History Main / CalculusIsArcaneKnowledge

8th Nov '17 7:21:32 AM RedScharlach
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* In the English language version of ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'', we have Professor Calculus, apparently named so to indicate just how brilliant he is as the direct translation "Professor Sunflower" just wouldn't have the same ring.

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* In the English language version of ''Franchise/{{Tintin}}'', we have Professor Calculus, apparently named so to indicate just how brilliant he is is, as the direct translation "Professor Sunflower" just wouldn't have the same ring.



* Joke: Two professors are arguing in a restaurant about whether calculus was obscure or rather well-known. The "obscure" professor went to the men's room. The "well-known" professor asks the waitress to help him play a joke on him -- when he came back, he would call her over, and ask her a question, and she should answer "one half x squared." He comes back, the professor asks him if the waitress knowing calculus would prove it, and the "obscure" professor agrees. He calls over the waitress and asks for the anti-derivative of "x". She answers, "one half x squared -- ''plus a constant.''" [[note]]That is, the "well-known" professor ''got it wrong,'' and the waitress ''corrected'' the answer he told her to give! (For those of you who have not taken calculus -- it is remarkably easy to forget the constant. Just about everyone who has has gotten back a test where all the problems lost one point for forgetting it, and it is completely plausible that the professor forgot.)[[/note]]

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* Joke: Two professors are arguing in a restaurant about whether calculus was obscure or rather well-known. The "obscure" professor went to the men's room. The "well-known" professor asks the waitress to help him play a joke on him -- when he came back, he would call her over, and ask her a question, and she should answer "one half x squared." He comes back, the professor asks him if the waitress knowing calculus would prove it, and the "obscure" professor agrees. He calls over the waitress and asks for the anti-derivative of "x". She answers, "one half x squared -- ''plus a constant.''" [[note]]That is, the "well-known" professor ''got it wrong,'' and the waitress ''corrected'' the answer he told her to give! (For those of you who have not taken calculus -- it is remarkably easy to forget the constant. Just about everyone who has has gotten back a test where all the problems lost one point for forgetting it, and it is completely plausible that the professor forgot.)[[/note]]



* ''Series/FamilyMatters'' also did this in one episode, where Laura complains about how difficult her Calculus test was. And Urkel, of course, rants about how easy Calculus is.

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* ''Series/FamilyMatters'' also did does this in one episode, where Laura complains about how difficult her Calculus calculus test was. And Urkel, of course, rants about how easy Calculus calculus is.



* ''"[[http://www.angryflower.com/whydoe.gif Look lively, people! Spot calculus check!]]"'' ''Webcomic/BobTheAngryFlower'' uses calculus as a measure of whether someone's smart enough to be worth his time (given how often he's been portrayed as a MadScientist, it shouldn't be suprising that Bob knows higher mathematics). Notice that, while other people seem to have half-forgotten their calculus, they still have studied it at some time in the past.

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* ''"[[http://www.angryflower.com/whydoe.gif Look lively, people! Spot calculus check!]]"'' ''Webcomic/BobTheAngryFlower'' uses calculus as a measure of whether someone's smart enough to be worth his time (given how often he's been portrayed as a MadScientist, it shouldn't be suprising surprising that Bob knows higher mathematics). Notice that, while other people seem to have half-forgotten their calculus, they still have studied it at some time in the past.
20th Oct '17 12:40:43 PM zzedar
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* In ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', UsefulNotes/NeilDeGrasseTyson shows off by solving a problem posed by UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton, and this is treated as an impressive achievement. The problem? To find the integral of a secant.

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24th Aug '17 10:33:15 AM DaNuke
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In most engineering courses, differential and integral calculus is the opposite of arcane: to the contrary, it is usually only the beginning of a 5-year-long journey to ''much'' more advanced mathematical concepts such as ordinary and partial differential equations, vector calculus and complex analysis, and these topics are in turn the base of branches of science such as statistics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, cosmology, chemistry and signal analysis. However, WritersCannotDoMath. Most writers are people who felt much more attracted to warm, flexible, humane, passionate arts and human studies rather than cold, hard, mechanical and stoic exact science. Others had the misfortune of having bad teachers, or maybe they actually fail at handling higher mathematics. As a result, back in their youth most writers made sure to take as little math in school as possible. Per the standard American high school curriculum, mathematics become an optional subject around the time when when calculus is taught, so for anyone who [[EveryoneHatesMathematics quit the subject at the first opportunity]], it's simply the hardest topic [[SmallReferencePools they're familiar with]].

Because of this, in media works "calculus" is often used as shorthand for "brain-hurty smart people stuff." This is somewhat of an exaggeration--beginning calculus is not particularly difficult as mathematics goes, and is the foundation for much of the true higher maths and physics. And everyone's brains use the processes represented by calculus in their everyday lives (for example, tracking the rate of change or finding the total distance traveled); what makes it difficult is substituting number-crunching for intuition. However, there are different kinds of intelligence, and mathematics that seems simple to one person can be entirely opaque to another.

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In most engineering courses, differential and integral calculus is the opposite of arcane: to the contrary, it is usually only the beginning of a 5-year-long journey to ''much'' more advanced mathematical concepts such as ordinary and partial differential equations, vector calculus and complex analysis, and these topics are in turn the base of branches of science such as statistics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, cosmology, chemistry and signal analysis. However, WritersCannotDoMath. Most writers are people who felt much more attracted to warm, flexible, humane, passionate arts and human studies rather than cold, hard, mechanical and stoic exact science. Others Other writers had the misfortune of having had bad teachers, or maybe they actually math teachers who left them hating exact sciences forever, others just plain fail at handling higher mathematics. As a result, back in their youth Whatever the reason, this translates to most writers having made sure to take as little math in basic school as possible. Per the standard American high school curriculum, mathematics become an optional subject around the time when when calculus is taught, so for anyone who [[EveryoneHatesMathematics quit the subject at the first opportunity]], it's simply the hardest topic [[SmallReferencePools they're familiar with]].

Because of this, in media works "calculus" is often used as shorthand for "brain-hurty smart people stuff." This is somewhat of an exaggeration--beginning calculus is not particularly difficult as mathematics goes, and is the foundation for much of the true higher maths and physics. And everyone's brains use the processes represented by calculus in their everyday lives (for example, tracking (the derivative is the rate of change growth or finding decrease, the total distance traveled); integral is the cumulative total); what makes it difficult is substituting number-crunching for intuition. However, there are different kinds of intelligence, and mathematics that seems simple to one person can be entirely opaque to another.
13th Apr '17 8:24:47 AM NNinja
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* In a Polish PostApocalyptic novel, the hideout of a group of surviving intellectuals is guarded by a door with a code-lock. To pass, one had to enter a solution to a simple integral.

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* %%* In a Polish PostApocalyptic novel, the hideout of a group of surviving intellectuals is guarded by a door with a code-lock. To pass, one had to enter a solution to a simple integral.
4th Dec '16 11:20:05 AM Discar
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2nd Dec '16 7:19:05 AM SCE2AUX
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** Which makes sense, since ''linear'' algebra is traditionally learned after calculus and differential equations. Calculus would be preceded by college algebra and trigonometry, commonly taught as "precalculus."
31st Oct '16 9:44:58 PM RyanofTinellb
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** A couple of centuries thence, even ten-year-old children are expected to have a basic knowledge of calculus, as an episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' shows.
8th Nov '15 11:29:56 AM Prfnoff
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In most engineering courses, differential and integral calculus is the opposite of arcane: to the contrary, it is usually only the beginning of a 5-year-long journey to ''much'' more advanced mathematical concepts such as ordinary and partial differential equations, vector calculus and complex analysis, and these topics are in turn the base of branches of science such as statistics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, chemistry and signal analysis. However, WritersCannotDoMath. Most writers are people who felt much more attracted to warm, flexible, humane, passionate arts and human studies rather than cold, hard, mechanical and stoic exact science. Others had the misfortune of having bad teachers, or maybe they actually fail at handling higher mathematics. As a result, back in their youth most writers made sure to take as little math in school as possible. Per the standard American high school curriculum, mathematics become an optional subject around the time when when calculus is taught, so for anyone who [[EveryoneHatesMathematics quit the subject at the first opportunity]], it's simply the hardest topic [[SmallReferencePools they're familiar with]].

to:

In most engineering courses, differential and integral calculus is the opposite of arcane: to the contrary, it is usually only the beginning of a 5-year-long journey to ''much'' more advanced mathematical concepts such as ordinary and partial differential equations, vector calculus and complex analysis, and these topics are in turn the base of branches of science such as statistics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, cosmology, chemistry and signal analysis. However, WritersCannotDoMath. Most writers are people who felt much more attracted to warm, flexible, humane, passionate arts and human studies rather than cold, hard, mechanical and stoic exact science. Others had the misfortune of having bad teachers, or maybe they actually fail at handling higher mathematics. As a result, back in their youth most writers made sure to take as little math in school as possible. Per the standard American high school curriculum, mathematics become an optional subject around the time when when calculus is taught, so for anyone who [[EveryoneHatesMathematics quit the subject at the first opportunity]], it's simply the hardest topic [[SmallReferencePools they're familiar with]].
6th Sep '15 5:17:04 PM nombretomado
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** During Weird Al's turn as Sir Creator/IsaacNewton on ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', he stumps Series/{{Bill Nye|TheScienceGuy}} with the question "The integral sec y dy from zero to one-sixth of pi is log to base e of the square root of three times the sixty-fourth power of [[BigWhat WHAT?]]" [[note]]The answer, it turns out, is anything that qualifies as the 64th root of 1. Creator/{{Neil deGrasse Tyson}}'s answer of choice is "i".[[/note]]

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** During Weird Al's turn as Sir Creator/IsaacNewton on ''WebVideo/EpicRapBattlesOfHistory'', he stumps Series/{{Bill Nye|TheScienceGuy}} with the question "The integral sec y dy from zero to one-sixth of pi is log to base e of the square root of three times the sixty-fourth power of [[BigWhat WHAT?]]" [[note]]The answer, it turns out, is anything that qualifies as the 64th root of 1. Creator/{{Neil UsefulNotes/{{Neil deGrasse Tyson}}'s answer of choice is "i".[[/note]]
30th Mar '15 6:07:05 PM DaNuke
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In most engineering courses, differential and integral calculus is the opposite of arcane: to the contrary, it is usually only the beginning of a 5-year-long journey to ''much'' more advanced mathematical concepts such as ordinary and partial differential equations, vector calculus and complex analysis, and these topics are in turn the base of branches of science such as statistics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, chemistry and signal analysis. However, WritersCannotDoMath. Most writers are people who felt much more attracted to warm, flexible, humane and passionate arts and human studies rather than the cold, hard, mechanical and stoic exact science, had the misfortune of having bad teachers, or actually fail at handling higher mathematics. As a result, back in their youth most writers made sure to take as little math in school as possible. Per the standard American high school curriculum, mathematics become an optional subject around the time when when calculus is taught, so for anyone who [[EveryoneHatesMathematics quit the subject at the first opportunity]], it's simply the hardest topic [[SmallReferencePools they're familiar with]].

to:

In most engineering courses, differential and integral calculus is the opposite of arcane: to the contrary, it is usually only the beginning of a 5-year-long journey to ''much'' more advanced mathematical concepts such as ordinary and partial differential equations, vector calculus and complex analysis, and these topics are in turn the base of branches of science such as statistics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, chemistry and signal analysis. However, WritersCannotDoMath. Most writers are people who felt much more attracted to warm, flexible, humane and humane, passionate arts and human studies rather than the cold, hard, mechanical and stoic exact science, science. Others had the misfortune of having bad teachers, or maybe they actually fail at handling higher mathematics. As a result, back in their youth most writers made sure to take as little math in school as possible. Per the standard American high school curriculum, mathematics become an optional subject around the time when when calculus is taught, so for anyone who [[EveryoneHatesMathematics quit the subject at the first opportunity]], it's simply the hardest topic [[SmallReferencePools they're familiar with]].
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