History Main / BinarySuns

21st May '17 5:04:35 PM Adeon
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* Binary stars become a plot point in ''Literature/TheLostFleet'' series. The [[HyperspaceLanes jump points]] around them are unstable meaning that while you can use a jump drive to leave a binary system it's functionally impossible to use them to reach a binary system. However, it is possible to use sub-light travel to get to a binary system and then build a [[PortalNetwork hypernet gate]] (the second form of FTL travel in the series) in order to allow travel to and from the system.
23rd Apr '17 4:19:22 PM AthenaBlue
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* [[ComicBook/{{Vampirella}} Satyr and Circe!]] (The twin suns of Drakulon; from their description and dim memory possibly BY Draconis.)

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* [[ComicBook/{{Vampirella}} ''ComicBook/{{Vampirella}}'': Satyr and Circe!]] Circe! (The twin suns of Drakulon; from their description and dim memory possibly BY Draconis.)


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** The human colony world in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E2Smile "Smile"]] has two suns.
19th Apr '17 2:16:53 PM shokoshu
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* [[ComicBook/{{Vampirella}} Satyr and Circe!]] (The twin suns of Drakulon; from their description and dim memory possibly BY Draconis.)
16th Apr '17 11:56:32 AM SwordsageRagnar
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* The Tau Empire spet world of Vior'la in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' orbits a binary star. Its orbit causes it to pass between the two stars every year, close enough for the planet's surface to be ravaged by intense plasma storms.

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* The Tau Empire spet sept world of Vior'la in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' orbits a binary star. Its orbit causes it to pass between the two stars every year, close enough for the planet's surface to be ravaged by intense plasma storms.storms, with the Tau living in specialized Hab-domes during this season. It's also well known for producing some of the toughest and elite members of the Fire Warrior Caste, so it should come as little surprise that the name Vior'la is Tau for "HotBlooded".
28th Mar '17 1:36:15 AM Sumatris
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* ''VideoGame/{{Freelancer}}'''s Sirius Sector consists of dozens of star systems, many of which are binaries or more. Most of them [[SceneryPorn look drop-dead gorgeous]].
15th Mar '17 11:54:00 AM AthenaBlue
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* In the later part of ''Anime/{{Braiger}}'', and throughout its sequels ''Bikezinger'' & ''Sasuliger'', the Solar System becomes a binary star system after BigBad Carmen Khamen uses the J9 robots' [[TelescopingRobot size-changing]] "Synchron System" to increase Jupiter's mass to the point where it can sustain nuclear fusion.



* The eponymous stars of ''Manga/TheFiveStarStories'' may or may not be a quintary star system, though the English translation inconsistently renders it as either [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale "star cluster", which usually have thousands of stars, or the patently absurd "galaxy"]]. At any rate they're far enough apart that you usually can't see them from each other's planets during daytime.



* In the later part of ''Anime/{{Braiger}}'', and throughout its sequels ''Bikezinger'' & ''Sasuliger'', the Solar System becomes a binary star system after BigBad Carmen Khamen uses the J9 robots' [[TelescopingRobot size-changing]] "Synchron System" to increase Jupiter's mass to the point where it can sustain nuclear fusion.
* The eponymous stars of ''Manga/TheFiveStarStories'' may or may not be a quintary star system, though the English translation inconsistently renders it as either [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale "star cluster", which usually have thousands of stars, or the patently absurd "galaxy"]]. At any rate they're far enough apart that you usually can't see them from each other's planets during daytime.



* Calvin in ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' once imagined Spaceman Spiff landing on a hostile alien planet "scorched by twin suns". He is then attacked by a monster (which turns out to be Calvin's mom).



[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* Calvin in ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' once imagined Spaceman Spiff landing on a hostile alien planet "scorched by twin suns". He is then attacked by a monster (which turns out to be Calvin's mom).
[[/folder]]



* ''Franchise/StarWars'' is one of the best known examples, due to the [[Film/ANewHope iconic double-sunset]] on Tatooine. Also indirectly the TropeNamer; the soundtrack name is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxDm-4Jrg9w Binary Sunset]].



* In ''Film/PitchBlack'', the main planet has three suns, and has almost constant day time. However when night time does fall, there's serious trouble.



* In ''Film/PitchBlack'', the main planet has three suns, and has almost constant daytime. However, when nighttime does fall, there's serious trouble.
* ''Franchise/StarWars'' has one of the best known examples, due to the [[Film/ANewHope iconic double-sunset]] on Tatooine. Also indirectly the TropeNamer; the soundtrack name is [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxDm-4Jrg9w Binary Sunset]].



* Norfolk in Peter F. Hamilton's ''Literature/NightsDawnTrilogy'' orbits the primary star of a binary system, lending a unique system involving "Duke day" (full white sunlight from the primary, Duke), "Duchess night" (red sunlight from the secondary, Duchess) and true night for the portions hidden from both stars. Duke day lasts for the same time all the time (at least at the equator), but Duchess night and true night pass between complete Duchess night and complete true night depending on the planet's position around its orbit.

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* Norfolk A planet which quickly becomes significant in Peter F. Hamilton's ''Literature/NightsDawnTrilogy'' the ''Cadre'' trilogy has ''three suns'' with visibly differing masses and ages, as well as a ''black hole'' close enough to be usually visible in the daytime sky. The sheer uniqueness of this arrangement, coupled with the fact that the first colonists lost navigational control and spent over a month helpless before gravitational forces neatly brought them to the planet led to the foundation of a system of religious philosophy which dominates the latter two books.
* Creator/ArthurCClarke's ''Literature/ChildhoodsEnd'' briefly visits a planet that
orbits ''eight'' stars. This gives it an utterly bizarre orbit in which every moment brings a unique arrangement of planet and stars.
* The homeworld of
the primary utods in ''The Dark Light Years'' is in a trinary star system, and has a very peculiar orbit: periodically, the combined gravities of the two other suns pull the planet away from its current sun, moving it to circle a different one.
* Darwin IV, the planet described in Creator/WayneBarlowe's ''Literature/{{Expedition}}'', has twin suns. The term "sunslight" is used several times in the text, the better to remind readers of this.
* The ''Literature/{{Helliconia}}'' trilogy is set in
a binary system, lending a unique system involving "Duke day" (full white sunlight from with the primary, Duke), "Duchess night" (red sunlight from the secondary, Duchess) eponymous planet orbiting a dim sun called Batalix, and true night both Helliconia and Batalix orbiting a larger blue giant star called Freyr in a slow, highly elliptical orbit. This gives Helliconia centuries-long seasons, with powerful consequences for the portions hidden development of its human civilization.
* Arthur Dent is impressed by watching a twin sunset
from both stars. Duke day lasts for the same time all the time (at least at the equator), but Duchess night and true night pass between complete Duchess night and complete true night depending on the planet's position around its orbit.Magrathea in ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy1''. Marvin is a little more jaded.



* The ''Literature/{{Helliconia}}'' trilogy is set in a binary system, with the eponymous planet orbiting a dim sun called Batalix, and both Helliconia and Batalix orbiting a larger blue giant star called Freyr in a slow, highly elliptical orbit. This gives Helliconia centuries-long seasons, with powerful consequences for the development of its human civilisation.



* Norfolk in Peter F. Hamilton's ''Literature/NightsDawnTrilogy'' orbits the primary star of a binary system, lending a unique system involving "Duke day" (full white sunlight from the primary, Duke), "Duchess night" (red sunlight from the secondary, Duchess) and true night for the portions hidden from both stars. Duke day lasts for the same time all the time (at least at the equator), but Duchess night and true night pass between complete Duchess night and complete true night depending on the planet's position around its orbit.
* The planet Placet in Creator/FredricBrown's story "Placet is a Crazy Place" orbits two suns in a figure-of-eight. When it is between the suns, the human colonists experience visual hallucinations. This is only ''one'' of the reasons why it is considered crazy.
* ''Quest For The Fallen Star'' has the world in a figure-8 orbit, with another planet called Coldaria orbiting the whole system at a great distance.



* Arthur Dent is impressed by watching a twin sunset from Magrathea in ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy1''. Marvin is a little more jaded.
* Creator/ArthurCClarke's ''Literature/ChildhoodsEnd'' briefly visits a planet that orbits ''eight'' stars. This gives it an utterly bizarre orbit in which every moment brings a unique arrangement of planet and stars.
* ''Quest For The Fallen Star'' has the world in a figure-8 orbit, with another planet called Coldaria orbiting the whole system at a great distance.
* The homeworld of the utods in ''The Dark Light Years'' is in a trinary star system, and has a very peculiar orbit: periodically, the combined gravities of the two other suns pull the planet away from its current sun, moving it to circle a different one.
* The planet Placet in Creator/FredricBrown's story "Placet is a Crazy Place" orbits two suns in a figure-of-eight. When it is between the suns, the human colonists experience visual hallucinations. This is only ''one'' of the reasons why it is considered crazy.
* A planet which quickly becomes significant in the ''Cadre'' trilogy has ''three suns'' with visibly differing masses and ages, as well as a ''black hole'' close enough to be usually visible in the daytime sky. The sheer uniqueness of this arrangement, coupled with the fact that the first colonists lost navigational control and spent over a month helpless before gravitational forces neatly brought them to the planet led to the foundation of a system of religious philosophy which dominates the latter two books.
* Darwin IV, the planet described in Creator/WayneBarlowe's ''Literature/{{Expedition}}'', has twin suns. The term "sunslight" is used several times in the text, the better to remind readers of this.
* The planet Naxera in Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra. The two suns are named for mythological brothers -- G'Dok and Leahru -- who also give their names to the two largest Naxeran [[FantasticCasteSystem castes]].



* The planet Naxera in Literature/StarTrekTheLostEra. The two suns are named for mythological brothers -- G'Dok and Leahru -- who also give their names to the two largest Naxeran [[FantasticCasteSystem castes]].



** The Doctor's homeworld Gallifrey is in a binary star system
** San Helios from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead "Planet of the Dead"]] has ''three'' suns.

to:

** The Doctor's homeworld Gallifrey is in a binary star system
system.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter "The Doctor's Daughter"]]: Messaline has three suns.
** As does
San Helios from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead "Planet of the Dead"]] has ''three'' suns.Dead"]].



* Due to its cross-over reference on the famous TropeCodifier, ''VideoGame/AngryBirds Franchise/StarWars'' features Tatooine and its two suns (though it shows them as a big red star and a smaller yellow one.)



* ''Videogame/SidMeiersAlphaCentauri''. See RealLife below for a bit of further information.
** Chiron--also called "Planet"--the planet where humans land, orbits Alpha Centauri A alone. Chiron is in a Type III situation. Alpha Centauri A and B orbit each other in a relatively close and mildly eccentric elliptical orbit, with them coming closest to each other (periastron) at about 11 AU (roughly the distance between the Sun and Saturn) and furthest apart from each other (apastron) at about 35 AU (roughly the distance between the Sun and Pluto); any planet orbiting in Alpha Centauri A's habitable zone would thus receive a non-negligible amount of light and heat from B (and vice-versa). Since the developers [[ShownTheirWork did their homework]], whenever Hercules (Alpha Centauri B) reaches periastron, the native life on Planet experiences tremendous growth. There are also two moons: Nessus and Pholus.
* Some systems in ''Videogame/{{Spore}}'' are Type 1. Habitable planets in such systems are typically farther away from the two suns, especially if one or both are blue stars. Since a planet in such a system would be getting illumination and consequently heating from both stars, and blue stars are the brightest and hottest stars of all, [[ShownTheirWork this makes a lot of sense]].

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* ''Videogame/SidMeiersAlphaCentauri''. See RealLife below for There are QUITE a bit lot of further information.
** Chiron--also called "Planet"--the planet where humans land, orbits Alpha Centauri A alone. Chiron is
these present in a Type III situation. Alpha Centauri A and B orbit each other in a relatively close and mildly eccentric elliptical orbit, with them coming closest to each other (periastron) at about 11 AU (roughly ''Videogame/EliteDangerous''. Much like the rest of the layout of the galaxy, the setup is extremely realistic; binary (or even trinary) systems can have a ''lot'' of distance between the Sun their respective stars, and Saturn) typically have a whole host of planets, moons, and furthest apart from each other (apastron) at about 35 AU (roughly the distance between the Sun and Pluto); any planet stations orbiting each one. Unfortunately, this can make traveling through such a system a royal pain in Alpha Centauri A's habitable zone would thus receive the ass, if the stars are far enough apart.
* In ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', every system is at least binary system due to the unique gravity interactions needed to make
a non-negligible amount of light and heat stable jump gate. The initial gate from B (and vice-versa). Since Earth was named EVE and was due to the sudden appearance of a wormhole in the solar system.
** However,
the developers [[ShownTheirWork did their homework]], whenever Hercules (Alpha Centauri B) reaches periastron, seem to have forgotten this piece of background, as no system in the native life on Planet experiences tremendous growth. There EVE cluster actually has more than one star (perhaps the other stars are also two moons: Nessus and Pholus.
* Some systems
all brown dwarfs and/or orbit very far from the other star?). However, in ''Videogame/{{Spore}}'' are Type 1. Habitable planets in such wormhole space, binary systems are typically farther away from common (although the two suns, especially if one or both are blue stars. Since second star exists only as a planet in such a system would be getting illumination and consequently heating from both stars, and blue stars are the brightest and hottest stars of all, [[ShownTheirWork this makes a lot of sense]].background texture rather than an object you can warp to).



* ''Videogame/{{Unreal}}'''s Na Pali orbits two suns



* ''Videogame/SidMeiersAlphaCentauri''. See RealLife below for a bit of further information.
** Chiron--also called "Planet"--the planet where humans land, orbits Alpha Centauri A alone. Chiron is in a Type III situation. Alpha Centauri A and B orbit each other in a relatively close and mildly eccentric elliptical orbit, with them coming closest to each other (periastron) at about 11 AU (roughly the distance between the Sun and Saturn) and furthest apart from each other (apastron) at about 35 AU (roughly the distance between the Sun and Pluto); any planet orbiting in Alpha Centauri A's habitable zone would thus receive a non-negligible amount of light and heat from B (and vice-versa). Since the developers [[ShownTheirWork did their homework]], whenever Hercules (Alpha Centauri B) reaches periastron, the native life on Planet experiences tremendous growth. There are also two moons: Nessus and Pholus.
* A little camera trickery in ''VideoGame/TheSims 2'' reveals this to be the case for Sim Earth. Which may or may not explain a few things.
* Some systems in ''Videogame/{{Spore}}'' are Type 1. Habitable planets in such systems are typically farther away from the two suns, especially if one or both are blue stars. Since a planet in such a system would be getting illumination and consequently heating from both stars, and blue stars are the brightest and hottest stars of all, [[ShownTheirWork this makes a lot of sense]].



* In ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', every system is at least binary system due to the unique gravity interactions needed to make a stable jump gate. The initial gate from Earth was named EVE and was due to the sudden appearance of a wormhole in the solar system.
** However, the developers seem to have forgotten this piece of background, as no system in the EVE cluster actually has more than one star (perhaps the other stars are all brown dwarfs and/or orbit very far from the other star?). However, in wormhole space, binary systems are common (although the second star exists only as a background texture rather than an object you can warp to).
* Due to its cross-over reference on the famous TropeCodifier, ''VideoGame/AngryBirds Franchise/StarWars'' features Tatooine and its two suns (though it shows them as a big red star and a smaller yellow one.)
* A little camera trickery in ''VideoGame/TheSims 2'' reveals this to be the case for Sim Earth. Which may or may not explain a few things.
* There are QUITE a lot of these present in ''Videogame/EliteDangerous''. Much like the rest of the layout of the galaxy, the setup is extremely realistic; binary (or even trinary) systems can have a ''lot'' of distance between their respective stars, and typically have a whole host of planets, moons, and stations orbiting each one. Unfortunately, this can make traveling through such a system a royal pain in the ass, if the stars are far enough apart.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', every system is at least binary system due to the unique gravity interactions needed to make a stable jump gate. The initial gate from Earth was named EVE and was due to the sudden appearance of a wormhole in the solar system.
** However, the developers seem to have forgotten this piece of background, as no system in the EVE cluster actually has more than one star (perhaps the other stars are all brown dwarfs and/or orbit very far from the other star?). However, in wormhole space, binary systems are common (although the second star exists only as a background texture rather than an object you can warp to).
* Due to its cross-over reference on the famous TropeCodifier, ''VideoGame/AngryBirds Franchise/StarWars'' features Tatooine and its
''Videogame/{{Unreal}}'''s Na Pali orbits two suns (though it shows them as a big red star and a smaller yellow one.)
* A little camera trickery in ''VideoGame/TheSims 2'' reveals this to be the case for Sim Earth. Which may or may not explain a few things.
* There are QUITE a lot of these present in ''Videogame/EliteDangerous''. Much like the rest of the layout of the galaxy, the setup is extremely realistic; binary (or even trinary) systems can have a ''lot'' of distance between their respective stars, and typically have a whole host of planets, moons, and stations orbiting each one. Unfortunately, this can make traveling through such a system a royal pain in the ass, if the stars are far enough apart.
suns.
10th Feb '17 12:33:47 AM AthenaBlue
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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Bravestarr}}'', the planet New Texas has a "sky of three suns".



* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Bravestarr}}'', the planet New Texas has a "sky of three suns".
10th Feb '17 12:32:25 AM AthenaBlue
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* A ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode called "Night Terrors" is set in a binary system.



* While it's never specified if the Votan system in ''Series/{{Defiance}}'' had two stars before the stellar collision, one of the songs on the soundtrack mentions "twin suns".
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** The Doctor's homeworld Gallifrey is in a binary star system
** San Helios from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead "Planet of the Dead"]] has ''three'' suns.



* Oz (excuse me, [[InsistentTerminology "the Outer Zone"]]) in ''Series/TinMan'' has dual suns and several moons. The plot concerns an [[TotalEclipseOfThePlot upcoming double eclipse]] in which both suns are behind one of the moons at once.
* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', the Doctor's homeworld, Gallifrey, is part of a binary star system.



* A ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode called "Night Terrors" is set in a binary system.
* Oz (excuse me, [[InsistentTerminology "the Outer Zone"]]) in ''Series/TinMan'' has dual suns and several moons. The plot concerns an [[TotalEclipseOfThePlot upcoming double eclipse]] in which both suns are behind one of the moons at once.



* While it's never specified if the Votan system in ''Series/{{Defiance}}'' had two stars before the stellar collision, one of the songs on the soundtrack mentions "twin suns".



[[folder:Toys]]
* In Metru Nui, of the Toys/{{Bionicle}} franchise, there are two suns. [[spoiler: They're actually the eyes of the robot Mata Nui, and Metru Nui is his brain. The matoran are maintenance systems, comparable in size to cells in the human body. When the suns "go out" is when Makuta put Mata Nui "to sleep".]]
[[/folder]]



* An early episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' had the characters delivering a package to Trisol, a planet [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin with three suns]].



* An early episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' had the characters delivering a package to Trisol, a planet [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin with three suns]].

to:

* An early episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' had ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': Besides TropeCodifier Tatooine appearing several times, the characters delivering a package to Trisol, show also has water world Mon Cala.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'':
** [[Recap/StarWarsRebelsS3E02TheAntillesExtraction "The Antilles Extraction"]] is set on the binary-star-orbiting planet Montross.
** {{Discussed|Trope}} in [[Recap/StarWarsRebelsS3E09VisionsAndVoices "Visions and Voices"]]. Kanan, Ezra and Sabine discover that [[spoiler: Obi-Wan Kenobi is still alive and]] living on
a planet [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin with three suns]].twin suns. [[TheSmartGuy Sabine]] points out that that piece of information doesn't narrow the field of possible planets down much, because it turns out that in the ''Franchise/StarWars'' galaxy, as in real life, binary systems are extremely common.
** Unsurprisingly, the episode [[Recap/StarWarsRebelsS3E18TwinSuns "Twin Suns"]] features this, specifically [[TropeCodifier Tatooine's]].



[[folder:Toys]]
* In Metru Nui, of the Toys/{{Bionicle}} franchise, there are two suns. [[spoiler: They're actually the eyes of the robot Mata Nui, and Metru Nui is his brain. The matoran are maintenance systems, comparable in size to cells in the human body. When the suns "go out" is when Makuta put Mata Nui "to sleep".]]
[[/folder]]
6th Dec '16 3:15:51 PM FiliasCupio
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Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns[[note]]if they are able to form, there are two circumstances under which the planet can have a stable orbit -- either the two suns are in a close binary with the planet distantly orbiting both, or the stars are in a distant binary with the planet closely orbiting one[[/note]] (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.

to:

Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns[[note]]if they are able to form, there are two circumstances under which the planet can have a stable orbit -- either the two suns are in a close binary with the planet distantly orbiting both, or the stars are in a distant binary with the planet closely orbiting one[[/note]] (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.
6th Dec '16 3:11:12 PM FiliasCupio
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Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.

to:

Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns[[note]]if they are able to form, there are two circumstances under which the planet can have a stable orbit -- either the two suns are in a close binary with the planet distantly orbiting both, or the stars are in a distant binary with the planet closely orbiting one[[/note]] (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.
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