History Main / BroadStrokes

11th Aug '17 4:57:49 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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* WordOfGod is that ''{{Anime/Cyborg 009}} vs {{Anime/Devilman}}'' takes place before the Yomi arc of the former and the final arc of the latter series, but admitted that the timing would still be "impossible" if you applied it to the original canon, so this trope is in effect for the [[AlternateContinuity universe]] it takes place in.

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* WordOfGod is that ''{{Anime/Cyborg 009}} vs {{Anime/Devilman}}'' ''Anime/Cyborg009VsDevilman'' takes place before the Yomi arc of the former and the final arc of the latter series, but admitted that the timing would still be "impossible" if you applied it to the original canon, so this trope is in effect for the [[AlternateContinuity universe]] it takes place in.
28th Jul '17 9:23:17 PM the-green-eyes-futurist
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* In CaptainAmericaCivilWar, Wanda Maximoff's role in [[Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron the creation of Ultron]] and her direct role in [[MindRape mind raping]] and unleashing the Hulk in Johannesburg are [[KarmaHoudini never mentioned or addressed.]]
24th Jul '17 3:36:11 PM MBG
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** This is part of the idea behind "hypertime", one of the various models of cosmology in the DC universe. Specifically, any story that the writer acknowledges as being true in a given story is true, everything else is up in the air.
23rd Jul '17 8:08:35 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' took this approach to G1 continuity: it took elements of the cartoon and comic continuities as canon for its backstory. The events are not referenced in detail; that allowed a sense of history while it continued with its own story. Then along came ''WesternAnimation/BeastMachines'', which at its core plot thread disagreed with both comic AND cartoon G1 continuities in irreconcilable ways.

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* ''{{Franchise/Transformers}}: WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' took this approach to G1 continuity: it took elements of the cartoon and comic continuities as canon for its backstory. The events are not referenced in detail; that allowed a sense of history while it continued with its own story. Then along came ''WesternAnimation/BeastMachines'', which at its core plot thread disagreed with both comic AND cartoon G1 continuities in irreconcilable ways.ways (and Beast Wars for that matter).
23rd Jul '17 7:43:25 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* The {{Literature/Discworld}} novels do this quite a bit. A good example is Sir Creator/TerryPratchett's treatment of elves and gnomes. In the first book, ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', there's a brief mention of elves as just another fantasy race on the disc. Rincewind and Twoflower see one at a tavern with no comment. But in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'', elves are a dangerous and cruel race, so bad that they were sealed away in a parallel dimension and there is a real threat of them breaking back into the world. In ''Discworld/TheWeeFreeMen'', Tiffany Aching had to rescue a Duke's son when he was kidnapped by the elves. Similarly, gnomes first were mentioned as short people in pointy hats, and latter became very short, very violent Scotsmen known as the Nac Mac Feegle (it was later clarified that these are seperate races, and the confusion was because the most prominent gnome character was an adopted Feegle).
** The continuity geek explanation is that "elves" in the early books are {{Half Human Hybrid}}s ("a race o' skinny types with pointy ears and a tendency to giggle and burn easily in sunshine. There's no harm in them", according to Granny), and that gnomes and Nac Mac Feegle are related but different (as shown in ''Discworld/IShallWearMidnight'').

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* The {{Literature/Discworld}} novels do this quite a bit. A good example is Sir Creator/TerryPratchett's treatment of elves and gnomes. In the first book, ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', there's a brief mention of elves as just another fantasy race on the disc. Rincewind and Twoflower see one at a tavern with no comment. But in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'', elves are a dangerous and cruel race, so bad that they were sealed away in a parallel dimension and there is a real threat of them breaking back into the world. In ''Discworld/TheWeeFreeMen'', Tiffany Aching had to rescue a Duke's son when he was kidnapped by the elves. Similarly, gnomes first were mentioned as short people in pointy hats, and latter became very short, very violent Scotsmen known as the Nac Mac Feegle (it was later clarified that these are seperate races, and the confusion was because the most prominent gnome character was an adopted Feegle).
Feegle.
** The continuity geek explanation is that "elves" in the early books are {{Half Human Hybrid}}s ("a race o' skinny types with pointy ears and a tendency to giggle and burn easily in sunshine. There's no harm in them", according to Granny), and that gnomes and Nac Mac Feegle are related but different (as shown in ''Discworld/IShallWearMidnight''). The confusion was eventually explained away by the most prominent Gnome being adopted and biologically a Feegle.
23rd Jul '17 7:34:59 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* The {{Literature/Discworld}} novels do this quite a bit. A good example is Sir Creator/TerryPratchett's treatment of elves and gnomes. In the first book, ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', there's a brief mention of elves as just another fantasy race on the disc. Rincewind and Twoflower see one at a tavern with no comment. But in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'', elves are a dangerous and cruel race, so bad that they were sealed away in a parallel dimension and there is a real threat of them breaking back into the world. In ''Discworld/TheWeeFreeMen'', Tiffany Aching had to rescue a Duke's son when he was kidnapped by the elves. Similarly, gnomes first were mentioned as short people in pointy hats, and latter became very short, very violent Scotsmen known as the Nac Mac Feegle.

to:

* The {{Literature/Discworld}} novels do this quite a bit. A good example is Sir Creator/TerryPratchett's treatment of elves and gnomes. In the first book, ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', there's a brief mention of elves as just another fantasy race on the disc. Rincewind and Twoflower see one at a tavern with no comment. But in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'', elves are a dangerous and cruel race, so bad that they were sealed away in a parallel dimension and there is a real threat of them breaking back into the world. In ''Discworld/TheWeeFreeMen'', Tiffany Aching had to rescue a Duke's son when he was kidnapped by the elves. Similarly, gnomes first were mentioned as short people in pointy hats, and latter became very short, very violent Scotsmen known as the Nac Mac Feegle.Feegle (it was later clarified that these are seperate races, and the confusion was because the most prominent gnome character was an adopted Feegle).
23rd Jul '17 7:29:13 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' shares the same basic concept and setting of the first three films--it's AfterTheEnd in Australia, Max is a former cop, and his family were murdered--but according to WordOfGod is not in exactly the same continuity as them. If you've seen the original movies, the discrepancies are pretty obvious: Max still has his V-8 Interceptor in the opening scene (he lost it in ''Film/TheRoadWarrior'', and it was supposedly the last of its kind), there are apparently multiple flourishing post-apocalyptic civilizations in Australia (the original ''Film/MadMax'' took place JustBeforeTheEnd), and Max's deceased child was apparently a young girl rather than an infant boy.

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* ''Film/MadMaxFuryRoad'' shares the same basic concept and setting of the first three films--it's AfterTheEnd in Australia, Max is a former cop, and his family were murdered--but according to WordOfGod is not in exactly the same continuity as them. If you've seen the original movies, the discrepancies are pretty obvious: Max still has his V-8 Interceptor in the opening scene (he lost it in ''Film/TheRoadWarrior'', and it was supposedly the last of its kind), there are apparently multiple flourishing post-apocalyptic civilizations in Australia (the original ''Film/MadMax'' took place JustBeforeTheEnd), and Max's deceased child was apparently a young girl rather than an infant boy. The idea is that the whole series is in-universe folklore, written long after his real deeds have passed into legend.
21st Jun '17 12:00:30 AM Nulono
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* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' 2008 movie was made as a ContinuityReboot in order to overwrite and change the details established by the 2003 ''Film/{{Hulk}}''. Despite that the '08 movie set itself in a time frame of the character's life so that it didn't retell the origin story in the same detail as the '03 movie. Even with so many differences the '08 movie connects itself by setting it five years after Banner ran away to South America, which is where TheTag of the '03 movie ended. As time has past since the '03 movie, the MCU felt more comfortable outright retconning the events of the movie. ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' introduces their Glenn Talbot, a military scientist in the '03 film who dies trying to kill the Hulk, as a General involved with the fallout of the collapse of SHIELD.

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* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'' 2008 movie was made as a ContinuityReboot in order to overwrite and change the details established by the 2003 ''Film/{{Hulk}}''. Despite that the '08 movie set itself in a time frame of the character's life so that it didn't retell the origin story in the same detail as the '03 movie. Even with so many differences the '08 movie connects itself by setting it five years after Banner ran away to South America, which is where TheTag of the '03 movie ended. As time has past had passed since the '03 movie, the MCU felt more comfortable outright retconning the events of the movie. ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' introduces their Glenn Talbot, a military scientist in the '03 film who dies trying to kill the Hulk, as a General involved with the fallout of the collapse of SHIELD.
13th Jun '17 2:52:14 AM CaptainTedium
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* ''Series/NinjaTurtlesTheNextMutation'' was implied to take place after [[Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles the live-action TMNT films]], as evidenced by Splinter missing an ear and the Turtles living in a subway station as in the second and third films. However, the Shredder is still alive, Michelangelo uses tonfa instead of nunchucks, and April O'Neil and Casey Jones were not only absent, but had no indication of existing at all.

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* ''Series/NinjaTurtlesTheNextMutation'' was implied to take place after [[Film/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles the live-action TMNT films]], film series by New Line Cinema]], as evidenced by Splinter missing an ear and the Turtles living in a subway station as in the second and third films. However, the Shredder is still alive, Michelangelo uses tonfa instead of nunchucks, and April O'Neil and Casey Jones were not only absent, but had no indication of existing at all.
20th May '17 10:22:47 AM nombretomado
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* In the ''{{Franchise/Ultima}}'' series, the events of ''Ultima 1''-''3'' happened; "the Stranger/Avatar was in a band of heroes that defeated Mondain, Minax, and Exodus"; but any element past that (Like the rocket ships and laser blasters) is ignored. Possibly {{justified|Trope}} due to all the TimeTravel.

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* In the ''{{Franchise/Ultima}}'' ''{{VideoGame/Ultima}}'' series, the events of ''Ultima 1''-''3'' happened; "the Stranger/Avatar was in a band of heroes that defeated Mondain, Minax, and Exodus"; but any element past that (Like the rocket ships and laser blasters) is ignored. Possibly {{justified|Trope}} due to all the TimeTravel.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BroadStrokes