History Main / BeliefMakesYouStupid

11th Mar '17 3:34:03 PM WanderingBrowser
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The very backstory to ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'' is somewhere between this trope and "Belief Makes You ''Evil''". Isaac's mom is shown in the opening to be very devout, if not TheFundamentalist, so when she hears "a voice" in her head she immediately assumes that this is God and so seeks to obey Him. Resulting her emotionally abusing Isaac by stealing/destroying all his belongings (including ''murdering his pets'', the game implies), locking him in his room, and then '''[[OffingTheOffspring trying to kill him]] as a HumanSacrifice to God'''. Semi subverted in some of the endings where Isaac is actually saved by divine intervention.

to:

* The very backstory to ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'' is somewhere between this trope and "Belief Makes You ''Evil''". Isaac's mom is shown in the opening to be very devout, if not TheFundamentalist, so when she hears "a voice" in her head she immediately assumes that this is God and so seeks to obey Him. Resulting her emotionally abusing Isaac by stealing/destroying all his belongings (including ''murdering his pets'', the game implies), locking him in his room, and then '''[[OffingTheOffspring trying to kill him]] as a HumanSacrifice to God'''. Semi subverted in At least, this is how it appears; the game's MultipleEndings and AmbiguousCanon leaves the actual details of what's going on pretty much up to the player to decide.
** At the very least, there's a MaybeMagicMaybeMundane thing going on, with
some of the endings where going with Mom just being crazy, some endings going with Isaac misreading the entire situation, and some endings going with Mom actually hearing a voice from a real biblical being. Which can either be a deceitful demon or the actual God -- who, again, can either be demanding Isaac's life because GodIsEvil or commanding it as a legitimately holy act, because Isaac is going to become a demon, if not the AntiChrist. And even then, it's left vague if Isaac is destined to become evil or if he ends up turning to evil out of rage at his Mom trying to kill him at God's command.
** Not helping in the slightest is the ShrugOfGod about what the hell
is actually saved going on:
-->'''McMillen:''' “It was never implied that [Mom's] insane. And if you’re going
by divine intervention.the Bible and you believe all the stories, then why wouldn’t you think that it’s possible now for that stuff to happen?”[[note]]Incidentally, this touches upon a complaint many, many atheists have made about the story of Isaac's biblical namesake, pointing out that it essentially boils down to a schizophrenic almost murdering his son in a fit of madness and that, rather than condemning it as we would under any other circumstance, the Bible teaches us that this is a truly moral man worthy of emulating.[[/note]]
2nd Mar '17 4:36:25 PM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Explored also in the two-parter ''Impossible Planet'' and ''The Satan Pit'', when the Doctor confronts what may or may not be the ''original'', actual, factual, Devil. What really bugs him is the claim that it ''predates'' the Universe, but in the end he admits that just because ''he'' believes that's impossible/gibberish doesn't mean it couldn't really be so.

to:

*** Explored also in the two-parter ''Impossible Planet'' "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet The Impossible Planet]]" and ''The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E9TheSatanPit The Satan Pit'', Pit]]", when the Doctor confronts what may or may not be the ''original'', actual, factual, Devil. What really bugs him is the claim that it ''predates'' the Universe, but in the end he admits that just because ''he'' believes that's impossible/gibberish doesn't mean it couldn't really be so.
2nd Mar '17 4:34:36 PM CumbersomeTercel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Franchise/StarTrek, at least until ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' fleshed out the Bajorans as more than spiritual cannon fodder for the Cardassians. Many episodes throughout the series explore the importance of faith (spiritual and otherwise) as well as the nebulous boundary between SufficientlyAdvancedAliens (be they benign or malicious) and ''actual gods'', especially when they really are (relatively) omniscient.
* The ''Series/BabylonFive'' episode "Believers" depicts a family from a zealously religious species refusing to allow Dr. Franklin perform simple life-saving surgery on their son because their religion states that he will lose his spirit if he is cut open. The alien parents are earnest and loving, but their arguments are little more than strawmen, and their culture is depicted as insular and close-minded at every turn. Franklin's belief that science is superior to their religion fits this trope as well, right up to the point where [[spoiler:he saves the child, expecting the parents to turn around and realize he was right, only to have the wind taken out of his self-righteous sails when the parents kill their own child, believing him to be effectively a soulless zombie]]. In the end, the episode leaves who was right and who was wrong ambiguous and up to the viewer to decide. In another episode Franklin is revealed to have a religion himself (albeit fictional) and not portrayed as any less intelligent for it (this helps him beat a drug addiction, in fact).
** The episode "Confession and Lamentations" is much less ambiguous: the Markab race is plagued by Drafa, an airborne disease 100% contagious and 100% lethal, and due to the widespread belief of it being a divine punishment for immorality, the Markab failed to take the appropriate precautions, even forbidding the few Markab who believed it to be just a deadly disease from enlisting help from non-Markab and negating funds to study it. In the end Franklin manages to find a vaccine and a cure thanks to Lazarenn (a Markab doctor on the station), becoming ill and sacrificing himself to allow him to study the illness, but by then the entire Markab population on the station is dead, and the losses among the wider Markab population are so great that the race is not genetically viable anymore, dooming it to die out in a few generations.

to:

* Franchise/StarTrek, ''Franchise/StarTrek'', at least until ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' fleshed out the Bajorans as more than spiritual cannon fodder for the Cardassians. Many episodes throughout the series explore the importance of faith (spiritual and otherwise) as well as the nebulous boundary between SufficientlyAdvancedAliens (be they benign or malicious) and ''actual gods'', especially when they really are (relatively) omniscient.
* The ''Series/BabylonFive'' episode "Believers" "[[{{Recap/BabylonFiveS01E10Believers}} Believers]]" depicts a family from a zealously religious species refusing to allow Dr. Franklin perform simple life-saving surgery on their son because their religion states that he will lose his spirit if he is cut open. The alien parents are earnest and loving, but their arguments are little more than strawmen, and their culture is depicted as insular and close-minded at every turn. Franklin's belief that science is superior to their religion fits this trope as well, right up to the point where [[spoiler:he saves the child, expecting the parents to turn around and realize he was right, only to have the wind taken out of his self-righteous sails when the parents kill their own child, believing him to be effectively a soulless zombie]]. In the end, the episode leaves who was right and who was wrong ambiguous and up to the viewer to decide. In another episode Franklin is revealed to have a religion himself (albeit fictional) and not portrayed as any less intelligent for it (this helps him beat a drug addiction, in fact).
** The episode "Confession "[[{{Recap/BabylonFiveS02E18ConfessionsAndLamentations}} Confessions and Lamentations" Lamentations]]" is much less ambiguous: the Markab race is plagued by Drafa, an airborne disease 100% contagious and 100% lethal, and due to the widespread belief of it being a divine punishment for immorality, the Markab failed to take the appropriate precautions, even forbidding the few Markab who believed it to be just a deadly disease from enlisting help from non-Markab and negating funds to study it. In the end Franklin manages to find a vaccine and a cure thanks to Lazarenn (a Markab doctor on the station), becoming ill and sacrificing himself to allow him to study the illness, but by then the entire Markab population on the station is dead, and the losses among the wider Markab population are so great that the race is not genetically viable anymore, dooming it to die out in a few generations.



** The episode "All About Mormons" especially plays with this; the Mormon family is presented as ridiculously gullible for buying the story of how their religion was founded, but when Stan calls them out for that one of their sons points out that they're also the only family in the entire town who's happy and loving, largely because their church's ''main'' focus is on family values, not religious history. Then they still got it a bit off, as the history of the church is a major focus of study (alternating with books of scripture). The origin story is seen as vitally important, as it's the thing the LDS church bases its validity ''on''. [[note]] For example, if Joseph Smith didn't have the First Vision and the Book of Mormon is a hoax, then there goes the keystone of a member's testimony that their faith ''is'' God's restored church.[[/note]]
** The aesop of the episodes "Go God Go" and "Go God Go XII" is that religion or not, humanity (and sentient otterdom) will [[SillyReasonForWar still find petty reasons]] [[HumansKillWantonly to murder each other]].
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The show has always enjoyed poking fun at the absurdities and inconsistencies of religion, right from the very first seasons. You could make an entire list of all the anti-religious or at least skeptical jokes in the show about blindly following religion and/or everything religious preachers say. Reverend Lovejoy has been portrayed as a hypocritical preacher whose is more interested in gaining money from churchgoers and judging other people's behavior than anything else. His gossipy and judgmental wife Helen falls in the same category. Funny enough, even Ned Flanders- who actually is a good person and doing everything the Bible says "even the stuff that contradicts the other stuff", as he said in "Hurricane Neddy"- irritates Lovejoy. Flanders himself, though portrayed as a good man with virtues in early seasons, has also been portrayed as somewhat of a caricature of what a ''good Christian'' should be, with his faith almost being omnipresent in his daily life to such a degree that it becomes a bit ridiculous. In later seasons the show's creators seem to have made Ned more {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed from "overly religious GoodSamaritan" to "TheFundamentalist KnightTemplar", usually to serve as a {{foil}} against the more scientifically-minded [[CreatorsPet Lisa]]. In "The Monkey Suit", Ned's opposition to the teaching of evolution turns the town into a fundamentalist dystopia, and in "You Kent Always Say What You Want" he went on a crusade to cleanse television after Kent Brockman swore in pain upon taking some hot coffee to the crotch.[[note]]And before that, we see Ned monitoring all TV shows for "impropriety", including Krypto "licking himself" on ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', prompting even his own children to say YouNeedToGetLaid[[/note]].

to:

** The episode "All "[[Recap/SouthParkS7E12AllAboutMormons All About Mormons" Mormons]]" especially plays with this; the Mormon family is presented as ridiculously gullible for buying the story of how their religion was founded, but when Stan calls them out for that one of their sons points out that they're also the only family in the entire town who's happy and loving, largely because their church's ''main'' focus is on family values, not religious history. Then they still got it a bit off, as the history of the church is a major focus of study (alternating with books of scripture). The origin story is seen as vitally important, as it's the thing the LDS church bases its validity ''on''. [[note]] For example, if Joseph Smith didn't have the First Vision and the Book of Mormon is a hoax, then there goes the keystone of a member's testimony that their faith ''is'' God's restored church.[[/note]]
** The aesop of the episodes "Go "[[Recap/SouthParkS10E12GoGodGo Go God Go" Go]]" and "Go "[[Recap/SouthParkS10E13GoGodGoXII Go God Go XII" XII]]" is that religion or not, humanity (and sentient otterdom) will [[SillyReasonForWar still find petty reasons]] [[HumansKillWantonly to murder each other]].
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The show has always enjoyed poking fun at the absurdities and inconsistencies of religion, right from the very first seasons. You could make an entire list of all the anti-religious or at least skeptical jokes in the show about blindly following religion and/or everything religious preachers say. Reverend Lovejoy has been portrayed as a hypocritical preacher whose is more interested in gaining money from churchgoers and judging other people's behavior than anything else. His gossipy and judgmental wife Helen falls in the same category. Funny enough, even Ned Flanders- who actually is a good person and doing everything the Bible says "even the stuff that contradicts the other stuff", as he said in "Hurricane Neddy"- "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS8E8HurricaneNeddy Hurricane Neddy]]"- irritates Lovejoy. Flanders himself, though portrayed as a good man with virtues in early seasons, has also been portrayed as somewhat of a caricature of what a ''good Christian'' should be, with his faith almost being omnipresent in his daily life to such a degree that it becomes a bit ridiculous. In later seasons the show's creators seem to have made Ned more {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed from "overly religious GoodSamaritan" to "TheFundamentalist KnightTemplar", usually to serve as a {{foil}} against the more scientifically-minded [[CreatorsPet Lisa]]. In "The "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS17E21TheMonkeySuit The Monkey Suit", Suit]]", Ned's opposition to the teaching of evolution turns the town into a fundamentalist dystopia, and in "You "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS18E22YouKentAlwaysSayWhatYouWant You Kent Always Say What You Want" Want]]" he went on a crusade to cleanse television after Kent Brockman swore in pain upon taking some hot coffee to the crotch.[[note]]And before that, we see Ned monitoring all TV shows for "impropriety", including Krypto "licking himself" on ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', prompting even his own children to say YouNeedToGetLaid[[/note]].
27th Feb '17 1:26:43 AM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The show has always enjoyed poking fun at the absurdities and inconsistencies of religion, right from the very first seasons. You could make an entire list of all the anti-religious or at least skeptical jokes in the show about blindly following religion and/or everything religious preachers say. Reverend Lovejoy has been portrayed as a hypocritical preacher whose is more interested in gaining money from churchgoers and judging other people's behavior than anything else. His gossipy and judgmental wife Helen falls in the same category. Funny enough, even Ned Flanders- who actually is a good person and doing everything the Bible says "even the stuff that contradicts the other stuff", as he said in "Hurricane Neddy"- irritates Lovejoy. Flanders himself, though portrayed as a good man with virtues in early seasons, has also been portrayed as somewhat of a caricature of what a ''good Christian'' should be, with his faith almost being omnipresent in his daily life to such a degree that it becomes a bit ridiculous. In later seasons the show's creators seem to have made Ned more {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed from "overly religious GoodSamaritan" to "TheFundamentalist KnightTemplar", usually to serve as a {{foil}} against the more scientifically-minded [[CreatorsPet Lisa]]. In "The Monkey Suit", Ned's opposition to the teaching of evolution turns the town into a fundamentalist dystopia, and in "You Kent Always Say What You Want" he went on a crusade to cleanse television after Kent Brockman swore in pain upon taking some hot coffee to the lap[[note]]And before that, we see Ned monitoring all TV shows for "impropriety", including Krypto "licking himself" on ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', prompting even his own children to say YouNeedToGetLaid[[/note]].

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The show has always enjoyed poking fun at the absurdities and inconsistencies of religion, right from the very first seasons. You could make an entire list of all the anti-religious or at least skeptical jokes in the show about blindly following religion and/or everything religious preachers say. Reverend Lovejoy has been portrayed as a hypocritical preacher whose is more interested in gaining money from churchgoers and judging other people's behavior than anything else. His gossipy and judgmental wife Helen falls in the same category. Funny enough, even Ned Flanders- who actually is a good person and doing everything the Bible says "even the stuff that contradicts the other stuff", as he said in "Hurricane Neddy"- irritates Lovejoy. Flanders himself, though portrayed as a good man with virtues in early seasons, has also been portrayed as somewhat of a caricature of what a ''good Christian'' should be, with his faith almost being omnipresent in his daily life to such a degree that it becomes a bit ridiculous. In later seasons the show's creators seem to have made Ned more {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed from "overly religious GoodSamaritan" to "TheFundamentalist KnightTemplar", usually to serve as a {{foil}} against the more scientifically-minded [[CreatorsPet Lisa]]. In "The Monkey Suit", Ned's opposition to the teaching of evolution turns the town into a fundamentalist dystopia, and in "You Kent Always Say What You Want" he went on a crusade to cleanse television after Kent Brockman swore in pain upon taking some hot coffee to the lap[[note]]And crotch.[[note]]And before that, we see Ned monitoring all TV shows for "impropriety", including Krypto "licking himself" on ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', prompting even his own children to say YouNeedToGetLaid[[/note]].
27th Feb '17 1:21:05 AM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Franchise/StarTrek, at least until ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' fleshed out the Bajorans as more than spiritual cannon fodder for the Cardassians. Many episodes throughout the series explore the importance of Faith (spiritual and otherwise) as well as the nebulous boundary between SufficientlyAdvancedAliens (be they benign or malicious) and ''Actual Gods'', especially when they really are (relatively) Omniscient.
* The ''Series/BabylonFive'' episode "Believers" depicts a family from a zealously religious species refusing to allow Dr. Franklin perform simple life-saving surgery on their son because their religion states that he will lose his spirit if he is cut open. The alien parents are earnest and loving, but their arguments are little more than strawmen, and their culture is depicted as insular and close-minded at every turn. Franklin's belief that Science is superior to Religion fits this trope as well, right up to the point where [[spoiler:he saves the child, expecting the parents to turn around and realize he was right, only to have the wind taken out of his self-righteous sails when the parents kill their own child, believing him to be effectively a soulless zombie]]. In the end, the episode leaves who was right and who was wrong ambiguous and up to the viewer to decide.

to:

* Franchise/StarTrek, at least until ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' fleshed out the Bajorans as more than spiritual cannon fodder for the Cardassians. Many episodes throughout the series explore the importance of Faith faith (spiritual and otherwise) as well as the nebulous boundary between SufficientlyAdvancedAliens (be they benign or malicious) and ''Actual Gods'', ''actual gods'', especially when they really are (relatively) Omniscient.
omniscient.
* The ''Series/BabylonFive'' episode "Believers" depicts a family from a zealously religious species refusing to allow Dr. Franklin perform simple life-saving surgery on their son because their religion states that he will lose his spirit if he is cut open. The alien parents are earnest and loving, but their arguments are little more than strawmen, and their culture is depicted as insular and close-minded at every turn. Franklin's belief that Science science is superior to Religion their religion fits this trope as well, right up to the point where [[spoiler:he saves the child, expecting the parents to turn around and realize he was right, only to have the wind taken out of his self-righteous sails when the parents kill their own child, believing him to be effectively a soulless zombie]]. In the end, the episode leaves who was right and who was wrong ambiguous and up to the viewer to decide. In another episode Franklin is revealed to have a religion himself (albeit fictional) and not portrayed as any less intelligent for it (this helps him beat a drug addiction, in fact).



* On ''Series/{{Lost}}'', [[spoiler:Richard Alpert]] is Catholic, and, in 1867, he accidentally kills a man while getting medicine for his dying wife, gets arrested, is told he can't be absolved for his sins[[note]]Which is ''also'' bad theology[[/note]], and then crashes on the island. Naturally, he is willing to believe he's gone to hell when told just that by an apparition of his dead wife and a mysterious Man in Black. Exploiting [[spoiler:Richard's]] faith, the Man in Black tells him he can only escape "hell" by killing "the devil," the Man in Black's archenemy [[spoiler:Jacob]]. The plan falls through when [[spoiler:Jacob]] explains [[spoiler:Richard]] is not dead, not in hell, and was misled by the Man in Black.

to:

* On ''Series/{{Lost}}'', [[spoiler:Richard Alpert]] is Catholic, and, in 1867, he accidentally kills a man while getting medicine for his dying wife, gets arrested, is told he can't be absolved for his sins[[note]]Which sins,[[note]]Which is ''also'' bad theology[[/note]], not Catholic doctrine[[/note]] and then crashes on the island. Naturally, he is willing to believe he's gone to hell when told just that by an apparition of his dead wife and a mysterious Man in Black. Exploiting [[spoiler:Richard's]] faith, the Man in Black tells him he can only escape "hell" by killing "the devil," the Man in Black's archenemy [[spoiler:Jacob]]. The plan falls through when [[spoiler:Jacob]] explains [[spoiler:Richard]] is not dead, not in hell, and was misled by the Man in Black.



* Averted on ''Series/TheXFiles'', of all shows. Though the premise of aliens and the paranormal may seem like the antithesis of religion (as it's usually portrayed), religion gets a ''ton'' of screen time during the series. Besides the Monster of the Week episodes that deal with things like stigmata, demonic possession, and recordings made by Christ, the show has a lot of religious undertones. However, these undertones aren't "God is responsible for everything on the show" kind of things. More questioning religion and how it came to be. At one point, Scully finds an extraterrestrial engraving that contains passages from the Bible, and Scully herself experiences a birthing experience similar to the birth of Christ. This interplay of religion and science also plays a large role in Scully's character development. Though a skeptic of Mulder's theories, she is a practicing Catholic and often must reconcile what she's learning with her faith. Played straight in earlier seasons, however. Mulder does everything but call Scully an idiot for her belief. It comes out horribly, however, as up to this point, Mulder has yet to come up with any significant proof for his own theories. And someone who believes in spirits and some sort of afterlife who criticizes the religious will always seem a bit silly. Scully calls Mulder out on this several times.

to:

* Averted {{Averted}} on ''Series/TheXFiles'', of all shows. Though the premise of aliens and the paranormal may seem like the antithesis of religion (as it's usually portrayed), religion gets a ''ton'' of screen time during the series. Besides the Monster of the Week episodes that deal with things like stigmata, demonic possession, and recordings made by Christ, the show has a lot of religious undertones. However, these undertones aren't "God is responsible for everything on the show" kind of things. More questioning religion and how it came to be. At one point, Scully finds an extraterrestrial engraving that contains passages from the Bible, and Scully herself experiences a birthing experience similar to the birth of Christ. This interplay of religion and science also plays a large role in Scully's character development. Though a skeptic of Mulder's theories, she is a practicing Catholic and often must reconcile what she's learning with her faith. Played straight in earlier seasons, however. Mulder does everything but call Scully an idiot for her belief. It comes out horribly, however, as up to this point, Mulder has yet to come up with any significant proof for his own theories. And someone who believes in spirits and some sort of afterlife who criticizes the religious will always seem a bit silly. Scully calls Mulder out on this several times.
27th Dec '16 7:45:15 AM Moopsball
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ZigZaggedTrope in ''VideoGame/PathOfExile''. The Templar exile player character is the only religious PC and is chastised by several NPCs for believing blindly in his faith. Nobody has anything good to say about the Templar order either, due to how High Templar Dominus has corrupted it. On the other hand, once the Templar has defeated the TrueFinalBoss Tasuni has this to say:
--> You, Templar have but one gift. Belief. You believed that God chose you to free Wraeclast from its nightmare and you've done everything in your power to prove that belief to be true.
--> It's a lie of course, but what a beautiful and powerful deceit! Please, continue to lie to yourself, Templar. It brings out the best in you.
10th Dec '16 10:29:47 PM TeraChimera
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Inverted in ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder''. The Nazis' [[StupidJetpackHitler super-science]] was reverse-engineered from that of the Da'at Yichud, a secret Jewish sect of inventors who use the act of creating devices as a way to commune with God. Essentially, the Da'at Yichud have ForScience as religious dogma; the act of creation is itself holy. While the Nazi tech is advanced, Da'at Yichud tech is so far beyond it that member Set Roth indirectly mentions ClarkesThirdLaw when talking about it, and Roth himself is a GadgeteerGenius of the highest caliber, able to hack a war robot guarding a concentration camp with nothing but a remote he cobbled together from scraps.
11th Nov '16 9:50:44 PM Discar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Literature/FatherBrown’s general appearance [[ObfuscatingStupidity made him look dumb to everyone]], but this trope is continually applied to him by the fact that he is a Catholic priest: A lot of people in his stories (''The Blue Cross, The Flying Stars, The Hammer of God, The eye of Apollo'') constantly make the wrong assumption that a priest is a [[AManIsNotAVirgin celibate simpleton]] unaware that in RealLife a priest must study philosophy and theology precisely to defend his beliefs helped by logic, and the fact of hearing a lot of people confessing sins to him gives him an interesting perspective about reality. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in The Blue Cross when he explains to MasterOfDisguise GentlemanThief Flambeau how he discovered him:

to:

* Literature/FatherBrown’s general appearance [[ObfuscatingStupidity made him look dumb to everyone]], but this trope is continually applied to him by the fact that he is a Catholic priest: A lot of people in his stories (''The Blue Cross, The Flying Stars, The Hammer of God, The eye of Apollo'') constantly make the wrong assumption that a priest is a [[AManIsNotAVirgin celibate simpleton]] simpleton unaware that in RealLife a priest must study philosophy and theology precisely to defend his beliefs helped by logic, and the fact of hearing a lot of people confessing sins to him gives him an interesting perspective about reality. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in The Blue Cross when he explains to MasterOfDisguise GentlemanThief Flambeau how he discovered him:



--> ''"'Oh, by being a [[AManIsNotAVirgin celibate simpleton]], I suppose,'' he said. ''Has it never struck you that a man who does next to nothing but [[{{Confessional}} hear men's real sins]] is not likely to be wholly unaware of human evil? But, as a matter of fact, another part of my trade, too, made me sure you weren't a priest."''

to:

--> ''"'Oh, by being a [[AManIsNotAVirgin celibate simpleton]], simpleton, I suppose,'' he said. ''Has it never struck you that a man who does next to nothing but [[{{Confessional}} hear men's real sins]] is not likely to be wholly unaware of human evil? But, as a matter of fact, another part of my trade, too, made me sure you weren't a priest."''
30th Oct '16 8:03:29 PM Materioptikon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Imperials with the most single-minded devotion to the Emperor are the Ogryns, a human subspecies of very stupid giants that require surgery just to rise to childlike intelligence and also possess unquestioning faith in the GodEmperor. Where regular humans fall to Chaos to satisfy their ambition or bloodlust, Ogryns are basically tricked into thinking the emperor doesn't like their manipulator's enemies.

to:

** The Imperials with the most single-minded devotion to the Emperor are the Ogryns, a human subspecies of very stupid giants that require surgery just to rise to childlike intelligence and also possess unquestioning faith in the GodEmperor. Where regular humans fall to Chaos to satisfy their ambition or bloodlust, Ogryns are basically tricked into thinking the emperor Emperor doesn't like their manipulator's enemies.



-->'''Emperor:''': I destroyed all asshole religions that existed on Terra. Do you want to know why?

to:

-->'''Emperor:''': I [[AC:I destroyed all asshole religions that existed on Terra. Do you want to know why?why?]]



-->'''Emperor''': Wrong. It is because religion is stupid, superstitious, brainwashing crap that makes you into an asshole.

to:

-->'''Emperor''': Wrong.[[AC:Wrong. It is because religion is stupid, superstitious, brainwashing crap that makes you into an asshole.]]
6th Sep '16 12:15:35 PM thatmadork
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* {{Averted|Trope}} in ''VideoGame/{{Stellaris}}''. Being a Spiritualist star nation will still get you insulted HollywoodAtheist-style by Materialists, but the two are treated as two sides of the same coin. After all, Materialists don't get [[PsychicPowers psionics]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 342. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BeliefMakesYouStupid