History Main / BeliefMakesYouStupid

13th Jul '17 4:24:13 PM CheeseDogX
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** On the other hand, ''Babylon 5'' averts this trope more often than your typical Space Opera TV show, for instance including an entire order of Catholic monks who stay on the station for a season to learn more about alien religions, who are never depicted as either unintelligent or deluded. Indeed, nearly all shades of belief (and nonbelief) tend to get a fair shake on the show.

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** On the other hand, ''Babylon 5'' averts this trope more often than your typical Space Opera TV show, for instance including an entire order of Catholic monks who stay on the station for a season to learn more about alien religions, who are never depicted as either unintelligent or deluded. Indeed, nearly all shades of belief (and nonbelief) tend to get a fair shake on the show. Pretty impressive, considering series creator JMichaelStraczynski is a staunch atheist.
5th Jul '17 4:25:20 AM MarqFJA
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* The Adeptus Mechanicus of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' believe that all knowledge ''already exists'', and that it must be found from ruins of the past rather than sought out--in this case, they're right, because the majority of human technological prowess was lost during the Age of Strife, and they're trying to recover it from various Forge Worlds. They tend to call any new technologies, human or alien, heresy unless they can be called a 'modification' of an existing STC technology. The Predator Annihilator is a well known example of this.

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* The Adeptus Mechanicus of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' 40000}}'':
** The Adeptus Mechanicus
believe that all knowledge ''already exists'', and that it must be found from ruins of the past rather than sought out--in this case, they're right, because the majority of human technological prowess was lost during the Age of Strife, and they're trying to recover it from various Forge Worlds. reinvented. They tend to call any new technologies, human or alien, heresy unless they can be called a 'modification' "modification" of an existing STC technology. The Predator Annihilator is a well known example of this. In this case, though, they're kinda right, because the majority of human technological prowess was lost during the Age of Strife, and they're trying to recover it from various Forge Worlds. Besides the trauma of the many horrific technologies that were used during the Age of Strife itself, a major contributing factor to the terrible damage said age caused upon the old human interstellar civilization was the preceding [[RobotWar war with the Men of Iron]], which explains why the Martian Tech-priests and the Imperium in general are so wary to the point of superstitiion of the very concept of scientific innovation, and why they renamed the pre-Age of Strife period from "'''Golden''' Age of Technology" as it was called back then to "'''Dark''' Age of Technology". They're terrified that someone would unleash another technological catastrophe that may very well finish off what the Men of Iron and the Age of Strife started.
27th Jun '17 12:27:50 PM xcountryguy
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* There is a take on this trope in ''MyFatherMyLord''. Although the deeply pious father [[spoiler: is shown to have a slightly negative impact on his wife and son because of his devotion to Judaism at first, his faith ultimately is shown to have tragic consequences; a day taking his son Menachem to the Red Sea, whilst his father and the other devotees are lost in fervent prayer, he slips away into the water and drowns. His father's love for the unseen trumped his fatherly duties to keep watch over his son.]]

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* There is a take on this trope in ''MyFatherMyLord''. Although the deeply pious father [[spoiler: is [[spoiler:is shown to have a slightly negative impact on his wife and son because of his devotion to Judaism at first, his faith ultimately is shown to have tragic consequences; a day taking his son Menachem to the Red Sea, whilst his father and the other devotees are lost in fervent prayer, he slips away into the water and drowns. His father's love for the unseen trumped his fatherly duties to keep watch over his son.]]



* Subverted in ''Tom's Midnight Garden''. Abel, the pious caretaker, at first appears to be a superstitious ignoramus, who thinks Tom is a demon; eventually, his belief allows him to recognize that Tom isn't evil. Later, [[spoiler: as discussed in a conversation between Hatty Bartholomew and Tom,]] the fact that [[spoiler: Abel could see Tom]] strongly implies that he was far more perceptive than anyone gave him credit for.

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* Subverted in ''Tom's Midnight Garden''. Abel, the pious caretaker, at first appears to be a superstitious ignoramus, who thinks Tom is a demon; eventually, his belief allows him to recognize that Tom isn't evil. Later, [[spoiler: as [[spoiler:as discussed in a conversation between Hatty Bartholomew and Tom,]] the fact that [[spoiler: Abel [[spoiler:Abel could see Tom]] strongly implies that he was far more perceptive than anyone gave him credit for.



* In ''Glow'' by Amy Kathleen Ryan, Waverly has this belief about religion, even though she is dating the highly religious Kieran. When she and all the girls on her GenerationShip, the Empyrean, are kidnapped by their sister ship, she distrusts their zealous captain, Pastor Anne Mather. Later, when she sees the same tendencies in Kieran, [[spoiler: who has taken over the Empyrean after the death of the captain]], she automatically distrusts him and all his followers.

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* In ''Glow'' by Amy Kathleen Ryan, Waverly has this belief about religion, even though she is dating the highly religious Kieran. When she and all the girls on her GenerationShip, the Empyrean, are kidnapped by their sister ship, she distrusts their zealous captain, Pastor Anne Mather. Later, when she sees the same tendencies in Kieran, [[spoiler: who [[spoiler:who has taken over the Empyrean after the death of the captain]], she automatically distrusts him and all his followers.



** Modern ''Series/DoctorWho'' has used this and its opposite, but an example of the trope being played straight would be [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter "The Doctor's Daughter"]], where the soldiers' "creation myth" turns out to be [[spoiler: only a week old, due to the nature of their clone-based reproduction and the atrocious death rate of the war]].

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** Modern ''Series/DoctorWho'' has used this and its opposite, but an example of the trope being played straight would be [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter "The Doctor's Daughter"]], where the soldiers' "creation myth" turns out to be [[spoiler: only [[spoiler:only a week old, due to the nature of their clone-based reproduction and the atrocious death rate of the war]].



* In ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', one of the questlines which splits from setting up the Water Filtration Plant involves [[spoiler: a religious zealot who secretly plants a chemical into the plant which, while harmless to humans, is incredibly toxic to several of the alien species living in New LA. She then proceeds to give out the antidote to the aliens who agree to convert to her faith, claiming it to be holy water from her faith's god. The player must assist a Ma-non who is extremely skeptical of religion as a whole (and constantly lets you know that) as he attempts to debunk the scam. Later on it's revealed that the "god" the zealot had seen was in fact a shapeshifting alien who took advantage of her faith to get her to poison the residents of New LA.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', one of the questlines which splits from setting up the Water Filtration Plant involves [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a religious zealot who secretly plants a chemical into the plant which, while harmless to humans, is incredibly toxic to several of the alien species living in New LA. She then proceeds to give out the antidote to the aliens who agree to convert to her faith, claiming it to be holy water from her faith's god. The player must assist a Ma-non who is extremely skeptical of religion as a whole (and constantly lets you know that) as he attempts to debunk the scam. Later on it's revealed that the "god" the zealot had seen was in fact a shapeshifting alien who took advantage of her faith to get her to poison the residents of New LA.]]
16th Jun '17 10:05:52 PM nombretomado
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* The SeventhSea setting has the Vaticine church, which actually [[InvertedTrope inverts]] the trope by advancing the position that all of the world is a puzzle that their god, Theus, laid out for humanity to unravel, and thus the church is one of the greatest forces for scientific advancement in the world. However, the [[UsefulNotes/TheSpanishInquisition Castillian Inquisition]] is just as bad for the advancement of science as it sounds.

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* The SeventhSea ''TabletopGame/SeventhSea'' setting has the Vaticine church, which actually [[InvertedTrope inverts]] the trope by advancing the position that all of the world is a puzzle that their god, Theus, laid out for humanity to unravel, and thus the church is one of the greatest forces for scientific advancement in the world. However, the [[UsefulNotes/TheSpanishInquisition Castillian Inquisition]] is just as bad for the advancement of science as it sounds.
9th Jun '17 4:23:41 AM outlander2012
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Added DiffLines:

-->'''Cartman''':Wait... Isn't... everybody at war over atheism?
-->'''Shvek''':Atheism? No. We've learned to get rid of all the isms in our time.
-->'''Medic''': Yes. Long ago we realized isms are great for those who are rational, but in the hands of irrational people, isms always lead to violence.
-->'''Cartman''': So there is no war now in the future?
-->'''Blavius''': Of course there's war! The stupid French-Chinese think they have a right to Hawaii!
5th Jun '17 5:07:50 PM SpacemanSpoof
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'', Sheldon's mother is about as offensively stereotypical as you can get for a Bible-believing Texan.[[note]]Granted, ''every'' character on the show is some sort of offensively exaggerated stereotype.[[/note]] [[ZigZagged Conversely]], she's also often portrayed as the down-to-earth voice of reason in contrast to Sheldon's antics.
31st May '17 6:38:04 AM thatmadork
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* A recurring theme in the works of ''Creator/KarlMarx''. Belief doesn't ''quite'' make you stupid, but it does make you believe that an eternal paradise exists in the next life so you won't really be encouraged to improve your lot in this one, and is only supported by the ruling classes to keep the workers from doing something with their dangerous free time, such as organizing, thinking and discussing real solutions to their lives.

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* A recurring theme in the works of ''Creator/KarlMarx''.Creator/KarlMarx. Belief doesn't ''quite'' make you stupid, but it does make you believe that an eternal paradise exists in the next life so you won't really be encouraged to improve your lot in this one, and is only supported by the ruling classes to keep the workers from doing something with their dangerous free time, such as organizing, thinking and discussing real solutions to their lives.
31st May '17 6:37:32 AM thatmadork
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Added DiffLines:

* A recurring theme in the works of ''Creator/KarlMarx''. Belief doesn't ''quite'' make you stupid, but it does make you believe that an eternal paradise exists in the next life so you won't really be encouraged to improve your lot in this one, and is only supported by the ruling classes to keep the workers from doing something with their dangerous free time, such as organizing, thinking and discussing real solutions to their lives.
5th May '17 5:38:57 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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-->'''McMillen:''' “It was never implied that [Mom's] insane. And if you’re going by the Bible and you believe all the stories, then why wouldn’t you think that it’s possible now for that stuff to happen?”[[note]]Incidentally, this touches upon a complaint many, many atheists have made about the story of Isaac's biblical namesake, pointing out that it essentially boils down to a schizophrenic almost murdering his son in a fit of madness and that, rather than condemning it as we would under any other circumstance, the Bible teaches us that this is a truly moral man worthy of emulating.[[/note]]
* In Videogame/XenobladeChroniclesX, one of the questlines which splits from setting up the Water Filtration Plant involves [[spoiler: a religious zealot who secretly plants a chemical into the plant which, while harmless to humans, is incredibly toxic to several of the alien species living in New LA. She then proceeds to give out the antidote to the aliens who agree to convert to her faith, claiming it to be holy water from her faith's god. The player must assist a Ma'non who is extremely skeptical of religion as a whole (and constantly lets you know that) as he attempts to debunk the scam. Later on it's revealed that the "god" the zealot had seen was in fact a shapeshifting alien who took advantage of her faith to get her to poison the residents of New LA.]]

to:

-->'''McMillen:''' --->'''[=McMillen=]:''' “It was never implied that [Mom's] insane. And if you’re going by the Bible and you believe all the stories, then why wouldn’t you think that it’s possible now for that stuff to happen?”[[note]]Incidentally, this touches upon a complaint many, many atheists have made about the story of Isaac's biblical namesake, pointing out that it essentially boils down to a schizophrenic almost murdering his son in a fit of madness and that, rather than condemning it as we would under any other circumstance, the Bible teaches us that this is a truly moral man worthy of emulating.[[/note]]
* In Videogame/XenobladeChroniclesX, ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', one of the questlines which splits from setting up the Water Filtration Plant involves [[spoiler: a religious zealot who secretly plants a chemical into the plant which, while harmless to humans, is incredibly toxic to several of the alien species living in New LA. She then proceeds to give out the antidote to the aliens who agree to convert to her faith, claiming it to be holy water from her faith's god. The player must assist a Ma'non Ma-non who is extremely skeptical of religion as a whole (and constantly lets you know that) as he attempts to debunk the scam. Later on it's revealed that the "god" the zealot had seen was in fact a shapeshifting alien who took advantage of her faith to get her to poison the residents of New LA.]]
29th Apr '17 1:10:43 PM Fireblood
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* ''Literature/TheSilerianTrilogy'': {{Zigzagged}}. The ''zanareen'' are religious fanatics whose members seek to prove they're the Firebringer by fasting, prayer and eventually throwing themselves into a live volcano. The rest of the religious characters are smart and level-headed however.

to:

* ''Literature/TheSilerianTrilogy'': {{Zigzagged}}. The ''zanareen'' are religious fanatics whose members seek to prove they're the Firebringer by fasting, prayer and eventually throwing themselves into a live volcano. The rest of the religious characters are smart and level-headed however. Even the ''zanareen'' belief this is what the Firebringer can survive is true, they're just wrong about it being any of them.
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