History Main / BewareTheSuperman

23rd Mar '17 9:58:01 AM Sapphirea2
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** The Series 9 finale "Hell Bent" has the Twelfth Doctor become TheUnfettered WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds in the wake of captivity, torture, and [[spoiler: the death of his beloved companion Clara]], the spoilered event being another fixed moment in time that he attempts to undo. Perhaps because he follows the "Never give up. Never give in" part of his credo a little '''too''' well this time, in the climax he revises it to "Never be cruel and never be cowardly. And if you ever are, always make amends" as he returns to his best self with a little help from [[spoiler: Mind Rape]].

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** The Over the course of Series 9, the Twelfth Doctor becomes increasingly frustrated with his nigh-immortality meaning he ultimately loses everyone he comes to care for and others besides. He becomes increasingly desperate to protect his companion Clara Oswald and to save others no matter how risky the means are, resulting in him [[spoiler: immortalizing a human girl, Ashildr]] -- which causes him trouble down the line. This sets up the Series 9 finale "Hell Bent" has the Twelfth Doctor become Bent", in which he becomes TheUnfettered WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds in the wake of captivity, torture, and [[spoiler: the death of his beloved companion Clara]], the Clara]]. Said spoilered event being is another fixed moment in time that he attempts to undo. undo, arguing DudeWheresMyReward with regard to all he's done for others at one point. Perhaps because he follows the "Never give up. Never give in" part of his credo a little '''too''' well this time, in the climax he revises it to "Never be cruel and never be cowardly. And if you ever are, always make amends" as he returns to his best self with a little help from [[spoiler: Mind Rape]].
27th Feb '17 4:42:21 AM merotoker
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** Three mini-series Creator/WarrenEllis wrote for them fit this trope. ''ComicBook/BlackSummer'' begins with one of the super"heroes" murdering the president of the United States, ''ComicBook/NoHero'' which revolves around the worlds premiere superhero team in reality controlling world politics from behind the scenes, and ''ComicBook/{{Supergod}}'' takes the position that superhumans (all artifically created, like biological nukes) are exactly that, inhuman, alien beings who have moved beyond human concepts of morality and even basic mindset, and range from WellIntentionedExtremist Krishna (who enacts a ''holocaust'' in India with the intent of reducing the population to a level where everyone can enjoy a high-technological lifestyle) to OmnicidalManiac Daijal who destroys most of the planet because he thinks utopia is too boring.

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** Three mini-series Creator/WarrenEllis wrote for them fit this trope. ''ComicBook/BlackSummer'' begins with one of the super"heroes" murdering the president of the United States, ''ComicBook/NoHero'' which revolves around the worlds premiere superhero team in reality controlling world politics from behind the scenes, and ''ComicBook/{{Supergod}}'' takes the position that superhumans (all artifically artificially created, like biological nukes) are exactly that, inhuman, alien beings who have moved beyond human concepts of morality and even basic mindset, and range from WellIntentionedExtremist Krishna (who enacts a ''holocaust'' in India with the intent of reducing the population to a level where everyone can enjoy a high-technological lifestyle) to OmnicidalManiac Daijal who destroys most of the planet because he thinks utopia is too boring.



* A recurring problem in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse. [[BigApplesauce New York City]] in particular has been the epicenter for superhuman events from ComicBook/{{Galactus}} trying to devour the planet (on more than one occasion), [[ComicBook/{{Inferno}} demonic invasions]] and seemingly endless battles between superheroes and villains (or sometimes just between superheroes and other superheroes), aliens, the occasional giant monster of undefined origin and one instance where a Herald of the above-mentioned Galactus levitated Manhattan Island into orbit. SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}} once blasted the entire planet with an EMP, has raised volcanoes on a whim and moved his giant space station around to anywhere he wants it. [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk The Hulk]] has left trails of destruction across America countless times. A prominent head of state goes by the name ''Doctor Doom''. The U.S. government has scary giant, purple robots flying around to "protect" the public from mutants. That any sane person does not live in a state of abject terror over all of this requires incredible powers of denial, a fact which has been lampshaded on many occasions.

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* A recurring problem in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse. [[BigApplesauce New York City]] in particular has been the epicenter for superhuman events from ComicBook/{{Galactus}} trying to devour the planet (on more than one occasion), [[ComicBook/{{Inferno}} demonic invasions]] and seemingly endless battles between superheroes and villains (or sometimes just between superheroes and other superheroes), aliens, the occasional giant monster of undefined origin and one instance where a Herald of the above-mentioned Galactus levitated Manhattan Island into orbit. SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}} ComicBook/{{Magneto}} once blasted the entire planet with an EMP, has raised volcanoes on a whim and moved his giant space station around to anywhere he wants it. [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk The Hulk]] has left trails of destruction across America countless times. A prominent head of state goes by the name ''Doctor Doom''. The U.S. government has scary giant, purple robots flying around to "protect" the public from mutants. That any sane person does not live in a state of abject terror over all of this requires incredible powers of denial, a fact which has been lampshaded on many occasions.



* In Franchise/StarWars, especially the ExpandedUniverse this is the reason why falling to the DarkSide is so terrible. Even a single one of the weakest of Dark Jedi and Sith are powerful enough to kill small armies singlehandedly, while some of the most powerful can [[ApocalypseHow KILL ENTIRE PLANETS,]] as well as raise armies out of similar minded individuals. Just one Force User going DarkSide is enough to cause galaxy-wide chaos. And to make things worse, the Dark Side is addictive. Even if a Jedi slips into it by accident, it takes incredible willpower to turn back and avoid becoming a monster.

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* In Franchise/StarWars, especially the ExpandedUniverse this is the reason why falling to the DarkSide TheDarkSide is so terrible. Even a single one of the weakest of Dark Jedi and Sith are powerful enough to kill small armies singlehandedly, while some of the most powerful can [[ApocalypseHow KILL ENTIRE PLANETS,]] as well as raise armies out of similar minded individuals. Just one Force User going DarkSide Dark Side is enough to cause galaxy-wide chaos. And to make things worse, the Dark Side is addictive. Even if a Jedi slips into it by accident, it takes incredible willpower to turn back and avoid becoming a monster.



* ''Film/XMen'':

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* ''Film/XMen'':''Film/XMenFilmSeries'':



** And in ''Film/SuicideSquad'', this fear of what a Superman-like entity could do if he decided to act against the world (or at least the interests of the U.S Government) is the driving force behind the creation of the eponymous squad of [[BoxedCrook supervillains pressed into government service.]]

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** And in ''Film/SuicideSquad'', ''Film/{{Suicide Squad|2016}}'', this fear of what a Superman-like entity could do if he decided to act against the world (or at least the interests of the U.S Government) is the driving force behind the creation of the eponymous squad of [[BoxedCrook supervillains pressed into government service.]]



* Played on multiple levels in the MarvelCinematicUniverse.

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* Played on multiple levels in the MarvelCinematicUniverse.Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse.



* Creator/JMichaelStraczynski likes this trope. His ''Series/BabylonFive'' series has the [[TheCorpsIsMother Psi-Corps]], the result of a SuperRegistrationAct that only served to unite telepaths in a monstrous organization with the creed that [[MugglePower "mundanes" are expendable]].

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* Creator/JMichaelStraczynski likes this trope. His ''Series/BabylonFive'' series has the [[TheCorpsIsMother [[MutantDraftBoard Psi-Corps]], the result of a SuperRegistrationAct that only served to unite telepaths in a monstrous organization with the creed that [[MugglePower "mundanes" are expendable]].



** [[spoiler: The [[{{UnPerson}} War Doctor]]]] of "The Name of the Doctor" and the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor" was an extended example of this happening to him. Happily, the ending of the latter reveals that [[spoiler: he and his other lives later managed to save Gallifrey rather than destroy it]].

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** [[spoiler: The [[{{UnPerson}} [[UnPerson War Doctor]]]] of "The Name of the Doctor" and the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor" was an extended example of this happening to him. Happily, the ending of the latter reveals that [[spoiler: he and his other lives later managed to save Gallifrey rather than destroy it]].



* ''Videogame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'' runs a lot with this trope. The galaxy is in ruins after what's been called "The Jedi Civil War," with trillions of casualties across hundreds of planets. Many of the {{NPC}}s the Exile encounters neither know nor care about the difference between Jedi and Sith. (As one party member puts it, "Just men and women fighting about religion while the galaxy burns") Kreia points out that the Republic and the Empire themselves are little more than proxies for the Force Users' never-ending religious warfare, and the Exile is her means to try and stop it all [[spoiler: by destroying the Force itself]].

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* ''Videogame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'' runs a lot with this trope. The galaxy is in ruins after what's been called "The Jedi Civil War," with trillions of casualties across hundreds of planets. Many of the {{NPC}}s {{N|onPlayerCharacter}}PCs the Exile encounters neither know nor care about the difference between Jedi and Sith. (As one party member puts it, "Just men and women fighting about religion while the galaxy burns") Kreia points out that the Republic and the Empire themselves are little more than proxies for the Force Users' never-ending religious warfare, and the Exile is her means to try and stop it all [[spoiler: by destroying the Force itself]].
24th Feb '17 7:14:11 AM Ilya_Rysenkov
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** What's worse is that it's heavily implied that the Emperor planned to destroy Primarchs and Space Marines, after they would outlive their usefullness.
8th Jan '17 6:26:20 PM MGD107
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* In ''Series/{{Powers}}'' the original purpose of Kaotic Chic was to raise awareness of how reckless Powers could be. Unfortunately they [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope ended up proving]] to be [[KnightTemplar just as if not more dangerous.]]

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* In ''Series/{{Powers}}'' the original purpose of Kaotic Chic was to raise awareness of how reckless Powers could be. Unfortunately they [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope ended up proving]] to be [[KnightTemplar just as as, if not more more, dangerous.]]
8th Jan '17 6:20:37 PM MGD107
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8th Jan '17 6:20:35 PM MGD107
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* In ''Series/{{Powers}}'' the original purpose of Kaotic Chic was to raise awareness of how reckless Powers could be.

to:

* In ''Series/{{Powers}}'' the original purpose of Kaotic Chic was to raise awareness of how reckless Powers could be. Unfortunately they [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope ended up proving]] to be [[KnightTemplar just as if not more dangerous.]]
8th Jan '17 6:16:30 PM MGD107
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** There's regular Joes and politicians who think that the "supermen" like the Avengers should not be allowed to act on their own (one important reason being their collateral damage). These viewpoints get explored in ''Film/IronMan2'' and are the main driving factor behind the plot from ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar''.

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** There's regular Joes and politicians who think that the "supermen" like the Avengers should not be allowed to act on their own (one important reason being their collateral damage). These viewpoints get explored in ''Film/IronMan2'' and are the main driving factor behind the plot from Accords in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar''.
29th Dec '16 7:42:57 AM Tron80
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* In ''Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'' story ''ComicBook/SupergirlCosmicAdventuresInTheEightGrade'' Lena hates super-powered beings. Linda -alias Supergirl- tries to convince her that a person can have powers and not being a jerk. Unfortunately, their schoolmates are determined to prove Linda ''wrong''.
-->'''Linda:''' Come on... It's not like everyone with super powers is a complete jerk... [...] Okay... See... He's not everybody. Some people are jerks no matter what. But that doesn't mean that we're suddenly going to be treated differently just because we don't have super powers.
18th Dec '16 10:21:09 AM Sapphirea2
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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', it's revealed in "The Name of the Doctor" that the title of "The Doctor" is his self-imposed promise ''never'' to succumb to this type of behavior. His turns as the "[[AGodAmI Time Lord Victorious]]" in "The Waters of Mars", [[spoiler: the [[{{UnPerson}} War Doctor]]]] of "The Name of the Doctor" and the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor", and [[spoiler: the apocalyptic "Hybrid"]] in "Hell Bent" are examples of what happens when he breaks that promise, though in all cases he is brought back to his best self. His promise is:
--> '''The Doctor:''' Never cruel or cowardly. Never give up. Never give in.
** "Hell Bent" has him revise the promise as [[spoiler: he succumbs to Mind Rape]]: "Never be cruel and never be cowardly. And if you ever are, always make amends."

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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', it's revealed in "The Name of the Doctor" that the title of "The Doctor" is his self-imposed promise ''never'' to succumb to this type of behavior. His turns as the "[[AGodAmI Time Lord Victorious]]" in "The Waters of Mars", [[spoiler: the [[{{UnPerson}} War Doctor]]]] of "The Name of the Doctor" and the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor", and [[spoiler: the apocalyptic "Hybrid"]] in "Hell Bent" are examples of what happens when he breaks that promise, though in all cases he is brought back behavior, but rather to his best self. His promise is:
--> '''The Doctor:''' Never
be "Never cruel or cowardly. Never give up. Never give in. \n" (As he puts it in the next story, "The Day of the Doctor".) In several stories, he does temporarily break that promise, and ''always'' when he has no companion serving as a MoralityPet. He always comes back to his best self, but usually at a cost.
** The Tenth Doctor's turn as the "[[AGodAmI Time Lord Victorious]]" in "The Waters of Mars" has him attempt to change a fixed moment in time -- one that's crucial to the history of humanity in the larger universe -- to save doomed lives, justifying it on the basis of being the LastOfHisKind. The problem is that changing a fixed moment threatens the universe with a RealityBreakingParadox, and in the end that's only prevented via [[spoiler: a woman's suicide]]. The resultant changes his actions manage to make are all for the worse, and he doesn't fully redeem himself until the next story, "The End of Time"...which is also his last not counting "The Day of the Doctor", which is set earlier in his timeline.
** [[spoiler: The [[{{UnPerson}} War Doctor]]]] of "The Name of the Doctor" and the 50th anniversary special "The Day of the Doctor" was an extended example of this happening to him. Happily, the ending of the latter reveals that [[spoiler: he and his other lives later managed to save Gallifrey rather than destroy it]].
** The Series 9 finale
"Hell Bent" has him revise the promise as Twelfth Doctor become TheUnfettered WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds in the wake of captivity, torture, and [[spoiler: the death of his beloved companion Clara]], the spoilered event being another fixed moment in time that he succumbs attempts to Mind Rape]]: undo. Perhaps because he follows the "Never give up. Never give in" part of his credo a little '''too''' well this time, in the climax he revises it to "Never be cruel and never be cowardly. And if you ever are, always make amends."amends" as he returns to his best self with a little help from [[spoiler: Mind Rape]].
13th Dec '16 6:42:49 AM Tron80
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** Ironically inverted in ''ComicBook/TheNail''. In an alternate universe, Clark Kent never becomes Superman. This means that there's no moral lighthouse to make the world realize that metahumans and superheroes aren't inherently dangerous, with the result that metahumans are viciously discriminated against and the Justice League are despised and distrusted. Funny how things work out, huh?



* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'' is set in a future of Franchise/TheDCU wherein the next generation of superhumans took their cue from the {{Nineties Anti Hero}}es rather than [[GoodIsOldFashioned 'outdated' heroes]] like Franchise/{{Superman}} (who retired in disillusionment [[spoiler: after one of them got off scot-free after murdering the Joker]]), with the result that the 'heroes' and 'villains' are more interested in recklessly kicking the tar out of each other than protecting the innocent. When {{The Cape}}s ''do'' make a reappearance, their [[WellIntentionedExtremist determination to rein in their more reckless brethren]] sees them quickly turn into {{Knight Templar}}s. Unlike many of these universes, it's suggested that this one is at least partially the public's fault, as they overwhelmingly rejected the ideals of the old-fashioned heroes and placed their trust in the more 'modern' ones, only to learn too late what this meant.
-->'''Magog:''' They chose the one who'd kill over the one who wouldn't. And now they're all dead.
** Never mind that the final act of the story features ''[[spoiler: Superman]]'' going into a blind rage at the governing powers. Just ''imagine'' that guy deciding to go on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge against ''society''. (Well, [[ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}} We don't need to...]]) Fortunately, he gets talked down by someone who appeals to his older ways, but it's a close thing there.

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* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'' ''ComicBook/KingdomCome''
** This story
is set in a future of Franchise/TheDCU wherein the next generation of superhumans took their cue from the {{Nineties Anti Hero}}es rather than [[GoodIsOldFashioned 'outdated' heroes]] like Franchise/{{Superman}} (who retired in disillusionment [[spoiler: after one of them got off scot-free after murdering the Joker]]), with the result that the 'heroes' and 'villains' are more interested in recklessly kicking the tar out of each other than protecting the innocent. When {{The Cape}}s ''do'' make a reappearance, their [[WellIntentionedExtremist determination to rein in their more reckless brethren]] sees them quickly turn into {{Knight Templar}}s. Unlike many of these universes, it's suggested that this one is at least partially the public's fault, as they overwhelmingly rejected the ideals of the old-fashioned heroes and placed their trust in the more 'modern' ones, only to learn too late what this meant.
-->'''Magog:''' --->'''Magog:''' They chose the one who'd kill over the one who wouldn't. And now they're all dead.
** Never mind that the final act of the story features ''[[spoiler: Superman]]'' going into a blind rage at the governing powers. Just ''imagine'' that guy deciding to go on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge against ''society''. (Well, [[ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}} We don't need to...]]) Fortunately, he gets talked down by someone who appeals to his older ways, but it's a close thing there.



* Creator/DCComics has ''ComicBook/TheSpectre'', who is a murderous PayEvilUntoEvil-preaching RealityWarper with a self-proclaimed OmniscientMoralityLicense. Even when he's bound to a human soul, which is supposed to put some restraints on him, he can be incredibly destructive. As in, wiping out two entire countries down to the last newborn child destructive.
** Since the Spectre is literally the Wrath of God incarnate, his OmniscientMoralityLicense is not really "self-proclaimed". This, of course, may only make him even ''more'' terrifying, when it hits you that God Himself is behind him, and that Spectre (at full power, which he isn't always at) is as close to genuinely [[TheOmnipotent omnipotent]] as is possible for anyone who isn't God to be. And the Spectre sometimes doesn't even ''want'' to do some of the things he does, but he's compelled to because that's his job. The Spectre is far, far more than superhuman, and even calling him a Force of Nature wouldn't do him justice. If The Spectre is after you, there may be nothing in the multiverse that will stop him; also, since he usually targets bad or wicked people, it can also mean that you will probably be going to {{Hell}} after he's conjured up a supernatural CruelAndUnusualDeath to gruesomely kill you off. Have a nice day.
* Ironically inverted in ''ComicBook/TheNail''. In an alternate universe, Clark Kent never becomes Superman. This means that there's no moral lighthouse to make the world realize that metahumans and superheroes aren't inherently dangerous, with the result that metahumans are viciously discriminated against and the Justice League are despised and distrusted. Funny how things work out, huh?
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