History Main / BrokenAesop

22nd Jul '17 10:09:01 AM Berrenta
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* "The Dog and the Wolf" claims it's better to die starved than live a fattened slave, but the dog isn't enslaved. He's employed and is shown to be capable of leaving the farm, he just doesn't want to because he's got a good job, it's only "slavery" in that he doesn't own the farm. The way the story is told, the wolf isn't rejecting enslavement as much as he's rejecting commitment to steady work.
14th Jul '17 5:07:12 AM Arivne
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** The story is ''supposedly'' saying that Beauty comes to see beyond the Beast's appearance and accept him for who he is... except that they're only able to live HappilyEverAfter when the curse is broken and he reverts to a perfect Handsome Prince (and thus comes off as "only beautiful people can love each other" instead... though this sort of neglects the fact that the transformation is the ''Beast's'' reward, not Belle's). In the versions where he is clearly some sort of animal or mix of animals, this "broken Aesop" cannot be avoided without getting too close to bestiality for most audience members comfort, so for the writers this is a case of damned if you do, damned if you don't.

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** The story is ''supposedly'' saying that Beauty comes to see beyond the Beast's appearance and accept him for who he is... except that they're only able to live HappilyEverAfter when the curse is broken and he reverts to a perfect Handsome Prince (and thus comes off as "only beautiful people can love each other" instead... though this sort of neglects the fact that the transformation is the ''Beast's'' reward, not Belle's). In the versions where he is clearly some sort of animal or mix of animals, this "broken Aesop" cannot be avoided without getting too close to bestiality for most audience members members' comfort, so for the writers this is a case of damned if you do, damned if you don't.
13th Jul '17 10:45:44 AM OverClover
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* "The Dog and the Wolf" claims it's better to die starved than live a fattened slave, but the dog isn't enslaved. He's employed and is shown to be capable of leaving the farm, he just doesn't want to because he's got a good job, it's only "slavery" in that he doesn't own the farm. The way the story is told, the wolf isn't rejecting enslavement as much as he's rejecting commitment to steady work.
12th Jul '17 4:20:36 AM mdwall
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* The TeamStarKid show {{Firebringer}} had an entire subplot abut how religion is deluded and evil (the tribe shaman's belief in an all-powerul duck that made the world in seven "quacks" feels awfully specific). It's hard to take seriously, however, when the big message that "there is no God" is delivered by an AncientAstronaut from the species that created life on earth.

to:

* The TeamStarKid show {{Firebringer}} had an entire subplot abut how that claims religion is deluded and evil (the tribe shaman's belief in an all-powerul duck that made the world in seven "quacks" feels awfully specific). It's hard to take seriously, It feels very awkward, however, when the big message that "there is no God" is delivered by an AncientAstronaut one of the AncientAstronauts from the species that created life on earth.earth.
12th Jul '17 4:15:51 AM mdwall
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Added DiffLines:

* The TeamStarKid show {{Firebringer}} had an entire subplot abut how religion is deluded and evil (the tribe shaman's belief in an all-powerul duck that made the world in seven "quacks" feels awfully specific). It's hard to take seriously, however, when the big message that "there is no God" is delivered by an AncientAstronaut from the species that created life on earth.
29th Jun '17 10:23:55 PM infernape612
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* "Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast" in its various tellings usually ends up having a Broken Aesop (especially in modern versions) that is naturally an inversion of the complaint about ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. It's believed that the story was originally told to girls who were in {{arranged marriage}}s to men they didn't care for, so ValuesDissonance may be involved.

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* "Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast" ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' in its various tellings usually ends up having a Broken Aesop (especially in modern versions) that is naturally an inversion of the complaint about ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}''. It's believed that the story was originally told to girls who were in {{arranged marriage}}s to men they didn't care for, so ValuesDissonance may be involved.
17th Jun '17 3:54:27 PM Orbiting
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* ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' points out a common use of this in {{Christmas Special}}s:
-->'''Dad:''' Watching a Christmas special?\\
'''Calvin:''' Yep.\\
'''Dad:''' Another show extolling love and peace interrupted every seven minutes by commercials extolling greed and waste. I hate to think what you're learning from this.\\
'''Calvin:''' [[ShutUpHannibal I'm learning I need my own TV so I can watch someplace else.]]



* E.C. Segar's ''Thimble Theater'', where ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} first appeared, sometimes had an AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle segment in which Popeye would teach morals. In one of them Popeye seriously teaches kids [[DoubleStandard not to be lazy with their language and mispronounce words]] ("sumpin' for "something", for instance). I would desperately like to believe that to be tongue-in-cheek, but if memory serves then none of the others were...
** ''Segar'''s original ''Thimble Theater'' had this as an occasional gag. Only after Segar's untimely demise did lesser hands continuing the strip insert the above insipid messages.

to:

* E.C. Segar's ''Thimble Theater'', where ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} first appeared, sometimes had an AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle segment in which Popeye would teach morals. In one of them Popeye seriously teaches kids [[DoubleStandard not to be lazy with their language and mispronounce words]] ("sumpin' for "something", for instance). I would desperately like to believe that to be tongue-in-cheek, but if memory serves then none of the others were...
** ''Segar'''s original ''Thimble Theater'' had this
It was originally used as an occasional gag. Only gag, but after Segar's untimely demise did lesser hands continuing the strip insert the above insipid messages.other writers sometimes forgot that it was supposed to be ironic.
14th Jun '17 4:26:45 PM MagBas
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* Trying to present a moral ambiguity [[DontShootTheMessage and failing badly.]]
20th May '17 8:08:28 PM CaptEquinox
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** ''Segar'''s original ''Thimble Theater'' had this as an occasional gag. Only after Segar's untimely demise did lesser hands continuing the strip insert the above insipid messages.
15th May '17 6:45:32 AM PurpleAlert
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* Coven's ''One Tin Soldier'' is an illustration of the perils of using a moral ideal to justify mistreating others, sarcastically encouraging the audience to go ahead and be an asshole "in the name of Heaven" because you'll always be able to say you did the right thing (and there won't be anyone to call out the winner if they make sure all the losers are dead). Unfortunately, the actual story being told to the children is a fable about the Valley People sacking the Mountain People's castle to steal their treasure, only to find that the treasure is just the idea of peace. The moral fails because the Valley People demand literal gold, and rather than just saying that there ''isn't any'', the Mountain People offer to share their treasure and just never send anything back. Sure, the Valley People are greedy dicks, but the conflict was a matter of PoorCommunicationKills, not a moral issue.
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