History Main / BroadcastingInTheUnitedStates

11th Mar '16 11:13:59 PM lizaphile
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There are also exceptions based upon prior ownership. In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, every television station's call sign starts with a K ''except'' for WFAA, because the station was originally owned by the same company that owned WFAA-AM, so it was allowed to keep its W call sign. This practice of allowing call sign carry over continues even today. Stations with a common owner can have the same callsign, but with a different suffix. So there can be a KOPB-AM, a KOPB-FM and a KOPB-DT (for digital television). Other suffixes are "TV" for analog television and "LP" for low power (there's also "CA", "CD", and "LD"). To reach communities outside of the main transmitter's area, translators are used. [[StationIdent They have names like K11BX]] (the number in the middle is the "channel" or frequency assignment where the station operates), and are lower power. The number will also tell you the type of translator: if the number is two digits, it's a repeater of a television station; a three digit number is a repeater of an FM station. Often, religious broadcasters abuse the translator rules and have FM translators scattered across the country.

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There are also exceptions based upon prior ownership. In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, every television station's call sign starts with a K ''except'' for WFAA, because the station was originally owned by the same company that owned WFAA-AM, so it was allowed to keep its W call sign. This practice of allowing call sign carry over continues even today. Stations with a common owner can have the same callsign, but with a different suffix. So there can be a KOPB-AM, a KOPB-FM and a KOPB-DT (for digital television). Other suffixes are "TV" for analog television and "LP" for low power (there's also "CA", "CD", and "LD"). To reach communities outside of the main transmitter's area, translators are used. [[StationIdent They have names like K11BX]] (the number in the middle is the "channel" or frequency assignment where the station operates), and are lower power. The number will also tell you the type of translator: if the number is two digits, it's a repeater of a television station; a three digit number is a repeater of an FM station.station (the FM repeater number itself identifies the FCC channel, which is only used by the FCC; 87.9 is Channel 200, while 107.9 is Channel 300); for instance, W241AG would identify a station at 96.1 FM, as it's on FM Channel 241). Often, religious broadcasters abuse the translator rules and have FM translators scattered across the country.
9th Mar '16 1:19:16 PM Hossmeister
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* ''MurphyBrown'' worked for the fictitious FYI newsmagazine on CBS in Washington, D.C.

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* ''MurphyBrown'' ''Series/MurphyBrown'' worked for the fictitious FYI newsmagazine on CBS in Washington, D.C.
6th Feb '16 9:12:46 PM nombretomado
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* ''WKRPInCincinnati'' is set in a radio station.
* {{Frasier}} worked in a Seattle radio station called KACL, AM 780.
* KBBL is a radio station in ''TheSimpsons''. There is also KBBL-TV.

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* ''WKRPInCincinnati'' ''Series/WKRPInCincinnati'' is set in a radio station.
* {{Frasier}} Series/{{Frasier}} worked in a Seattle radio station called KACL, AM 780.
* KBBL is a radio station in ''TheSimpsons''.''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. There is also KBBL-TV.



* ''NewsRadio'' took place in radio station WNYX.

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* ''NewsRadio'' ''Series/NewsRadio'' took place in radio station WNYX.



* Billy Batson in the original ''[[{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]]'' works for WHIZ. He hosts a couple of panel shows and reads news and continuity.

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* Billy Batson in the original ''[[{{Shazam}} ''[[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]]'' works for WHIZ. He hosts a couple of panel shows and reads news and continuity.
19th Oct '15 4:05:21 PM Josef5678
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Public television and radio is partially funded by the government through the CPB, but isn't a government broadcaster, though individual stations may be operated by local governments. Creator/{{PBS}} is the public television network and {{NPR}} is one of the public radio networks.

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Public television and radio is partially funded by the government through the CPB, but isn't a government broadcaster, though individual stations may be operated by local governments. Creator/{{PBS}} is the public television network and {{NPR}} Creator/{{NPR}} is one of the public radio networks.
11th Aug '15 11:38:19 AM BriannaFaxMachine
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* The old American Movie Classics channel used to have a series called ''Remember WENN'', about a station in the 1930s.

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* The old Long before its current crop of original series, American Movie Classics channel used to have a series called ''Remember WENN'', produced Series/RememberWENN, about a station in the 1930s.
23rd May '14 12:29:08 AM lizaphile
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* Frequency modulation, or FM, radio covers 87.9 to 107.9 [=MHz=]. The last digit after the decimal point is always an odd number. It is used for all kinds of broadcasts, from college radio to top 40 music. HD radio is starting here as a subcarrier, although the receivers are really expensive now. FM is good for stereo music and can support data streams on subcarriers. Part of the VHF band. News, talk and sports radio are making their ways to FM, slowly but surely.

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* Frequency modulation, or FM, radio covers 87.9 to 107.9 [=MHz=].[=MHz=] (87.7 FM, where the audio for analog channel 6 is heard, is also on many radios, with some low-power stations taking advantage of that to air a radio format). The last digit after the decimal point is always an odd number. It is used for all kinds of broadcasts, from college radio to top 40 music. HD radio is starting here as a subcarrier, although the receivers are really expensive now. FM is good for stereo music and can support data streams on subcarriers. Part of the VHF band. News, talk and sports radio are making their ways to FM, slowly but surely.
29th Apr '14 4:01:38 AM jmaynard
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* VHF TV covers channels 2 to 13. There is no Channel 1.[[note]]There was one when the TV channels were first allocated, but it was reallocated to other uses - most of it became a ham radio band, but 49 MHz walkie-talkies and the like are in the lower part - very early on, and the few channel 1 stations were reassigned.[[/note]] Starting in February 2009 analog television stations switched to digital stations, and all stations switched by June.

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* VHF TV covers channels 2 to 13. There is no Channel 1.[[note]]There was one when the TV channels were first allocated, but it was reallocated to other uses - most of it became a ham radio band, but 49 MHz [=MHz=] walkie-talkies and the like are in the lower part - very early on, and the few channel 1 stations were reassigned.[[/note]] Starting in February 2009 analog television stations switched to digital stations, and all stations switched by June.
29th Apr '14 4:00:32 AM jmaynard
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* VHF TV covers channels 2 to 13. There is no Channel 1. Starting in February 2009 analog television stations switched to digital stations, and all stations switched by June.

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* VHF TV covers channels 2 to 13. There is no Channel 1. [[note]]There was one when the TV channels were first allocated, but it was reallocated to other uses - most of it became a ham radio band, but 49 MHz walkie-talkies and the like are in the lower part - very early on, and the few channel 1 stations were reassigned.[[/note]] Starting in February 2009 analog television stations switched to digital stations, and all stations switched by June.
23rd Jul '13 8:01:58 AM themisterfree
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* The Music/WeirdAlYankovic cult classic ''Film/{{UHF}}'' took had two stations whose call letters are never identified, Channel 62 and Channel 8 (the latter of which went dark by the movie's end; the logo for that station looks identical to the logo used by real-life Dallas station WFAA from 1996 to the present day)
* In ''{{Network}}'', the fictitious fourth network (alongside CBS, ABC and NBC) is UBS (Universal Broadcasting Service).
* ''MurphyBrown'' worked for the fictitious FYI network in Washington, D.C.

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* The Music/WeirdAlYankovic cult classic ''Film/{{UHF}}'' took had two stations whose call letters are never identified, Channel 62 and Channel 8 (the latter of which went dark by the movie's end; the logo for that station looks identical to the logo used by real-life Dallas station WFAA from 1996 to the present day)
day, and during one scene, when one character preps for broadcast, the truck seen in the background is the satellite truck from KTUL-8, the real-life channel 8 in Tulsa, OK, where the movie was filmed)
* In ''{{Network}}'', the fictitious fourth network (alongside CBS, ABC and NBC) is UBS (Universal (Union Broadcasting Service).
* ''MurphyBrown'' worked for the fictitious FYI network newsmagazine on CBS in Washington, D.C.
16th Apr '13 5:33:39 AM jmaynard
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* Shortwave radio is mostly unused for broadcasting in the United States. What stations do exist are religious (often run by a new "prophet") or operated by fringe groups. You can find official time signal broadcasts there too, among other signals; really cool alarm and digital clocks can set themselves to these signals.

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* Shortwave radio is mostly unused for broadcasting in the United States. What stations do exist are religious (often run by a new "prophet") or operated by fringe groups. You can find official time signal broadcasts there too, among other signals; really cool alarm and digital clocks [[note]]usually misnamed "atomic", even though they do not have their own atomic time standard[[/note]] can set themselves to these signals.
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