History Main / BernardHerrmann

11th Mar '13 2:32:11 PM MarkLungo
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[[redirect:Music/BernardHermann]]

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[[redirect:Music/BernardHermann]][[redirect:Music/BernardHerrmann]]
8th Jan '13 8:02:11 PM JIKTV
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[[redirect:Music/BernardHermann]]
8th Jan '13 8:00:24 PM JIKTV
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->''"It was ridiculous; that train was a train of death!"''
-->--'''Bernard Herrmann''', ''commenting on Richard Rodney Bennett's use of a waltz in ''Murder On The Orient Express

[[quoteright:240:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/BernardHerrmann_2758.jpg]]

'''BernardHerrmann''', born in New York City on June 29, 1911, was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest film composers of all time. Herrmann's music is typified by frequent use of ''ostinati'' (short repeating patterns), novel orchestration and, in his film scores, an ability to portray character traits not altogether obvious from other elements of the film. He won an [[AcademyAward Oscar]] for ''TheDevilAndDanielWebster'' (1941), his second film score.

In 1934, he joined the Columbia Broadcasting System (Creator/{{CBS}}) as a staff conductor. Whilst at CBS, he met Orson Welles, and wrote scores for his Mercury Theatre broadcasts including the famous adaptation of HGWells' ''TheWarOfTheWorlds''. When Welles moved to movies, Herrmann went with him, writing the scores for ''Film/CitizenKane'' (1941) and ''TheMagnificentAmbersons'' (1942), although the score for the latter, like the film itself, was heavily edited by the studio.

Twentieth Century-Fox music director AlfredNewman hired Herrmann to score ''Film/JaneEyre'' (1943), ''HanoverSquare'' (1945), ''AnnaAndTheKingOfSiam'' (1946), ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947) and ''Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951'' (1951).

Hermann is most closely associated with the director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' and ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.

Herrmann moved to England, where he began working with younger directors, including FrancoisTruffaut, BrianDePalma, LarryCohen and MartinScorsese. His last score was for [=DePalma=]'s ''{{Obsession}}''. He died in his sleep on December 24, 1975.

Herrmann's non-cinematic works include the four-act opera ''Literature/WutheringHeights''. Herrmann also did some television work; he composed the original theme song for ''Series/TheTwilightZone'' (used only during the first season), and also scored individual episodes of that series, ''TheAlfredHitchcockHour'' and ''HaveGunWillTravel''.

!!Film Scores Written By Bernard Herrman Include:

* ''Film/CitizenKane'' (1941)
* ''All That Money Can Buy'' [-AKA-] ''TheDevilAndDanielWebster'' (1941)
* ''The Magnificent Ambersons'' (1942)
* ''Film/JaneEyre'' (1943)
* ''HanoverSquare'' (1945)
* ''Anna and the King of Siam'' (1946)
* ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947)
* ''Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951'' (1951)
* ''OnDangerousGround'' (1952)
* ''5 Fingers'' (1952)
* ''The Snows of Kilimanjaro'' (1952)
* ''White Witch Doctor'' (1953)
* ''Beneath the 12-Mile Reef'' (1953)
* ''King of the Khyber Rifles'' (1953)
* ''TheEgyptian'' (1954) -- With AlfredNewman
* ''Garden of Evil'' (1954)
* ''Prince of Players'' (1955)
* ''The Kentuckian'' (1955)
* ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1955)
* ''The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit'' (1956)
* ''TheManWhoKnewTooMuch'' (1956)
* ''TheWrongMan'' (1956)
* ''A Hatful of Rain'' (1957)
* ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' (1958)
* ''Film/NorthByNorthwest''
* ''Blue Denim'' (1959)
* ''Journey to the Center of the Earth'' (1959)
* ''The 3 Worlds of Gulliver'' (1960)
* ''Film/{{Psycho}}'' (1962)
* ''Mysterious Island'' (1961)
* ''TenderIsTheNight'' (1962)
* ''CapeFear'' (1962)
* ''Jason and the Argonauts'' (1963)
* ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964)
* ''{{Fahrenheit 451}}'' (1966)
* ''The Bride Wore Black'' (1968)
* ''TwistedNerve'' (1968) (The theme for the main character was later popularized as "Twisted Nerve" when used in ''KillBill''.)
* ''Bezeten - Het gat in de muur'' (1969)
* ''The Battle of Neretva'' (1969)
* ''The Night Digger'' (1971)
* ''Endless Night'' (1972)
* ''Sisters'' (1973)
* ''ItsAlive'' (1974)
* ''TaxiDriver'' (1976)
* ''Obsession'' (1976)

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5th Dec '12 3:49:02 PM dsneybuf
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Hermann is most closely associated with the director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''{{Vertigo}}'' and ''NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.

to:

Hermann is most closely associated with the director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''{{Vertigo}}'' ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' and ''NorthByNorthwest''.''Film/NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''{{Vertigo}}'' ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.



* ''{{Vertigo}}'' (1958)
* ''NorthByNorthwest''

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* ''{{Vertigo}}'' ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' (1958)
* ''NorthByNorthwest''''Film/NorthByNorthwest''
24th Nov '12 8:18:27 PM Idiosyncrat
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Hermann is most closely associated with the director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''{{Vertigo}}'' and ''NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is probably from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.

to:

Hermann is most closely associated with the director Creator/AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''{{Vertigo}}'' and ''NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is probably from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.
5th Oct '12 9:38:44 AM nombretomado
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Twentieth Century-Fox music director AlfredNewman hired Herrmann to score ''JaneEyre'' (1943), ''HanoverSquare'' (1945), ''AnnaAndTheKingOfSiam'' (1946), ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947) and ''Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951'' (1951).

to:

Twentieth Century-Fox music director AlfredNewman hired Herrmann to score ''JaneEyre'' ''Film/JaneEyre'' (1943), ''HanoverSquare'' (1945), ''AnnaAndTheKingOfSiam'' (1946), ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947) and ''Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951'' (1951).



* ''JaneEyre'' (1943)

to:

* ''JaneEyre'' ''Film/JaneEyre'' (1943)
24th Aug '12 11:53:26 AM FELH2
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In 1934, he joined the Columbia Broadcasting System ({{CBS}}) as a staff conductor. Whilst at CBS, he met Orson Welles, and wrote scores for his Mercury Theatre broadcasts including the famous adaptation of HGWells' ''TheWarOfTheWorlds''. When Welles moved to movies, Herrmann went with him, writing the scores for ''Film/CitizenKane'' (1941) and ''TheMagnificentAmbersons'' (1942), although the score for the latter, like the film itself, was heavily edited by the studio.

to:

In 1934, he joined the Columbia Broadcasting System ({{CBS}}) (Creator/{{CBS}}) as a staff conductor. Whilst at CBS, he met Orson Welles, and wrote scores for his Mercury Theatre broadcasts including the famous adaptation of HGWells' ''TheWarOfTheWorlds''. When Welles moved to movies, Herrmann went with him, writing the scores for ''Film/CitizenKane'' (1941) and ''TheMagnificentAmbersons'' (1942), although the score for the latter, like the film itself, was heavily edited by the studio.
24th Jul '12 8:42:07 AM ccoa
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* ''TheDayTheEarthStoodStill'' (1951)

to:

* ''TheDayTheEarthStoodStill'' ''Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951'' (1951)
24th Jul '12 8:14:07 AM ccoa
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Twentieth Century-Fox music director AlfredNewman hired Herrmann to score ''JaneEyre'' (1943), ''HanoverSquare'' (1945), ''AnnaAndTheKingOfSiam'' (1946), ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947) and ''TheDayTheEarthStoodStill'' (1951).

to:

Twentieth Century-Fox music director AlfredNewman hired Herrmann to score ''JaneEyre'' (1943), ''HanoverSquare'' (1945), ''AnnaAndTheKingOfSiam'' (1946), ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947) and ''TheDayTheEarthStoodStill'' ''Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951'' (1951).
5th Jul '12 1:45:06 AM FELH2
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Hermann is most closely associated with the director AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''{{Vertigo}}'' and ''NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is probably from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.

to:

Hermann is most closely associated with the director AlfredHitchcock.Creator/AlfredHitchcock. He wrote the scores for every Hitchcock film from ''TheTroubleWithHarry'' (1956) to ''{{Marnie}}'' (1964), a period which included ''{{Vertigo}}'' and ''NorthByNorthwest''. He oversaw the sound design in ''TheBirds'' (1963), although there was no actual music in the film as such, just electronically created bird sounds. Herrmann's most famous music is probably from another Hitchcock film, ''Film/{{Psycho}}''. The [[PsychoStrings screeching violin music]] heard during the shower scene (a scene which Hitchcock originally suggested have no music at all) is probably one of the most famous moments from all film scores. His score for ''{{Vertigo}}'' is just as masterly. In many of the key scenes Hitchcock essentially gave the film over to Herrmann, whose melodies, echoing Creator/RichardWagner's "Liebestod" from ''TristanUndIsolde'', dramatically conveys Scotty's obsessive love for the woman he imagines to be Madeleine. Their working relationship was rocky at times; in one film, Hitchcock wanted a scene in a rowboat to have no music, because "How did the orchestra get out in the middle of the lake?" (To which Hermann replied "And how did the cameras get out there?") Herrmann's relationship with Hitchcock came to an end when the latter rejected a score for ''TornCurtain''.



* ''[[TheGhostAndMrsMuir The Ghost and Mrs. Muir]]'' (1947)

to:

* ''[[TheGhostAndMrsMuir The Ghost and Mrs. Muir]]'' ''TheGhostAndMrsMuir'' (1947)



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