History Main / BritishStuffiness

9th Sep '17 2:47:40 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Directly referenced in the Franchise/{{American Girls|Collection}} book "Happy Birthday, Molly!" when Molly's mother explains to her why the English girl who is visiting is so quiet. Her explanation is that "English children are taught to be reserved--very polite and quiet." Since the girl was one of the BlitzEvacuees watching London be bombed may have something to do with her quietness. Molly's mother also invokes the stereotype at first, and one of Molly's friends also expects Emily to curtsey because that's what English girls do, according to her stereotypes.

to:

* Directly referenced in the Franchise/{{American Literature/{{American Girls|Collection}} book "Happy Birthday, Molly!" when Molly's mother explains to her why the English girl who is visiting is so quiet. Her explanation is that "English children are taught to be reserved--very polite and quiet." Since the girl was one of the BlitzEvacuees watching London be bombed may have something to do with her quietness. Molly's mother also invokes the stereotype at first, and one of Molly's friends also expects Emily to curtsey because that's what English girls do, according to her stereotypes.
18th Jun '17 6:06:32 PM WillyFourEyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Whether or not Miles Edgeworth is an example of this is the subject of much debate in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' fandom. He spent part of his childhood in America and his teen years in Germany, but there's room to suggest he was born British, and his behaviour and speech patterns certainly fit. His voiceover in ''Dual Destinies'' even has the right accent. Also, he can get quite emotional but usually keeps it under wraps unless it's sheer exasperation.

to:

* Whether or not Miles Edgeworth is an example of this is the subject of much debate in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' fandom. He spent part of his childhood in America and his teen years in Germany, but there's room to suggest he was born British, and his behaviour and speech patterns certainly fit. His voiceover in ''Dual Destinies'' and ''Spirit of Justice'' even has the right accent. Also, he can get quite emotional but usually keeps it under wraps unless it's sheer exasperation.



** This doesn't save him from {{Freudian Slip}}ping several times throughout the review.
** During a Let's Play of the adventure game ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAG32E0BunQ Normality]]'', Gabriel got him to crack up by simply singing a fake [[BlackEyedPeas Will.i.am]] lyric.

to:

** This doesn't save him from {{Freudian Slip}}ping [[FreudianSlipperySlope several times times]] throughout the review.
** During a Let's Play of the adventure game ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAG32E0BunQ Normality]]'', Gabriel got him to crack up by simply singing a fake [[BlackEyedPeas [[Music/BlackEyedPeas Will.i.am]] lyric.
13th Jun '17 9:29:45 PM BatmanKalEl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Contrast EvilBrit, who is often WickedCultured and hence more [[AffablyEvil open-minded]], whereas the Stuffy Brit may be a protagonist, but is portrayed as merely [[FourTemperamentEnsemble temperamentally]] handicapped. Not to be confused with the MeanBrit, who is [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] and [[BritCom gregarious]].

to:

Compare with QuintessentialBritishGentleman. Contrast also with EvilBrit, who is often WickedCultured and hence more [[AffablyEvil open-minded]], whereas the Stuffy Brit may be a protagonist, but is portrayed as merely [[FourTemperamentEnsemble temperamentally]] handicapped. Not to be confused with the MeanBrit, who is [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] and [[BritCom gregarious]].
21st May '17 10:43:41 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The image of British stuffiness goes back to the days of VictorianBritain, when many upper and middle class people expressed prudish behaviour. Since the British Empire was so huge many locals across the world witnessed this British prudency and the stereotype stuck.

to:

* The image of British stuffiness goes back to the days of VictorianBritain, UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain, when many upper and middle class people expressed prudish behaviour. Since the British Empire was so huge many locals across the world witnessed this British prudency and the stereotype stuck.
17th May '17 10:50:40 PM eowynjedi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/{{Emma}}'', when John Knightley and his wife visit Hartfield, he and his brother John greet with a handshake and a simple "how d'ye do" which Austen notes as "the classic English mode" of almost entirely concealing brotherly affection that would have them drop everything the instant the other needed help.
29th Apr '17 8:47:31 PM kquinn0830
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Percy is pretty stuffy as well, as evidenced by the fact he calls his parents "Mother and Father" rather than "Mum and Dad" like his siblings. Of course, this has more to do with him being a pompous, ambitious prefect with NoSenseOfHumor who has his eyes set on becoming Minister for Magic rather than his nationality.
29th Apr '17 12:01:45 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ToddInTheShadows' ''One Hit Wonderland'' episode for "The Monster Mash", he mentions that the BBC banned it for being too macabre -- "And people say the Brits have a stick up their ass! Pshaw!"

to:

* In ToddInTheShadows' WebVideo/ToddInTheShadows' ''One Hit Wonderland'' episode for "The Monster Mash", he mentions that the BBC banned it for being too macabre -- "And people say the Brits have a stick up their ass! Pshaw!"
14th Apr '17 12:56:56 PM CosmicFerret
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Franchise/{{Batman}}'s butler Alfred often comes across as a Stuffy Brit, which carries over to most adaptations. The most prominent exception is ''Film/BatmanBegins'', where he's given a British army sergeant's accent and backstory. In the comics he also had plenty of backstory: at one point it was that he was an SOE agent/saboteur for England during WWII and had a kid with a beautiful French Resistance named Mademoiselle Marie, but that's been dropped because of [[ComicBookTime timeline considerations]]. (Humorously, one of the standard portrayals of Alfred was on ''BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' - where, except for the first few episodes, he was voiced by [[FakeBrit an American actor]]!)

to:

* Franchise/{{Batman}}'s butler Alfred often comes across as a Stuffy Brit, which carries over to most adaptations. The most prominent exception is ''Film/BatmanBegins'', where he's given a British army sergeant's accent and backstory. In the comics he also had plenty of backstory: at one point it was that he was an SOE agent/saboteur for England during WWII and had a kid with a beautiful French Resistance named Mademoiselle Marie, but that's been dropped because of [[ComicBookTime timeline considerations]]. (Humorously, one of the standard portrayals of Alfred was on ''BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' - where, except for the first few episodes, he was voiced by [[FakeBrit an American actor]]!)
10th Apr '17 7:43:14 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/{{The Circle|1925}}: Elizabeth describes her husband Arnold, an English lord, as "an old woman." He tries to talk her out of leaving him by saying "You might force me to do something rash—and I'd dislike that frightfully."
30th Mar '17 1:13:29 PM Laevatein
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* In ToddInTheShadows' ''One Hit Wonderland'' episode for "The Monster Mash", he mentions that the BBC banned it for being too macabre -- "And people say the Brits have a stick up their ass! Pshaw!"
This list shows the last 10 events of 93. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BritishStuffiness