History Main / Cap

25th Jun '16 4:53:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The various ''Infinity Engine'' games, excepting ''Icewind Dale II'', kept to a number of caps based on the Advanced ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' (2nd Edition) ruleset--for example, the maximum any ability score could reach regardless of magic items was 25, which was the absolute maximum the game allowed at the time, and then usually only by gods. In addition, there were artificial caps on the games to ensure a challenge--in ''BaldursGate'' your character could not exceed 161,000 experience points (enough to put any single-classed character to level 7 or higher, depending on class), and no game using the Infinity Engine allowed more than six permanent party members. (''Icewind Dale II'' used a modified 3rd Edition ruleset, which had far less limits on characters, but still had a level cap of 30.)

to:

* The various ''Infinity Engine'' games, excepting ''Icewind Dale II'', kept to a number of caps based on the Advanced ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' (2nd Edition) ruleset--for example, the maximum any ability score could reach regardless of magic items was 25, which was the absolute maximum the game allowed at the time, and then usually only by gods. In addition, there were artificial caps on the games to ensure a challenge--in ''BaldursGate'' ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' your character could not exceed 161,000 experience points (enough to put any single-classed character to level 7 or higher, depending on class), and no game using the Infinity Engine allowed more than six permanent party members. (''Icewind Dale II'' used a modified 3rd Edition ruleset, which had far less limits on characters, but still had a level cap of 30.)
18th Jun '16 12:19:19 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Atari2600 title ''River Raid'' actually [[KillScreen ends]] when you reach the score cap. The counter shows six digits, and when you score what would be 1,000,000, the counter changes to "!!!!!!" and your plane explodes.
* ''Desert Falcon'', another 2600 game, had a score counter that went back to zero, but had the side-effect of making the score climb more quickly, so it took less time to break the cap again, which made the score climb even faster, etc.

to:

* The Atari2600 title ''River Raid'' ''VideoGame/RiverRaid'' actually [[KillScreen ends]] when you reach the score cap. The counter shows six digits, and when you score what would be 1,000,000, the counter changes to "!!!!!!" and your plane explodes.
* ''Desert Falcon'', another 2600 UsefulNotes/{{Atari 2600}} game, had a score counter that went back to zero, but had the side-effect of making the score climb more quickly, so it took less time to break the cap again, which made the score climb even faster, etc.




to:

* In ''VideoGame/DangunFeveron'', the bonus multiplier maxes out at 999.
27th May '16 12:03:02 PM bwburke94
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Oddly, negative temperatures (measured in [[strike:degrees]][[note]]There are no "degrees" Kelvin. Just Kelvin.[[/note]] Kelvin) are possible, but are actually the HOTTEST possible temperatures, as heat will always flow from a negative temperature system to a positive temperature system.

to:

** Oddly, negative temperatures (measured in [[strike:degrees]][[note]]There Kelvin[[note]]There are no "degrees" Kelvin. Just Kelvin.[[/note]] Kelvin) [[/note]]) are possible, but are actually the HOTTEST possible temperatures, as heat will always flow from a negative temperature system to a positive temperature system.



* 32-bit time variables on Unix-like systems will roll over in a few decades unless they are changed to 64-bit variables. They store the current date and time as seconds since January 1, 1970 at midnight. The number of seconds will go over [[PowersOfTwoMinusOne 2^31-1]] on January 19, 2038. Older AppleMacintosh systems store the date and time as an unsigned 32-bit integer counting the number of seconds since January 1, 1904; this will go over 2^32-1 at February 6, 2040. (Fortunately, it's relatively easily fixed for good. Moving all our time fields into 64 bit variables won't be trivial, but once we have the next rollover will happen on Sunday, 4 December ''292,277,026,596'' CE. For those keeping score at home, [[TimeAbyss at that point the universe will be over 21 times its current age]] and we will [[{{Understatement}} probably not be using Unix anymore]].)

to:

* 32-bit time variables on Unix-like systems will roll over in a few decades unless they are changed to 64-bit variables. They store the current date and time as seconds since January 1, 1970 at midnight. The number of seconds will go over [[PowersOfTwoMinusOne 2^31-1]] on January 19, 2038. Older AppleMacintosh systems store the date and time as an unsigned 32-bit integer counting the number of seconds since January 1, 1904; this will go over 2^32-1 at February 6, 2040. (Fortunately, it's relatively easily fixed for good. Moving all our time fields into 64 bit variables won't be trivial, but once we have the next rollover will happen on Sunday, 4 December ''292,277,026,596'' CE.4, ''292,277,026,596''. For those keeping score at home, [[TimeAbyss at that point the universe will be over 21 times its current age]] and we will [[{{Understatement}} probably not be using Unix anymore]].)
17th May '16 6:03:12 AM Koveras
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Designer Imposed Cap:''' A cap deliberately set by the designers, usually to keep play balanced. For example, you might be limited to carrying 15 bombs so you can't plow through the entire game throwing bombs at everything.

to:

* '''Designer Imposed Cap:''' A cap deliberately set by the designers, usually to keep play balanced.balanced or as an AntiHoarding measure. For example, you might be limited to carrying 15 bombs so you can't plow through the entire game throwing bombs at everything.
12th May '16 9:55:02 AM case
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/TokyoXtremeRacer Zero'' caps your speed at 263 mph. ''Tokyo Xtreme Racer 3'' caps your money at 99,999,990 credits. Then there's a boss that, thanks to the developers not adjusting its money requirement for the US version, requires more money than this cap, making her [[GameBreakingBug impossible to challenge]]. Since she, along with the rest of the first 599 opponents, must be defeated to face the GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere FinalBoss, the game is {{Unwinnable}} without cheating.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TokyoXtremeRacer Zero'' caps your speed at 263 mph. ''Tokyo Xtreme Racer 3'' caps your money at 99,999,990 credits. Then there's a boss that, thanks to the developers not adjusting its money requirement for the US version, requires more money than this cap, making her [[GameBreakingBug impossible to challenge]]. Since she, along with the rest of the first 599 opponents, must be defeated to face the GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere FinalBoss, the game is {{Unwinnable}} [[UnwinnableByMistake Unwinnable]] without cheating.
12th May '16 9:36:13 AM case
Is there an issue? Send a Message


For caps that apply to the number of a certain object that can on the screen at once, see OneBulletAtATime. See also ArbitraryHeadcountLimit, ScratchDamage, and PinballScoring. Overflows can easily be GoodBadBugs.

to:

For caps that apply to the number of a certain object that can on the screen at once, see OneBulletAtATime. A SuperTrope of:
* AbsurdlyHighLevelCap
* AbsurdlyLowLevelCap
* ArbitraryHeadcountLimit
* CharacterNameLimits
* OneBulletAtATime

See also ArbitraryHeadcountLimit, ScratchDamage, also: ScratchDamage and PinballScoring. Overflows can easily be GoodBadBugs.
5th May '16 11:43:55 AM Phred
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/MapleStory'' originally put the cap on mesos (the game's currency) at 2,147,483,647; the cap has since been raised to 9,999,999,999. Many player-sold items cost [[UpToEleven even more than that]], necessitating real-money trades. Meanwhile, the original damage cap was 199,999; the current cap is 50,000,000, and with certain modifiers, it's possible to reach 110,000,000 damage as a certain class.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MapleStory'' originally put the cap on mesos (the game's currency) at 2,147,483,647; the cap has since been raised to 9,999,999,999. Many player-sold items cost [[UpToEleven even more than that]], necessitating real-money trades. Meanwhile, the original damage cap was 199,999; the current cap is 50,000,000, and with certain modifiers, it's possible to reach 110,000,000 damage as a certain class.
class. This causes an interesting shift in utilities for classes, as some classes that are generally considered to be weak will turn out to out perform "strong classes" in a setting where both have achieved capped damage.
27th Apr '16 1:51:56 AM Adept
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The max score in ''{{VideoGame/Bookworm}}'' is 2.14 billion according to PopCap.

to:

* The max score in ''{{VideoGame/Bookworm}}'' is 2.14 billion according to PopCap.Creator/PopCap.
16th Mar '16 4:18:31 PM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* One ridiculous example of this is ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon DS'', which features several mines that go deeper and deeper. The second mine has 255 levels. The third has 999. The fourth ''has 65,535 levels.''

to:

* One ridiculous example of this is ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon DS'', ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonDS'', which features several mines that go deeper and deeper. The second mine has 255 levels. The third has 999. The fourth ''has 65,535 levels.''
15th Mar '16 7:57:00 AM MadCat221
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Games are sometimes not even programmed to cap such counters when they should. They will dutifully add one to a value that can't properly go any higher, resulting in an "overflow" malfunction. This is especially common with old games, because putting in a test for a maximum value would use memory and CPU cycles they didn't have to spare. An overflow might manifest as:

to:

Games are sometimes not even programmed to cap such counters when they should. They will dutifully add one to a value that can't properly go any higher, resulting in a kind of malfunction known as an "overflow" malfunction.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_overflow Integer Overflow]]. This is especially common with old games, because putting in a test for a maximum value would use memory and CPU cycles they didn't have to spare. An overflow might manifest as:
This list shows the last 10 events of 154. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Cap