History Main / BinarySuns

6th Dec '16 3:15:51 PM FiliasCupio
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Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns[[note]]if they are able to form, there are two circumstances under which the planet can have a stable orbit -- either the two suns are in a close binary with the planet distantly orbiting both, or the stars are in a distant binary with the planet closely orbiting one[[/note]] (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.

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Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns[[note]]if they are able to form, there are two circumstances under which the planet can have a stable orbit -- either the two suns are in a close binary with the planet distantly orbiting both, or the stars are in a distant binary with the planet closely orbiting one[[/note]] (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.
6th Dec '16 3:11:12 PM FiliasCupio
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Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.

to:

Their prevalence in science fiction is actually an example of RealityIsUnrealistic, because binary stars are in fact much more common than single stars like our Sun[[note]]At least, when dealing with stars comparable in size and intrinsic brightness to the sun (as well as with massive stars, that like to form part of double or multiple systems). The smaller, dimmer, and much more numerous red dwarf stars are usually solitary; solitary red dwarfs actually make up the majority of all star systems in any given significant volume of space.[[/note]], although it is uncertain how likely it is that habitable planets would form in the presence of two suns[[note]]if they are able to form, there are two circumstances under which the planet can have a stable orbit -- either the two suns are in a close binary with the planet distantly orbiting both, or the stars are in a distant binary with the planet closely orbiting one[[/note]] (for the sake of RuleOfCool, though, it's best [[MST3KMantra not to ask]]). So there is still some ArtisticLicenseAstronomy involved.
8th Oct '16 12:28:37 PM Nippertipper
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A trope where a planet has two suns in the sky. Occurs primarly in sci-fi settings, but certainly isn't limited to it.

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A trope where a planet has two suns in the sky.sky, either orbiting one of them or travelling in a long orbit around both of the stars. Occurs primarly in sci-fi settings, but certainly isn't limited to it.
4th Oct '16 4:57:07 PM nombretomado
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* In ''EVEOnline'', every system is at least binary system due to the unique gravity interactions needed to make a stable jump gate. The initial gate from Earth was named EVE and was due to the sudden appearance of a wormhole in the solar system.

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* In ''EVEOnline'', ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', every system is at least binary system due to the unique gravity interactions needed to make a stable jump gate. The initial gate from Earth was named EVE and was due to the sudden appearance of a wormhole in the solar system.
4th Aug '16 8:54:45 PM PaulA
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* The planet Placet in FredricBrown's story "Placet is a Crazy Place" orbits two suns in a figure-of-eight. When it is between the suns, the human colonists experience visual hallucinations. This is only ''one'' of the reasons why it is considered crazy.

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* The planet Placet in FredricBrown's Creator/FredricBrown's story "Placet is a Crazy Place" orbits two suns in a figure-of-eight. When it is between the suns, the human colonists experience visual hallucinations. This is only ''one'' of the reasons why it is considered crazy.
9th Jul '16 4:57:03 AM Clare
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Visionaries}}'' has a ''three'' suns and their alignment is what triggers a new age of magic.

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* The planet Prysmos in ''WesternAnimation/{{Visionaries}}'' has a ''three'' suns and their alignment is what triggers a new age Age of magic.Magic.
28th Jun '16 3:43:32 AM Morgenthaler
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* ArthurCClarke's ''ChildhoodsEnd'' briefly visits a planet that orbits ''eight'' stars. This gives it an utterly bizarre orbit in which every moment brings a unique arrangement of planet and stars.

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* ArthurCClarke's ''ChildhoodsEnd'' Creator/ArthurCClarke's ''Literature/ChildhoodsEnd'' briefly visits a planet that orbits ''eight'' stars. This gives it an utterly bizarre orbit in which every moment brings a unique arrangement of planet and stars.
25th Jun '16 4:14:45 PM nombretomado
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* In Metru Nui, of the {{Bionicle}} franchise, there are two suns. [[spoiler: They're actually the eyes of the robot Mata Nui, and Metru Nui is his brain. The matoran are maintenance systems, comparable in size to cells in the human body. When the suns "go out" is when Makuta put Mata Nui "to sleep".]]

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* In Metru Nui, of the {{Bionicle}} Toys/{{Bionicle}} franchise, there are two suns. [[spoiler: They're actually the eyes of the robot Mata Nui, and Metru Nui is his brain. The matoran are maintenance systems, comparable in size to cells in the human body. When the suns "go out" is when Makuta put Mata Nui "to sleep".]]
8th Jun '16 12:14:08 PM Willbyr
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[[caption-width-right:320:Never, ever forget your sunscreen on Tatooine.]]

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[[caption-width-right:320:Never, [-[[caption-width-right:320:Never, ever forget your sunscreen on Tatooine.]]]]-]



* Planet Namek in ''DragonBall'' has '''three''' suns, and perpetual daytime because at least one of them is always in the sky at any given time.

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* Planet Namek in ''DragonBall'' ''Franchise/DragonBall'' has '''three''' suns, and perpetual daytime because at least one of them is always in the sky at any given time.



* The eponymous stars of ''TheFiveStarStories'' may or may not be a quintary star system, though the English translation inconsistently renders it as either [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale "star cluster", which usually have thousands of stars, or the patently absurd "galaxy"]]. At any rate they're far enough apart that you usually can't see them from each other's planets during daytime.

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* The eponymous stars of ''TheFiveStarStories'' ''Manga/TheFiveStarStories'' may or may not be a quintary star system, though the English translation inconsistently renders it as either [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale "star cluster", which usually have thousands of stars, or the patently absurd "galaxy"]]. At any rate they're far enough apart that you usually can't see them from each other's planets during daytime.
8th Jun '16 11:26:09 AM Morgenthaler
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* Norfolk in Peter F. Hamilton's ''NightsDawnTrilogy'' orbits the primary star of a binary system, lending a unique system involving "Duke day" (full white sunlight from the primary, Duke), "Duchess night" (red sunlight from the secondary, Duchess) and true night for the portions hidden from both stars. Duke day lasts for the same time all the time (at least at the equator), but Duchess night and true night pass between complete Duchess night and complete true night depending on the planet's position around its orbit.

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* Norfolk in Peter F. Hamilton's ''NightsDawnTrilogy'' ''Literature/NightsDawnTrilogy'' orbits the primary star of a binary system, lending a unique system involving "Duke day" (full white sunlight from the primary, Duke), "Duchess night" (red sunlight from the secondary, Duchess) and true night for the portions hidden from both stars. Duke day lasts for the same time all the time (at least at the equator), but Duchess night and true night pass between complete Duchess night and complete true night depending on the planet's position around its orbit.
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