History Main / CallASmeerpARabbit

15th Jul '16 1:48:13 AM Sophovot
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-->'''Aang''': You mean platypus-bear?
-->'''Katara''': No, it just says "bear".
-->'''Sokka''': Certainly you mean his pet skunk-bear.
-->'''Toph''': Or his armadillo-bear!
-->'''Aang''': Gopher-bear?
-->'''Katara''': Just... bear.
-->'''Toph''': This place is weird.
3rd Jul '16 4:49:53 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Franchise/Bionicle}}'' often used this, mostly in its early years:

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* ''{{Franchise/Bionicle}}'' ''{{Toys/Bionicle}}'' often used this, mostly in its early years:
25th Jun '16 2:50:54 PM undyingembers
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* TabletopGame/Numenera: After one billion years in the future, all life forms on Earth look nothing like what they look like now. What people would call a tiger or an elk would be very different from what we would call them.
20th Jun '16 3:50:26 AM StFan
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* The French word for the shrew is "''musaraigne''", literally meaning mouse-spider. They are neither (though shrews at least look like mouses, but they aren't rodents). The likening to spiders came from the folklore belief that all shrews are venomous (some are, but not all species).
13th Jun '16 10:51:17 AM chopshop
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* In ''{{VideoGame/Dishonored}}'', pretty much all animals in the setting function under this. Dogs look like pitbulls with crocodilian heads, whales have tentacles, rats travel in swarms like bugs, and that's not even getting into the bizarre things living over on Pandyssia. WordOfGod noted that the design team wanted the animals to look identifiable but subtly alien, like an animalistic version of UncannyValley.
8th Jun '16 9:20:36 PM PeverellForever
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* Wolves ''Literature/FatesRoad'' are not wolves. They are humans who have mutated into somewhat deformed bipeds with vaguely wolf-ish faces.
4th Jun '16 3:10:25 PM tkzv
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* Very common in the novels of Creator/DaveDuncan:
** "Eagles" and "bats" from ''Shadow'' seem to have little in common with their Earth namesakes. For one, bats contain a narcotic drug and eagles have a prominent fleshy headcomb, [[spoiler:which they use to communicate]].
** "Dragons", "llamas", "rabbits", "alpacas" from ''The Great Game'' trilogy are just the names Edward came up with to describe them to Earth inhabitants, somewhere between first and second novels. Locals use those names from the start because of TranslationConvention.
* ''Those Who Survive'' by Creator/KirBulychev (from ''Literature/DoctorPavlysh'' series) starts with teenagers gathering mushrooms in the forest and being attacked by wolves. But when villagers rush to their rescue, wolves cover their heads with tails and roll away. Then the rescued quickly gather the mushrooms before they run away or bury themselves. Turns out, the villagers are survivors from a crashed starship living in HungryJungle. When Earth-born humans encounter a new animal or plant, they pick some trait and name their find after an Earth organism with the same trait. "Wolves" are lizards that hunt in packs; "bears" are bigger lizards prone to parasitic plant infection that makes them green and fuzzy; "goats" are bleating herbivores (with 6 eyes and trunks); "mushrooms" are an early stage of the life cycle of a mobile carnivorous plant (or a sessile land animal) and so on. Children born in the colony just invent their own words. In the second book adults end up naming a glue-spitting arthropod a "fastidious" (long story), because "crab" and "spider" are already taken.



* Red pandas, a.k.a. firefoxes, are neither foxes, nor relatives of the giant panda. Not called "red raccoons", despite looking quite a bit like exactly that, because it's only in the last few decades that non-Americans even knew what a raccoon was (or at least didn't think of them as every bit as exotic and not-a-basis-for-comparison as, say, kangaroos).
* On the other hand, giant pandas have flip-flopped on this trope. Originally thought to be bears, their unusual coloring and lifestyle led some to conclude that they must be instead related to red pandas and thusly, according to the knowledge of the time, to raccoons. [[ScienceMarchesOn Thanks to genetic testing and other newer techniques]], it's now known that ''neither'' species is part of the raccoon family. Giant pandas are now firmly acknowledged as bears, while red pandas are placed in their own family, ''Ailuridae'' (and are more closely related to weasels than anything else).

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* Red pandas, a.k.a. firefoxes, are neither foxes, nor close relatives of the giant panda. Not called "red raccoons", despite looking quite a bit like exactly that, because it's only in the last few decades that non-Americans even knew what a raccoon was (or at least didn't think of them as every bit as exotic and not-a-basis-for-comparison as, say, kangaroos).
* Speaking of American raccoons, their Russian name is derived from the "genet" a Mediterranean fur animal with a similar tail.
* On the other hand, giant pandas have flip-flopped on this trope. Originally thought to be bears, their unusual coloring and lifestyle led some to conclude that they must be instead related to red pandas and thusly, according to the knowledge of the time, to raccoons. [[ScienceMarchesOn Thanks to genetic testing and other newer techniques]], it's now known that ''neither'' species is part of the raccoon family. Giant pandas are now firmly acknowledged as bears, while red pandas are placed in their own family, ''Ailuridae'' (and are more closely related closest to the common ancestor of bears, raccoons, weasels than anything else).and skunks).



* The ''{{tanuki}}'' suffers from a bit of this, often being misidentified as a raccoon or a badger. Its name in English is even raccoon-dog (they're canids).

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* The ''{{tanuki}}'' suffers from a bit of this, this. They're canids often being misidentified as a raccoon or a badger. Its name in English name is even raccoon-dog (they're canids).raccoon-dog. Same for many other languages.



* Nutrias are neither rats nor beavers, they are in their own separate family. Muskrats and water rats aren't true rats either.

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* Nutrias (or coypus, or "South American swamp beavers") are neither rats nor beavers, they are in their own separate family.family, albeit in the Rodentia order. Muskrats and water rats aren't true rats either.



** Bear in mind that the "nutria" in South America is a rodent, but it was named by the Spanish after the Eurasian otter--a carnivoran of the family Mustelidae (the weasel family), and thus no more closely related to the nutria than a ''giraffe''.[[note]]Otters and giraffes are part of the large super-clade Laurasiatheria; nutria, being rodents, are part of the super-clade Euarchontoglires (which comprises the rodents, lagomorphs--that's rabbits, hares, etc.--and ''primates''--so yes, ''people''). The Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires are sister taxa, forming the Boreoeutheria together. This means that otters and nutria are more closely related to each other than they would be to, say, an armadillo or an elephant (or elephant shrew)--but that's not particularly closely related, is it?[[/note]]

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** Bear in mind that the South America "nutria" in South America is a rodent, but it was named by the Spanish after the Eurasian otter--a carnivoran of the family Mustelidae (the weasel family), and thus no more closely related to the nutria than a ''giraffe''.[[note]]Otters and giraffes are part of the large super-clade Laurasiatheria; nutria, being rodents, are part of the super-clade Euarchontoglires (which comprises the rodents, lagomorphs--that's rabbits, hares, etc.--and ''primates''--so yes, ''people''). The Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires are sister taxa, forming the Boreoeutheria together. This means that otters and nutria are more closely related to each other than they would be to, say, an armadillo or an elephant (or elephant shrew)--but that's not particularly closely related, is it?[[/note]]
21st May '16 9:40:55 PM erforce
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* ''{{Film/Ghostbusters}}'': "OK... so... She's a dog." (Technically, a demon dog, but...)

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* ''{{Film/Ghostbusters}}'': ''{{Film/Ghostbusters 1984}}'': "OK... so... She's a dog." (Technically, a demon dog, but...)
18th May '16 1:14:48 AM RAMChYLD
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** VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX has ''Ragtime Mouse''- which certainly doesn't look like any mouse we know, ''and there are mice people in the game''. Also, the music playing during the encounter certainly isn't ragtime.[[note]]It's actually a mistranslation of Ragtime Mouth - which made more sense given the giant mouth[[/note]]

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** VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX has ''Ragtime Mouse''- which certainly doesn't look like any mouse we know, ''and there are mice people in the game''. Also, the music playing during the encounter certainly isn't ragtime.[[note]]It's actually a mistranslation of Ragtime Mouth ''Mouth'' - which made more sense given the giant mouth[[/note]]
18th May '16 1:02:17 AM RAMChYLD
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** VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX has ''Ragtime Mouse''- which certainly doesn't look like any mouse we know, ''and there are mice people in the game''. Also, the music playing during the encounter certainly isn't ragtime.[[note]]It's actually a mistranslation of Ragtime Mouth - which made more sense given the giant mouth[[/note]]
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