History Main / BlindJump

17th Dec '17 4:45:10 PM StarSword
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* In ''Literature AncillaryJustice '', ships usually exit gate-space well distant from stations and planets, in order to avoid colliding with other ships. [[spoiler:In the third book, Anaander Mianaai gates a ship up to Athoek Station and strikes a chronically misscheduled passenger shuttle, killing hundreds and leaving the populace more uncooperative.]]

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* In ''Literature AncillaryJustice '', ''Literature/AncillaryJustice'', ships usually exit gate-space well distant from stations and planets, in order to avoid colliding with other ships. [[spoiler:In the third book, Anaander Mianaai gates a ship up to Athoek Station and strikes a chronically misscheduled passenger shuttle, killing hundreds and leaving the populace more uncooperative.]]



* Space travel in the ''Literature/KrisLongknife'' universe works on a PortalNetwork of jump points that are theorized to have been built by a trio of {{Precursors}}. Two key traits of jump points are:
** There's no way to see what's on the other side. This is counteracted in civilized space by placing traffic buoys on either side to send an alert that a ship is about to pass through, and Kris's people eventually invent a "periscope" that can see out the other side of a jump point. What prompts the latter invention is the their tracking a spaceship through a jump but having their buoy not return; the periscope reveals that the star on the far side is in the middle of a supernova.
** If you enter one at zero rotation and at less than 50,000 km/h, you'll only travel a short distance to the next point. Entering faster jumps you further, but the destination is unpredictable on the first try: while exactly matching your original velocity and rotation gets you back, it takes until ''Redoubtable'' before Kris's {{AI}} companion Nelly is able to devise an algorithm to predict a set of systems one might end up in after a fast jump. A blind jump led Kris's great-grandfather Ray Longknife to the discovery of the LostColony of Santa Maria, Kris's great-grandmother Rita Longknife was lost leading a fleet of battlecruisers into a blind jump during the Iteeche War 80 years before the series, and during the series [[spoiler:a conspiracy in Greenfeld leads to the cruiser carrying Hank Peterwald's body home to perform a bad jump in order to conceal evidence of foul play in his death from a sabotaged EscapePod]].



* Given the way Hyperspace is a separate navigable layer of space and the HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace nature of ''Series/BabylonFive'', it's an extremely bad idea to blindly roam around in Hyperspace. Without a navigation lock on a known Hyperspace exit point you're all but guaranteed to get irrevocably lost in hell. Worse is that Hyperspace "moves" and loosing engine power will cause you to drift away from the navigation beckons. Still, there are massive Explorer Class ships who's job it is to build new jumpgates and the nav beckons that go with them in previously unexplored space. How exactly they do this without getting lost is never explored. The Vorlons once used the "blind jump lost in hell" nature of Hyperspace to try and get rid of a piece of technology, unfortunately it was later accidentally found.

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* Given the way Hyperspace is a separate navigable layer of space and the HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace nature of ''Series/BabylonFive'', it's an extremely bad idea to blindly roam around in Hyperspace. Without a navigation lock on a known Hyperspace exit point you're all but guaranteed to get irrevocably lost in hell. Worse is that Hyperspace "moves" and loosing losing engine power will cause you to drift away from the navigation beckons. Still, there are massive Explorer Class ships who's job it is to build new jumpgates and the nav beckons beacons that go with them in previously unexplored space. How exactly they do this without getting lost is never explored. The Vorlons once used the "blind jump lost in hell" nature of Hyperspace to try and get rid of a piece of technology, unfortunately it was later accidentally found.



** The manual to the ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' mentions that the ''Pillar Of Autumn'' did a blind jump to escape Reach, stumbling upon the titular Halo and setting the events of the first game in motion. The tie-in novel ''Literature/HaloTheFallOfReach'', however, reveals that Cortana had secretly used untested coordinates from a [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] artifact instead, which is also implied in the prequel game ''VideoGame/HaloReach''.

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** The manual to the ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' mentions that In ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'', the ''Pillar Of Autumn'' did a blind jump to escape Reach, stumbling upon the titular Halo and setting the events of the first game in motion. The tie-in novel ''Literature/HaloTheFallOfReach'', however, reveals that Cortana had secretly used untested coordinates from a [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] artifact instead, which is also implied in the prequel game ''VideoGame/HaloReach''.
8th Dec '17 11:25:06 PM timotaka
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* The story of ''[[Literature/HeecheeSaga Gateway]]'' revolves around an alien space station humans have found within our solar system which holds hundreds of small starships capable of faster-than-light travel. However, the navigation system on these is so alien that nobody has been able to figure out how the settings correspond to anything about the destination beyond a few basics: The computer lights up when valid coordinates are selected, the same settings will always lead to the same destination, and nobody who has tried changing the navigation settings in mid-flight has ever returned.

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* The story of ''[[Literature/HeecheeSaga Gateway]]'' revolves around an alien space station humans have found within our solar system which holds hundreds of small starships capable of faster-than-light travel. However, heading to a new destination is always a blind jump simply because the navigation system on these is so alien that nobody has been able to figure out how the settings correspond to anything about the destination beyond a few basics: The computer lights up when valid coordinates are selected, the same settings will can be repeated to reliably always lead to the same destination, and nobody who has tried changing the navigation settings in mid-flight has ever returned.
8th Dec '17 11:23:17 PM timotaka
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* The story of ''[[Literature/HeecheeSaga Gateway]]'' revolves around an alien space station humans have found within our solar system which holds hundreds of small starships capable of faster-than-light travel. However, the navigation system on these is so alien that nobody has been able to figure out how the settings correspond to anything about the destination beyond a few basics: The computer lights up when valid coordinates are selected, the same settings will always lead to the same destination, and nobody who has tried changing the navigation settings in mid-flight has ever returned.
26th Oct '17 12:58:52 AM PaulA
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* Creator/AndreNorton's ''Uncharted Stars''. To escape pursuit by Jacks (space pirates), the protagonists must make a hyperspace jump using untested coordinates from a [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] artifact that they hope will take them where they want to go. A variant that crops up in some of her stories, especially in ''Literature/TheTimeTraders'' series, is that they have carefully plotted courses -- on tapes. If you can't read the label on the tape, or somebody switched it, you have no idea where you're going ... but it ''will'' get you there flawlessly. Whether you've got any way to get ''back'' -- if, for instance, you used up your fuel -- is another matter.

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* Creator/AndreNorton's ''Uncharted Stars''. Creator/AndreNorton:
** ''Literature/UnchartedStars''.
To escape pursuit by Jacks (space pirates), the protagonists must make a hyperspace jump using untested coordinates from a [[{{Precursors}} Forerunner]] artifact that they hope will take them where they want to go. go.
**
A variant that crops up in some of her stories, especially in the ''Literature/TheTimeTraders'' series, is that they have carefully plotted courses -- on tapes. If you can't read the label on the tape, or somebody switched it, you have no idea where you're going ... but it ''will'' get you there flawlessly. Whether you've got any way to get ''back'' -- if, for instance, you used up your fuel -- is another matter.
13th Oct '17 1:53:43 AM PaulA
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* The Literature/CoDominium ''Warworld'' series has the last ship full of Saurons, malevolent SuperSoldiers, escape to a backwater PrisonPlanet by making a blind jump.

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* The Literature/CoDominium ''Warworld'' ''Literature/WarWorld'' series has the last ship full of Saurons, malevolent SuperSoldiers, escape to a backwater PrisonPlanet by making a blind jump.
6th Oct '17 7:28:01 PM intastiel
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* A magical variant in ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': in the DreamLand of Tel'aran'rhiod, a DreamWalker can focus their mind on a desire and intuitively transport themselves to a location that's appropriate to the desire. It's considered prohibitively risky, since the dreamer has absolutely no control over the specific location they jump to, the technique doesn't account for dangers at the destination point, and people who die in Tel'aran'rhiod end up DeaderThanDead.
20th Sep '17 5:30:14 PM Amahn
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* Given the way Hyperspace is a separate navigable layer of space and the HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace nature of ''Series/BabylonFive'', it's an extremely bad idea to blindly roam around in Hyperspace. Without a navigation lock on a known Hyperspace exit point you're all but guaranteed to get irrevocably lost in hell. Worse is that Hyperspace "moves" and loosing engine power will cause you to drift away from the navigation beckons. Still, there are massive Explorer Class ships who's job it is to build new jumpgates and the nav beckons that go with them in previously unexplored space. How exactly they do this without getting lost is never explored.

to:

* Given the way Hyperspace is a separate navigable layer of space and the HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace nature of ''Series/BabylonFive'', it's an extremely bad idea to blindly roam around in Hyperspace. Without a navigation lock on a known Hyperspace exit point you're all but guaranteed to get irrevocably lost in hell. Worse is that Hyperspace "moves" and loosing engine power will cause you to drift away from the navigation beckons. Still, there are massive Explorer Class ships who's job it is to build new jumpgates and the nav beckons that go with them in previously unexplored space. How exactly they do this without getting lost is never explored. The Vorlons once used the "blind jump lost in hell" nature of Hyperspace to try and get rid of a piece of technology, unfortunately it was later accidentally found.
20th Sep '17 5:27:54 PM Amahn
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Added DiffLines:

* Given the way Hyperspace is a separate navigable layer of space and the HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace nature of ''Series/BabylonFive'', it's an extremely bad idea to blindly roam around in Hyperspace. Without a navigation lock on a known Hyperspace exit point you're all but guaranteed to get irrevocably lost in hell. Worse is that Hyperspace "moves" and loosing engine power will cause you to drift away from the navigation beckons. Still, there are massive Explorer Class ships who's job it is to build new jumpgates and the nav beckons that go with them in previously unexplored space. How exactly they do this without getting lost is never explored.


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* Played with in ''VideoGame/EarthAndBeyond''. All ships were equipped with thrusters for normal flight and warp drives for traveling around larger distances. Warping could be done in 2 methods; traveling by "autopilot" along a programmed course between navigation points, or "free warping" by pointing your ship in the direction you want to go and activating your warp drive. Using navigation points required only an initial energy drain on your reactor and then you could fly indefinitely until you reached your target, which did not have to be along a straight line. Free warping however pulled a constant drain on your reactor thereby limiting the distance you could travel, and there was no ability to turn while in free warp. Free warping was useful for making quick escapes from dangerous situations without opening your map to plot a course, and could be used to discover nav points that were too far from main routes for most sensors to detect.
** A somewhat lesser example that applies to story only was in the Ancient Gates. When humans discovered them and started to open them they had no idea where they would lead. A few were opened during the course of the game giving access to new high level zones.
21st Aug '17 7:31:38 PM NOYB
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* In the new-era ''Series/DoctorWho'' Series 4 finale, "The Stolen Earth"/"Journey's End", Martha attempts to use a reverse-engineered teleporter despite the fact that the scientists have no idea how to program the thing correctly. Lucky for Martha, the tech has a mental link and she is teleported to her mother's house instead of being scattered into atoms.

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* In the new-era ''Series/DoctorWho'' Series 4 finale, "The Stolen Earth"/"Journey's End", Martha attempts to use a reverse-engineered teleporter despite the fact that the scientists have no idea how to program the thing correctly. Lucky for Martha, the tech has a mental an empathic link and she is teleported to her mother's house instead of being scattered into atoms.
21st Aug '17 7:31:02 PM NOYB
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* In the new era ''Series/DoctorWho'' series 4 finale, "The Stolen Earth"/"Journey's End", Martha attempts to use a reverse-engineered teleporter despite the fact that the scientists have no idea how to program the thing correctly. Lucky for Martha, the tech has a mental link and she is teleported to her house instead of being scattered into atoms.

to:

* In the new era new-era ''Series/DoctorWho'' series Series 4 finale, "The Stolen Earth"/"Journey's End", Martha attempts to use a reverse-engineered teleporter despite the fact that the scientists have no idea how to program the thing correctly. Lucky for Martha, the tech has a mental link and she is teleported to her mother's house instead of being scattered into atoms.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BlindJump