History Main / CPRCleanPrettyReliable

22nd May '17 9:38:20 PM zaphod77
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* In BladeAndSoul, summoners teach their pet CAT to perform CPR on dead characters. The cat hops on the dead character and performs hollywood style chest compression, despite no really having enough weight or strength to do it. It's not even constant with the cat pausing every few seconds. If not interrupted (takes 20 seconds), the dead character is always successfully revived, no matter how long they have waited, as long as the character has not released the corpse and respawned. It's adorable.
13th May '17 6:07:41 PM GardenGoblin
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* ''AWorldLessVisible: '' Has a fairly realistic portrayal. The recipient has his ribs broken, it only barely gets his heart going, and they have to get it going a few more times in the ambulance. He doesn't wake up until a few days later.
26th Apr '17 4:10:31 PM TheBigBopper
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* Guts performs CPR on a drowned Casca at one point in ''Manga/{{Berserk}}''. It's curious enough where he learned to do that in the DungAges, but it resuscitates her after a few repetitions all the same.

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* ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'': When Guts performs CPR on a drowned pulls Casca at one point in ''Manga/{{Berserk}}''. It's curious enough where out of a river after they fall off a cliff, he learned gets her to do that in start breathing again and cough up the DungAges, but it resuscitates her water she inhaled after a few repetitions all the same.including mouth-to-mouth. Not only is it clean, pretty, and reliable, but how Guts knows CPR despite living in a MedievalEuropeanFantasy world is a bit of a mystery.
26th Apr '17 8:19:29 AM Silverblade2
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* In ''SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker: Last Laugh'', Nightwing, believing that Robin has been eaten by Killer Croc, goes in an all-out frenzy and beats up the Joker to the point where his heart stops beating. Fortunately, Batman stops Nightwing in time before the Joker collapses, almost nearing death, and the Dark Knight resuscitates him using CPR in order to stop Nightwing from stooping down to the Joker's level as a murderer.

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* In ''SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker: ''ComicBook/TheJoker: Last Laugh'', Nightwing, believing that Robin has been eaten by Killer Croc, goes in an all-out frenzy and beats up the Joker to the point where his heart stops beating. Fortunately, Batman stops Nightwing in time before the Joker collapses, almost nearing death, and the Dark Knight resuscitates him using CPR in order to stop Nightwing from stooping down to the Joker's level as a murderer.
24th Apr '17 5:37:25 AM WaterBlap
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* Debunked in ''Website/{{Lifehacker}}'''s "[[http://lifehacker.com/5980488/five-survival-skills-the-movies-taught-you-wrong?tag=security Five Survival Skills the Movies Taught You Wrong]]".
7th Apr '17 4:03:40 PM GoldenSeals
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->''"Real CPR looks like real CPR; Movie CPR looks like somebody just kinda, like, heaving against somebody's chest going like, 'Live, dammit! Live!' and just like, pounding his fist against their chest..."''

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->''"Real ->''Real CPR looks like real CPR; Movie CPR looks like somebody just kinda, like, heaving against somebody's chest going like, 'Live, "Live, dammit! Live!' Live!" and just like, pounding his fist against their chest..."''chest.''



Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency first aid protocol for an unconscious person on whom normal breathing cannot be detected. For some very basic RL information on CPR, see [[UsefulNotes/CPRCleanPrettyReliable the Useful Notes subpage]].

'''In TV-land, it's:'''
* Clean (doesn't take into account hygiene, oral-vector diseases, or any precautions against these.)
* Pretty (it's heroic to know how to do CPR; unless the show is a SitCom or an {{anime}} series, hold the HoYay! or anxiety for the perception of same. It also gives a reason for a male character to undo a female one's blouse- or [[ShirtlessScene vice versa]])
* Reliable (unless the story calls for the character to be KilledOffForReal or AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence, he'll be back in action, no muss, no fuss. If the character ''is'' destined to die, his rescuers will give up the situation as hopeless within just a few minutes.) In fact, a 1996 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that CPR success rates in television shows was 75%.
* R can also be for "Romantic", since the resuscitated character, if of the opposite gender, will often react to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation by kissing their rescuer passionately (or, conversely, reacting with outrage on the assumption that the rescuer was attempting to steal a kiss (or worse) from the victim). This is as opposed to the more realistic reaction of throwing up, groaning and feeling like hell. In fact, today in most cases, mouth-to-mouth ''isn't even recommended'' by some jurisdictions. When mouth-to-mouth is performed, it will often be done with a special mask to avoid contact between mouths and to protect against discharge from the mouth of the patient.

In reality, it isn't clean, pretty, ''or'' romantic. It's an emergency procedure consisting of external cardiac massage and artificial respiration, the first treatment for a person who has collapsed, has no pulse[[note]]Checking for pulse is no longer taught or expected of laypersons; it's too difficult and takes too long. If there are no signs of life -- no breathing, no movement, no response to voice -- CPR should be started[[/note]], and has stopped breathing. It's not fast either - the purpose is to buy time until advanced help is available by circulating blood and preventing brain damage from lack of oxygen. More importantly, you're not supposed to give up after a minute or two just because they haven't started breathing on their own; rather, you should keep going until advanced help gets there. It's also expected for the victim's ribs to ''get broken during CPR,'' something that almost never happens on TV.[[note]]Part of the reason why the arms are limp in TV CPR is because actually performing the procedure would probably snap one or more ribs of the actor portraying the victim.[[/note]] Additionally, while there may be cases in which the removal of the patient's clothes is necessary or beneficial, this would only be done where the clothes are obstructive and would not be required if the patient was wearing, say, a simple cotton t-shirt.

Most importantly, in Real Life, [=CPR=] ''rarely'' results in a full recovery. If a person's heart and breathing have actually stopped to the point of needing CPR, chances of recovery at all is usually less than 10%, and even if proper medical care can be brought in time to keep them from outright dying, such patients generally die within one to two years. There is also a large chance of permanent brain damage.

CPR is NewerThanTheyThink; it was only developed in 1957, and public education on it began in the 1960s. This is after nearly 200 years of serious attempts to revive the dying. Prior to that, resuscitation involved the Holger Nielsen method (ca. 1900), and the Silvester method (late 1800s) before that, which were only really effective on a victim whose heart was still beating.[[note]]Remember, we only really, truly came out of the medical dark ages in the 20th century[[/note]]

The ''defibrillator'' is older than CPR, invented in 1947 after half a century of animal testing, but [[MagicalDefibrillator that's another trope]].

If CPR is depicted inaccurately because compressions are applied too far to the left, that's HeartInTheWrongPlace. For an equally Clean, Pretty, and Reliable healing technique, see PsychicSurgery.

See also KissOfLife, WorstAid.

There are some [[UsefulNotes/CPRCleanPrettyReliable Useful Notes]] on it.[[note]]Spoiler: If you're here ''because'' someone nearby needs CPR, [[WhatTheHellHero what's wrong with you?]][[/note]]

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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) CPR is an emergency first aid protocol for performed on an unconscious person on whom normal breathing cannot be detected. For It's characterized by someone pressing rhythmically against a victim's chest and occasionally blowing air into the victim's mouth. In RealLife, CPR stands for '''c'''ardio'''p'''ulmonary '''r'''esuscitation, and its purpose is to keep people alive in time for them to receive actual medical care; its success rate less than 10%. On TV, though, CPR stands for "clean, pretty, and reliable":
* It's '''clean''' because it doesn't take into account hygiene or oral-vector diseases, which can be easily transmitted in the process -- especially when using mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, which is no longer recommended by
some jurisdictions precisely for this reason.
* It's '''pretty''' because it rarely results in anything nasty like extreme exhaustion, or breaking the victim's ribs, or the victim [[VomitIndiscretionShot vomiting]] on the off chance he or she wakes up. Instead, everybody gets to look nice and pretty, there's [[KissOfLife kissing involved]], and the rescuer even gets to [[ShirtlessScene remove the victim's shirt]]. This makes knowing CPR a
very basic RL heroic thing on TV, and can occasionally lead to characters who jump in to perform CPR just to steal a kiss from the victim (or to fake unconsciousness to steal a kiss from the rescuer). On the other hand, the heightened sexual tension can cause issues if the rescuer is not attracted to the victim (particularly [[GayMoment if they're the same sex]]).
* It's '''reliable''' because the story demands it. If the victim is supposed to be saved from the brink of death, CPR will revive him almost immediately to show the audience that he's okay. Although real-life recovery rates are less than 10%, a 1996 study published in the ''New England Journal of Medicine'' estimated CPR success rates on TV at around 75%. In the event that the victim really is supposed to [[KilledOffForReal die for real]], rescuers will give up remarkably quickly.

This is a sub-trope of WorstAid and sister trope to the MagicalDefibrillator, another medical technique that works very differently on TV than it does in RealLife. A specific subtrope is HeartInTheWrongPlace, which shows CPR given with the compressions too far to the left. For an equally clean, pretty, and reliable healing technique, see PsychicSurgery.

For more
information on CPR, about CPR in RealLife, see [[UsefulNotes/CPRCleanPrettyReliable the Useful Notes subpage]].

'''In TV-land, it's:'''
* Clean (doesn't take into account hygiene, oral-vector diseases, or any precautions against these.)
* Pretty (it's heroic
page]]. (That page is not meant to know be a guide for how to do CPR; unless the show is a SitCom or an {{anime}} series, hold the HoYay! or anxiety for the perception of same. It also gives a reason for a male character to undo a female one's blouse- or [[ShirtlessScene vice versa]])
* Reliable (unless the story calls for the character to be KilledOffForReal or AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence, he'll be back in action, no muss, no fuss. If the character ''is'' destined to die, his rescuers will give up the situation as hopeless within just a few minutes.) In fact, a 1996 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that CPR success rates in television shows was 75%.
* R can also be for "Romantic", since the resuscitated character, if of the opposite gender, will often react to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation by kissing their rescuer passionately (or, conversely, reacting with outrage on the assumption that the rescuer was attempting to steal a kiss (or worse) from the victim). This is as opposed to the more realistic reaction of throwing up, groaning and feeling like hell. In fact, today in most cases, mouth-to-mouth ''isn't even recommended'' by some jurisdictions. When mouth-to-mouth is performed, it will often be done with a special mask to avoid contact between mouths and to protect against discharge from the mouth of the patient.

In reality, it isn't clean, pretty, ''or'' romantic. It's an emergency procedure consisting of external cardiac massage and artificial respiration, the first treatment for a person who has collapsed, has no pulse[[note]]Checking for pulse is no longer taught or expected of laypersons; it's too difficult and takes too long. If there are no signs of life -- no breathing, no movement, no response to voice -- CPR should be started[[/note]], and has stopped breathing. It's not fast either - the purpose is to buy time until advanced help is available by circulating blood and preventing brain damage from lack of oxygen. More importantly, you're not supposed to give up after a minute or two just because they haven't started breathing on their own; rather, you should keep going until advanced help gets there. It's also expected for the victim's ribs to ''get broken during CPR,'' something that almost never happens on TV.[[note]]Part of the reason why the arms are limp in TV CPR is because
actually performing the procedure would probably snap one or more ribs of the actor portraying the victim.[[/note]] Additionally, while there may be cases perform CPR in which the removal of the patient's clothes is necessary or beneficial, this would only be done where the clothes are obstructive and would not be required real life; if the patient was wearing, say, a simple cotton t-shirt.

Most importantly, in Real Life, [=CPR=] ''rarely'' results in a full recovery. If a person's heart and breathing have
someone near you actually stopped to the point of needing CPR, chances of recovery at all is usually less than 10%, and even if proper medical care can be brought in time to keep them from outright dying, such patients generally die within one to two years. There is also a large chance of permanent brain damage.

CPR is NewerThanTheyThink; it was only developed in 1957, and public education on it began in the 1960s. This is after nearly 200 years of serious attempts to revive the dying. Prior to that, resuscitation involved the Holger Nielsen method (ca. 1900), and the Silvester method (late 1800s) before that, which were only really effective on a victim whose heart was still beating.[[note]]Remember, we only really, truly came out of the medical dark ages in the 20th century[[/note]]

The ''defibrillator'' is older than CPR, invented in 1947 after half a century of animal testing, but [[MagicalDefibrillator that's another trope]].

If CPR is depicted inaccurately because compressions are applied too far to the left, that's HeartInTheWrongPlace. For an equally Clean, Pretty, and Reliable healing technique, see PsychicSurgery.

See also KissOfLife, WorstAid.

There are some [[UsefulNotes/CPRCleanPrettyReliable Useful Notes]] on it.[[note]]Spoiler: If you're here ''because'' someone nearby
needs CPR, [[WhatTheHellHero what's wrong with you?]][[/note]]
call emergency services instead.)

Finally, as this trope involves dying characters, '''please beware of spoilers.'''



* [[http://hawtness.com/2010/05/20/wtf-girl-videos-for-your-health/#comments Sexy CPR]]. On the other hand, her technique isn't so bad...
* Completely averted with the [[http://www.citizencpr.ie/ Citizen CPR]] campaign in Ireland. Understandable, as it's a PublicServiceAnnouncement. The statistics quoted about death due to cardiac arrest don't apply elsewhere, but the principle is sound and worth a watch.

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* [[http://hawtness.com/2010/05/20/wtf-girl-videos-for-your-health/#comments Sexy CPR]]. On the other hand, her CPR]] has a [[DistractedByTheSexy very titillating]] way to allegedly teach CPR. Her technique isn't so bad...
bad, but still.
* Completely averted with the The [[http://www.citizencpr.ie/ Citizen CPR]] campaign [[PublicServiceAnnouncement PSA campaign]] in Ireland. Understandable, as it's a PublicServiceAnnouncement. The UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} is designed to totally avert this trope and teach citizens about how CPR really works (although the statistics quoted quotes about death due to cardiac arrest don't apply elsewhere, but the principle is sound and worth a watch.elsewhere).



** This advert [[InvokedTrope clearly]] plays with this trope, trying to invoke a 'movie-like' set in attempt to make it more memorable and probably also correct the Hollywood misconceptions regarding application of this technique.
** This ad actually [[http://www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa-times-age/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503414&objectid=11252192 helped]] someone in {{RealLife}}!

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** * This advert [[InvokedTrope clearly]] plays with this trope, trying to invoke a 'movie-like' "movie-like" set in attempt to make it more memorable and probably also correct the Hollywood misconceptions regarding application of this technique.
** * This ad actually from UsefulNotes/NewZealand is credited with [[http://www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa-times-age/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503414&objectid=11252192 helped]] helping]] someone save someone else in {{RealLife}}!RealLife.



* The first episode of ''Anime/{{FLCL}}''. [[RuleOfFunny Played for laughs, though.]]
* ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'' - Millerna and Van very much perform the KissOfLife version on Hitomi. Though it's more realistic in some respects - Hitomi doesn't quite vomit, but she comes close to coughing her guts out and looks half dead for a few minutes.
** It's also somewhat justified as there's no physical damage, rather her heart has simply stopped due to {{Synchronization}} with a guy who had just died.
* Averted in ''Manga/{{Monster}}'': It's obviously a wasted, desperate effort and the dude obviously stays dead.

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* The first episode of ''Anime/{{FLCL}}''. ''Anime/{{FLCL}}'' [[RuleOfFunny Played played it for laughs, though.]]
laughs]], as the victim ''clearly'' didn't need CPR.
* ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'' - ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'': Millerna and Van very much perform the KissOfLife version on Hitomi. Though it's It's more realistic in some respects - other respects, though; Hitomi doesn't quite vomit, but she comes close to coughing her guts out and looks half dead for a few minutes.
** It's also somewhat justified as there's
minutes. There's no physical damage, rather but that's because her heart has simply stopped due to {{Synchronization}} with a guy who had just died.
* Averted in ''Manga/{{Monster}}'': It's obviously a wasted, desperate effort and the dude obviously stays dead.dead, but the doctor continues CPR regardless.



** Spoofed. After fishing Sousuke out of the school's pool, Tesse insists on giving him CPR. Sure, that makes sense -- Except for one thing: he's already ''breathing''. Seeing as Tesse's mostly just [[DudeShesLikeInAComa trying to take advantage of the situation for some good ol' lip-locking]], Kaname's irritated attempts to point this out don't deter her very much.
** Prior to this, fun is had from [[ChasteHero Sousuke's]] complete failure to differentiate kissing from CPR.

to:

** Spoofed. Fun is had from [[ChasteHero Sousuke's]] complete failure to differentiate kissing from CPR.
**
After fishing Sousuke out of the school's pool, Tesse insists on giving him CPR. Sure, that makes sense -- Except for one thing: CPR, even though he's already ''breathing''. breathing. Seeing as Tesse's mostly just [[DudeShesLikeInAComa trying to take advantage of the situation for some good ol' lip-locking]], Kaname's irritated attempts to point this out don't deter her very much.
** Prior to this, fun is had from [[ChasteHero Sousuke's]] complete failure to differentiate kissing from CPR.
much.



* Sakura from ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' performed CPR on [[spoiler:Naruto in order to keep him alive after Kurama was extracted. This was explicitly noted to be a stop-gap measure until they could seal the other half of Kurama into him. When his heart stopped beating, Sakura averted the trope by cutting into his chest cavity so she could begin massaging his heart by hand to keep blood flowing.[[note]]This is an actual medical procedure called internal cardiac massage, but is usually limited to during surgical procedures.]] [[/note]]
* In chapter 1/episode 1 of ''Manga/NagasareteAirantou'' Suzu administers the KissOfLife to a half-drowned Ikuto, nearly killing him in the process (inflating him like a balloon, whereupon he flies in a circle before landing back where he started).
* When Haru is unconscious after his fight with Lance (in ''Manga/RaveMaster'') the older Musica proposes artificial respiration to try and revive him. Elie volunteers and is going to put her lips on his when he wakes up. Haru greets her cheerfully. He gets slugged.
* ''Anime/{{Slayers}}'' has a particularly over-the-top example when Sylphiel is trying to revive [[spoiler:Lina]]. After a few whacks on the chest, a couple of chest compressions, and one breath, she sighs in relief that [[spoiler:Lina]] no longer looks dead... then goes back to casting a long-winded healing spell.
* At least in the manga, Ranma from ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' is shown to do a variation of this to Miss Hinako (who is shown to comically, as in like a fountain, vomit up water) and implied to do so to [[SuperDrowningSkills Akane]] a few times.
* In one of the last episodes of ''Manga/WolfsRain'', [[spoiler: Hubb and Cheza]] perform CPR on [[spoiler: Quent]] when he starts having strange breathing spasms. It's bad enough that they're doing CPR when he clearly has a pulse and respiration, but to make matters worse [[spoiler:Hubb]] speculates that the spasms might be due to internal bleeding or shock from dehydration, neither of which CPR would help with -- in fact, it would most likely only exacerbate the former!
* Episode 9 of ''Anime/AngelBeats'' shows us some of Otonashi's back story, which reveals [[spoiler:several more hours worth of memories before his death, which mostly involve him administering basic medical aid to the survivors of the subway train crash he was in]] this includes an instance of CPR which is a lot more realistic than usual. It's dirty, exhausting and [[spoiler:doesn't work]], also it sticks to the rule of only giving up if you become too exhausted [[spoiler:Otonashi had to eventually, it isn't clear how long he kept it up but a rescue attempt was several days away - what with them being caved in - and Otonashi himself was suffering from the injuries that would eventually kill him just before said rescuers showed up.]]

to:

* Sakura from ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' performed CPR on [[spoiler:Naruto in order to keep him alive after Kurama was extracted. ]] This was explicitly noted to be a stop-gap measure until they [[spoiler:they could seal the other half of Kurama into him. When his heart stopped beating, him.]] Sakura averted the trope by even used a different medical technique, [[spoiler:internal cardiac massage -- ''i.e.'' cutting into his chest cavity so she could begin the patient open and massaging his the heart by hand hand, which was one way to keep blood flowing.[[note]]This is an actual medical procedure called internal cardiac massage, but is usually limited to during surgical procedures.]] [[/note]]
do CPR in real life before it was invented]].
* In chapter 1/episode 1, episode 1 of ''Manga/NagasareteAirantou'' ''Manga/NagasareteAirantou'', Suzu administers the KissOfLife to a half-drowned Ikuto, nearly killing him in the process (inflating him like a balloon, whereupon he flies in a circle before landing back where he started).
* When In ''Manga/RaveMaster'', when Haru is unconscious after his fight with Lance (in ''Manga/RaveMaster'') Lance, the older Musica proposes artificial respiration to try and revive him. Elie volunteers and is going to put her lips on his when he wakes up. Haru greets her cheerfully. He gets slugged.
* ''Anime/{{Slayers}}'' has a particularly over-the-top example when Sylphiel is trying to revive [[spoiler:Lina]]. After a few whacks on the chest, a couple of chest compressions, and one breath, she sighs in relief that [[spoiler:Lina]] no longer looks dead... dead -- then goes back to casting a long-winded healing spell.
* At least in the manga, Ranma from ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' is shown to do a variation of this to Miss Hinako (who is shown to comically, as in like a fountain, comically vomit up water) water like a fountain) and implied to do so to [[SuperDrowningSkills Akane]] a few times.
* In one of the last episodes of ''Manga/WolfsRain'', [[spoiler: Hubb [[spoiler:Hubb and Cheza]] perform CPR on [[spoiler: Quent]] [[spoiler:Quent]] when he starts having strange breathing spasms. It's bad enough that they're doing CPR when he clearly has a pulse and respiration, but to make matters worse [[spoiler:Hubb]] speculates that the spasms might be due to internal bleeding or shock from dehydration, neither of which CPR would help with -- in fact, it would most likely only exacerbate the former!
former.
* Episode 9 of ''Anime/AngelBeats'' shows us some of Otonashi's back story, which reveals [[spoiler:several more hours hours' worth of memories before his death, which mostly involve him administering basic medical aid to the survivors of the subway train crash he was in]] this in]]. This includes an instance of CPR which is a lot more realistic than usual. It's dirty, exhausting and [[spoiler:doesn't work]], and it also it sticks to the rule of only giving up if you become too exhausted to continue. [[spoiler:Otonashi had to eventually, it isn't clear how long he kept it up up, but a rescue attempt was several days away - -- what with them being caved in - -- and Otonashi himself was suffering from the injuries that would eventually kill him just before said rescuers showed up.]]up]].



* Subverted in ''Anime/TheBigO'' with this quote:
-->'''Roger''': You could've come up with a gentler way to bring me around, you know. [[KissOfLife Like, mouth to mouth, or something?]]\\
'''Dorothy''': Not with the displacement capacity of my air tank. You're such a louse, Roger Smith.\\
'''Roger''': Heh, you're definitely our Dorothy.

to:

* Subverted in ''Anime/TheBigO'' with this quote:
-->'''Roger''':
''Anime/TheBigO'':
-->'''Roger:'''
You could've come up with a gentler way to bring me around, you know. [[KissOfLife Like, mouth to mouth, or something?]]\\
'''Dorothy''': '''Dorothy:''' Not with the displacement capacity of my air tank. You're such a louse, Roger Smith.\\
'''Roger''': '''Roger:''' Heh, you're definitely our Dorothy.



* Guts performs CPR on a drowned Casca at one point in ''Manga/{{Berserk}}''. Curious enough where he learned to do that in the DungAges, but it resuscitates her after a few repetitions all the same.

to:

* Guts performs CPR on a drowned Casca at one point in ''Manga/{{Berserk}}''. Curious It's curious enough where he learned to do that in the DungAges, but it resuscitates her after a few repetitions all the same.



* In ''Anime/StarDriver'' Wako preforms CPR on Takuto after finding him washed up on the shore. Later the characters discuss the romantic implications.
* After an encounter with a lake demon in ''Manga/{{Inuyasha}}'' leaves Sango unconscious, [[ChivalrousPervert Miroku]] decides that he needs to resuscitate her - only to be left protesting his innocence after Sango regains consciousness to find his face inches from hers and comes to the predictable conclusion, with [[ArmorPiercingSlap the predictable result]].
* A variation in ''Manga/{{Life}}''. [[spoiler:Miki]] had fainted so Ayumu attempted to revive her by giving her water. She couldn't do it though, so she instead drank some water and swapped it with her. Despite how gross that sounds it didn't look as bad as it seems.
* Averted in the Manga ''Manga/{{IO}}'': Its one of the few correct depictions of CPR in manga. Even the translator comments on it.
* In the manga of ''Manga/AirGear'', Agito is somehow able to perform this with a ''bamboo stick''. Really. And it works, no other life support necessary!

to:

* In ''Anime/StarDriver'' ''Anime/StarDriver'', Wako preforms CPR on Takuto after finding him washed up on the shore. Later the characters discuss the romantic implications.
* After an encounter with a lake demon in ''Manga/{{Inuyasha}}'' leaves Sango unconscious, [[ChivalrousPervert Miroku]] decides that he needs to resuscitate her - -- only to be left protesting his innocence after Sango regains consciousness to find his face inches from hers and comes to the predictable conclusion, with [[ArmorPiercingSlap the predictable result]].
* A variation in ''Manga/{{Life}}''. [[spoiler:Miki]] had fainted fainted, so Ayumu attempted to revive her by giving her water. She couldn't do it though, so she instead drank some water and swapped it with her. Despite how gross that sounds sounds, it didn't look as bad as it seems.
* Averted in the Manga ''Manga/{{IO}}'': Its ''Manga/{{IO}}'', one of the few correct depictions of CPR in manga. Even the translator comments on it.
* In the manga of ''Manga/AirGear'', Agito is somehow able to perform this with a ''bamboo stick''. Really. And it works, no other life support necessary!necessary.



** It is not so clean and pretty when [[spoiler: Marjorie tries to drown herself in the bathtub and Lorenzo has to give her CPR. It is also not reliable because she ends up in a coma.]]
* ''LightNovel/{{Oreshura}}'', from Episode 5:
** Eita is forced to do this for Masuzu shortly after he rescues her from drowning in the school's swimming pool. He calls for the teacher, but notices that the teacher is giving CPR to another student. And as he does this, he hears some {{Squee}} from his classmates as he "kisses" her.
** Later in the episode, while watching over his sick ChildhoodFriend Chiwa, she talks in her sleep about wanting "CPR" from him as well, having gotten a text about the CPR he gave Masuzu earlier.

to:

** It is not so clean and pretty when [[spoiler: Marjorie [[spoiler:Marjorie tries to drown herself in the bathtub and Lorenzo has to give her CPR. It is also not reliable because she ends up in a coma.]]
* ''LightNovel/{{Oreshura}}'', from Episode 5:
**
5: Eita is forced to do this for Masuzu shortly after he rescues her from drowning in the school's swimming pool. He calls for the teacher, but notices that the teacher is giving CPR to another student. And as he does this, he hears some {{Squee}} from his classmates as he "kisses" her.
**
her. Later in the episode, while watching over his sick ChildhoodFriend Chiwa, she talks in her sleep about wanting "CPR" from him as well, having gotten a text about the CPR he gave Masuzu earlier.



* In an arc of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' called "Red Zone", ComicBook/CaptainAmerica is exposed to a contagious evil bacteria and stops breathing. Saying, "Sorry Tony... but Captain America's [[MoreExpendableThanYou more important than you]]", ComicBook/IronMan immediately takes off his helmet and starts mouth-to-mouth. ([[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything With dramatic lighting]] and [[HoYay close-ups!]]) The "CPR revives people by itself" aspect is theoretically averted, as his goal is to keep Cap alive until he can be rescued, but ultimately used straight as, minutes later, ComicBook/IronMan is passed out and Cap is weak and disoriented, but on his feet. Must be the SuperSoldier Serum.

to:

* In an arc of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' called "Red Zone", ComicBook/CaptainAmerica is exposed to a contagious evil bacteria and stops breathing. Saying, "Sorry Tony... but Captain America's [[MoreExpendableThanYou more important than you]]", ComicBook/IronMan immediately takes off his helmet and starts mouth-to-mouth. ([[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything With dramatic lighting]] and [[HoYay close-ups!]]) The "CPR revives people by itself" aspect is theoretically averted, as his goal is to keep Cap alive until he can be rescued, but ultimately used straight as, minutes later, ComicBook/IronMan is passed out and Cap is weak and disoriented, but on his feet. Must It must be the SuperSoldier Serum.



* In ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5241479/36/Letters-The-Year-With-the-Stone Letters: The Year With the Stone]]'' Hermione gives a partially-asphyxiated Snape CPR and he's up and about within a minute or so.
* Averted in Fanfic/PrisonIslandBreak. Doctor Amy Rose Blossom performs CPR on Shadow the Hedgehog. She has to suck the blood and vomit out of his mouth to keep him from drowning, while considering how likely he is to die. It's explicitly unromantic, especially since at one point she tires and Silver has to perform it (in real life too, if you get tired, you swap out with somebody else). Silver does exactly as she commands him while contemplating how his entire medical experience revolves around watching repeat episodes of ''Series/{{Scrubs}}''. On the whole it is suggested that what leads to Shadow's survival is his superior healing abilities.
* Another aversion occurs in [[Fanfic/AKingdomDivided A Kingdom Divided]]. When Cloudchaser tries to resuscitate [[spoiler: Rainbow Dash]] she starts with checking her mouth for 'foreign objects,' and the whole scene ends with [[spoiler: Rainbow Dash dying]].

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* In ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5241479/36/Letters-The-Year-With-the-Stone Letters: The Year With the Stone]]'' Stone]]'', Hermione gives a partially-asphyxiated Snape CPR CPR, and he's up and about within a minute or so.
* Averted in Fanfic/PrisonIslandBreak.''Fanfic/PrisonIslandBreak''. Doctor Amy Rose Blossom performs CPR on Shadow the Hedgehog. She has to suck the blood and vomit out of his mouth to keep him from drowning, while considering how likely he is to die. It's explicitly unromantic, especially since at one point she tires and Silver has to perform it (in real life too, if you get tired, you swap out with somebody else).(a common event in RealLife). Silver does exactly as she commands him while contemplating how his entire medical experience revolves around watching repeat episodes of ''Series/{{Scrubs}}''. On the whole whole, it is suggested that what leads to Shadow's survival is his superior healing abilities.
* Another aversion occurs Averted in [[Fanfic/AKingdomDivided A Kingdom Divided]]. ''Fanfic/AKingdomDivided''. When Cloudchaser tries to resuscitate [[spoiler: Rainbow Dash]] Dash]], she starts with by checking her mouth for 'foreign objects,' "foreign objects", and the whole scene ends with [[spoiler: Rainbow Dash dying]].



* Partially averted in ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/8575201/7/Harry-Potter-and-the-Escape-to-New-York Harry Potter and the Escape to New York]]''. While it takes only a minute or two to work, there's absolutely nothing pretty about it and Harry ends up with two broken ribs.
* In ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/7665632/32/Potter-s-Protector Potter's Protector]]'' CPR fails completely at first and Harry has to resort to using a lightning spell to imitate a defibrillator.

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* Partially averted in ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/8575201/7/Harry-Potter-and-the-Escape-to-New-York Harry Potter and the Escape to New York]]''. While it takes only a minute or two to work, there's absolutely nothing pretty about it it, and Harry ends up with two broken ribs.
* In ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/7665632/32/Potter-s-Protector Potter's Protector]]'' Protector]]'', CPR fails completely at first first, and Harry has to resort to using a lightning spell to [[MagicalDefibrillator imitate a defibrillator.defibrillator]].



* ''Film/TheAbyss'': While the technique does succeed in reviving an otherwise deceased person, it's neither clean nor pretty, and it goes on for several minutes, rather than less than one. Truth is, while it's still not a completely realistic depiction, it's still several steps ahead of most.
** At least til you get to the [[PleaseWakeUp Miraculous]] [[WorstAid Bitchslap]] [[ClusterFBomb of Life]].
* Although an attempt by Bond [[spoiler:on Vesper]] fails in ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'', it still counts as (a) Bond gives up less than a minute into administration, and (b) his technique doesn't focus so much on restoring circulation as copping one last feel.
* In the recent ''Literature/NancyDrew'' movie, Nancy performs CPR on someone who is pretending to choke.
* Averted in ''Film/TheOrphanage'' - the woman being resuscitated didn't make it, and brief glimpse to her face shows that her entire lower jaw was horribly dislocated by the car that hit her, showing that the guy giving CPR had really strong stomach, though being a trained doctor probably helped.
* ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'' has Dr. [=McCoy=] attempting to revive a Klingon who has been shot in the chest. His heart isn't beating, so [=McCoy=] tries CPR for a few seconds and then gives him what may be the now-outdated "precordial thump", which brings him back to life long enough to utter appropriate final words. However, in some rare cases, a physical jolt to the heart like that can indeed take it out of fibrillation. WebSite/SFDebris refers to this as Cardio Plot Resuscitation as it revives the patient long enough to move the plot forward. [=McCoy=] does point out he doesn't even know Klingon anatomy; he may be trying anything he can think of, desperately hoping he gets lucky. He was also drunk.

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* ''Film/TheAbyss'': While the technique does succeed in reviving an otherwise deceased person, it's neither clean nor pretty, and it goes on for several minutes, rather than less than one. Truth is, while it's still not a completely realistic depiction, it's still several steps ahead of most.
** At
most, at least til you get to until the [[PleaseWakeUp Miraculous]] [[WorstAid Bitchslap]] [[ClusterFBomb of Life]].
* Although an attempt by Bond [[spoiler:on Vesper]] fails in ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'', it still counts as (a) Bond gives up less than a minute into administration, and (b) his technique doesn't focus so much on restoring circulation so much as copping one last feel.
* In the recent ''Literature/NancyDrew'' movie, Nancy performs CPR on someone who is pretending to choke.
* Averted in ''Film/TheOrphanage'' - ''Film/TheOrphanage''; the woman being resuscitated didn't make it, and brief glimpse to of her face shows that her entire lower jaw was horribly dislocated by the car that hit her, showing that the guy giving CPR had really strong stomach, though being a trained doctor probably helped.
* ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'' has Dr. [=McCoy=] attempting to revive a Klingon who has been shot in the chest. His heart isn't beating, so [=McCoy=] tries CPR for a few seconds and then gives whacks him what may be on the now-outdated "precordial thump", chest, which brings him back to life long enough to utter appropriate final words. However, in some rare cases, a physical jolt to the heart like [=McCoy=] admits that can indeed take it out of fibrillation. WebSite/SFDebris he doesn't know [[BizarreAlienBiology Klingon anatomy]] and was drunk to boot, so he may just have been acting in desperation. Website/SFDebris refers to this as Cardio "Cardio Plot Resuscitation as Resuscitation"; it revives the patient long enough to move the plot forward. [=McCoy=] does point out he doesn't even know Klingon anatomy; he Interestingly, the whack on the chest may be trying anything he can think of, desperately hoping he gets lucky. He was also drunk.a variant of the now-outdated "precordial thump", which occasionally acts on TV as a MagicalDefibrillator.



** ''Film/SpiderMan1'': A lab assistant begins CPR after Norman's heart stops. He's giving him sideways chest compressions from a standing position and it only takes TWO to start Norman's heart again.

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** ''Film/SpiderMan1'': A lab assistant begins CPR after Norman's heart stops. He's giving him sideways chest compressions from a standing position and it only takes TWO two to start Norman's heart again.



* In ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'', this Trope was averted; the CPR the doctors used to attempt to resuscitate E.T. was actually rather realistic, and it seemed to fail to their (and likely the viewers) heart-wrenching regret. (Of course, they didn't realize that he was OnlyMostlyDead and they simply ''couldn't'' succeed in saving him that way; he could only save himself when he realized that his kinsfolk were coming.)
* Played straight in ''Film/{{The Haunting in Connecticut}}''. Since the receiver of the CPR was [[spoiler: possessed by a spirit at the time, and was only brought back after said spirit left his body]], this may be [[JustifiedTrope justified]].
* In ''Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesIII'', after Michaelangelo rescues Yoshi from the burning house, Leonardo attempts CPR on Yoshi. During this, Mitsu clams he's 'casting an evil spell', but April corrects her that 'he's helping'.
* During the end of the movie ''Fearless'', Laura Klein (played by ''IsabellaRossellini'') gives CPR to her husband Max Klein (played by ''JeffBridges'') after eating a strawberry. During this, we see flashbacks of Max's experience in the past plane crash while at the same time, during CPR, we see a bit of drool from her mouth when she's desperately is trying to revive him.
* ''Film/HoneyIShrunkTheKids'' - Acts as a first kiss between the two teen lovebirds
* In ''Film/KissKissBangBang'' Harry gives Perry very bad CPR after he is ''shot through the chest'', and only gets a mouthful of blood for his trouble.]]
* ''Film/MissionImpossibleIII'' has Ethan receiving CPR from his nurse wife after electrocuting himself. Complete with dramatic punching of the chest!
* Averted in ''Film/TerminatorSalvation'', where John Connor attempts to revive the dead Marcus through two Precordial Thumps before tearing two wires out of the wall and giving him an improvised defibrillation.

to:

* In ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'', this Trope was averted; Averted in ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial''; the CPR the doctors used to attempt to resuscitate E.T. was actually rather realistic, and it they seemed to fail to their (and likely the viewers) heart-wrenching regret. (Of be heartbroken that they couldn't revive him. Of course, they didn't realize that he E.T. has BizarreAlienBiology and was OnlyMostlyDead and they simply ''couldn't'' succeed in saving him that way; he could only save himself when he realized that his kinsfolk were coming.)
OnlyMostlyDead, so CPR wouldn't have worked anyway.
* Played straight in ''Film/{{The Haunting in Connecticut}}''. Since ''Film/TheHauntingInConnecticut''; that said, the receiver recipient of the CPR was [[spoiler: possessed [[spoiler:possessed by a spirit at the time, and was only brought back after said spirit left his body]], this may be [[JustifiedTrope justified]].
body]].
* In ''Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesIII'', after Michaelangelo rescues Yoshi from the burning house, Leonardo attempts CPR on Yoshi. During this, Mitsu clams he's 'casting "casting an evil spell', spell", but April corrects her that 'he's helping'.
"he's helping".
* During the end of the movie ''Fearless'', ''Film/{{Fearless}}'', Laura Klein (played by ''IsabellaRossellini'') gives CPR to her husband Max Klein (played by ''JeffBridges'') after eating a strawberry. During this, we see flashbacks of Max's experience in the past plane crash while at the same time, during CPR, we see a bit of drool from her mouth when she's desperately is trying to revive him.
* ''Film/HoneyIShrunkTheKids'' - Acts In ''Film/HoneyIShrunkTheKids'', CPR acts as a first kiss FirstKiss between the two teen lovebirds
* In ''Film/KissKissBangBang'' ''Film/KissKissBangBang'', Harry gives Perry very bad CPR after he is ''shot through the chest'', and only gets a mouthful of blood for his trouble.]]
trouble.
* ''Film/MissionImpossibleIII'' has Ethan receiving CPR from his nurse wife after electrocuting himself. Complete himself, complete with dramatic punching of the chest!
* Averted in ''Film/TerminatorSalvation'', where John Connor attempts to revive the dead Marcus through two Precordial Thumps before tearing two wires out of the wall and giving him an improvised defibrillation.
chest.



* Played for laughs in ''Film/TheSandlot'' where Squints intentionally jumps into the deep end of the pool so that he'll be rescued by his crush the life guard. After a few tries of CPR, Squints pulls the life guard into a big kiss.
* It's played for laughs in ''Film/{{Thor}}'', where after accidentally running Thor over with a car and [[MrFanservice upon seeing Thor]] (and he was conscious and breathing fine on his own), Darcy was quick to point out she knows [[KissOfLife CPR]] to help him.

to:

* Played for laughs in ''Film/TheSandlot'' where ''Film/TheSandlot'', when Squints intentionally jumps into the deep end of the pool so that he'll be rescued by his crush the life guard. lifeguard crush. After a few tries of CPR, Squints pulls the life guard lifeguard into a big kiss.
* It's played Played for laughs in ''Film/{{Thor}}'', where after Darcy accidentally running runs Thor over with a car and car. [[MrFanservice upon Upon seeing Thor]] (and he (who was conscious and breathing fine on his own), Darcy was quick to point out she knows [[KissOfLife CPR]] to help him.



* In ''Young Film/DrKildare'', Kildare performs artificial respiration on a woman for ''half-an-hour''. After the woman revives she's perfectly fine. Revival after 30 minutes of being clinically dead is virtually impossible, and if it did happen it would come with massive brain damage.
* ''Film/InLikeFlint''. After shocking a guard's heart back into beating, Flint does some mild chest compression on him and he revives.
* Averted in ''Film/SherlockHolmesAGameOfShadows'' where [[spoiler: Watson's chest compressions weren't able to revive Holmes.]] Instead, he had to use [[spoiler: adrenaline]]. After [[spoiler: Holmes]] is revived, he mentions his chest really hurts. It also averts MagicalDefibrillator as [[spoiler: adrenaline is what is actually used to restart a heart that has completely stopped.]] However, the use of CPR at all in this scene is still an anachronism; as noted above, it wasn't invented until the 1950's.
* In the 1992 version of ''Only You'', Cliff goes snorkeling alone, ignoring the advice from an experienced snorkeler to "watch out for the kelp beds". It cuts to him coming to on the beach, horrified to think the ugly old woman above him just gave him mouth to mouth.
* Used cautiously in the B-movie ''Atomic Shark'', in which a pretty girl does mouth-to-mouth to revive a guy who'd fallen into the sea. Because the guy in question is about ''twelve'', visually the scene doesn't play out the "sexy" aspect of this trope at all, even though the ''dialogue'' strongly implies the kid was faking unconsciousness in order to get kissed by the young woman he has a crush on.
* ''Film/TheKentuckytFriedMovie''. During the "High Adventure" segment the French adventurer and explorer Claude [=LeMond=] is interviewed on the title talk show. During the segment the interviewer's heart stops beating and [=LeMond=] restarts his heart by pounding on his chest a couple of times. The interviewer is revived and has no further problems.

to:

* In ''Young Film/DrKildare'', Kildare performs artificial respiration on a woman for ''half-an-hour''.half an hour. After the woman revives she's perfectly fine. Revival after 30 minutes of being clinically dead is virtually impossible, and if it did happen it would come with massive brain damage.
* ''Film/InLikeFlint''. After In ''Film/InLikeFlint'', after shocking a guard's heart back into beating, Flint does some mild chest compression on him and he revives.
* Averted in ''Film/SherlockHolmesAGameOfShadows'' ''Film/SherlockHolmesAGameOfShadows'', where [[spoiler: Watson's [[spoiler:Watson's chest compressions weren't able to revive Holmes.]] Instead, he had to use [[spoiler: adrenaline]]. [[spoiler:adrenaline]]. After [[spoiler: Holmes]] [[spoiler:Holmes is revived, revived]], he mentions his chest really hurts. It also averts MagicalDefibrillator as [[spoiler: adrenaline [[spoiler:adrenaline is what is actually used to restart a heart that has completely stopped.]] However, the use of CPR at all in this scene is still an anachronism; as noted above, it wasn't invented until the 1950's.
1950s.
* In the 1992 version of ''Only You'', ''Film/OnlyYou'', Cliff goes snorkeling alone, ignoring the advice from an experienced snorkeler to "watch out for the kelp beds". It cuts to him coming to on the beach, horrified to think the ugly old woman above him just gave him mouth to mouth.mouth-to-mouth.
* Used cautiously in the B-movie ''Atomic Shark'', ''Film/AtomicShark'', in which a pretty girl does mouth-to-mouth to revive a guy who'd who had fallen into the sea. Because the guy in question is about ''twelve'', visually the scene doesn't play out the "sexy" aspect of this trope at all, even though the ''dialogue'' strongly implies the kid was faking unconsciousness in order to get kissed by the young woman he has a crush on.
* ''Film/TheKentuckytFriedMovie''. During In ''Film/TheKentuckyFriedMovie'', during the "High Adventure" segment segment, the French adventurer and explorer Claude [=LeMond=] is interviewed on the title eponymous talk show. During the segment the interviewer's heart stops beating beating, and [=LeMond=] restarts his heart by pounding on his chest a couple of times. The interviewer is revived and has no further problems.



* The closest thing to "Clean, Pretty, Reliable" is in drowning victims--successful CPR can revive someone back to consciousness, and people who were quickly recovered have a comparatively high chance of success. Though the high concentration of water makes the vomiting look more "clean", it's still far from pretty, especially if the drowning occured in seawater, which can seriously damage the lungs.
** Even closer is a cardiac arrest due to electric shock. In this case, if performed immediately, CPR may produce the closest possible effect to "miraculous resurrection" (given that only the heart was significantly affected).
* On the day of July 24th 2010 emergency medical dispatcher Chris Solomons had cardiac arrest from a massive heart attack. He was treated with CPR and an AED by his colleagues as seen in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w32PUDL2lb8 this video]].
* One thing that is never shown in media depictions of CPR is the damage that the responder does to themselves. Regardless of whether the resuscitation is successful, the responder can expect their trousers (if they are wearing trousers) to be torn through and their knees will be lacerated and bleeding if the floor is even remotely rough. After a protracted session, some first responders have been unable to stand, let alone walk, without assistance.
** In situations where there are a sufficient number of rescuers, trading off doing the compressions is used when possible. Even then, going hard for only two or three minutes at a time and getting a chance to rest is physically exhausting, on top of the mental stress.

to:

* The closest thing to "Clean, Pretty, Reliable" is in drowning victims--successful CPR can revive someone back to consciousness, and people who were quickly recovered have a comparatively high chance of success. Though the high concentration of water makes the vomiting look more "clean", it's still far from pretty, especially if the drowning occured in seawater, which can seriously damage the lungs.
** Even closer is a cardiac arrest due to electric shock. In this case, if performed immediately, CPR may produce the closest possible effect to "miraculous resurrection" (given that only the heart was significantly affected).
* On the day of July 24th 2010 24th, 2010, emergency medical dispatcher Chris Solomons had cardiac arrest from a massive heart attack. He was treated with CPR and an AED by his colleagues as seen in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w32PUDL2lb8 this video]].
* One thing that is never shown in media depictions of CPR is the damage that the responder does to themselves. Regardless of whether the resuscitation is successful, the responder can expect their trousers (if they are wearing trousers) to be torn through and their knees will be lacerated and bleeding if the floor is even remotely rough. After a protracted session, some first responders have been unable to stand, let alone walk, without assistance.
** In situations where there are a sufficient number of rescuers, trading off doing the compressions is used when possible. Even then, going hard for only two or three minutes at a time and getting a chance to rest is physically exhausting, on top of the mental stress.
video]].



** Likely part of the miraculous recovery was the fact that medics were on him right after he collapsed, and CPR commenced within a minute. So his brain wasn't without oxygen for long. The cardiologist that worked on him corroborates this idea, saying the reason they continued to work on him so long was because he never degraded from ventricular fibrillation, suggesting the continued CPR was at least keeping him neurologically intact. This is also a textbook example of the fact that ''CPR itself does not revive someone'', as stated at the top.



* Sometimes even the TV presentation of CPR can save a life, as proven by [[http://www.kionrightnow.com/story/23079125/marina-boy-honored-as-local-hero this story]] about an 11-year-old boy who saved a five-year-old girl with CPR he learned from watching ''Series/{{NCIS}}''.
* Doing CPR on someone who's collapsed from cyanide poisoning is 100% ''un''reliable, as getting air into their lungs or keeping their blood moving won't do any good: the toxin makes it impossible for tissues to use any oxygen this might deliver to them. Worse yet, if the cyanide was inhaled or ingested orally, attempting mouth-to-mouth without adequate protective barriers could result in toxic cross-contamination, ''killing the person who's trying to save the victim''.
* The limits of CPR were demonstrated with the tragic death of Carrie Fisher in December 2016. Even though her medical distress was immediately noted and several trained medical professionals were on the plane to immediately tend to her--the best possible scenario one could hope for in that situation--she had suffered irreversible organ damage.

to:

* Sometimes even the TV presentation of CPR can save a life, as proven by [[http://www.kionrightnow.com/story/23079125/marina-boy-honored-as-local-hero this story]] about an 11-year-old eleven-year-old boy who saved a five-year-old girl with CPR he learned from watching ''Series/{{NCIS}}''.
* Doing CPR on someone who's collapsed from cyanide poisoning is 100% ''un''reliable, as getting air into their lungs or keeping their blood moving won't do any good: the toxin makes it impossible for tissues to use any oxygen this might deliver to them. Worse yet, if the cyanide was inhaled or ingested orally, attempting mouth-to-mouth without adequate protective barriers could result in toxic cross-contamination, ''killing the person who's trying to save the victim''.
* The limits of CPR were demonstrated with the tragic death of Carrie Fisher in December 2016. Even though her medical distress was immediately noted and several trained medical professionals were on the plane to immediately tend to her--the best possible scenario one could hope for in that situation--she had suffered irreversible organ damage.
''Series/{{NCIS}}''.
6th Apr '17 10:47:27 AM notemily
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Added DiffLines:

** In RealLife, Henry was unconscious for ''two hours'' and might have [[http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/the-jousting-accident-that-turned-henry-viii-into-a-tyrant-1670421.html actually suffered brain damage]].
4th Apr '17 8:56:53 AM AthenaBlue
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* R can also be for "Romantic," since the resuscitated character, if of the opposite gender, will often react to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation by kissing their rescuer passionately (or, conversely, reacting with outrage on the assumption that the rescuer was attempting to steal a kiss (or worse) from the victim). This is as opposed to the more realistic reaction of throwing up, groaning and feeling like hell. In fact, today in most cases, mouth-to-mouth ''isn't even recommended'' by some jurisdictions. When mouth-to-mouth is performed, it will often be done with a special mask to avoid contact between mouths and to protect against discharge from the mouth of the patient.

to:

* R can also be for "Romantic," "Romantic", since the resuscitated character, if of the opposite gender, will often react to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation by kissing their rescuer passionately (or, conversely, reacting with outrage on the assumption that the rescuer was attempting to steal a kiss (or worse) from the victim). This is as opposed to the more realistic reaction of throwing up, groaning and feeling like hell. In fact, today in most cases, mouth-to-mouth ''isn't even recommended'' by some jurisdictions. When mouth-to-mouth is performed, it will often be done with a special mask to avoid contact between mouths and to protect against discharge from the mouth of the patient.



* ''Series/{{ER}}'':
** Averted where a drunk and passed out partygoer vomits into the mouth of [[TheChewToy Dr. Carter]] when he tries to administer CPR.
** Averted in early episode had Carter giving CPR to an elderly gentlemen while nurses prepared to defibrillate. He then proceeds to break the old man's rib with a loud crack.
* Averted in ''Series/{{Casualty 1906}}'', which is set before CPR was invented.
* Subverted in ''Series/CardiacArrest'' with a patient suffering from multiple broken ribs. From the look on the junior doctor's face, suddenly realising you've crushed a man's chest is not nice.
* In the "Prophecy Girl" episode of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Xander revives Buffy with CPR and she recovers fully and quickly. Buffy is a Slayer with supernatural healing ability, which makes it more acceptable. A more realistic depiction is in the episode "The Body" -- Buffy attempts CPR on [[spoiler: her mom]] and breaks a rib, which is common even without Slayer strength. This is also a rare case of it failing (although it's also one where it would be incredibly ridiculous for it to succeed, given that the cause of death was a ''brain aneurysm''). Buffy's not even sure if [[spoiler:her mother]] is alive at this point. What sucked was that Buffy had to be talked through the procedure by the 911 operator.
* ''Series/{{Dollhouse}}'' manages to walk its way into this one with a near-audible "thud". At the end of "The Attic", [[spoiler: Echo]] manages to unplug [[spoiler: herself]] from the neural network by flatlining [[spoiler: her]] vitals and coming back. [[spoiler: Victor and Sierra,]] not as special, however, need help coming back from the dead, and [[WorstAid badly-administered CPR]] seems just the ticket.
* In ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'', Xena accidentally ''invents'' CPR to save Gabrielle's life after a seizure (caused by a head injury) apparently kills her. ("She just needs air. I need to get some air into her lungs!" and, later, sobbing and pounding on her chest as she demands that her friend "Wake up! Wake up! ''Wake up!''") Being her love int--er, sidekick, Gabs does. Gabs' reaction is an aversion of the trope: Although the newly-resuscitated Gabrielle doesn't vomit, she is white as a sheet, sweaty, trembling, staring, thoroughly disoriented, and looks as though she would very much ''like'' to spew her guts.
* ''Series/MacGyver'', episode "The Enemy Within": [=MacGyver=] and a friend apply CPR to the victim of an induced heart attack, demonstrating technique that would make a first aid teacher fail them on the spot, and keeping at it only long enough to show they tried before giving up and saying "He's dead" in a suitably dramatic voice. Later in the same episode, there's also a dodgy scene involving a [[MagicalDefibrillator defibrillator]].

to:

* ''Series/{{ER}}'':
** Averted where a drunk and passed out partygoer vomits into
Played straight in "And the mouth Window of [[TheChewToy Dr. Carter]] Opportunity", the second-season finale of ''Series/TwoBrokeGirls'', when he tries to administer CPR.
Caroline revives Max that way after an electric shock knocks her unconscious.
* ''Series/TwentyFour'':
** Averted in early episode had Carter In Season 2, Jack saves Nina by giving her a few mouth breaths, without fixating her chest or using any compression at all. It works.
** The ''Reliable'' part is averted in Season 4, when [[spoiler: Paul Raines]] dies after Jack forces the doctors at gunpoint to work on another patient with critical information. It should however be noted that the attempt to save him is rather pathetic, and he's declared dead a ''mere minute'' after he crashes. This all takes place in a fully equipped medical facility, and the doctors stabilize the other patient a few minutes later, which would have still given them plenty of time to try to revive him, particularly if Jack and Curtis had continued with CPR in the meantime.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' had a justified example in [[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS2E19TheDirtyHalfDozen "The Dirty Half-Dozen"]]: Skye can [[BadVibrations induce earthquake-like vibrations]], so she she just uses that on Lincoln's stopped heart.
* Played with in the pilot of ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment''; Tobias lost his medical license as a result of incompetently applying
CPR to an elderly gentlemen while nurses prepared man who was simply taking a nap.
* A form of BaitAndSwitchCredits is used in ''Series/AshesToAshes'' when previewing Episode 6 of Season 1. Gene is pictured about
to defibrillate. He then proceeds to break the old man's rib with a loud crack.
* Averted in ''Series/{{Casualty 1906}}'', which
kiss Alex. The reveal is set before that it's only CPR was invented.
* Subverted in ''Series/CardiacArrest'' with a patient suffering
after she is rescued from multiple broken ribs. From the look on the junior doctor's face, suddenly realising you've crushed [[spoiler:a refrigerator in a man's chest is not nice.
restaurant used as a front for money-laundering]].
* In the "Prophecy Girl" Used in an early episode of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Xander revives Buffy ''Series/BarneyMiller'' with CPR and she recovers fully and quickly. Buffy is a Slayer with supernatural healing ability, which makes it more acceptable. A more realistic depiction is man that tried to electrocute himself in the episode "The Body" -- Buffy attempts CPR on [[spoiler: her mom]] bathroom and breaks a rib, which is common even without Slayer strength. This is also a rare case of it failing (although it's also one where it would be incredibly ridiculous for it to succeed, given that the cause of death was a ''brain aneurysm''). Buffy's not even sure if [[spoiler:her mother]] is alive at this point. What sucked was that Buffy had to be talked through the procedure by the 911 operator.
* ''Series/{{Dollhouse}}'' manages to walk its way into this one with a near-audible "thud". At the end of "The Attic", [[spoiler: Echo]] manages to unplug [[spoiler: herself]] from the neural network by flatlining [[spoiler: her]] vitals and coming back. [[spoiler: Victor and Sierra,]] not as special, however, need help coming back from the dead, and [[WorstAid badly-administered CPR]] seems just the ticket.
* In ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'', Xena accidentally ''invents'' CPR to save Gabrielle's life after a seizure (caused by a head injury)
apparently kills her. ("She just needs air. I need succeded, but Barney starts compressions after Chano uses a mirror to get some air into her lungs!" and, later, sobbing and pounding on her chest as she demands that her friend "Wake up! Wake up! ''Wake up!''") Being her love int--er, sidekick, Gabs does. Gabs' reaction is an aversion of verify whether he's breathing or not. After the trope: Although the newly-resuscitated Gabrielle doesn't vomit, she is white as a sheet, sweaty, trembling, staring, thoroughly disoriented, and looks as though she would very much ''like'' man starts turning blue, Barney resorts to spew her guts.
* ''Series/MacGyver'', episode "The Enemy Within": [=MacGyver=] and a friend apply CPR to the victim of an induced heart attack, demonstrating technique that would make a first aid teacher fail them on the spot, and keeping at it only long enough to show they tried before giving up and saying "He's dead" in a suitably dramatic voice. Later
walloping him in the same episode, there's also a dodgy scene involving a [[MagicalDefibrillator defibrillator]].chest with his fist, which restores him to breathing. He does remain unconscious, however, and the [=EMTs=] do point out that his ribs are broken.
-->'''Harris:''' Pop him again!



* ''Series/{{Lost}}'': This trope was almost averted in the first season, when guitarist Charlie Pace is hung from a tree while attempting to rescue fellow survivor Claire. When he is found by Jack Shepard (a doctor) and Kate Austen, Jack tries CPR on him for three minutes, but it doesn't seem to work. The music plays very somberly, and it looks like he is dead for good... until Jack starts yelling at him to wake up, and keeps pounding his chest until Charlie comes to. So close.
%% * Used on ''Series/PunkyBrewster'', in an episode called "Cherie Life Saver".
* Episodes of both ''Series/LawAndOrder'' and ''Series/CSINewYork'' have had HIV-transmission scares from giving artificial respiration, so yay for recognizing that stuff can be transmitted. Even better, both series also note that it's vastly unlikely for HIV to go through saliva.

to:

* ''Series/{{Lost}}'': This trope was almost averted When Denny has a heart attack in season five of ''Series/BostonLegal'', everyone thinks he's faking until [[HeterosexualLifePartners Alan]] realizes he's not breathing and leaps in to save him. Slightly more realistic than usual, as an ambulance is called and we don't see Denny conscious again until he's on his way to the first season, when guitarist Charlie Pace is hung from a tree hospital.
* Subverted fairly realistically on ''Series/BreakingBad''. After accidentally beating an underling to death
while attempting to rescue fellow survivor Claire. When he is found by Jack Shepard (a doctor) and Kate Austen, Jack tries high on meth, Tuco demands that Walt, the "scientist," perform CPR on him for three minutes, but it him. It's pretty obvious that Tuco got all of his information about CPR from TV. Needless to say, his attempts have no effect.
--> '''Tuco:''' What are you doing? Don't just push on him! Do the breathing in his mouth thing!\\
'''Walt:''' (more than a little hysterical) They don't teach that anymore! It
doesn't seem to work. The music plays very somberly, and it looks like he is dead for good... until Jack starts yelling at him to wake up, and keeps pounding his chest until Charlie comes to. So close.
%%
work!
* Used on ''Series/PunkyBrewster'', in an In the "Prophecy Girl" episode called "Cherie Life Saver".
* Episodes
of both ''Series/LawAndOrder'' ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', Xander revives Buffy with CPR and ''Series/CSINewYork'' have had HIV-transmission scares from giving artificial respiration, so yay for recognizing that stuff can be transmitted. Even better, both series she recovers fully and quickly. Buffy is a Slayer with supernatural healing ability, which makes it more acceptable. A more realistic depiction is in the episode "The Body" -- Buffy attempts CPR on [[spoiler: her mom]] and breaks a rib, which is common even without Slayer strength. This is also note that a rare case of it failing (although it's vastly unlikely also one where it would be incredibly ridiculous for HIV it to go succeed, given that the cause of death was a ''brain aneurysm''). Buffy's not even sure if [[spoiler:her mother]] is alive at this point. What sucked was that Buffy had to be talked through saliva.the procedure by the 911 operator.
* ''Series/BurnNotice'' is usually fairly realistic when it comes to things like this, but in the season finale of season 6, Sam's heart and breathing stop due to a bullet wound that couldn't be treated immediately, Michael administers CPR for about 10 seconds, and Sam makes a full recovery with no immediate adverse effects (other than the effects of having been shot).
* Subverted in ''Series/CardiacArrest'' with a patient suffering from multiple broken ribs. From the look on the junior doctor's face, suddenly realising you've crushed a man's chest is not nice.
* Averted in ''Series/{{Casualty 1906}}'', which is set before CPR was invented.
* In a first-season episode of ''Series/{{Charmed}}'', Andy brings Prue back this way. She coughs a little bit when she starts to come back, but not very much and it very quickly turns into a hug. Possibly justified given that Prue's stopped heart was intentionally induced using a potion from the Book of Shadows, and she explicitly stated (to Phoebe; Andy had no idea what was going on) that it was completely reviveable with CPR as long as the CPR was administered within four minutes of taking the potion.
* ''Series/CodeBlack'' averts this in every conceivable manner. Nobody ever tries to [[MagicalDefibrillator shock a flatline]][[labelnote:*]]You don't shock a flatline because it ''doesn't work''. Defibrillators are meant to reset an abnormal cardiac rhythm, not restore one when it no longer exists.[[/labelnote]]. Last-ditch CPR tends to involve cutting open the rib cage (usually at Center Stage) and starting internal cardiac massage, and this only works rarely, as in real life. Most situations with successful CPR involve an abnormal heart rhythm that's restored with only a few shocks, as in real life; by the time the patients are in cardiac arrest, the doctors' resuscitation efforts usually fail.



* ''Series/DocMartin'': Morwena manages to revive her grandfather with a good minute and a half worth of this.



** There is a deliberately ludicrous example in "The Horns of Nimon", when the Doctor attempts to perform CPR on K-9, a robot who does not breathe and whose reason for malfunctioning was his head coming off. He stops doing it after a little while after realising it's stupid.
** In "Smith and Jones", CPR is performed on The Doctor, even though his problem required a blood transfusion, not CPR. POSSIBLY justified as the Doctor is not human, so it could be chalked up to BizarreAlienBiology. The Doctor was obviously not dead yet or he would've regenerated.
** When Martha finds Jack unconscious outside of the TARDIS, and later when he electrocutes himself. The Doctor tells her not to bother, [[ResurrectiveImmortality with good reason.]]
** In "The Curse of the Black Spot,"[[spoiler:Rory, who is on alien life support, talks Amy through how to do CPR so she can do it on him once she and the Doctor rescue him. After about a minute of really poorly done CPR, Amy gives up. A few seconds later, Rory starts coughing, sits up, and is fine.]]

to:

** There is a deliberately ludicrous example in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E5TheHornsOfNimon "The Horns of Nimon", Nimon"]], when the Doctor attempts to perform CPR on K-9, a robot who does not breathe and whose reason for malfunctioning was his head coming off. He stops doing it after a little while after realising realizing it's stupid.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones "Smith and Jones", Jones"]], Martha performs CPR is performed on The the Doctor, even though his problem required a blood transfusion, not CPR. POSSIBLY justified as the Doctor is not human, so it could be chalked up to BizarreAlienBiology. The Doctor was obviously not dead yet or he would've regenerated.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E11Utopia "Utopia"]]: When Martha finds Jack unconscious outside of the TARDIS, and later when he electrocutes himself. The Doctor tells her not to bother, [[ResurrectiveImmortality with good reason.]]
reason]].
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E3TheCurseOfTheBlackSpot "The Curse of the Black Spot,"[[spoiler:Rory, Spot"]], [[spoiler:Rory, who is on alien life support, talks Amy through how to do CPR so she can do it on him once she and the Doctor rescue him. After about a minute of really poorly done CPR, Amy gives up. A few seconds later, Rory starts coughing, sits up, and is fine.]]]]
* ''Series/{{Dollhouse}}'' manages to walk its way into this one with a near-audible "thud". At the end of "The Attic", [[spoiler: Echo]] manages to unplug [[spoiler: herself]] from the neural network by flatlining [[spoiler: her]] vitals and coming back. [[spoiler: Victor and Sierra,]] not as special, however, need help coming back from the dead, and [[WorstAid badly-administered CPR]] seems just the ticket.
* Averted in the season four episode "Breath of Life" for ''Series/TheDistrict''. Sergeant Brander performs CPR on another officer, using it the proper way to keep the victim going long enough for an ambulance, after the victim's partner refused to do it because the victim is gay. Brander forgetting, in a tense situation, to use a mouth guard makes for a minor bit of suspense, as he waits for test results about whether he caught any disease (particularly AIDS) from the victim.



* ''Series/{{ER}}'':
** Averted where a drunk and passed out partygoer vomits into the mouth of [[TheChewToy Dr. Carter]] when he tries to administer CPR.
** Averted in early episode had Carter giving CPR to an elderly gentlemen while nurses prepared to defibrillate. He then proceeds to break the old man's rib with a loud crack.
* ''Series/{{Eureka}}'':
** One episode depicted it as a semi-romantic kiss between two love interests involving no chest compressions -- averted in that it was just used to keep the victim stable until medical help could arrive.
** Later done by Allison Blake attempting to revive a man with chest compressions ''alone''. ([[http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&p=hands-only+CPR Hands-only CPR]] is [[http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-failure/news/20100728/studies-cpr-without-rescue-breathing-ok medically acceptable]]).
* ''Series/FamilyMatters'': Urkel saves an electrocuted Carl with CPR, he remembers to get a CPR mask out of Carl's first aid kit, preventing any mouth contact. However, true to the trope Carl revives with no apparent problems.
* In the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode "The Flax", John and Aeryn have to depressurize and then repressurize their spacecraft with only one working spacesuit between them. The solution: stop John's breathing with a Peacekeeper poison and then resuscitate him with CPR! And his only complaint is that the poison hurt more than Aeryn told him it would.
* In ''Series/HermansHead'', Herman's CPR usage on a friend ends up cracking some of her ribs. Unfortunately a lawyer seems to take advantage of the general lack of knowledge of CPR risks to get the friend to sue Herman for the injuries.
* Played both Clean and Reliable on the episode of ''Series/TheJeffersons'' in which George winds up using the technique to save the leader of a KKK group, although the KKK leader still has to be taken to the hospital afterward.
* Episodes of both ''Series/LawAndOrder'' and ''Series/CSINewYork'' have had HIV-transmission scares from giving artificial respiration, so yay for recognizing that stuff can be transmitted. Even better, both series also note that it's vastly unlikely for HIV to go through saliva.



* ''Series/{{Lost}}'': This trope was almost averted in the first season, when guitarist Charlie Pace is hung from a tree while attempting to rescue fellow survivor Claire. When he is found by Jack Shepard (a doctor) and Kate Austen, Jack tries CPR on him for three minutes, but it doesn't seem to work. The music plays very somberly, and it looks like he is dead for good... until Jack starts yelling at him to wake up, and keeps pounding his chest until Charlie comes to. So close.
* ''Series/MacGyver'', episode "The Enemy Within": [=MacGyver=] and a friend apply CPR to the victim of an induced heart attack, demonstrating technique that would make a first aid teacher fail them on the spot, and keeping at it only long enough to show they tried before giving up and saying "He's dead" in a suitably dramatic voice. Later in the same episode, there's also a dodgy scene involving a [[MagicalDefibrillator defibrillator]].
* Averted in an early episode of ''Series/{{MASH}}'' when Hawkeye had to perform open heart massage to resuscitate a soldier. The soldier didn't make it. A few seasons later, when newly-arrived BJ Hunnicutt was trying to resuscitate a soldier, Colonel Potter asked if he was going to use open heart massage. BJ answered, "I can do it closed. I've seen it done in the States."
* Done surprisingly well in a recent episode of ''Series/TheMentalist'' - certainly, it IS pretty, but quite realistic anyway (automatic defibrillator!) and the "reliable" part is justified (the reason for passing out is drowning, which tends to come with a better prognosis).
* ''Series/MrBean'' subverts it. Mr. Bean is left to give a man CPR at the bus stop after he has a heart attack but does not want direct contact during mouth-to-mouth and also seems to have fun with the rise and fall of the man's chest. After successfully reviving him with his car's jumper cables, he only knocks him unconscious again and also disables the ambulance that comes to save him by using it to jump the battery of his dead car.
* Lampshaded on "Murdoch Ahoy" of ''Series/MurdochMysteries''. Detective Murdoch is saved from drowning by his LoveInterest Dr. Julia Ogden who dives for him, takes him out of the water and gives him CPR. Inspector Brackereid just stares at her and doesn't understand what she's doing. Later when they're back at their Station House, he jokes that while his best man was fighting for his life, she only used it as an opportunity to smooch him. She tries to convince him that mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is a real medical thing used in Switzerland to save babies.
%% * Used on ''Series/PunkyBrewster'', in an episode called "Cherie Life Saver".
* ''Series/TheRanch'' : Colt performs CPR on a newborn ''calf'' that appears to be stillborn. Not only does he bring the animal back to life, he's so good the calf is brushed and dried of all the birth goo coating it to that point!
%% * ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': "Pilot", "Hourglass", "Accelerate", and "Hereafter".
* ''Series/StargateUniverse'': To break Col. Telford's brainwashing, Young seals him in a room and evacuates the air. A few seconds after he takes his last breath, Young orders the room repressurized and rushes in, drops to his knees, and starts compressions without a pause, without checking Telford's airway, or really even so much as looking at him. Naturally, Telford is breathing and conscious within a matter of seconds.
* The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "The Paradise Syndrome" literally adds insult to injury by Kirk having to teach the technique to primitive Native American stereotypes, using the now ''horribly'' outdated "leg pumping" method.
* Used in the online-only webisodes for ''Series/TheWalkingDead'', which [[http://www.amctv.com/the-walking-dead/videos/the-walking-dead-webisodes-3-domestic-violence you can watch here]] (CPR happens first thing, not safe for kids gore.) First off, the woman performing never calls for help. While the woman checks for a heartbeat, the zombie's [[EyeAwaken eyes open]]. If the woman would have at least ''looked at the face she was about to put her lips on'', we could have avoided all of this.
* In the television adaptation of ''Series/WolfHall'', Henry appears to be quite dead after his jousting accident because when Cromwell asks for a mirror to check breathing he's told it was already tried. After another few moments of chaos he checks again by holding his hand to Henry's nose and, feeling breath, proceeds to thump Henry in the chest twice. It works, and Henry sits up.
* In ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'', Xena accidentally ''invents'' CPR to save Gabrielle's life after a seizure (caused by a head injury) apparently kills her. ("She just needs air. I need to get some air into her lungs!" and, later, sobbing and pounding on her chest as she demands that her friend "Wake up! Wake up! ''Wake up!''") Being her love int--er, sidekick, Gabs does. Gabs' reaction is an aversion of the trope: Although the newly-resuscitated Gabrielle doesn't vomit, she is white as a sheet, sweaty, trembling, staring, thoroughly disoriented, and looks as though she would very much ''like'' to spew her guts.



* When Denny has a heart attack in season five of ''Series/BostonLegal'', everyone thinks he's faking until [[HeterosexualLifePartners Alan]] realises he's not breathing and leaps in to save him. Slightly more realistic than usual, as an ambulance is called and we don't see Denny conscious again until he's on his way to the hospital.
* ''Series/TwentyFour'':
** In Season 2, Jack saves Nina by giving her a few mouth breaths, without fixating her chest or using any compression at all. It works.
** The ''Reliable'' part is averted in Season 4, when [[spoiler: Paul Raines]] dies after Jack forces the doctors at gunpoint to work on another patient with critical information. It should however be noted that the attempt to save him is rather pathetic, and he's declared dead a ''mere minute'' after he crashes. This all takes place in a fully equipped medical facility, and the doctors stabilise the other patient a few minutes later, which would have still given them plenty of time to try to revive him, particularly if Jack and Curtis had continued with CPR in the meantime.
* ''Series/FamilyMatters'': Urkel saves an electrocuted Carl with CPR, he remembers to get a CPR mask out of Carl's first aid kit, preventing any mouth contact. However, true to the trope Carl revives with no apparent problems.
* Averted in the season four episode "Breath of Life" for ''Series/TheDistrict''. Sergeant Brander performs CPR on another officer, using it the proper way to keep the victim going long enough for an ambulance, after the victim's partner refused to do it because the victim is gay. Brander forgetting, in a tense situation, to use a mouth guard makes for a minor bit of suspense, as he waits for test results about whether he caught any disease (particularly AIDS) from the victim.
* ''Series/{{Eureka}}'':
** One episode depicted it as a semi-romantic kiss between two love interests involving no chest compressions- averted in that it was just used to keep the victim stable until medical help could arrive.
** Later done by Allison Blake attempting to revive a man with chest compressions ''alone''. ([[http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8&p=hands-only+CPR Hands-only CPR]] is [[http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-failure/news/20100728/studies-cpr-without-rescue-breathing-ok medically acceptable]]).
* Played with in the pilot of ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment''; Tobias lost his medical license as a result of incompetently applying CPR to an elderly man who was simply taking a nap.
* ''Series/StargateUniverse'': To break Col. Telford's brainwashing, Young seals him in a room and evacuates the air. A few seconds after he takes his last breath, Young orders the room repressurized and rushes in, drops to his knees, and starts compressions without a pause, without checking Telford's airway, or really even so much as looking at him. Naturally, Telford is breathing and conscious within a matter of seconds.
* In the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode "The Flax", John and Aeryn have to depressurise and then repressurise their spacecraft with only one working spacesuit between them. The solution: stop John's breathing with a Peacekeeper poison and then resuscitate him with CPR! And his only complaint is that the poison hurt more than Aeryn told him it would.
* An episode of classic ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek]]'', "The Paradise Syndrome", features Kirk using a (now outdated) variant of the Silvester Method on one of the locals.
* Averted in an early episode of ''Series/{{MASH}}'' when Hawkeye had to perform open heart massage to resuscitate a soldier. The soldier didn't make it. A few seasons later, when newly-arrived BJ Hunnicutt was trying to resuscitate a soldier, Colonel Potter asked if he was going to use open heart massage. BJ answered, "I can do it closed. I've seen it done in the States."
* Played both Clean and Reliable on the episode of ''Series/TheJeffersons'' in which George winds up using the technique to save the leader of a KKK group, although the KKK leader still has to be taken to the hospital afterward.
* In ''Series/HermansHead'', Herman's CPR usage on a friend ends up cracking some of her ribs. Unfortunately a lawyer seems to take advantage of the general lack of knowledge of CPR risks to get the friend to sue Herman for the injuries.
* In a first-season episode of ''Series/{{Charmed}}'', Andy brings Prue back this way. She coughs a little bit when she starts to come back, but not very much and it very quickly turns into a hug. Possibly justified given that Prue's stopped heart was intentionally induced using a potion from the Book of Shadows, and she explicitly stated (to Phoebe; Andy had no idea what was going on) that it was completely reviveable with CPR as long as the CPR was administered within four minutes of taking the potion.
* A form of BaitAndSwitchCredits is used in ''Series/AshesToAshes'' when previewing Episode 6 of Season 1. Gene is pictured about to kiss Alex. The reveal is that it's only CPR after she is rescued from [[spoiler:a refrigerator in a restaurant used as a front for money-laundering]].
* Used in the online-only webisodes for ''Series/TheWalkingDead'', which [[http://www.amctv.com/the-walking-dead/videos/the-walking-dead-webisodes-3-domestic-violence you can watch here]] (CPR happens first thing, not safe for kids gore.) First off, the woman preforming never calls for help. While the woman checks for a heartbeat, the zombie's [[EyeAwaken eyes open]]. If the woman would have at least ''looked at the face she was about to put her lips on'', we could have avoided all of this.
* Done surprisingly well in a recent episode of ''Series/TheMentalist'' - certainly, it IS pretty, but quite realistic anyway (automatic defibrillator!) and the "reliable" part is justified (the reason for passing out is drowning, which tends to come with a better prognosis).
%% * ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': "Pilot", "Hourglass", "Accelerate", and "Hereafter".
* ''Series/BurnNotice'' is usually fairly realistic when it comes to things like this, but in the season finale of season 6, Sam's heart and breathing stop due to a bullet wound that couldn't be treated immediately, Michael administers CPR for about 10 seconds, and Sam makes a full recovery with no immediate adverse effects (other than the effects of having been shot.)
* Subverted fairly realistically on ''Series/BreakingBad''. After accidentally beating an underling to death while high on meth, Tuco demands that Walt, the "scientist," perform CPR on him. It's pretty obvious that Tuco got all of his information about CPR from TV. Needless to say, his attempts have no effect.
--> '''Tuco:''' What are you doing? Don't just push on him! Do the breathing in his mouth thing!\\
'''Walt:''' (more than a little hysterical) They don't teach that anymore! It doesn't work!
* Played straight in "And the Window of Opportunity", the second-season finale of ''Series/TwoBrokeGirls'', when Caroline revives Max that way after an electric shock knocks her unconscious.
* ''Series/DocMartin'': Morwena manages to revive her grandfather with a good minute and a half worth of this.
* Lampshaded on "Murdoch Ahoy" of ''Series/MurdochMysteries''. Detective Murdoch is saved from drowning by his LoveInterest Dr. Julia Ogden who dives for him, takes him out of the water and gives him CPR. Inspector Brackereid just stares at her and doesn't understand what she's doing. Later when they're back at their Station House, he jokes that while his best man was fighting for his life, she only used it as an opportunity to smooch him. She tries to convince him that mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is a real medical thing used in Switzerland to save babies.
* The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "The Paradise Syndrome" literally adds insult to injury by Kirk having to teach the technique to primitive Native American stereotypes, using the now ''horribly'' outdated "leg pumping" method.
* ''Series/TheRanch'' : Colt performs CPR on a newborn ''calf'' that appears to be stillborn. Not only does he bring the animal back to life, he's so good the calf is brushed and dried of all the birth goo coating it to that point!
* ''Series/CodeBlack'' averts this in every conceivable manner. Nobody ever tries to [[MagicalDefibrillator shock a flatline]][[labelnote:*]]You don't shock a flatline because it ''doesn't work''. Defibrillators are meant to reset an abnormal cardiac rhythm, not restore one when it no longer exists.[[/labelnote]]. Last-ditch CPR tends to involve cutting open the rib cage (usually at Center Stage) and starting internal cardiac massage, and this only works rarely, as in real life. Most situations with successful CPR involve an abnormal heart rhythm that's restored with only a few shocks, as in real life; by the time the patients are in cardiac arrest, the doctors' resuscitation efforts usually fail.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' had a justified example in [[Recap/AgentsOfSHIELDS2E19TheDirtyHalfDozen "The Dirty Half-Dozen"]]: Skye can [[BadVibrations induce earthquake-like vibrations]], so she she just uses that on Lincoln's stopped heart.
* Used in an early episode of ''Series/BarneyMiller'' with a man that tried to electrocute himself in the bathroom and apparently succeded, but Barney starts compressions after Chano uses a mirror to verify whether he's breathing or not. After the man starts turning blue, Barney resorts to walloping him in the chest with his fist, which restores him to breathing. He does remain unconscious, however, and the [=EMTs=] do point out that his ribs are broken.
-->'''Harris:''' Pop him again!
* In the television adaptation of ''Series/WolfHall'', Henry appears to be quite dead after his jousting accident because when Cromwell asks for a mirror to check breathing he's told it was already tried. After another few moments of chaos he checks again by holding his hand to Henry's nose and, feeling breath, proceeds to thump Henry in the chest twice. It works, and Henry sits up.
* ''Series/MrBean'' subverts it. Mr. Bean is left to give a man CPR at the bus stop after he has a heart attack but does not want direct contact during mouth-to-mouth and also seems to have fun with the rise and fall of the man's chest. After successfully reviving him with his car's jumper cables, he only knocks him unconscious again and also disables the ambulance that comes to save him by using it to jump the battery of his dead car.
11th Mar '17 11:16:46 AM nombretomado
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* In ''MetalGearSolid4'' Johnny gives CPR [[spoiler:to Meryl]] after she drowned. She did spit up water after that but she was revived.

to:

* In ''MetalGearSolid4'' ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' Johnny gives CPR [[spoiler:to Meryl]] after she drowned. She did spit up water after that but she was revived.
30th Dec '16 4:49:34 AM KeithM
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Added DiffLines:

** In situations where there are a sufficient number of rescuers, trading off doing the compressions is used when possible. Even then, going hard for only two or three minutes at a time and getting a chance to rest is physically exhausting, on top of the mental stress.


Added DiffLines:

* The limits of CPR were demonstrated with the tragic death of Carrie Fisher in December 2016. Even though her medical distress was immediately noted and several trained medical professionals were on the plane to immediately tend to her--the best possible scenario one could hope for in that situation--she had suffered irreversible organ damage.
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