1 and 2 of the original game, new V-Triggers for all the cast, the widely requested addition of Arcade Mode, and an Extra Battle Mode), though it's a free DLC update for those who already own the vanilla version.

to:

** For a series with such a reputation for this trope, notably, ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'' will ''subvert'' this trope. At the moment, Capcom plans to release post-release content (i.e. characters) as updates instead.
*** Capcom
instead. They did [[DoubleSubversion ultimately cave in in]] January 2018 with its the release of ''Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition'' (which features the 12 DLC characters from Seasons 1 and 2 of the original game, new V-Triggers for all the cast, the widely requested addition of Arcade Mode, and an Extra Battle Mode), though it's a free DLC update for those who already own the vanilla version.
8th Feb '18 12:07:34 PM X2X
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** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' (an interquel set between ''II'' and ''III'') was originally released for the arcades in Japan and Asia exclusively and then ported to home consoles. The home versions added six more characters to the roster. Then it got an update for the home consoles in the form of ''Super Street Fighter IV'' which added 10 more characters to the roster. ''Super Street Fighter IV'' was then ported to the arcades (and the home consoles as [[DownloadableContent DLC]] as ''Super Street Fighter IV: Arcade Edition''). Four more characters were added to the roster (Yun, Yang, Evil Ryu, and the introduction of Oni, who is an alternate form of Akuma). A [=3DS=] version was also released, titled ''Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition''. An update titled ''Super Street Fighter IV: Arcade Edition Ver. 2012'' was released as a downloadable patch in December 2011. Another balance update (''Ultra Street Fighter IV'') was released in 2014, with another 5 additional characters (four of them, Hugo, Poison, Elena, and Rolento, ported over from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken'').[[note]]Where it gets odd with this one is that, for the PC version, they just literally changed the name of the Arcade Edition to Ultra - but you still have to actually ''buy'' ''Ultra''.[[/note]]

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** ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' (an interquel set between ''II'' and ''III'') was originally released for the arcades in Japan and Asia exclusively and then ported to home consoles. The home versions added six more characters to the roster. Then it got an update for the home consoles in the form of ''Super Street Fighter IV'' which added 10 more characters to the roster. ''Super Street Fighter IV'' was then ported to the arcades (and the home consoles as [[DownloadableContent DLC]] as ''Super Street Fighter IV: Arcade Edition''). Four more characters were added to the roster (Yun, Yang, Evil Ryu, and the introduction of Oni, who is an alternate form of Akuma). A [=3DS=] version was also released, titled ''Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition''. An update titled ''Super Street Fighter IV: Arcade Edition Ver. 2012'' was released as a downloadable patch in December 2011. Another balance update (''Ultra Street Fighter IV'') was released in 2014, with another 5 additional characters (four of them, Hugo, Poison, Elena, and Rolento, ported over from ''VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken'').[[note]]Where it gets odd with this one is that, for the PC version, they just literally changed the name of the Arcade Edition ''Arcade Edition'' to Ultra - ''Ultra'' -- but you still have to actually ''buy'' ''Ultra''.[[/note]]



*** Capcom did ultimately cave in January 2018 with its release of ''Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition'' (which features the 12 DLC characters from Seasons 1 and 2 of the original game, new V-Triggers for all the cast, the widely requested addition of Arcade Mode, and an Extra Battle Mode), though it's a free DLC update for those who already own the vanilla version.



** January 2017 saw the announcement of a second update known as ''REV 2''. Aside of the usual character rebalancing (including new moves for the existing cast) and roster expansion (one of the "new" fighters being series veteran Baiken, PromotedToPlayable from NPC status in ''-REVELATOR-'' much like Johnny and Dizzy before her), ''REV 2'' features new story scenarios, such as story Episodes for Jam, Raven, Haehyun, and Dizzy (who lacked them in the previous iteration). The game was released in arcades at the end of March that year, followed by a retail release on consoles and PC two months later as both a downloadable add-on to the original ''-REVELATOR-'' and, [[NoExportForYou if you live in Japan]], a standalone physical and digital release for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4.
* Arc System Works fell head first back into this with ''Guilty Gear''[='=]s SpiritualSuccessor, ''Franchise/{{BlazBlue}}'', albeit not at first.

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** January 2017 saw the announcement of a second update known as ''REV 2''. Aside of the usual character rebalancing (including a few new moves for the existing cast) and roster expansion (one of the "new" fighters being series veteran Baiken, PromotedToPlayable from NPC status in ''-REVELATOR-'' much like Johnny and Dizzy before her), ''REV 2'' features new story scenarios, such as story Episodes for Jam, Raven, Haehyun, and Dizzy (who lacked them in the previous iteration). The game was released in arcades at the end of March that year, followed by a retail release on consoles and PC two months later as both a downloadable add-on to the original ''-REVELATOR-'' and, [[NoExportForYou if you live in Japan]], a standalone physical and digital release for the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4.
* Arc System Works fell head first head-first back into this with ''Guilty Gear''[='=]s SpiritualSuccessor, ''Franchise/{{BlazBlue}}'', ''Franchise/BlazBlue'', albeit not at first.



** ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma BlazBlue: Chronophantasma]]'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next game, ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralFiction BlazBlue: Central Fiction]]''. In addition, the producer Mori has stated that there will be no ''Extend'' for CF, and further updates to the game will be done through DLC.

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma BlazBlue: Chronophantasma]]'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next game, ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralFiction BlazBlue: Central Fiction]]''. In addition, the producer Mori series producer, Toshimichi Mori, has stated that there will be no ''Extend'' for CF, ''CF'', and further updates to the game will be done through DLC.
11th Jan '18 12:38:07 PM Siggu
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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney trilogy]] was originally released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, DS versions of all three games were made, [[{{Woolseyism}} localized]], and released internationally. Other than remastered music, a larger aspect ratio, and a bonus case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were mostly the same. Later, all three games were made available on UsefulNotes/WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no significant differences. The trilogy was later released in one package on the iOS store (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). This collection featured improved graphics, and many [[PortingDisaster problems]]. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, with the only difference being a slightly touched-up script. In 2016, ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' got its iOS version, followed by its 3DS version a year later. A benefit from this trope is that all these titles [[TropesAreTools are still on the market, well after their home consoles became outdated]].

to:

* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney trilogy]] was originally released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, DS versions of all three games were made, [[{{Woolseyism}} localized]], and released internationally. Other than remastered music, a larger aspect ratio, and a bonus case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were mostly the same. Later, all three games were made available on UsefulNotes/WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no significant differences. The trilogy was later released in one package on the iOS store (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). This collection featured improved graphics, and many [[PortingDisaster problems]]. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, with the only difference being a slightly touched-up script. In 2016, ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' got its iOS version, followed by its 3DS version a year later. And then it was announced that all six main games would get a UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch version as well. A benefit from this trope is that all these titles [[TropesAreTools are still on the market, well after their home consoles became outdated]].
6th Jan '18 9:08:43 PM AhBengI
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** Game Freak began to move away from the UpdatedRerelease formula with ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 Black and White]]'' ''2''. Yes, a NumberedSequel instead of an UpdatedRerelease. Though apart from the plot, the games still fill the same role as a hypothetical ''Grey'' version. The company also surprised the fandom entirely when they didn't have either in the sixth generation, choosing to move onwards to the seventh generation after releasing ''[[VideoGameRemake Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]]'' rather than make a ''Z'' version to follow ''[[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY X and Y]]''.

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** Game Freak began to move away from the UpdatedRerelease formula with ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 Black and White]]'' ''2''. Yes, a NumberedSequel instead of an UpdatedRerelease. Though apart from the plot, the games still fill the same role as a hypothetical ''Grey'' version. The company also surprised the fandom entirely when they didn't have either in the sixth generation, choosing to move onwards to the seventh generation after releasing ''[[VideoGameRemake Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire]]'' rather than make a ''Z'' version to follow ''[[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY X and Y]]''.Y]]'' then moved back with ''Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon'' following ''Sun and Moon''.
4th Jan '18 9:07:28 PM rjd1922
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Among some video game publishers, there exists an annoying tendency to release one game, and then release it again several times with minor changes before any wholesale {{sequel}} ever comes along. When one finally does, it's 2:1 odds that it will be a {{prequel}} that doesn't do much of anything to advance the main plotline. Whether this is done to [[PanderingToTheBase cater to the hardcore fanbase]] or [[MoneyDearBoy cynically milk a franchise for all it's worth]] is purely a matter of conjecture.

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Among some video game publishers, there exists an annoying tendency to release one game, and then release it again several times with minor changes before any wholesale {{sequel}} ever comes along. When one a new game finally does, is released, it's 2:1 odds that it will be a {{prequel}} or SpinOff that doesn't do much of anything to advance the main plotline. Whether this is done to [[PanderingToTheBase cater to the hardcore fanbase]] or [[MoneyDearBoy cynically milk a franchise for all it's worth]] is purely a matter of conjecture.
7th Dec '17 1:37:14 AM FRizer
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* Somewhat averted by the classic ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' formula. Each new game demands a brand new set of eight robot masters to fight, and along with those new bosses come new weapons to play with, new levels with new artwork and tile sets, and a new story. While this [[MissionPackSequel rigid formula]] has kept the series from growing or expanding (''VideoGame/MegaMan7'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan8 8]]'' in particular were way too short, given the consoles they were released on), it also acts as a failsafe, ensuring that each new ''Mega Man'' game will not be terribly derivative of its predecessors. For the most part it works, as ''VideoGame/MegaMan9'' and ''[[VideoGame/MegaMan10 10]]'' can attest, but it's not foolproof. ''VideoGame/MegaMan5'' invokes stagnation by offering the player a poor assortment of weapons and pretending the {{big bad}} isn't Dr. Wily again, while ''VideoGame/MegaManX6'' does it by thoughtlessly plastering instant-death spikes everywhere and [[HijackedByGanon shoehorning Sigma in at the last second]].



** The [[VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom Marvel fighting games]] are an example as the developers [[LazyArtist re-used the same sprites]] in all "sequels" of ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'' (just compare the [[WolverinePublicity omnipresent]] ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}: he has the exact same animations in ''X-Men: [=CotA=]'', ''Marvel Super Heroes'', ''X-Men vs. Street Fighter'', ''Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter'', ''Marvel vs. Capcom'', and ''Marvel vs. Capcom 2''). The only exception is ''Marvel vs. Capcom 3'', where all characters were animated with 3D models (and even then, some characters were adapted straight from the preceding crossover, ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'', with minimal changes). Gameplay-wise, this is more arguable, although differences between certain titles boil down mainly to the roster choices (compare ''[=XvSF=]'' to ''[=MSHvSF=]'').



*** Additionally, a true sequel (''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'') was released around the same time as ''Accent Core Plus'' (the new story in ''AC+'' leads into ''Overture'' in some aspects where Sol, Ky, and Dizzy are concerned). And a sequel to both that and ''GGXX'', ''Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-'' was later released.

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*** Additionally, ** Later, a true sequel (''Guilty Gear 2: Overture'') was released around the same time as ''Accent Core Plus'' (the new story in ''AC+'' leads into ''Overture'' in some aspects where Sol, Ky, and Dizzy are concerned). And a sequel to both that and ''GGXX'', ''Guilty Gear Xrd -SIGN-'' was later released.



* Arc System Works fell head first back into this with ''Guilty Gear''[='=]s SpiritualSuccessor, ''Franchise/{{BlazBlue}}'', albeit not at first. Like ''Guilty Gear'', each time the subtitle changes, new gameplay is introduced but they continue to use the same sprite artwork between each one.

to:

* Arc System Works fell head first back into this with ''Guilty Gear''[='=]s SpiritualSuccessor, ''Franchise/{{BlazBlue}}'', albeit not at first. Like ''Guilty Gear'', each time the subtitle changes, new gameplay is introduced but they continue to use the same sprite artwork between each one.



** ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma BlazBlue: Chronophantasma]]'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next game, ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralFiction BlazBlue: Central Fiction]]''.

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronophantasma BlazBlue: Chronophantasma]]'' follows in ''Continuum Shift''[='=]s footsteps. The original game came first, then a patch for the additional characters, and then finally a new patch called ''Chronophantasma Extend'' that was several extra story campaigns plus, for Western audiences, [[NoExportForYou the previously exclusive Library Mode]] all given in a full retail release. Thankfully, that was the only re-release before the next game, ''[[VideoGame/BlazBlueCentralFiction BlazBlue: Central Fiction]]''. In addition, the producer Mori has stated that there will be no ''Extend'' for CF, and further updates to the game will be done through DLC.
24th Nov '17 12:26:25 AM Codefreak5
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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney trilogy]] was originally released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, DS versions of all three games were made, [[{{Woolseyism}} localized]], and released internationally. Other than remastered music, a larger aspect ratio, and a bonus case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were mostly the same. Later, all three games were made available on UsefulNotes/WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no significant differences. The trilogy was later released in one package on the iOS store (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). This collection featured improved graphics, and many [[PortingDisaster problems]]. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, with the only difference being a slightly touched-up script. In 2016, ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' got its iOS version. A benefit from this trope is that all these titles [[TropesAreTools are still on the market, well after their home consoles became outdated]].

to:

* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series' first three games are [[IncrediblyLamePun guilty]] of this. The [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney trilogy]] was originally released on the GBA only in Japan. Years later, DS versions of all three games were made, [[{{Woolseyism}} localized]], and released internationally. Other than remastered music, a larger aspect ratio, and a bonus case in the first game which made use of the DS's new features, all three games were mostly the same. Later, all three games were made available on UsefulNotes/WiiWare, with the only notable difference being that the player can point the Wiimote while shouting [[RuleofCool OBJEC]][[AwesomeButImpractical TION!]] But again, no significant differences. The trilogy was later released in one package on the iOS store (using a free-to-play model where the user must pay for each individual episode save for 1 and 2). This collection featured improved graphics, and many [[PortingDisaster problems]]. Then all three games were released on the 3DS as ''Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy''. The graphics were practically identical to the iOS versions, with the only difference being a slightly touched-up script. In 2016, ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' got its iOS version.version, followed by its 3DS version a year later. A benefit from this trope is that all these titles [[TropesAreTools are still on the market, well after their home consoles became outdated]].
21st Nov '17 7:36:58 AM 404waffles
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** In the ''VideoGame/{{Beatmania}}'' series, it goes: ''BM'', ''BM 2nd'', ''BM 3rd'', ''BM Complete'', ''BM 4th'', ''BM 5th'', ''BM Complete 2'', ''BM Club'', ''BM feat. DCT'', ''BM Core Remix'', ''BM 6th UK Underground'', ''BM 7th Keepin Evolution'', ''BM The Final'', ''BMIIDX'', ''BMIIDX Club'', ''BMIIDX Substream'', ''BMIIDX 2nd'' through ''10th'', ''BMIIDX 11 Red'', ''BMIIDX 12'' ''Happy Sky, BMIIDX 13 Distorted'', ''BMIIDX 14 Gold'', ''BMIIDX 15 DJ Troopers'', ''BMIIDX 16 Empress'', ''BMIIDX 17 Sirius'', ''BMIIDX 18 Resort Anthem'', ''BMIIDX 19 Lincle'', ''BMIIDX 20 Tricoro'', ''BMIIDX 21 Spada'', ''BMIIDX 22 Pendual'', ''BMIIDX 23 Copula'', ''BMIIDX 24 Sinobuz''. And again, this only includes the main arcade series, not any of the home console versions or the arcade variants like ''Beatstage'' or ''Hip Hop Mania''.

to:

** In the ''VideoGame/{{Beatmania}}'' series, it goes: ''BM'', ''BM 2nd'', ''BM 3rd'', ''BM Complete'', ''BM 4th'', ''BM 5th'', ''BM Complete 2'', ''BM Club'', ''BM feat. DCT'', ''BM Core Remix'', ''BM 6th UK Underground'', ''BM 7th Keepin Evolution'', ''BM The Final'', ''BMIIDX'', ''BMIIDX Club'', ''BMIIDX Substream'', ''BMIIDX 2nd'' through ''10th'', ''BMIIDX 11 Red'', ''BMIIDX 12'' ''Happy Sky, BMIIDX 13 Distorted'', ''BMIIDX 14 Gold'', ''BMIIDX 15 DJ Troopers'', ''BMIIDX 16 Empress'', ''BMIIDX 17 Sirius'', ''BMIIDX 18 Resort Anthem'', ''BMIIDX 19 Lincle'', ''BMIIDX 20 Tricoro'', ''BMIIDX 21 Spada'', ''BMIIDX 22 Pendual'', ''BMIIDX 23 Copula'', ''BMIIDX 24 Sinobuz''.Sinobuz'', ''BMIIDX 25 Cannon Ballers''. And again, this only includes the main arcade series, not any of the home console versions or the arcade variants like ''Beatstage'' or ''Hip Hop Mania''.
18th Oct '17 1:20:26 PM mariofan1000
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGames/TheBindingOfIsaac'' has a rather convoluted history with expansions:
** The original flash version was released in 2011 and was intended as a small side-project. It got some free updates, culminating in the "Halloween Update" which was a free expansion that included new items and a new level, Sheol.
** In 2012, the first expansion, ''Wrath of the Lamb'', was released. It, itself got an expansion-within-the-expansion that added a new level, The Chest.
** After that, technical issues relating to the flash engine (Namely, the game getting so bloated they were unable to open the actual game files) caused Edmund [=McMillen=] to team up with Nicalis to create a VideoGameRemake entitled ''Rebirth'' that included another expansion's worth of content.
** Then, Florian Himsl, the sole flash version programmer, managed to open the flash version again after ''Rebirth'' came out, and worked on another free update to ''Wrath of the Lamb'' entitled the "''Eternal Edition''" which included a [[PlatformHell deliberately unfair]] hard mode. Edmund McMillen himself stated that people should treat it as a "Fuck you" update for masochistic players, rather than an actual, serious update.
** ''Rebirth'' got its own expansion, entitled ''Afterbirth'', which included a new game mode called Greed.
** ''Afterbirth'' was then followed with ''Afterbirth+'', a smaller update whose main features included a new floor called ''The Void'' and official mod support.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CapcomSequelStagnation