History Main / CallingYourAttacks

16th Apr '16 6:24:18 AM FoolsEditAccount
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* In ''VideoGame/UncommonTime'', the {{Limit Break}}s all involve the characters doing this, along with an additional dramatic line.
-->'''Alto:''' "The hatred, the hope... All of it is my power! Disappear!! Grand Concerto!"
11th Apr '16 6:29:30 PM TheCuza
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** "Snake Cuts Grass!"

to:

** "Snake Cuts Grass!"Grass!" (leg sweep)
** "Monkey Plucks Two Peaches!" (EyeScream)



*** [[DeadpanSnarker Uncle]]: "Thank you for sharing, Angry Crow!" (counters Hak Foo's attack)

to:

*** [[DeadpanSnarker Uncle]]: "Thank --->'''Uncle:''' Thank you for sharing, Angry Crow!" (counters Crow! ''[counters Hak Foo's attack)attack]''
11th Apr '16 10:46:54 AM Snipertoaster
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* ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'' has any allied team member yell out the name of the Arts that they use (assuming that they aren't in a Skell and not responding to a Soul Voice). Some villains to do this as well, notably [[spoiler: Ryyz and Dagahn when in the Zu Pharg]].
6th Apr '16 7:23:29 AM Tron80
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* ''Fanfic/{{Wonderful}}'': Done by many characters:
-->'''Taylor:''' UNITE... HAND! WONDER PUNCH! WONDER BUNKER! WONDER GHOST!\\
'''Sophia:''' UNITE... CROSSBOW!\\
'''Emma:''' UNITE... HAMMER!\\
'''Rachel:''' UNITE... DOG!\\
'''Miss Militia:''' UNITE... GUN!
5th Apr '16 2:29:00 PM Willbyr
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* In ''Manga/{{Kinnikuman}}'' and its sequel ''KinnikumanNisei'', every wrestler (even Meat) calls their attacks.

to:

* In ''Manga/{{Kinnikuman}}'' and its sequel ''KinnikumanNisei'', ''Anime/UltimateMuscle'', every wrestler (even Meat) calls their attacks.
5th Apr '16 5:57:36 AM Alceister
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* Proclaiming attacks helps in situations when you need to organize a particular type of attack from a particular source. In older times, archers would be called up for volley fire on large concentrations of troops; spearmen or pikemen would be told to brace their spears (lower the pointy end while supporting the non-pointy end on the ground) to receive a charge by enemy cavalry. When artillery and other types of heavy weapons came along, this became all the more important to ensure that theywere using the most appropriate type of munition for a given situation.

to:

* Proclaiming attacks helps in situations ** Pilots of Western Air Forces typically call out warnings when you need to organize a particular type launching weapons. A call of attack from a particular source. In older times, archers would be called up "Fox Two" for volley fire on large concentrations of troops; spearmen or pikemen would be told to brace their spears (lower example, warns nearby friendly aircraft that the pointy end while supporting pilot has fired an infrared guided missile (most often an AIM-9 Sidewinder). "Fox One" means a semi-active radar air-to-air missile (usually an AIM-7 Sparrow) has been fired, whereas "Fox Three" means that an active radar missile has been fired (usually an AIM-120 AMRAMM, aka the non-pointy end on "slammer"). "Guns guns guns" means the ground) to receive a charge by aircraft's guns are being fired. Considering that only friendlies and not hostiles can hear the radio calls, there is considerably less risk of warning the enemy cavalry. When artillery and other types of what's going on. This doesn't translate to the less realistic flight sims, where every aircraft seems to be broadcasting on an open channel.
** If we count the command to fire, then most
heavy weapons came along, would apply, although the call is meant to be heard by the weapon crew and accompanying friendly troops. Sometimes, the last thing heard on the radio before everything is drowned out by exploding shells/rockets/missiles is a [[DangerDeadpan calm voice]] on the radio: "commence firing".
*** In the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US military]], armored vehicle crewmen will often use the phrase "on the way" before firing the vehicle's primary cannon or missile armament. This is especially pertinent with tanks since the loader could be severely injured or killed by the recoiling cannon breech if the gunner [[NiceJobBreakingItHero forgets to make
this became all announcement before firing the more important main gun]].
* Military orders are essentially this, particularly in older times.
* In wartime, if one side has a strong enough air force, they may openly announce their attacks on particular targets, which serves two purposes: it allows civilians ([[ScrewThisImOuttaHere or deserting enemy troops]]) in the area
to ensure get out of harm's way (no doubt causing traffic congestion problems for the defenders to deal with at the same time), while also essentially declaring that theywere using [[IShallTauntYou there is nothing the most appropriate type defenders can do to stop you, even with advance warning.]] Take care not to do this unless you actually ''can'' attack the target with impunity, of munition for a given situation.course.



* Pilots of Western Air Forces typically call out warnings when launching weapons. A call of "Fox Two" for example, warns nearby friendly aircraft that the pilot has fired an infrared guided missile (most often an AIM-9 Sidewinder). "Fox One" means a semi-active radar air-to-air missile (usually an AIM-7 Sparrow) has been fired, whereas "Fox Three" means that an active radar missile has been fired (usually an AIM-120 AMRAMM, aka the "slammer"). "Guns guns guns" means the aircraft's guns are being fired.
** Although, considering that only friendlies and not hostiles can hear the radio calls, there is considerably less risk of warning the enemy of what's going on. Apparently this doesn't translate to the less realistic flight sims, though, where every aircraft seems to be broadcasting on the guard (public) channel.
** If we count the command to fire, then most modern vehicular weapons would apply, although the call is meant to be heard by the vehicle crew and accompanying friendly troops. Sometimes, the last thing heard on the radio before everything is drowned out by exploding shells/rockets/missiles is a [[DangerDeadpan calm voice]] on the radio: "commence firing".
*** In the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US military]], armored vehicle crewmen will often use the phrase "on the way" before firing the vehicle's primary cannon or missile armament. This is especially pertinent with tanks since the loader could be severely injured or killed by the recoiling cannon breech if the gunner [[NiceJobBreakingItHero forgets to make this announcement before firing the main gun]].
* According to the other wiki, in some states, one has to announce the intent to use deadly force before they can legally be justified fighting back in self defense against an attacker.
* In wartime, if one side has a strong enough air force, they may openly announce their attacks on particular targets, which serves two purposes: it allows civilians ([[ScrewThisImOuttaHere or deserting enemy troops]]) in the area to get out of harm's way (no doubt causing traffic congestion problems for the defenders to deal with at the same time), while also essentially declaring that [[IShallTauntYou there is nothing the defenders can do to stop you, even with advance warning.]] Take care not to do this unless you actually ''can'' attack the target with impunity, of course.

to:

* Pilots of Western Air Forces typically call out warnings when launching weapons. A call of "Fox Two" for example, warns nearby friendly aircraft that the pilot has fired an infrared guided missile (most often an AIM-9 Sidewinder). "Fox One" means a semi-active radar air-to-air missile (usually an AIM-7 Sparrow) has been fired, whereas "Fox Three" means that an active radar missile has been fired (usually an AIM-120 AMRAMM, aka the "slammer"). "Guns guns guns" means the aircraft's guns are being fired.
** Although, considering that only friendlies and not hostiles can hear the radio calls, there is considerably less risk of warning the enemy of what's going on. Apparently this doesn't translate to the less realistic flight sims, though, where every aircraft seems to be broadcasting on the guard (public) channel.
** If we count the command to fire, then most modern vehicular weapons would apply, although the call is meant to be heard by the vehicle crew and accompanying friendly troops. Sometimes, the last thing heard on the radio before everything is drowned out by exploding shells/rockets/missiles is a [[DangerDeadpan calm voice]] on the radio: "commence firing".
***
In the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US military]], armored vehicle crewmen will often use the phrase "on the way" before firing the vehicle's primary cannon or missile armament. This is especially pertinent with tanks since the loader could be severely injured or killed by the recoiling cannon breech if the gunner [[NiceJobBreakingItHero forgets to make this announcement before firing the main gun]].
* According to the other wiki, in
some states, one has to announce the their intent to use deadly force before they can be legally be justified fighting back in self defense to defend themselves against an attacker.
* In wartime, if one side has a strong enough air force, they may openly announce their attacks on particular targets, which serves two purposes: it allows civilians ([[ScrewThisImOuttaHere or deserting enemy troops]]) in the area to get out of harm's way (no doubt causing traffic congestion problems for the defenders to deal with at the same time), while also essentially declaring that [[IShallTauntYou there is nothing the defenders can do to stop you, even with advance warning.]] Take care not to do this unless you actually ''can'' attack the target with impunity, of course.
attacker.
3rd Apr '16 11:20:17 PM Alceister
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* Proclaiming attacks helps in situations when you need to organize a particular type of attack from a particular source. In older times, archers would be called up for volley fire on large concentrations of troops; spearmen or pikemen would be told to brace their spears (lower the pointy end while supporting the non-pointy end on the ground) to receive a charge by enemy infantry or cavalry. When artillery and other types of heavy weapons came along, this became all the more important to ensure that theywere using the most appropriate type of munition for a given situation.

to:

* Proclaiming attacks helps in situations when you need to organize a particular type of attack from a particular source. In older times, archers would be called up for volley fire on large concentrations of troops; spearmen or pikemen would be told to brace their spears (lower the pointy end while supporting the non-pointy end on the ground) to receive a charge by enemy infantry or cavalry. When artillery and other types of heavy weapons came along, this became all the more important to ensure that theywere using the most appropriate type of munition for a given situation.
2nd Apr '16 12:34:33 AM Alceister
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** Announcing your target - either to focus fire or avoid overkill in a gunfight. "Contact" makes people aware that you have spotted a target, to be followed by instructions regarding the target's positioning; "Tango down" (or its phonetic alphabet equivalent in other languages) makes people aware that your target is dead, and that you stop firing and find a different target. "Fire at will" essentially tells people to choose their own targets and fire as quickly as they can, though this should only be done when the risk of friendly or civilian casualties is minimal.

to:

** Announcing your target - either to focus fire or avoid overkill in a gunfight. "Contact" makes people aware that you have spotted a target, to be followed by instructions regarding the target's positioning; "Tango down" (or its phonetic alphabet equivalent in other languages) makes people aware that your target is dead, dead or incapacitated, and that you stop firing and they should find a different target. "Fire at will" essentially tells people to choose their own targets and fire as quickly as they can, though this should only be done when the risk of friendly or civilian casualties is minimal.
2nd Apr '16 12:30:51 AM Alceister
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** "Fire in the hole!" Translation: something's about to explode real soon, so you'd best find some cover, block your ears, and open your mouth.
** And the related "Frag out!" when throwing a hand grenade.
** Inverted with "Grenade!", which is your buddy calling the ''enemy's'' attack when he spots something small, round and explodey headed in your direction.
** Likewise, "Incoming!", warning of incoming mortar rounds.
** Inverted (kinda) - someone might remark "Outbound" after hearing mortars (or just the sound of rounds), but that's usually superfluous, although it tends to calm panicking rookies.
** Also inverted for "Reloading!" and any variations; you're informing others that you're currently ''unable'' to attack because your weapon is out of ammo.
* Loudly proclaiming attacks helps in situations when you need to organize the fire from a large number of sources. Volley fire, be it from English longbows, gunpowder cannons or artillery is simply more effective if it can be directed. A good pair of lungs and yelling certainly helps to be heard over the din of battle to do so.
** Announcing your target - to either avoid all team shooting at the same guy (usually, shouldn't happen, but...) in gunfight helps. Announcing spotting a target (Contact) and giving targeting instructions ( on my 3, By the bushes, left side,) helps a lot. Inversion like "Tango Down" helps your buddies to know to switch target since he's dead. Iron lungs get issued after boot camp.
* Most martial arts accompany an attack with a ''kiai'' (a shout), because there is a biomechanical advantage in exhaling sharply (and thus tensing the torso muscles) when striking. Boxers learn a similar technique. In kendo (among others) it's common to shout the part of the body that you're striking at, such as "MEN!" (head), "KOTE!" (hand), or "DO!" (torso). Under some organizations' rules, this is part of the scoring process; failing to call a target or calling the wrong target causes the hit to be ignored. This is done to ensure that a fighter with poor technique cannot swing wildly to attempt to get points through pure luck. The fighter must clearly state at the time of the attack what he is attempting to strike.
* Pilots of Western Air Forces typically call out warnings when launching weapons. A call of "Fox Two!" for example, warns nearby friendly aircraft that the pilot has fired an infrared guided missile (most often an AIM-9 Sidewinder). "Fox One" means a semi-active radar air-to-air missile (usually an AIM-7 Sparrow) has been fired, whereas "Fox Three" means that an active radar missile has been fired (usually an AIM-120 AMRAMM, aka the "slammer"). "Guns Guns Guns" means the aircraft's guns are being fired.

to:

** "Fire in the hole!" Translation: hole" means that something's about to explode real soon, so you'd best find some cover, block your ears, and open your mouth.
** And the related "Frag out!" when throwing a hand grenade.
** Inverted with "Grenade!", which is your buddy calling the ''enemy's'' attack when he spots something small, round and explodey headed in your direction.
** Likewise, "Incoming!", warning of incoming mortar rounds.
** Inverted (kinda) - someone might remark "Outbound" after hearing mortars (or just the sound of rounds), but that's usually superfluous, although it tends to calm panicking rookies.
** Also inverted for "Reloading!" and any variations; you're informing
mouth. Similarly, "frag out" essentially tells others that you're currently ''unable'' you are throwing a grenade at the enemy, so they might want to attack because your weapon take cover just in case that grenade sends fragments flying back towards you. This is out of ammo.
* Loudly proclaiming attacks helps in situations
then inverted with "grenade", which is when you need to organize spot something round and small flying through the fire from a large number of sources. Volley fire, be it from English longbows, gunpowder cannons or artillery is simply more effective if it can be directed. A good pair of lungs and yelling certainly helps to be heard over the din of battle to do so.
** Announcing your target - to either avoid all team shooting at the same guy (usually, shouldn't happen, but...) in gunfight helps. Announcing spotting a target (Contact) and giving targeting instructions ( on my 3, By the bushes, left side,) helps a lot. Inversion like "Tango Down" helps your buddies to know to switch target since he's dead. Iron lungs get issued after boot camp.
air towards you.
** Also inverted for "reloading" and any variations; you're informing others that you're currently ''unable'' to attack because your weapon is out of ammo.
** Announcing your target - either to focus fire or avoid overkill in a gunfight. "Contact" makes people aware that you have spotted a target, to be followed by instructions regarding the target's positioning; "Tango down" (or its phonetic alphabet equivalent in other languages) makes people aware that your target is dead, and that you stop firing and find a different target. "Fire at will" essentially tells people to choose their own targets and fire as quickly as they can, though this should only be done when the risk of friendly or civilian casualties is minimal.
* Proclaiming attacks helps in situations when you need to organize a particular type of attack from a particular source. In older times, archers would be called up for volley fire on large concentrations of troops; spearmen or pikemen would be told to brace their spears (lower the pointy end while supporting the non-pointy end on the ground) to receive a charge by enemy infantry or cavalry. When artillery and other types of heavy weapons came along, this became all the more important to ensure that theywere using the most appropriate type of munition for a given situation.
* Most martial arts accompany an attack with a ''kiai'' (a shout), because there is a biomechanical advantage in exhaling sharply (and thus tensing the torso muscles) when striking. Boxers learn a similar technique. In kendo (among others) it's common to shout the part of the body that you're striking at, such as "MEN!" "men" (head), "KOTE!" "kote" (hand), or "DO!" "do!" (torso). Under some organizations' rules, this is part of the scoring process; failing to call a target or calling the wrong target causes the hit to be ignored. This is done to ensure that a fighter with poor technique cannot swing wildly to attempt to get points through pure luck. The fighter must clearly state at the time of the attack what he is attempting to strike.
* Pilots of Western Air Forces typically call out warnings when launching weapons. A call of "Fox Two!" Two" for example, warns nearby friendly aircraft that the pilot has fired an infrared guided missile (most often an AIM-9 Sidewinder). "Fox One" means a semi-active radar air-to-air missile (usually an AIM-7 Sparrow) has been fired, whereas "Fox Three" means that an active radar missile has been fired (usually an AIM-120 AMRAMM, aka the "slammer"). "Guns Guns Guns" guns guns" means the aircraft's guns are being fired.



** If we count the command to fire, then most modern vehicular weapons would apply, although the call is meant to be heard by the vehicle crew and accompanying friendly troops. Sometimes, the last thing heard on the radio before everything is drowned out by exploding shells/rockets/missiles is a [[DangerDeadpan calm voice]] on the radio: "Commence firing".
*** In the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US military]], armored vehicle crewmen will often use the phrase "On the way!" before firing the vehicle's primary cannon or missile armament. This is especially pertinent with tanks since the Loader could be severely injured or killed by the cannon breech if the Gunner [[NiceJobBreakingItHero forgets to make this announcement before firing the main gun]].
** According to the other wiki, in some states, one has to announce the intent to use deadly force before they can legally be justified fighting back in self defense against an attacker.
* In wartime, if one side has a strong enough air force, they may preemptively announce their attacks on particular targets, which serves two purposes: It allows civilians ([[ScrewThisImOuttaHere or deserting enemy troops]]) in the area to get out of harm's way (no doubt causing traffic congestion problems for the defenders to deal with at the same time), while also essentially declaring that [[IShallTauntYou there is nothing the defenders can do to stop you, even with advance warning.]] Take care not to do this unless you actually ''can'' attack the target with impunity, of course.

to:

** If we count the command to fire, then most modern vehicular weapons would apply, although the call is meant to be heard by the vehicle crew and accompanying friendly troops. Sometimes, the last thing heard on the radio before everything is drowned out by exploding shells/rockets/missiles is a [[DangerDeadpan calm voice]] on the radio: "Commence "commence firing".
*** In the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US military]], armored vehicle crewmen will often use the phrase "On "on the way!" way" before firing the vehicle's primary cannon or missile armament. This is especially pertinent with tanks since the Loader loader could be severely injured or killed by the recoiling cannon breech if the Gunner gunner [[NiceJobBreakingItHero forgets to make this announcement before firing the main gun]].
** * According to the other wiki, in some states, one has to announce the intent to use deadly force before they can legally be justified fighting back in self defense against an attacker.
* In wartime, if one side has a strong enough air force, they may preemptively openly announce their attacks on particular targets, which serves two purposes: It it allows civilians ([[ScrewThisImOuttaHere or deserting enemy troops]]) in the area to get out of harm's way (no doubt causing traffic congestion problems for the defenders to deal with at the same time), while also essentially declaring that [[IShallTauntYou there is nothing the defenders can do to stop you, even with advance warning.]] Take care not to do this unless you actually ''can'' attack the target with impunity, of course.
2nd Apr '16 12:01:56 AM Alceister
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** "Fire in the hole!" Translation: something's about to explode real soon, so you'd best find some cover and block your ears.

to:

** "Fire in the hole!" Translation: something's about to explode real soon, so you'd best find some cover and cover, block your ears.ears, and open your mouth.
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