History Main / CallThatAFormation

24th Jan '16 3:20:14 PM chc232323
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* The top of the page contains a necessary simplification. Modern weapons are so accurate and fire so quickly that the old standbys like lines and squares simply don't work. However, that doesn't mean that modern soldiers run about willy-nilly. A modern squad or platoon of soldiers has a very complex shape designed such that when maneuvering, the unit's weapons provide it with excellent security in each direction and the unit can reform when it must "react to contact." When approaching an objective, facing obstacles, crossing dangerously open ground, or otherwise encountering anything suspicious, a well-trained unit has a pre-planned response. Since these formations are complex, evolve slowly, and generally would be boring to watch, don't expect them to show up on camera, aside from some close-quarters battle drills like room-clearing. ** For an example of the basics of the complexity required to maneuver a modern infantry squad, read [[http://www.armystudyguide.com/content/EIB/EIB_Related_Battle_Drills/battle-drill-1-conduct-pl.shtml Battle Drill 1]], the very first such drill, for the US Army, or [[http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/call/call_97-15_ctc3q1a.htm how to cross a road]].
20th Dec '15 4:06:34 PM nombretomado
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** Massed cavalry charges are a peculiarly Mannish phenomenon - namely Dúnedain and Rohirrim - and massed cavalry charges tend to appear only in the Third Age. TheSilmarillion does not mention a single Elvish cavalry ''unit'', not to speak about charges - Elves always tend to fight as infantry. It is appropriate to think that Men are far more formidable as enemies to Orcs as heavy cavalry than Elves - even the Noldor - as infantry.
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** Massed cavalry charges are a peculiarly Mannish phenomenon - namely Dúnedain and Rohirrim - and massed cavalry charges tend to appear only in the Third Age. TheSilmarillion ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' does not mention a single Elvish cavalry ''unit'', not to speak about charges - Elves always tend to fight as infantry. It is appropriate to think that Men are far more formidable as enemies to Orcs as heavy cavalry than Elves - even the Noldor - as infantry.
31st Oct '15 8:58:24 PM SantosLHalper
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** [[BladeOnAStick Lancers]] will be used as grinder units, hiding behind the shields and trying to whittle down the opponent's HPs or enforcing some side of the lines by forcing the enemy back with a low lance or halberd swipe that's easily dodged, but still will have you take a step back.
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** [[BladeOnAStick [[ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice Lancers]] will be used as grinder units, hiding behind the shields and trying to whittle down the opponent's HPs or enforcing some side of the lines by forcing the enemy back with a low lance or halberd swipe that's easily dodged, but still will have you take a step back.
31st Oct '15 8:49:39 PM SantosLHalper
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* If LARP can be qualified as actual warfare, new players that join a group for training are usually trained in basic tactical movement as well as fencing with their variety of weapons. In France (since that's where this Troper's from) everyone in a line has its role: ** [[LightningBruiser Voltigeurs]] (acrobats, if you will) are usually used as flankers and will try to backstab the enemy by outmaneuvering their line. They're most of the time dual wielders, with a combination of either short or medium blades, using their speed and offense potential. ** [[StoneWall Shield bearers]] often form the center of the formation and protect everyone on their sides, trying to snap hits under their shields on some occasion. They're the core of the formation.
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* If LARP can be qualified as actual warfare, new players that join a group for training are usually trained in basic tactical movement as well as fencing with their variety of weapons. In France (since that's where this Troper's from) France, for example, everyone in a line has its role: ** [[LightningBruiser Voltigeurs]] (acrobats, if you will) Skirmishers]] are usually used as flankers and will try to backstab the enemy by outmaneuvering their line. They're most of the time dual wielders, with a combination of either short or medium blades, using their speed and offense potential. ** [[StoneWall Shield bearers]] Bearers]] often form the center of the formation and protect everyone on their sides, trying to snap hits under their shields on some occasion. They're the core of the formation.
21st Oct '15 8:04:03 PM Willbyr
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In ancient warfare, or indeed modern warfare before the advent of accurate rifles, armies generally kept in some kind of formation. Well, some armies, anyway. The Celtic peoples of Roman and Greek times were exceptions to this rule (even then, there is evidence that the Celtic peoples had at least some minor sense of organization for battle purposes). But armies like the Romans, Greeks, generally any spearmen on any battlefield, and any modern European army, all stayed as a block of troops and worked together in a distinct formation.
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%% Image selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1440425098071564600 %% Please do not replace or remove without starting a new thread. %% [[quoteright:350:[[Film/ThreeHundred http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/callthataformation_300spartans3.png]]]] In ancient warfare, or indeed modern warfare before the advent of accurate rifles, armies generally kept in some kind of formation. Well, some armies, anyway. The Celtic peoples of Roman and Greek times were exceptions to this rule (even then, there is evidence that the Celtic peoples had at least some minor sense of organization for battle purposes). But armies like the Romans, Greeks, generally any spearmen on any battlefield, and any modern European army, all stayed as a block of troops and worked together in a distinct formation.

That said, some things you'd expect to be unrealistic, like having soldiers wielding different weapons from each other in the same group of soldiers, aren't necessarily wrong; towards the end of Medieval warfare, knights generally fought with the support of several warriors of lower status armed with weapons, and fought in smaller units. And as soldiers were often required to arm themselves, those of lower status would often have to bring whatever they could to hit the enemy with. The warfare during The UsefulNotes/WarsOfTheRoses is an example. Generally though, warriors of different social standings fought separately from their collegues.
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That said, some things you'd expect to be unrealistic, like having soldiers wielding different weapons from each other in the same group of soldiers, aren't necessarily wrong; towards the end of Medieval warfare, knights generally fought with the support of several warriors of lower status armed with weapons, and fought in smaller units. And as soldiers were often required to arm themselves, those of lower status would often have to bring whatever they could to hit the enemy with. The warfare during The UsefulNotes/WarsOfTheRoses is an example. Generally though, warriors of different social standings fought separately from their collegues. colleagues.
6th Oct '15 2:13:58 PM MagwitchOo
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Too many typos, almost feels intentional.
* ''VideoGame/GuildWars2'' needs formations for they World vs World-fights (a real-time strategy and tower defense mix for a MMORPG). Since moste forces are defined by random players, they tend to follow this trope. However there are basic formations which the tougher [[FantasyCharacterClasses classes]] stick close to the team leader and the ranged fighters forming a semi cirlce around and barraging constantly onto the leader's position. This is made possible with an easily spottable standard hovering above the leader.
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* ''VideoGame/GuildWars2'' needs formations for they the World vs World-fights (a real-time strategy and tower defense mix for a MMORPG). Since moste most forces are defined by random players, they tend to follow this trope. However there are basic formations which where the tougher [[FantasyCharacterClasses classes]] stick close to the team leader and the ranged fighters forming form a semi cirlce circle around and barraging constantly onto the leader's position. This is made possible with an easily spottable spot-able standard hovering above the leader.
23rd Sep '15 7:23:50 PM Berrenta
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** [[LightningBruiser Voltigeurs]] (acrobats, if you will) are usually used as flankers and will try to backstab the enemy by outmaneuvering their line. They're most of the time dual wielders, with a combination of either short or medium blades, using their speed and offense potential ForMassiveDamage.
to:
** [[LightningBruiser Voltigeurs]] (acrobats, if you will) are usually used as flankers and will try to backstab the enemy by outmaneuvering their line. They're most of the time dual wielders, with a combination of either short or medium blades, using their speed and offense potential ForMassiveDamage.potential.
20th Sep '15 5:13:38 PM nombretomado
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* A pretty good example of why formations are so pivotal in battles would be how the NapoleonicWars were fought. In the 1700-1800's, the bulk of a European (or Europeanized) army was made up of musket-wielding infantrymen, usually organized into "line" infantry regiments of about 1000-1600 men (usually less, due to casualties and disease). The biggest threats to an infantryman on the battlefield came from enemy infantry, cavalry, and artillery, and an infantry regiment had separate formations to deal with each; therefore, infantry were rigorously trained and drilled to quickly switch between them, as taking too long could prove disastrous. Conversely, using them effectively could swing the balance of a battle. The most common formations were:
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* A pretty good example of why formations are so pivotal in battles would be how the NapoleonicWars UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars were fought. In the 1700-1800's, the bulk of a European (or Europeanized) army was made up of musket-wielding infantrymen, usually organized into "line" infantry regiments of about 1000-1600 men (usually less, due to casualties and disease). The biggest threats to an infantryman on the battlefield came from enemy infantry, cavalry, and artillery, and an infantry regiment had separate formations to deal with each; therefore, infantry were rigorously trained and drilled to quickly switch between them, as taking too long could prove disastrous. Conversely, using them effectively could swing the balance of a battle. The most common formations were:
27th Aug '15 10:24:21 PM FordPrefect
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* If LARP can be qualified as actual warfare, new players that join a group for training are usually trained in basic tactical movement as well as fencing with their variety of weapons. In France (since that's where this Troper's from) everyone in a line has it's role:
to:
* If LARP can be qualified as actual warfare, new players that join a group for training are usually trained in basic tactical movement as well as fencing with their variety of weapons. In France (since that's where this Troper's from) everyone in a line has it's its role:
27th Aug '15 10:23:48 PM FordPrefect
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* In ''Film/ThreeHundred'', the Spartans alternate between fighting in formation and fighting out of formation; notably, while fighting the first persian waves they fight in a tight phalanx formation, and break once they've killed the majority of the Persian troops to charge into them. Later when the Persian cavalry arrives, the Spartans adopt a tight arrow-shaped formation. The Spartans have some trouble fighting the Immortals later on until they manage to form up into a phalanx when the Arcadians distract the Immortals, and they also use a shieldwall when fighting the Persian elephants. The only times the Spartans are shown taking losses are when they fight outside of formation, such as initially against the Immortals, when the grenadiers attack, and when a few Spartans range out ahead of the rest of the formation and get hit by cavalry. And, of course, its possible that they never actually broke ranks at all, and it was just a tactic by the UnreliableNarrator to make the deaths look more heroic.
to:
* In ''Film/ThreeHundred'', the Spartans alternate between fighting in formation and fighting out of formation; notably, while fighting the first persian Persian waves they fight in a tight phalanx formation, and break once they've killed the majority of the Persian troops to charge into them. Later when the Persian cavalry arrives, the Spartans adopt a tight arrow-shaped formation. The Spartans have some trouble fighting the Immortals later on until they manage to form up into a phalanx when the Arcadians distract the Immortals, and they also use a shieldwall when fighting the Persian elephants. The only times the Spartans are shown taking losses are when they fight outside of formation, such as initially against the Immortals, when the grenadiers attack, and when a few Spartans range out ahead of the rest of the formation and get hit by cavalry. And, of course, its possible that they never actually broke ranks at all, and it was just a tactic by the UnreliableNarrator to make the deaths look more heroic.
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