History Main / BritishBrevity

21st May '17 12:56:56 AM Jbadder
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* New Zealand web series ''WebSeries/EpicNPCMan'' has been split into seven, eight and ten episodes in its respective seasons.
20th May '17 11:48:01 AM CosmicFerret
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[[AC:USANetwork]]

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[[AC:USANetwork]][[AC:Creator/USANetwork]]
9th May '17 8:19:21 PM Shadeblade11
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UsefulNotes/PrimeTime shows are made differently in Britain, and perhaps the biggest sign of this is season length. With few exceptions, Brits do ''not'' like {{Filler}}. In the United States prime time shows generally run 22-24 episodes per full-length season. British shows, on the other hand, tend to produce only up to about thirteen episodes a year if they're dramatic, or about six if they're comedies. This also applies to most European countries and Latin America, although these mostly follow daily schedules (specially in recent years, as it has expanded to primetime) rather than weekly installments. Most Commonwealth nations also follow this model, with relatively short series being the norm on their equivalents of the BBC.

There are a number of reasons for this, the simplest being that British shows usually have a fairly small creative team. It's not uncommon for one person to single-handedly write every episode of a show, as Creator/StevenMoffat did with ''Series/{{Coupling}}'', or David Renwick with ''Series/JonathanCreek'' (compare American sitcoms, which are almost always "written by committee"). The shorter working schedule means that a British show can often focus more on a tighter cast of regular characters, whereas American shows frequently have to create more of an {{ensemble|Cast}}, to allow their actors to have sufficient breaks during the long, grueling shooting schedule. British TV can also spend a year producing as much screen time as an American show produces in less than two months, resulting in a more concentrated "series" (called a "season" in the US; so a UK series [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage can consist of 10 "series"]]). The [[UsefulNotes/BritishWeather unpredictable weather]] and long winters in the UK may be a contributory factor, as it may be difficult for production teams to commit to long filming schedules.

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UsefulNotes/PrimeTime shows are made differently in Britain, and perhaps the biggest sign of this is season length. With few exceptions, Brits do ''not'' like {{Filler}}. In the United States States, prime time shows generally run 22-24 episodes per full-length season. British shows, on the other hand, tend to produce only up to about thirteen episodes a year if they're dramatic, or about six if they're comedies. This also applies to most European countries and Latin America, although these mostly follow daily schedules (specially (especially in recent years, as it has expanded to primetime) rather than weekly installments.instalments. Most Commonwealth nations also follow this model, with relatively short series being the norm on their equivalents of the BBC.

There are a number of reasons for this, the simplest being that British shows usually have a fairly small creative team. It's not uncommon for one person to single-handedly write every episode of a show, as Creator/StevenMoffat did with ''Series/{{Coupling}}'', or David Renwick with ''Series/JonathanCreek'' (compare American sitcoms, which are almost always "written by committee"). The shorter working schedule means that a British show can often focus more on a tighter cast of regular characters, whereas American shows frequently have to create more of an {{ensemble|Cast}}, to allow their actors to have sufficient breaks during the long, grueling gruelling shooting schedule. British TV can also spend a year producing as much screen time as an American show produces in less than two months, resulting in a more concentrated "series" (called a "season" in the US; so a UK series [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage can consist of 10 "series"]]). The [[UsefulNotes/BritishWeather unpredictable weather]] and long winters in the UK may be a contributory factor, as it may be difficult for production teams to commit to long filming schedules.



On the other hand, the relatively long amount of time taken to produce such a small amount of content, and the smaller creative teams, can result in some shows which are very, very high quality throughout, even if their total number of high-quality episodes might be less than a well-received American show because of their sheer length. British shows tend to have the entire series filmed before broadcast, so shows are rarely canceled mid-season, or affected by events like a [[TVStrikes writers' strike]]. Additionally, short shows are less vulnerable to [[SeasonalRot dragging out way past their creative prime]] and JumpingTheShark.

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On the other hand, the relatively long amount of time taken to produce such a small amount of content, and the smaller creative teams, can result in some shows which are very, very high quality throughout, even if their total number of high-quality episodes might be less than a well-received American show because of their sheer length. British shows tend to have the entire series filmed before broadcast, so shows are rarely canceled cancelled mid-season, or affected by events like a [[TVStrikes writers' strike]]. Additionally, short shows are less vulnerable to [[SeasonalRot dragging out way past their creative prime]] and JumpingTheShark.



* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' series three, ''Children of Earth'', was five one-hour episodes forming a single serial, in comparison to the two ''Series/DoctorWho'' length (13-part) series beforehand. Series 4, ''Miracle Day'', was another single serial but this time ten episodes long. ''Miracle Day'' was, however, initially conceived as a 5/6-part series by the British lead writer; it was only after it became a co-production with an american cable network that the series order was increased to 10 episodes. (In fact the network tried to fight for 13 episodes)

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* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' series three, ''Children of Earth'', was five one-hour episodes forming a single serial, in comparison to the two ''Series/DoctorWho'' length (13-part) series beforehand. Series 4, ''Miracle Day'', was another single serial but this time ten episodes long. ''Miracle Day'' was, however, initially conceived as a 5/6-part series by the British lead writer; it was only after it became a co-production with an american American cable network that the series order was increased to 10 episodes. (In fact the network tried to fight for 13 episodes)



* ''Series/BlackBooks'' has three seasons, each with 6 episodes each. This results in three remarkably short, but incredibly consistent and humourous series.

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* ''Series/BlackBooks'' has three seasons, each with 6 episodes each. This results in three remarkably short, but incredibly consistent and humourous humorous series.



* ''Series/{{Poirot}}'' and ''Literature/{{M|issMarple}}arple'', both shows on ITV loosely based on Creator/AgathaChristie's ''Literature/HerculePoirot'' and ''Miss Marple'', have a special kind of British Brevity, with the former consisting of 70 episodes in all thirteen seasons, [[LongRunners over the course of nearly 25 years]]; and the latter consisting of 23 episodes (with four feature length episodes in each series except Series 6, which has only three) over the course of nine years. The only difference is that ITV was unable to produce a seventh series of ''Marple'' due to Creator/{{BBC}}'s [[ScrewedByTheNetwork acquiring the rights for the production of Agatha Christie adaptations]]. ''Poirot'', on the other hand, fared better, having been completed with all of the ''Hercule Poirot'' novels and short stories, ending with the final episode, "Literature/{{Curtain}}", on 13 November 2013.

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* ''Series/{{Poirot}}'' and ''Literature/{{M|issMarple}}arple'', both shows on ITV loosely based on Creator/AgathaChristie's ''Literature/HerculePoirot'' and ''Miss Marple'', have a special kind of British Brevity, with the former consisting of 70 episodes in all thirteen seasons, [[LongRunners over the course of nearly 25 years]]; and the latter consisting of 23 episodes (with four feature length feature-length episodes in each series except Series 6, which has only three) over the course of nine years. The only difference is that ITV was unable to produce a seventh series of ''Marple'' due to Creator/{{BBC}}'s [[ScrewedByTheNetwork acquiring the rights for the production of Agatha Christie adaptations]]. ''Poirot'', on the other hand, fared better, having been completed with all of the ''Hercule Poirot'' novels and short stories, ending with the final episode, "Literature/{{Curtain}}", on 13 November 2013.



* ''Series/PeepShow'' and ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' both run six episode seasons. ''Peep Show'' has made it to 42 episodes after 7 series, which makes it the ''longest running sitcom in Channel 4 history''.

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* ''Series/PeepShow'' and ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' both run six episode seasons. ''Peep Show'' has made it to 42 episodes after 7 series, which makes it the ''longest running ''longest-running sitcom in Channel 4 history''.



* ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey'' was aired on ITV from 1978 to 1992 (14 years) for a grand total of 42 episodes over Seven Series, plus one feature-length special in between Series Two and Three, not to mention the pilot that aired on the BBC in 1975 as an episode of Series/PlayForToday.

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* ''Series/RumpoleOfTheBailey'' was aired on ITV from 1978 to 1992 (14 years) for a grand total of 42 episodes over of Seven Series, plus one feature-length special in between Series Two and Three, not to mention the pilot that aired on the BBC in 1975 as an episode of Series/PlayForToday.



* The council estate comedy-drama ''Series/{{Shameless}}'' is competing fiercely for the title of most prolific UK non-soap. It has featured 16 hour long episodes from Series 5 to Series 7 with 22 episodes confirmed for Series 8 in 2011.

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* The council estate comedy-drama ''Series/{{Shameless}}'' is competing fiercely for the title of most prolific UK non-soap. It has featured 16 hour long episodes from Series 5 to Series 7 with 22 episodes confirmed for Series 8 in 2011.



** It's worth noting that the only competition for this title comes if one includes animation, with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' beating it by sheer quantity of episodes produced, over 500 in 24 years (and still ongoing).

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** It's worth noting that the only competition for this title comes if one includes animation, with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' beating it by the sheer quantity of episodes produced, over 500 in 24 years (and still ongoing).



** The 2005 revival series, in contrast, has 13 45-minute episodes per season, plus a Christmas special 60-75 minutes in length. These generally run to an hour and an hour and a half in foreign syndication, due to the addition of advertisements (which are not shown on Creator/TheBBC). Between December 2008 and January 2010, in lieu of airing a regular-length season, the show aired 5 extended-length specials (two of which were Christmas specials and two of which constituted a two-part story). They weren't intended as a season in their own right, but was actually meant as a farewell parade for the Tenth Doctor. Officially, the BBC considers these specials to be a continuation of Season 4, which already had 13 regular episodes, resulting in an unusually long 18-episode season aired over the course of about 18 months.
*** 13 (or 14 if you count the Christmas specials) nearly-hour-long episodes per year is actually pretty close to the standard season length for American hour-longs originating on cable (usually 13 to 16 depending on the network).

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** The 2005 revival series, in contrast, has 13 45-minute episodes per season, plus a Christmas special 60-75 minutes in length. These generally run to for an hour and an hour and a half in foreign syndication, due to the addition of advertisements (which are not shown on Creator/TheBBC). Between December 2008 and January 2010, in lieu of airing a regular-length season, the show aired 5 extended-length specials (two of which were Christmas specials and two of which constituted a two-part story). They weren't intended as a season in their own right, right but was actually meant as a farewell parade for the Tenth Doctor. Officially, the BBC considers these specials to be a continuation of Season 4, which already had 13 regular episodes, resulting in an unusually long 18-episode season aired over the course of about 18 months.
*** 13 (or 14 if you count the Christmas specials) nearly-hour-long episodes per year is are actually pretty close to the standard season length for American hour-longs originating on cable (usually 13 to 16 depending on the network).



* A few British children's TV shows (particularly fairly [[LongRunner long runners]]) may be inversion of this trope, since they want longer series to keep children entertained. BBC kids' series GrangeHill aired 601 episodes over 31 years, and BykerGrove consisted of 344 episodes over 18 years (both having 20 episodes per year with short early seasons). Meanwhile ITV's Children'sWard clocked up an impressive 143 episodes over 11 years (13 eps per year) for its' run.

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* A few British children's TV shows (particularly fairly [[LongRunner long runners]]) may be an inversion of this trope, trope since they want longer series to keep children entertained. BBC kids' series GrangeHill aired 601 episodes over 31 years, and BykerGrove consisted of 344 episodes over 18 years (both having 20 episodes per year with short early seasons). Meanwhile Meanwhile, ITV's Children'sWard clocked up an impressive 143 episodes over 11 years (13 eps per year) for its' run.



Nowadays, however, a production company can make profit other ways, such as DVD sales and merchandising, so this is loosening up a little bit.[[note]] Fun Fact: In the early days before the switch to color, an American TV season used to be even ''longer'' than it is today. Seasons of 36 episodes were not uncommon. This length was due to several interconnected factors: the major networks (in a rare case of assuming viewers ''weren't'' morons) figured that people would only watch content if it was "fresh". As a result of this and the general lack of any back-catalog due to the newness of the medium reruns were rare. Also, many of the earliest TV actors got their start in Vaudeville and later moved to radio, meaning they were quite used to a gruelling production schedule. As filming technology advanced (and as writers and actors unions started flexing their muscles regarding salary), production costs went up, meaning that fewer episodes could be made on the same relative budget. This, coupled with the networks finally realizing that reruns were an absolute gold mine, sent the number of episodes in a standard season tumbling downwards to where it is today.[[/note]]

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Nowadays, however, a production company can make profit other ways, such as DVD sales and merchandising, merchandise, so this is loosening up a little bit.[[note]] Fun Fact: In the early days before the switch to color, colour, an American TV season used to be even ''longer'' than it is today. Seasons of 36 episodes were not uncommon. This length was due to several interconnected factors: the major networks (in a rare case of assuming viewers ''weren't'' morons) figured that people would only watch content if it was "fresh". As a result of this and the general lack of any back-catalog due to the newness of the medium reruns were rare. Also, many of the earliest TV actors got their start in Vaudeville and later moved to radio, meaning they were quite used to a gruelling production schedule. As filming technology advanced (and as writers and actors unions started flexing their muscles regarding salary), production costs went up, meaning that fewer episodes could be made on the same relative budget. This, coupled with the networks finally realizing realising that reruns were an absolute gold mine, sent the number of episodes in a standard season tumbling downwards to where it is today.[[/note]]



More recently, cable television channels have begun airing their scripted original programming in shorter seasons. Such shows may either retain the wheel format, alternating with another original series, or they may show reruns and other programming during the offseason. Though these shows often run for several years, each season is considerably shorter than the 24-episode standard for American shows, though a bit longer than the usual British season; 10-13 episodes per season, give or take, seems to be the norm. Many of these shows are praised for their quality and ingenuity, likely because the season is only as long as the writers need it to be.

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More recently, cable television channels have begun airing their scripted original programming in shorter seasons. Such shows may either retain the wheel format, alternating alternate with another original series, or they may show reruns and other another programming during the offseason. Though these shows often run for several years, each season is considerably shorter than the 24-episode standard for American shows, though a bit longer than the usual British season; 10-13 episodes per season, give or take, seems to be the norm. Many of these shows are praised for their quality and ingenuity, likely because the season is only as long as the writers need it to be.



* ''Series/{{LOST}}'' started off with the usual American style of 22-25 hour-long episodes per season for the first three years (25, then 23, then 22, respectively). The final three seasons, however, were shortened -- each was going to have 16 episodes originally, before the 2007 Writer's Strike forced the creative team to modify their plan. The final result: about 70 episodes from the first three seasons, around 50.5 from the last three seasons (the last episode being 2 1/2 hours, including commercials).

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* ''Series/{{LOST}}'' started off with the usual American style of 22-25 hour-long episodes per season for the first three years (25, then 23, then 22, respectively). The final three seasons, however, were shortened -- each was going to have 16 episodes originally, originally before the 2007 Writer's Strike forced the creative team to modify their plan. The final result: about 70 episodes from the first three seasons, around 50.5 from the last three seasons (the last episode being 2 1/2 hours, including commercials).



* ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' -- First season ran for 10 episodes, and the second one, whilst announced as having 13, ultimately ran for 10.

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* ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' -- First The first season ran for 10 episodes, and the second one, whilst announced as having 13, ultimately ran for 10.



* ''Series/{{Oz}}'' -- Six seasons altogether. Each have eight episodes except for season 4, which was 16 episodes long and split into two blocks.

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* ''Series/{{Oz}}'' -- Six seasons altogether. Each have one has eight episodes except for season 4, which was 16 episodes long and split into two blocks.



* ''Series/TeenWolf'' -- Five seasons so far. Seasons 1, 2 and 4 consist of 12 episodes each. Season 3 is 24 episodes split into two distinct 12-episode arcs (referred to as 3a and 3b) with a three month break in-between. Likewise, seasons 5 and 6 are 20 episodes long and split into two halves.

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* ''Series/TeenWolf'' -- Five seasons so far. Seasons 1, 2 and 4 consist consists of 12 episodes each. Season 3 is 24 episodes split into two distinct 12-episode arcs (referred to as 3a and 3b) with a three month three-month break in-between. Likewise, seasons 5 and 6 are 20 episodes long and split into two halves.



* ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'' (Creator/{{Netflix}}) has had three 12-episode seasons (plus one Chirstmas special).
* ''{{Series/Damages}}'' ([[ChannelHop FX, then Netflix and DirecTV]]) had 13 episodes per season for three seasons, and a fourth and fifth season with 10 each.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman'' (Creator/{{Netflix}}) has had three 12-episode seasons (plus one Chirstmas Christmas special).
* ''{{Series/Damages}}'' ([[ChannelHop FX, then Netflix and DirecTV]]) had 13 episodes per season for three seasons, seasons and a fourth and fifth season with 10 each.



* ''WesternAnimation/CareBearsAndCousins'' (Creator/{{Netflix}}) - Only six episodes per season. Currently there's only two seasons. Fans are hoping that this means that there will be more seasons in a year.

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* ''WesternAnimation/CareBearsAndCousins'' (Creator/{{Netflix}}) - Only six episodes per season. Currently there's Currently, there are only two seasons. Fans are hoping that this means that there will be more seasons in a year.
2nd May '17 6:39:22 PM LorienTheYounger
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* ''Series/RedDwarf'' consists of six series of six episodes each (broadcast 1988-1993), followed by two series of eight episodes each (broadcast 1997 & 1999), followed by a three-episode special (broadcast 2009), and then another six episode series (broadcast 2012). This makes for an uncommonly mighty total of 61 episodes now, but spread over 25 years and counting.

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* ''Series/RedDwarf'' so far consists of six 6-episode series of six episodes each (broadcast 1988-1993), followed by two 8-episode series of eight episodes each (broadcast 1997 & 1999), followed by then a three-episode 3-episode special (broadcast 2009), and then another six episode three 6-episode series (broadcast 2012). 2012 & 2016-2017). This makes for an uncommonly mighty total of 61 73 episodes now, but spread over 25 years and counting.almost 30 years.
28th Mar '17 6:38:09 PM nombretomado
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* ''Rock & Chips'' (a prequel to ''OnlyFoolsAndHorses'') ran for three 90-60 minutes specials (January 2010 pilot, Christmas 2010 special and Easter 2011 special), but creator and writer John Sullivan died before a full series could be made.

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* ''Rock & Chips'' (a prequel to ''OnlyFoolsAndHorses'') ''Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses'') ran for three 90-60 minutes specials (January 2010 pilot, Christmas 2010 special and Easter 2011 special), but creator and writer John Sullivan died before a full series could be made.
19th Feb '17 2:06:22 PM MisterApple
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* ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'''s first three series each consist of three 90-minute episodes. Creator/StevenMoffat and Creator/MarkGatiss comment on this trope on the Series 2 DVD commentary, stating that they would love to do more a season, but the time and logistical constraints involved in filming a series of feature-length productions in a relatively short span prevent this. Made worse by the fact that the show catapulted Creator/BenedictCumberbatch and Creator/MartinFreeman to the A-List; in fact Peter Jackson had to rearrange the filming of ''The Hobbit'' so Freeman could fly back to film ''Sherloc''. Similarly, Moffatt has to juggle Sherlock around his commitments to ''Series/DoctorWho'', for which he is also serving as Head Writer and Showrunner.

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* ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'''s first three series each consist of three 90-minute episodes. Creator/StevenMoffat and Creator/MarkGatiss comment on this trope on the Series 2 DVD commentary, stating that they would love to do more a season, but the time and logistical constraints involved in filming a series of feature-length productions in a relatively short span prevent this. Made worse by the fact that the show catapulted Creator/BenedictCumberbatch and Creator/MartinFreeman to the A-List; in fact Peter Jackson had to rearrange the filming of ''The Hobbit'' so Freeman could fly back to film ''Sherloc''.''Sherlock''. Similarly, Moffatt has to juggle Sherlock around his commitments to ''Series/DoctorWho'', for which he is also serving as Head Writer and Showrunner.
25th Jan '17 4:29:58 AM TroperDoper
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** The 2005 revival series, in contrast, has 13 45-minute episodes per season, plus a Christmas special 60-75 minutes in length. These generally run to an hour and an hour and a half in foreign syndication, due to the addition of advertisements (which are not shown on Creator/TheBBC). Between December 2008 and January 2010, in lieu of airing a regular-length season, the show aired 5 extended-length specials (two of which were Christmas specials and two of which constituted a two-part story). Officially, the BBC considers these specials to be a continuation of Season 4, which already had 13 regular episodes, resulting in an unusually long 18-episode season aired over the course of about 18 months.
*** 13 (or 14 if you count the Christmas specials) nearly-hour-long episodes per year is actually pretty close to the standard season length for American hour-longs originating on cable (usually 13 to 16 depending on the network).
** Beginning in 2012, the show's seventh series will be split across two years, with six episodes airing the first, including the Christmas special, and eight in 2013 (incidentally, the show's 50th birthday).

to:

** The 2005 revival series, in contrast, has 13 45-minute episodes per season, plus a Christmas special 60-75 minutes in length. These generally run to an hour and an hour and a half in foreign syndication, due to the addition of advertisements (which are not shown on Creator/TheBBC). Between December 2008 and January 2010, in lieu of airing a regular-length season, the show aired 5 extended-length specials (two of which were Christmas specials and two of which constituted a two-part story). They weren't intended as a season in their own right, but was actually meant as a farewell parade for the Tenth Doctor. Officially, the BBC considers these specials to be a continuation of Season 4, which already had 13 regular episodes, resulting in an unusually long 18-episode season aired over the course of about 18 months.
*** 13 (or 14 if you count the Christmas specials) nearly-hour-long episodes per year is actually pretty close to the standard season length for American hour-longs originating on cable (usually 13 to 16 depending on the network).
network).
** Beginning in 2012, the show's seventh series will be was split across two years, with six episodes airing the first, including the Christmas special, and eight in 2013 (incidentally, the show's 50th birthday).birthday).
** In 2014, the number of episodes per season was reduced to 12 plus a Christmas special. This is somewhat fitting considering this change was initiated at the beginning of the ''12th'' Doctor's era.
6th Jan '17 11:12:04 AM Malachi108
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* ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'''s first three series each consist of three 90-minute episodes. Creator/StevenMoffat and Creator/MarkGatiss comment on this trope on the Series 2 DVD commentary, stating that they would love to do more a season, but the time and logistical constraints involved in filming a series of feature-length productions in a relatively short span prevent this (made worse by the fact that the show catapulted Creator/BenedictCumberbatch and Creator/MartinFreeman to the A-List; in fact Peter Jackson had to rearrange the filming of ''The Hobbit'' so Freeman could fly back to film ''Sherlock.'' Similarly, Moffatt has to juggle Sherlock around his commitments to ''Series/DoctorWho'', for which he is also serving as Head Writer and Showrunner.

to:

* ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'''s first three series each consist of three 90-minute episodes. Creator/StevenMoffat and Creator/MarkGatiss comment on this trope on the Series 2 DVD commentary, stating that they would love to do more a season, but the time and logistical constraints involved in filming a series of feature-length productions in a relatively short span prevent this (made this. Made worse by the fact that the show catapulted Creator/BenedictCumberbatch and Creator/MartinFreeman to the A-List; in fact Peter Jackson had to rearrange the filming of ''The Hobbit'' so Freeman could fly back to film ''Sherlock.'' ''Sherloc''. Similarly, Moffatt has to juggle Sherlock around his commitments to ''Series/DoctorWho'', for which he is also serving as Head Writer and Showrunner.
26th Dec '16 8:28:22 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' wound up its plot after two seasons of eight episodes each. Its follow-on series ''AshesToAshes'' mustered three seasons, or twenty-four episodes total: about the same as ''one'' US season. The whole lot together made forty episodes in five years.

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* ''Series/{{Life On Mars|2006}}'' wound up its plot after two seasons of eight episodes each. Its follow-on series ''AshesToAshes'' ''Series/AshesToAshes'' mustered three seasons, or twenty-four episodes total: about the same as ''one'' US season. The whole lot together made forty episodes in five years.
26th Dec '16 12:22:48 PM Xtifr
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