History Main / BrutalBonusLevel

18th Oct '17 12:57:31 PM TheWarioBros
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*** The GBA remake of ''Yoshi's Island'' added six more 'secret' levels, and they're about as brutal as the extra ones in the original game. This is especially true of Yoshi's Island Easter Eggs/Crazy Maze Days, which is a MarathonLevel made up of all manner of level elements from previous stages and with a few PlatformHell tendencies found in the DS title.
15th Oct '17 12:27:48 PM GuiRitter
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* ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriorsGundam 3'' has the DLC mission "The Return of the Legendary Dynasty Warrior Gundam". It's only playable on the hardest difficulty, there are two Ace Pilots in the field using Musha Gundam and Musha Gundam Mk-II, both being able to kill the sturdiest playable gundam with two light attacks and that will fight the player in Fortresses that must be taken (and while fighting in a fortress, the player will be attacked by a neverending rain of rockets). Onde both fortresses are taken, the player will eventually face a giant mobile suit along the way (wich is also able to KO your suit with one or two well-placed attacks). And once the enemy gauge is finally depleted, all the enemies leave the field and the player must head to the main hall, while the Knight Gundam awaits. However, as soon as you get near him, both Musha Gundams will join the boss! And ANY strike from any of them is strong enough to take half of your health gauge. And as a nice touch for this mission, the game is programmed to only have one kind of item appear during the whole stage: the temporary 30% defense boost. That's right: absolutely no health recovering items will spawn during the mission.

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* ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriorsGundam 3'' has the DLC mission "The Return of the Legendary Dynasty Warrior Gundam". It's only playable on the hardest difficulty, there are two Ace Pilots in the field using Musha Gundam and Musha Gundam Mk-II, both being able to kill the sturdiest playable gundam with two light attacks and that will fight the player in Fortresses that must be taken (and while fighting in a fortress, the player will be attacked by a neverending rain of rockets). Onde Once both fortresses are taken, the player will eventually face a giant mobile suit along the way (wich is also able to KO your suit with one or two well-placed attacks). And once the enemy gauge is finally depleted, all the enemies leave the field and the player must head to the main hall, while the Knight Gundam awaits. However, as soon as you get near him, both Musha Gundams will join the boss! And ANY strike from any of them is strong enough to take half of your health gauge. And as a nice touch for this mission, the game is programmed to only have one kind of item appear during the whole stage: the temporary 30% defense boost. That's right: absolutely no health recovering items will spawn during the mission.
11th Oct '17 1:41:38 AM GrammarNavi
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Compare BonusDungeon, a mostly equivalent trope (a BonusDungeon doesn't ''have'' to be [[NintendoHard fiendishly difficult]], though examples of that trope still tend to be more difficult than the rest of the game). For the boss version of this, check out BonusBoss, or alternatively, TrueFinalBoss (though the former may very well reside in the BrutalBonusLevel (the latter's residence would technically just be TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon)).

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Compare BonusDungeon, a mostly equivalent trope (a BonusDungeon doesn't ''have'' to be [[NintendoHard fiendishly difficult]], though examples of that trope still tend to be more difficult than the rest of the game). For the boss version of this, check out BonusBoss, or alternatively, TrueFinalBoss (though the former may very well reside in the BrutalBonusLevel Brutal Bonus Level (the latter's residence would technically just be TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon)).



** In ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'', pretty much all the DLC locations could be this trope. However, the best example of this is the Frigid Outskirts, a BrutalBonusLevel ''[[UpToEleven inside another brutal bonus level]]''. You are trapped in a snowstorm that makes it nearly impossible to see around you. While blinded by the storm and trying to find your way to the end, you are constantly ambushed by respawning lightning-spamming [[DemonicSpiders Ice Stallions]] and Faraam Warriors... and if you're really unlucky, you can possibly [[FromBadToWorse get invaded by other players too]]. What lays at the end of this madness? A boss fight against Bonus Bosses Lud and Zallen. Your reward for all this punishment is the Ring of the Living - which allows you to camouflage yourself by removing the glowing outline in phantom form.

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** In ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsII'', pretty much all the DLC locations could be this trope. However, the best example of this is the Frigid Outskirts, a BrutalBonusLevel Brutal Bonus Level ''[[UpToEleven inside another brutal bonus level]]''. You are trapped in a snowstorm that makes it nearly impossible to see around you. While blinded by the storm and trying to find your way to the end, you are constantly ambushed by respawning lightning-spamming [[DemonicSpiders Ice Stallions]] and Faraam Warriors... and if you're really unlucky, you can possibly [[FromBadToWorse get invaded by other players too]]. What lays at the end of this madness? A boss fight against Bonus Bosses Lud and Zallen. Your reward for all this punishment is the Ring of the Living - which allows you to camouflage yourself by removing the glowing outline in phantom form.
5th Oct '17 10:05:48 AM Luigifan
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The extra difficult {{Secret Level}}s which some games have. They exist largely so that the player can [[BraggingRightsReward brag to his friends]] about how awesome he is for winning them. A SubTrope of Secret Level, distinguished from its mother trope by the extreme difficulty being the only point of these levels. Examples of this trope are, naturally, almost always ThatOneLevel.

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The [[VideoGameDifficultyTropes extra difficult difficult]] {{Secret Level}}s which some games have. They exist largely so that the player can [[BraggingRightsReward brag to his friends]] about how awesome he is for winning them. A SubTrope of Secret Level, distinguished from its mother trope by the [[NintendoHard extreme difficulty difficulty]] being the only point of these levels. Examples of this trope are, naturally, almost always ThatOneLevel.



Can be set in PlanetHeck, but not always. Won't necessarily have a sign at the beginning saying "WelcomeToHell!", but [[VideoGame/CaveStory might as well]].

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Can be set in PlanetHeck, but not always. Won't necessarily have [[VideoGame/CaveStory a sign at the beginning beginning]] saying "WelcomeToHell!", but [[VideoGame/CaveStory [[PlatformHell might as well]].
5th Oct '17 9:25:48 AM Luigifan
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Compare BonusDungeon, an equivalent trope. For the boss version of this, check out BonusBoss, or alternatively, TrueFinalBoss (though the former may very well reside in the BrutalBonusLevel (the latter's residence would technically just be TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon)).

to:

Compare BonusDungeon, an a mostly equivalent trope.trope (a BonusDungeon doesn't ''have'' to be [[NintendoHard fiendishly difficult]], though examples of that trope still tend to be more difficult than the rest of the game). For the boss version of this, check out BonusBoss, or alternatively, TrueFinalBoss (though the former may very well reside in the BrutalBonusLevel (the latter's residence would technically just be TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon)).
5th Oct '17 9:13:40 AM Luigifan
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For the boss version of this, check out BonusBoss, or alternatively, TrueFinalBoss.

to:

Compare BonusDungeon, an equivalent trope. For the boss version of this, check out BonusBoss, or alternatively, TrueFinalBoss.
TrueFinalBoss (though the former may very well reside in the BrutalBonusLevel (the latter's residence would technically just be TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon)).



** Sacred Grounds/Blood Stained Sanctuary is so difficult that it has a "WelcomeToHell!" sign. Of course, completing this level (including the TrueFinalBoss) is [[EarnYourHappyEnding the only way to get the good ending.]] There are absolutely NO save points inside it, AT ALL. Even before [[spoiler: the Heavy Press or Ballos, the True Final Bosses.]] And if you saved at the last opportunity and want to get some Life Capsules, you can't, as you've just passed the only PointOfNoReturn in the game: using that Save Point. Even still, the Save Point before that ([[spoiler:which, humorously, is the same Save Point]]) is right before the regular Sequential Final Bosses, meaning you'll have to fight them again.
** The "Final/Last Cave (Hidden)" is also one of these, and is required to get to the aforementioned Sacred Grounds, including a boss fight not in the regular version: [[spoiler: the Red Demon/Ogre that Arthur drove away.]]

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** Sacred Grounds/Blood Stained Sanctuary is so difficult that it has a "WelcomeToHell!" sign. Of course, completing this level (including the TrueFinalBoss) is [[EarnYourHappyEnding the only way to get the good ending.]] There are absolutely NO save points inside it, AT ALL. Even before [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the Heavy Press or Ballos, the True Final Bosses.]] Bosses]]. And if you saved at the last opportunity and want to get some Life Capsules, you can't, as you've just passed the only PointOfNoReturn in the game: using that Save Point. Even still, the Save Point before that ([[spoiler:which, humorously, is the same Save Point]]) Point, just minus a few {{Event Flag}}s]]) is right before the regular Sequential Final Bosses, [[SequentialBoss Sequential]] {{Final Boss}}es, meaning you'll have to fight them again.
** The "Final/Last Cave (Hidden)" is also one of these, and is required to get to the aforementioned Sacred Grounds, including a boss fight not in the regular version: [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the Red Demon/Ogre that Arthur drove away.]]away]].



** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames'' have an additional level in their linked games, the Hero's Cave.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames'' have an additional level in their linked games, the Hero's Cave. Yes, this is the same place that is the NoobCave in the unliked game.
2nd Oct '17 8:26:20 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/SeventhDragon III: code VFD'' has the Shadow Realm, unlocked by beating the FinalBoss. First, it costs 50 Dz to enter, which means if you've been diligent in building and upgrading Nodens facilties, you'll need to kill every last dragon in the game. Second, you know how throughout the game, dragons appear as PreexistingEncounters (as opposed to RandomEncounters for normal enemies)? In this dungeon, ''every random encounter enemy is a dragon'', and a very powerful one at that. The second dragon battle theme (the one used in Chapters 6 and 7) plays for each of these random encounters too, just to hammer in the point.

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* ''VideoGame/SeventhDragon III: code VFD'' has the Shadow Realm, unlocked by beating the FinalBoss. First, it costs 50 Dz to enter, which means if you've been diligent in building and upgrading Nodens facilties, you'll need to kill every last dragon in the game. Second, you know how throughout the game, dragons appear as PreexistingEncounters (as opposed to RandomEncounters for normal enemies)? In this dungeon, ''every random encounter enemy is a dragon'', and a very powerful one at that.that, in contrast to the EasyLevelsHardBosses of the main bulk of the game. The second dragon battle theme (the one used in Chapters 6 and 7) plays for each of these random encounters too, just to hammer in the point.
2nd Oct '17 8:25:04 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/SeventhDragon III: code VFD'' has the Shadow Realm, unlocked by beating the FinalBoss. First, it costs 50 Dz to enter, which means if you've been diligent in building and upgrading Nodens facilties, you'll need to kill every last dragon in the game. Second, you know how throughout the game, dragons appear as PreexistingEncounters (as opposed to RandomEnconters for normal enemies)? In this dungeon, ''every random encounter enemy is a dragon'', and a very powerful one at that. The second dragon battle theme (the one used in Chapters 6 and 7) plays for each of these random encounters too, just to hammer in the point.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SeventhDragon III: code VFD'' has the Shadow Realm, unlocked by beating the FinalBoss. First, it costs 50 Dz to enter, which means if you've been diligent in building and upgrading Nodens facilties, you'll need to kill every last dragon in the game. Second, you know how throughout the game, dragons appear as PreexistingEncounters (as opposed to RandomEnconters RandomEncounters for normal enemies)? In this dungeon, ''every random encounter enemy is a dragon'', and a very powerful one at that. The second dragon battle theme (the one used in Chapters 6 and 7) plays for each of these random encounters too, just to hammer in the point.
2nd Oct '17 8:24:54 PM LucaEarlgrey
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/SeventhDragon III: code VFD'' has the Shadow Realm, unlocked by beating the FinalBoss. First, it costs 50 Dz to enter, which means if you've been diligent in building and upgrading Nodens facilties, you'll need to kill every last dragon in the game. Second, you know how throughout the game, dragons appear as PreexistingEncounters (as opposed to RandomEnconters for normal enemies)? In this dungeon, ''every random encounter enemy is a dragon'', and a very powerful one at that. The second dragon battle theme (the one used in Chapters 6 and 7) plays for each of these random encounters too, just to hammer in the point.
11th Sep '17 8:26:50 PM MyFinalEdits
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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has the Cave of Ordeals in a similar vein to the Savage Labyrinth from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The Wind Waker]]''. Each room has a different set of monsters, and deeper rooms require later items to advance. While the rooms generally don't get too tough, the final room contains THREE Darknuts (four in the second playthrough). Since they tend to bulk together, parry attacks are difficult to pull off without getting hurt, and bombs are limited and not easily available. They ''also'' don't give you RandomDrops ''and'' you can't steal RandomDrop items from them like in ''The Wind Waker''. Again, it's not without mercy: they will drop Rupees (your Magic Armor needs them to protect you) and a few hearts can be found in the floor by Wolf Link.
*** The ''HD Remake'' of Twilight Princess also includes the Cave of Shadows, which can only be accessed by using a Wolf Link amiibo. It functions similarly to the Cave of Ordeals, but you have to be in your wolf form inside the dungeon.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has the ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'':
*** The
Cave of Ordeals is the same in a similar vein concept to the Savage Labyrinth from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The Wind Waker]]''. Each room has a different set of monsters, and deeper rooms require later items to advance. While the rooms generally don't get too tough, the final room contains THREE Darknuts (four in the second playthrough). Since they tend to bulk together, parry attacks are difficult to pull off without getting hurt, and bombs are limited and not easily available. They ''also'' don't give you RandomDrops ''and'' you can't steal RandomDrop items from them like in ''The Wind Waker''. Again, it's not without mercy: they will drop Rupees (your Magic Armor needs them to protect you) and a few hearts can be found in the floor by Wolf Link.
*** The ''HD Remake'' of Twilight Princess also includes adds the Cave of Shadows, which can only be accessed by using a Wolf Link amiibo. It functions similarly to the Cave of Ordeals, but you have to be in your wolf form inside the dungeon.



** The Hall of Darkness, in ''Legends of Titan''. Mixes up all the gimmicks from previous dungeons, adds many new and is filled with [[PuzzleBoss Puzzle]] ''[[PuzzleBoss Random Encounters]]'', that features powerful foes with different weaknesses to exploit but that are always found in groups specifically designed to fill in their flaws. For example, Red Lion is the strongest non-boss enemy in the game, but starts the battle [[StandardStatusEffects sleeping]]... but he's usually found with a Hollow Magus, that can damage their allies and boost their power through the roof. So, just kill the Hollow Magus first, right? Wrong! Her evasion is insanely high, and sometimes she's found with a Thunder Spawn, which is one massive damage sponge and [[BerserkButton goes berserk if you kill one of its allies]]. Have fun!

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** The Hall of Darkness, in ''Legends of Titan''. Mixes up all many of the gimmicks from previous dungeons, adds many new and is filled with [[PuzzleBoss Puzzle]] ''[[PuzzleBoss Random Encounters]]'', that features powerful foes with different weaknesses to exploit but that are always found in groups specifically designed to fill in their flaws. For example, Red Lion is the strongest non-boss enemy in the game, but starts the battle [[StandardStatusEffects sleeping]]... but he's usually found with a Hollow Magus, that can damage their allies and boost their power through the roof. So, just kill the Hollow Magus first, right? Wrong! Her evasion is insanely high, and sometimes she's found with a Thunder Spawn, which is one massive damage sponge and [[BerserkButton goes berserk if you kill one of its allies]]. Lastly, unless you're in for a SelfImposedChallenge that very few players have managed to accomplish, before facing the BonusBoss you need to weaken it first by collecting a set of chemicals in a specific order that is only vaguely hinted through various lore entries scattered in the last floor. Have fun!



** The Special World in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'', though some could be [[EasyLevelTrick easily cleared]] with a cape. Tubular was a particularly insidious showstopper, if you try to play it properly.

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** The Special World in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'', though some could be [[EasyLevelTrick easily cleared]] with a cape. Tubular was is a particularly insidious showstopper, if you try to play it properly.



** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'' allows one to unlock the levels played at ''VideoGame/NintendoWorldChampionships'' 2015 when one beats every other built in level. [[spoiler: Beating those allows one to place the Weird Mushroom down on demand.]]

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** ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker'' allows one to unlock the levels played at ''VideoGame/NintendoWorldChampionships'' 2015 when one beats every other built in level. [[spoiler: Beating those allows one to place the Weird Mushroom down on demand.]]]] The 3DS version has World 19 from Super Mario Challenge, unlocked after earning enough achievement medals from the previous worlds, and it's also the longest (12 levels).



** The last few Special Stages of the classic games will almost always be the most difficult of the bunch.
*** For example, Special Stage 5 of ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' features rings that are on the sides and ceilings, and the game never explains [[GuideDangIt how you're supposed to get to them.]]

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** The last few Special Stages of the classic games will almost always be the most difficult of the bunch.
***
bunch. For example, Special Stage 5 of ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2'' features rings that are on the sides and ceilings, and the game never explains [[GuideDangIt how you're supposed to get to them.]]



** ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot1996'' had three kinds of bonus levels, reachable through collecting sets of tokens through the level. Tawna's bonus levels are essentially breathers, where the player can collect extra lives and save the game or get a passwords. Brio's bonus levels consist of much more challenging jumping puzzles, with bigger rewards to match. Cortex's bonus levels are the absolute worst, with absolutely devious platforming challenges. Sadly, only Cortex's levels are obligatory for HundredPercentCompletion, because beating them unlocks extra levels...but should you fail them, you'll have to restart the stage you came from for another chance, and one of the bonus levels happens to be located in the game's resident ScrappyLevel, Sunset Vista.
** ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot2CortexStrikesBack'', ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped'' and ''Videogame/CrashBandicootTheWrathOfCortex'' had regular bonus levels, which were easy (most of time, anyway), and Death Routes and Gem Paths, which were this trope. The first required NoDeathRun until the platform that took you to them, and were accordingly brutal, usually overloaded with traps or jumping sequences requiring lightning reflexes and nanosecond timing. Gem Paths required to acquire a gem of corresponding color (or all of them) and had similar difficulty as Death Routes.

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** ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot1996'' had has three kinds of bonus levels, reachable through collecting sets of tokens through the level. Tawna's bonus levels are essentially breathers, where the player can collect extra lives and save the game or get a passwords. Brio's bonus levels consist of much more challenging jumping puzzles, with bigger rewards to match. Cortex's bonus levels are the absolute worst, with absolutely devious platforming challenges. Sadly, only Cortex's levels are obligatory for HundredPercentCompletion, because beating them unlocks extra levels... but should you fail them, you'll have to restart the stage you came from for another chance, and one of the bonus levels happens to be located in the game's resident ScrappyLevel, Sunset Vista.
** ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot2CortexStrikesBack'', ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped'' and ''Videogame/CrashBandicootTheWrathOfCortex'' had have regular bonus levels, which were are easy (most of time, anyway), and Death Routes and Gem Paths, which were are this trope. The first required requires NoDeathRun until the platform that took takes you to them, and were are accordingly brutal, usually overloaded with traps or jumping sequences requiring lightning reflexes and nanosecond timing. Gem Paths required require to acquire collect a gem of corresponding color (or all of them) and had have similar difficulty as Death Routes.



* ''NightSky'' has a reward for collecting all the bonus stars hidden throughout the game, a final chapter called "Slightly Nonsense," which features some real challenges that force you to battle and exploit the environment physics every step of the way. This chapter includes, among other things, a level where you can only get around by working the anti-gravity power on and off, trampolines, and surfaces where the friction and impulse physics are intentionally wonky.

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* ''NightSky'' ''VideoGame/NightSky'' has a reward for collecting all the bonus stars hidden throughout the game, a final chapter called "Slightly Nonsense," which features some real challenges that force you to battle and exploit the environment physics every step of the way. This chapter includes, among other things, a level where you can only get around by working the anti-gravity power on and off, trampolines, and surfaces where the friction and impulse physics are intentionally wonky.
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