History Main / CanonDiscontinuity

29th Aug '16 10:33:30 AM GlitteringFlowers
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* The last hundred or so pages of ''[[Manga/{{Gunnm}} Battle Angel Alita]]'' are ignored by the renewed ''Battle Angel Alita: Last Order''; originally intended as an [[RecursiveAdaptation adaptation of the last level of the game of the comic]], it has spiraled into a second story longer than the original that is still ongoing. Note that in this case, the original ending was an effort to avoid AuthorExistenceFailure. After he got better instead, he decided to do it right.

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* The last hundred or so pages of ''[[Manga/{{Gunnm}} Battle Angel Alita]]'' are ignored by the renewed ''Battle Angel Alita: Last Order''; originally intended as an [[RecursiveAdaptation adaptation of the last level of the game of the comic]], it has spiraled into a second story longer than the original that is still ongoing. Note that in this case, the original ending was an a then-''extremely'' ill Yukito Kishiro's effort to avoid AuthorExistenceFailure. After AuthorExistenceFailure; since he got better managed to recover instead, he decided to do it right.
23rd Aug '16 4:58:26 PM RacattackForce
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Not to be confused with ExiledFromContinuity, when it's a ''character'' or a specific element or elements of a universe that are declared off limits for use, be it in-universe or in another version of that universe, for legal reasons or otherwise (although whether they are simply made non-canonical or technically still exist, but can't be used depends on the situation). Compare SchrodingersCanon.

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Not to be confused with ExiledFromContinuity, when it's a ''character'' or a specific element or elements of a universe that are declared off limits for use, be it in-universe or in another version of that universe, for legal reasons or otherwise (although whether they are simply made non-canonical or technically still exist, but can't be used depends on the situation). Compare SchrodingersCanon.
SchrodingersCanon, where a work's status as canon has yet to be determined, and RetCanon, where something that was intended as non-canon becomes canon.
18th Aug '16 12:42:25 PM jmparker78
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** ''Trek'' rivals ''Series/DoctorWho'' for the most [[BrokenBase contentious]], [[UnpleasableFanbase persnickety fanbase]] in fandom history. Depending on whom you talk to, everything bearing the name ''Star Trek'' is canon, from the series to novels to comics to games, or only the classic series was canon, or only the classic series and ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. There is a small but very vocal contingent of fans that declare only the original series, the first six films and the first three seasons of TNG as canon, because once Gene Roddenberry had died, he was no longer around to put his seal of approval on anything, thus it couldn't be canon. This is despite Roddenberry himself agreeing that anything from the live-action series and movies was automatic canon, with or without his seal of approval, and the fact that Roddenberry was only directly involved in the first two seasons of the classic series, the first film and the first season of TNG. There was some hew and cry surrounding the last two films starring the classic cast, with rumors that Roddenberry had declared both to not be canon, but this wasn't true. He simply wasn't happy with the direction film producer Harve Bennett was taking with the films, but he never claimed he had the power to rule over their canon status.
18th Aug '16 12:41:33 PM jmparker78
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Trek'' rivals ''Series/DoctorWho'' for the most [[BrokenBase contentious]], [[UnpleasableFanbase persnickety fanbase]] in fandom history. Depending on whom you talk to, everything bearing the name ''Star Trek'' is canon, from the series to novels to comics to games, or only the classic series was canon, or only the classic series and ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. There is a small but very vocal contingent of fans that declare only the original series, the first six films and the first three seasons of TNG as canon, because once Gene Roddenberry had died, he was no longer around to put his seal of approval on anything, thus it couldn't be canon. This is despite Roddenberry himself agreeing that anything from the live-action series and movies was automatic canon, with or without his seal of approval, and the fact that Roddenberry was only directly involved in the first two seasons of the classic series, the first film and the first season of TNG. There was some hew and cry surrounding the last two films starring the classic cast, with rumors that Roddenberry had declared both to not be canon, but this wasn't true. He simply wasn't happy with the direction film producer Harve Bennett was taking with the films, but he never claimed he had the power to rule over their canon status.
15th Aug '16 3:11:32 AM Abberline1888
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* The ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3k]]'' film ''Film/BoggyCreek2TheLegendContinues'' is a curious case; Charles B. Pierce produced and directed the original ''Film/TheLegendOfBoggyCreek'', a documentary/dramatic re-enactment about an actual rural legend of a sasquatch-like creature living in the backwoods of Fouke, Arkansas. The studio that owned the film tried to cash in on its popularity and made a full-on fictional sequel, ''Return to Boggy Creek'', without the involvement of Charles B. Pierce. Charles B. Pierce then, out of spite, made his own sequel, completely ignoring the events of ''Return'', combining a fictional narrative about a college nature trip with more dramatic re-enactments of alleged sightings of the creature.

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* The ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3k]]'' film ''Film/BoggyCreek2TheLegendContinues'' is a curious case; Charles B. Pierce produced and directed the original ''Film/TheLegendOfBoggyCreek'', a documentary/dramatic re-enactment about an actual rural legend of a sasquatch-like creature living in the backwoods of Fouke, Arkansas. The studio that owned the film tried to cash in on its popularity and made a full-on fictional sequel, ''Return to Boggy Creek'', without the involvement of Charles B. Pierce. Charles B. Pierce then, out of spite, made his own sequel, completely ignoring the events of ''Return'', combining a fictional narrative about a college nature trip with more dramatic re-enactments of alleged sightings of the creature.
10th Aug '16 4:49:11 PM CyberTiger88
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There are numerous reasons why this can happen. It can be an uncomfortable case of OldShame, double standards, MisaimedFandom or UnfortunateImplications for the writers. It can also happen when FanonDiscontinuity is so vehement that the writers end up agreeing and rewrite the canon. Sometimes it's just a moment or piece of writing viewed as stupid, unpopular, or simply not making sense within that universe. A {{retcon}} big enough, or duelling writers that are ArmedWithCanon can cause elements of a work, like characters, events, or episodes to be turfed out of the canon.

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There are numerous reasons why this can happen. It can be an uncomfortable case of OldShame, double standards, MisaimedFandom or UnfortunateImplications for the writers. It can also happen when FanonDiscontinuity is so vehement that [[AuthorsSavingThrow the writers end up agreeing and rewrite the canon.canon]]. Sometimes it's just a moment or piece of writing viewed as stupid, unpopular, or simply not making sense within that universe. A {{retcon}} big enough, or duelling dueling writers that are ArmedWithCanon can cause elements of a work, like characters, events, or episodes to be turfed out of the canon.



* In ''Franchise/TransformersGeneration1'', the BigBad Unicron was revealed in season three to have been a GoneHorriblyRight experiment by an alien MadScientist named "Primacron" - his intent was that Unicron would devour all life in the universe, and then Primacron could repopulate the universe with lifeforms of his own creation and design. All subsequent itinerations of ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' have stuck with the idea of Unicron as a {{Satan}}ic EldritchAbomination, a concept from the Marvel Transformers comics.

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* In ''Franchise/TransformersGeneration1'', the BigBad Unicron was revealed in season three to have been a GoneHorriblyRight experiment by an alien MadScientist named "Primacron" - his intent was that Unicron would devour all life in the universe, and then Primacron could repopulate the universe with lifeforms of his own creation and design. All subsequent itinerations installments of ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' have stuck with the idea of Unicron as a {{Satan}}ic [[SatanicArchetype Satanic]] EldritchAbomination, a concept from the Marvel Transformers comics.
6th Aug '16 10:45:40 AM comicwriter
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** In ''Captain America'' #225, Steve Gerber created a new origin for Steve Rogers, revealing that he was from the Midwest and had an older brother who died at Pearl Harbor. The story was stricken from canon by later writers, with Gerber's origin {{Handwave}}d away as false memories implanted by the government in case Steve was ever captured.

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** In ''Captain America'' #225, Steve Gerber created a new origin for Steve Rogers, revealing that he was from the Midwest and had an older brother who died at Pearl Harbor. The story was stricken from canon by later writers, with Gerber's origin {{Handwave}}d away as false memories implanted by the government in case Steve was were ever captured.
6th Aug '16 10:36:47 AM comicwriter
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* ''Captain America'' Vol. 4 had a controversial story by John Ney Reiber and Chuck Austen, which implied that the story of how Cap had been frozen (recounted in ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'' #4) was a lie. "Ice," Austen's follow up story arc, revealed that the U.S. government had frozen Cap so that he couldn't prevent the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and that the {{Flashback}}s from ''Avengers'' #4 were FakeMemories. Austen was soon replaced, and the {{Retcon}} was never mentioned again.

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* ''Comicbook/CaptainAmerica'':
** In ''Captain America'' #225, Steve Gerber created a new origin for Steve Rogers, revealing that he was from the Midwest and had an older brother who died at Pearl Harbor. The story was stricken from canon by later writers, with Gerber's origin {{Handwave}}d away as false memories implanted by the government in case Steve was ever captured.
**
''Captain America'' Vol. 4 had a controversial story by John Ney Reiber and Chuck Austen, which implied that the story of how Cap had been frozen (recounted in ''Comicbook/TheAvengers'' #4) was a lie. "Ice," Austen's follow up story arc, revealed that the U.S. government had frozen Cap so that he couldn't prevent the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and that the {{Flashback}}s from ''Avengers'' #4 were FakeMemories. Austen was soon replaced, and the {{Retcon}} was never mentioned again.



* Everything previously established about the White Queen (complete with her being in her 40s) was wiped out by the combination of Creator/GrantMorrison's ''Comicbook/NewXMen'' run and Emma Frost's short-lived flashback ongoing series.

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* Everything previously established about the White Queen (complete with her being in her 40s) was wiped out by the combination of Creator/GrantMorrison's ''Comicbook/NewXMen'' run and Emma Frost's Comicbook/EmmaFrost's short-lived flashback ongoing series.
4th Aug '16 5:12:21 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''{{Franchise/Halo}}'''s continuity policy directly addresses this; new material automatically overrides old material in the event of a contradiction, while the games override the [[ExpandedUniverse books]], which in turn override promotional materials like the "Believe" ad campaign. Thus, the claims in the older books that Elites, Brutes, and Hunters were never encountered until the last year of the Human-Covenant war were overridden by newer material (and updated reprints of said older books) which had them fighting in the war from the very beginning.

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* ''{{Franchise/Halo}}'''s continuity policy directly addresses this; new material automatically overrides old material in the event of a contradiction, while the games (usually) override the [[ExpandedUniverse books]], ExpandedUniverse media, which in turn override promotional materials like the "Believe" ad campaign. Thus, the claims in the older books that Elites, Brutes, and Hunters were never encountered until the last year of the Human-Covenant war were overridden by newer material (and updated reprints of said older books) which had them fighting in the war from the very beginning.
8th Jul '16 5:40:49 AM ScroogeMacDuck
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** The Franchise/DisneyPrincess roster varies significantly, tending to eliminate princesses from less popular movies. This shows up in merchandise and tie-in books. Most notably, [[Disney/TheBlackCauldron Princess Eilonwy]] and [[Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire Kida]] are never included. One book specifically mentions that Ariel is the only princess from an underwater kingdom.
** Disney has no regard for their Direct-to-DVD sequels such as ''Poccahontas 2'', ''Mulan 2'' and ''The Little Mermaid 2''. Characters introduced in those sequels rarely (if ever) get merchandising, and the events that take place in those movies are never referenced again.
** Television spinoffs of the Disney Canon, such as ''Timon and Pumbaa'', ''The Little Mermaid'', or ''Hercules: The Series'' are also rendered non-canon to the films and are never brought up again afterward. Oftentimes they can end up conflicting with events from the movies as well.

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** It appears that ''[[WesternAnimation/TheLittleMermaid the]] ''[[WesternAnimation/TheLittleMermaid Little Mermaid]]'' [[WesternAnimation/TheLittleMermaid animated series]] (designed as a prequel to the first movie) has been kicked out of continuity by ''The Little Mermaid III - Ariel's Beginning'', as ''Ariel's Beginning'' is also a prequel to the first movie that would generally be consistent with the series but features a totally different version of Ariel and Flounder's first meeting than was presented in the series. Or it's just the one episode about their meeting that is touched -- it has not been clarified.
** Very similarly, ''The Lion King 1/2'' (itself of debatable canonicity) seems to declare discontinuity on the ''WesternAnimation/TimonAndPumbaa'' TV series, since it too featured a completely different version of Timon and Pumbaa's youth than featured in the movie.
** The Franchise/DisneyPrincess roster varies significantly, tending to eliminate princesses from less popular movies. This shows up in merchandise and tie-in books. Most notably, [[Disney/TheBlackCauldron Princess Eilonwy]] and [[Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire Kida]] are never included. One book specifically mentions that Ariel is the only princess from an underwater kingdom.
** Disney has
kingdom. Of course, there is no regard for their Direct-to-DVD sequels such as ''Poccahontas 2'', ''Mulan 2'' and ''The Little Mermaid 2''. Characters introduced in those sequels rarely (if ever) get merchandising, and the events that take place in those movies are never referenced again.
** Television spinoffs of the Disney Canon, such as ''Timon and Pumbaa'', ''The Little Mermaid'', or ''Hercules: The Series'' are also rendered non-canon to the films and are never brought up again afterward. Oftentimes they can end up conflicting with events from the movies as well.
real continuity involved -- it's just a marketing thing.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CanonDiscontinuity