History Main / BlackSheep

26th Feb '17 1:51:39 PM eroock
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* Sloth in ''Film/TheGoonies''. He's mentally disabled and physically deformed, [[MadwomanInTheAttic kept chained in the basement]], and not even a candidate to be his mama's [[TheUnFavorite Un Favorite]]. More importantly, unlike the rest of his family he's a good guy at heart, opposing them when given the chance.
19th Feb '17 6:16:33 AM Gaby007
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* ''Fanfic/AManOfIron'': Antony Stark grates his cousin Ned's sensibilities by his arrogance, vanity and self-centredness. Tony knows it and gleefully goes out of his way to mock the "proper" Northern way, seeing it as stagnant and unlikable.
8th Feb '17 11:05:35 PM cherrychels
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* In "Literature/TheSilmarillion" from the House of Fingolfin, Maeglin. His grandfather Fingolfin and Uncles Fingon and Turgon are heroic figures who are all High King of the Noldor in turn, Turgon's daughter Idril is a decent PrincessClassic and her husband Tuor is a great hero, and his mother Aredhel was decent if quite adventurous. Maeglin is a treacherous figure who desires [[KissingCousins Idril]], and is the first Elf with such a desire. He betrays Turgon's city of Gondolin to [[BigBad Morgoth]] leading to [[EvilNephew Turgon's death]]. He also tries to 'take' Idril and murder her seven-year old son Earendil, at which her husband Tuor throws Maeglin from the walls of Gondolin. This villainous nature may be due to Maeglin's father Eol, the sinister Dark Elf, who basically kidnapped Aredhel, kept Maeglin in the forest for the first 80 years of his life, and accidentally killed Maeglin's mother while trying to kill Maeglin, at which Turgon had him executed. This treachery and serving [[GodOfEvil Morgoth]] marks Maeglin out as someone considered the wickedest Elf, worse then his relatives from the House of Feanor (Fingolfin's older half-brother), as at least they served their House and fought against the DarkLord.

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* In "Literature/TheSilmarillion" from the House of Fingolfin, Maeglin. His grandfather Fingolfin and Uncles Fingon and Turgon are heroic figures who are all High King of the Noldor in Noldor. In turn, Turgon's daughter Idril is a decent PrincessClassic and her husband Tuor is a great hero, and while his mother Aredhel was decent if quite adventurous. Maeglin is a treacherous figure who desires [[KissingCousins Idril]], and is the first Elf with such a desire. He betrays Turgon's city of Gondolin to [[BigBad Morgoth]] leading to [[EvilNephew Turgon's death]]. He also tries to 'take' Idril and murder her seven-year old son Earendil, at which her husband Tuor throws Maeglin from the walls of Gondolin. This villainous nature may be due to Maeglin's father Eol, the sinister Dark Elf, who basically kidnapped Aredhel, kept Maeglin in the forest for the first 80 years of his life, and accidentally killed Maeglin's mother while trying to kill Maeglin, at which Turgon had him executed. This treachery and serving [[GodOfEvil Morgoth]] marks Maeglin out as someone considered the wickedest Elf, worse then his relatives from the House of Feanor (Fingolfin's older half-brother), as at least they served their House and fought against the DarkLord.



** The uncontrollable teenage sociopath Joffrey would ordinarily take on the role in contrast to his sweet-natured and well-behaved siblings Tommen and Myrcella, but is never treated like this due to being his mother's decided favourite and because he had too much power for anybody (except perhaps Tywin) to challenge directly. Since he was seen as too weak to hold power, meek, good-hearted Tommen was liked by the adult adult Lannisters but also treated as a bit of a black sheep.

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** The uncontrollable teenage sociopath Joffrey would ordinarily take on the role in contrast to his sweet-natured and well-behaved siblings Tommen and Myrcella, but is never treated like this due to being his mother's decided favourite and because he had too much power for anybody (except perhaps Tywin) his grandfather Tywin Lannister) to challenge directly. Since he was seen as too weak to hold power, meek, good-hearted Tommen was liked by the adult adult Lannisters but also treated as a bit of a black sheep.



** Jon, to a lesser degree, for being an [[HeroicBastard illegitimate son]] raised alongside with his trueborn siblings -- though he [[LikeFatherLikeSon takes after his lord father]] quite a bit and loves and is loved by his father, trueborn siblings, and uncle (but he is Catelyn's [[TheUnfavorite Unfavorite]] for being Ned's illegitimate son).
** The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norms and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to confront Ned directly) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly-behaved when Ned wasn't looking. He also doesn't seem to particularly well-liked among his foster siblings and did and said things which would be completely acceptable in his birth culture (for example, boasting about hypothetical rape and murder) but were totally unacceptable and creepy in the culture of the North. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.

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** Jon, to a lesser degree, for being an Ned Stark's [[HeroicBastard illegitimate son]] raised alongside with his trueborn siblings in the Stark family -- though he [[LikeFatherLikeSon takes after his lord father]] quite a bit and loves and is loved by his father, trueborn siblings, and uncle (but he is Catelyn's [[TheUnfavorite Unfavorite]] for being Ned's illegitimate son).
** *** The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norms and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to confront Ned directly) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly-behaved when Ned wasn't looking. He also doesn't seem to particularly well-liked among his foster siblings and did and said things which would be completely acceptable in his birth culture (for example, boasting about hypothetical rape and murder) but were totally unacceptable and creepy in the culture of the North. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
8th Feb '17 10:55:29 PM MeepieV
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** Theon is also this among his birth family, the Greyjoys, as he was raised in a different culture (specifically, under the roof of a hated man who executed/murdered his much more preferred older brothers ), though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with rape and pillage-related murder, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep.

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** Theon is also this among his birth family, the Greyjoys, as he was raised in a different culture (specifically, under the roof of a hated man who executed/murdered his much more preferred older brothers ), though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who (as an adult, at least) has any real problem with rape and pillage-related murder, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep.



** When the little boy in the Grimm fairy tale "The Juniper Tree" is brutally abused and then murdered by his stepmother, he returns in the form of bird and concocts an elaborate scheme to get his revenge. Oddly, it's only after he crushes his stepmom to death that he becomes fully embraced into the family unit.

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** When * Fairy tales are filled with the little boy in the Grimm fairy tale "The Juniper Tree" is brutally abused and then murdered by his stepmother, he returns in the form of bird and concocts an elaborate scheme to get his revenge. Oddly, it's only after he crushes his stepmom to death that he becomes fully embraced into the black sheep characters, who are outsiders within their family unit. but whose misfit tendencies help them succeed later on.
8th Feb '17 10:42:27 PM MeepieV
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** The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norms and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to confront Ned directly) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly-behaved when Ned wasn't looking. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with rape and pillage-related murder, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep.

to:

** The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norms and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to confront Ned directly) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly-behaved when Ned wasn't looking. He also doesn't seem to particularly well-liked among his foster siblings and did and said things which would be completely acceptable in his birth culture (for example, boasting about hypothetical rape and murder) but were totally unacceptable and creepy in the culture of the North. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his birth family, the Greyjoys, as Theon he was raised in a different culture, culture (specifically, under the roof of a hated man who executed/murdered his much more preferred older brothers ), though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with rape and pillage-related murder, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep.


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** Hollywood writer Diane from [[WesternAnimation/BojackHorseman ]] the figurative black sheep in her working-class Boston family (or at least, this is how she is described in-universe, although she has both black sheep and white sheep tendencies). Her adopted brother Gary is the [[PettingZooPeople literal/taxonomical black sheep]]


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[[folder:Folklore]]
* Loki from Norse Mythology (and any other characterisation you can think of) pulls huge amounts of mischief in contrast to his much more upstanding family, and earns both his horrible fate and black sheep status.
** When the little boy in the Grimm fairy tale "The Juniper Tree" is brutally abused and then murdered by his stepmother, he returns in the form of bird and concocts an elaborate scheme to get his revenge. Oddly, it's only after he crushes his stepmom to death that he becomes fully embraced into the family unit.
[[/folder]]

8th Feb '17 3:52:51 PM MeepieV
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* The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norm and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to do so) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly behaved when Ned wasn't looking. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with things like rape, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep.

to:

* ** The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norm norms and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to do so) confront Ned directly) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly behaved poorly-behaved when Ned wasn't looking. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with things like rape, rape and pillage-related murder, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep.
8th Feb '17 3:47:17 PM MeepieV
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** The uncontrollable teenage sociopath Joffrey would ordinarily take on the role in contrast to his sweet-natured and well-behaved siblings Tommen and Myrcella, but is never treated like this due to being his mother's decided favourite and because he had too much power for anybody (except perhaps Tywin) to challenge directly. Since he was seen as too weak to hold power, meek, good-hearted Tommen was liked by the adult adult Lannisters but also treated as a bit of a black sheep.
** The show is very clever in how it plays with this trope in relation to Tommen. In the earlier seasons, Cersei and her father's preference for a brutal psychopathic maniac (Joffrey) over a kind and sweetly eccentric little boy (who loved to spend his time playing alone with his cats) was used to make the Lannisters seem even more ruthless and unhinged. Then, Tommen comes to power, and it's clear he actually is much too weak and in no way psychologically equipped to make the harsh decisions required of a king and his reign ends up being at least as disastrous as his older brother's.



* The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norm and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to do so) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly behaved when Ned wasn't looking. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with things like rape, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep at the same time.
** Sam for being the fat, timid, and bookish son of a great warrior. Leads to some pretty horrific child abuse, as his father gives him the option of being murdered or join an extremely deadly military order he would have seemed woefully unequipped to survive.

to:

* The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norm and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon who never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to do so) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly behaved when Ned wasn't looking. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with things like rape, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep at the same time.sheep.
** Sam for being the fat, timid, and bookish son of a great warrior. Leads to some pretty horrific child abuse, as his father gives him the option of either being murdered or join "voluntarily" joining an extremely deadly military order he would have seemed woefully unequipped to survive.
8th Feb '17 3:19:17 PM MeepieV
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** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him.
** Sam for being the fat, timid, and bookish son of a great warrior.

to:

*The position of black sheep rotated around the Stark family a lot. Robb, Sansa and Bran were the definite white sheep, but there was also Arya, who totally refused to adopt traditional female behavioural norm and was prone to asserting her own beliefs and opinions, and foster brother/hostage Theon never challenged Ned's authority or misbehaved while Ned was looking (most likely because he was too scared to do so) but was by far the most destructive, reckless and poorly behaved when Ned wasn't looking. Rickon was too young to be an official black sheep, but was characterised in both the tv series and book as being wild and prone to violence, so he would have likely taken up this position had his family unit survived long enough.
** Theon among the Starks for being a hostage/ward. He is also this among his family, the Greyjoys, as Theon was raised in a different culture, though his sister loves him.
him. Interestingly, given that Theon is the only member of his Viking clan who has any real problem with things like rape, he's simultaneously the black sheep and the white sheep at the same time.
** Sam for being the fat, timid, and bookish son of a great warrior. Leads to some pretty horrific child abuse, as his father gives him the option of being murdered or join an extremely deadly military order he would have seemed woefully unequipped to survive.
8th Feb '17 2:39:55 PM MeepieV
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* Nate started out as this at the beginning of ''Series/SixFeetUnder'' and his character act dealt his need to balance responsibility to his family with his desire for continuing independence and freedom of expression. Common to this trope, [[DutifulSon Dutiful Son]] David feels angry about their recently deceased father's perceived favouritism of Nate.

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* Nate started out as this at the beginning of ''Series/SixFeetUnder'' and his character act dealt his need arc revolved around learning to balance responsibility duty to his family with his desire for continuing independence and freedom of expression. Common to this trope, [[DutifulSon Dutiful Son]] dutiful Son David feels angry about their recently deceased father's perceived favouritism of Nate.
8th Feb '17 2:37:18 PM MeepieV
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* Nate started out as this at the beginning of ''Series/SixFeetUnder'' and his character act dealt his need to balance responsibility to his family with his desire for continuing independence and freedom of expression. Common to this trope, [[DutifulSon Dutiful Son]] David feels angry about their recently deceased father's perceived favouritism of Nate.
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