History Main / BeliefMakesYouStupid

20th Sep '17 8:23:02 AM tyrekecorrea
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-->'''Shvek''':Atheism? No. We've learned to get rid of all the isms in our time.

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-->'''Shvek''':Atheism? -->'''Shvek''': Atheism? No. We've learned to get rid of all the isms in our time.
18th Sep '17 10:05:08 AM ElSquibbonator
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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'''s general philosophy towards religion seems to be "Faith may make you stupid sometimes, but it will probably also make you good (or at least well-meaning)."

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'''s general philosophy towards religion seems to be "Faith may make you stupid sometimes, but it will probably also make you good (or at least well-meaning)." In other words, it gets a DumbIsGood portrayal.
10th Sep '17 2:14:40 AM benda
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* Literature/FatherBrown’s general appearance [[ObfuscatingStupidity made him look dumb to everyone]], but this trope is continually applied to him by the fact that he is a Catholic priest: A lot of people in his stories (''The Blue Cross, The Flying Stars, The Hammer of God, The eye of Apollo'') constantly make the wrong assumption that a priest is a celibate simpleton unaware that in RealLife a priest must study philosophy and theology precisely to defend his beliefs helped by logic, and the fact of hearing a lot of people confessing sins to him gives him an interesting perspective about reality. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in The Blue Cross when he explains to MasterOfDisguise GentlemanThief Flambeau how he discovered him:

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* Literature/FatherBrown’s general appearance [[ObfuscatingStupidity made him look dumb to everyone]], but this trope is continually applied to him by the fact that he is a Catholic priest: A lot of people in his stories (''The Blue Cross, The Flying Stars, The Hammer of God, The eye Eye of Apollo'') constantly make the wrong assumption that a priest is a celibate simpleton unaware that in RealLife a priest must study philosophy and theology precisely to defend his beliefs helped by logic, and the fact of hearing a lot of people confessing sins to him gives him an interesting perspective about reality. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in The Blue Cross when he explains to MasterOfDisguise GentlemanThief Flambeau how he discovered him:


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** Father Brown ends up [[InvertedTrope inverting the trope]] in "The Oracle of the Dog'':
--> The first effect of not believing in God, is that you lose your common sense.
4th Sep '17 9:53:18 AM HalcyonDayz
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* ZigZaggedTrope in ''VideoGame/PathOfExile''. The Templar exile player character is the only religious PC and is chastised by several NPCs for believing blindly in his faith. Nobody has anything good to say about the Templar order either, due to how High Templar Dominus has corrupted it. On the other hand, once the Templar has defeated the TrueFinalBoss Tasuni has this to say:

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* ZigZaggedTrope in ''VideoGame/PathOfExile''. The Templar exile player character is the only religious PC and is chastised by several NPCs {{Non Player Character}}s for believing blindly in his faith. Nobody has anything good to say about the Templar order either, due to how High Templar Dominus has corrupted it. On the other hand, once the Templar has defeated the TrueFinalBoss Tasuni has this to say:
28th Aug '17 4:53:50 AM livestockgeorge
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** Even being an atheist, Straczynski himself does not believe this trope. He makes a conscious effort to avert it. At the most, he thinks that certain beliefs make you naive about the real world. He read the entire Bible twice and enjoyed it during his studies of ancient philosophy, and has said that he wishes he could believe in forgiveness in the way that devout Christians do, but that he cannot forgive evil people on an emotional level. He also repeatedly noted that his beliefs weren't relevant to the story he wanted to tell. Hence his constant use of the religious version of MaybeMagicalMaybeMundane.

to:

** Even being an atheist, Straczynski himself does not believe this trope. He makes a conscious effort to avert it. At the most, he thinks that certain beliefs make you naive about the real world. He read the entire Bible twice and enjoyed it during his studies of ancient philosophy, and has said that he wishes he could believe in forgiveness in the way that devout Christians do, but that he cannot forgive evil people on an emotional level. He also repeatedly noted that his beliefs weren't relevant to the story he wanted to tell. Hence his constant use of the religious version of MaybeMagicalMaybeMundane.MaybeMagicMaybeMundane.
28th Aug '17 4:53:09 AM livestockgeorge
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Added DiffLines:

** Even being an atheist, Straczynski himself does not believe this trope. He makes a conscious effort to avert it. At the most, he thinks that certain beliefs make you naive about the real world. He read the entire Bible twice and enjoyed it during his studies of ancient philosophy, and has said that he wishes he could believe in forgiveness in the way that devout Christians do, but that he cannot forgive evil people on an emotional level. He also repeatedly noted that his beliefs weren't relevant to the story he wanted to tell. Hence his constant use of the religious version of MaybeMagicalMaybeMundane.
6th Aug '17 5:26:49 PM MikeW
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Added DiffLines:

* On ''Series/StargateSG1'', Senator Kinsey shows himself to be this. When he talks about how things will be okay if the Stargate project is shut down, the team tell him about the Goa'uld. They then just stare in shock when Kinsey says even if this alien armada invades ''God will not let anything happen to the United States.''
13th Jul '17 4:24:13 PM CheeseDogX
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** On the other hand, ''Babylon 5'' averts this trope more often than your typical Space Opera TV show, for instance including an entire order of Catholic monks who stay on the station for a season to learn more about alien religions, who are never depicted as either unintelligent or deluded. Indeed, nearly all shades of belief (and nonbelief) tend to get a fair shake on the show.

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** On the other hand, ''Babylon 5'' averts this trope more often than your typical Space Opera TV show, for instance including an entire order of Catholic monks who stay on the station for a season to learn more about alien religions, who are never depicted as either unintelligent or deluded. Indeed, nearly all shades of belief (and nonbelief) tend to get a fair shake on the show. Pretty impressive, considering series creator JMichaelStraczynski is a staunch atheist.
5th Jul '17 4:25:20 AM MarqFJA
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* The Adeptus Mechanicus of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' believe that all knowledge ''already exists'', and that it must be found from ruins of the past rather than sought out--in this case, they're right, because the majority of human technological prowess was lost during the Age of Strife, and they're trying to recover it from various Forge Worlds. They tend to call any new technologies, human or alien, heresy unless they can be called a 'modification' of an existing STC technology. The Predator Annihilator is a well known example of this.

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* The Adeptus Mechanicus of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' 40000}}'':
** The Adeptus Mechanicus
believe that all knowledge ''already exists'', and that it must be found from ruins of the past rather than sought out--in this case, they're right, because the majority of human technological prowess was lost during the Age of Strife, and they're trying to recover it from various Forge Worlds. reinvented. They tend to call any new technologies, human or alien, heresy unless they can be called a 'modification' "modification" of an existing STC technology. The Predator Annihilator is a well known example of this. In this case, though, they're kinda right, because the majority of human technological prowess was lost during the Age of Strife, and they're trying to recover it from various Forge Worlds. Besides the trauma of the many horrific technologies that were used during the Age of Strife itself, a major contributing factor to the terrible damage said age caused upon the old human interstellar civilization was the preceding [[RobotWar war with the Men of Iron]], which explains why the Martian Tech-priests and the Imperium in general are so wary to the point of superstitiion of the very concept of scientific innovation, and why they renamed the pre-Age of Strife period from "'''Golden''' Age of Technology" as it was called back then to "'''Dark''' Age of Technology". They're terrified that someone would unleash another technological catastrophe that may very well finish off what the Men of Iron and the Age of Strife started.
27th Jun '17 12:27:50 PM xcountryguy
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* There is a take on this trope in ''MyFatherMyLord''. Although the deeply pious father [[spoiler: is shown to have a slightly negative impact on his wife and son because of his devotion to Judaism at first, his faith ultimately is shown to have tragic consequences; a day taking his son Menachem to the Red Sea, whilst his father and the other devotees are lost in fervent prayer, he slips away into the water and drowns. His father's love for the unseen trumped his fatherly duties to keep watch over his son.]]

to:

* There is a take on this trope in ''MyFatherMyLord''. Although the deeply pious father [[spoiler: is [[spoiler:is shown to have a slightly negative impact on his wife and son because of his devotion to Judaism at first, his faith ultimately is shown to have tragic consequences; a day taking his son Menachem to the Red Sea, whilst his father and the other devotees are lost in fervent prayer, he slips away into the water and drowns. His father's love for the unseen trumped his fatherly duties to keep watch over his son.]]



* Subverted in ''Tom's Midnight Garden''. Abel, the pious caretaker, at first appears to be a superstitious ignoramus, who thinks Tom is a demon; eventually, his belief allows him to recognize that Tom isn't evil. Later, [[spoiler: as discussed in a conversation between Hatty Bartholomew and Tom,]] the fact that [[spoiler: Abel could see Tom]] strongly implies that he was far more perceptive than anyone gave him credit for.

to:

* Subverted in ''Tom's Midnight Garden''. Abel, the pious caretaker, at first appears to be a superstitious ignoramus, who thinks Tom is a demon; eventually, his belief allows him to recognize that Tom isn't evil. Later, [[spoiler: as [[spoiler:as discussed in a conversation between Hatty Bartholomew and Tom,]] the fact that [[spoiler: Abel [[spoiler:Abel could see Tom]] strongly implies that he was far more perceptive than anyone gave him credit for.



* In ''Glow'' by Amy Kathleen Ryan, Waverly has this belief about religion, even though she is dating the highly religious Kieran. When she and all the girls on her GenerationShip, the Empyrean, are kidnapped by their sister ship, she distrusts their zealous captain, Pastor Anne Mather. Later, when she sees the same tendencies in Kieran, [[spoiler: who has taken over the Empyrean after the death of the captain]], she automatically distrusts him and all his followers.

to:

* In ''Glow'' by Amy Kathleen Ryan, Waverly has this belief about religion, even though she is dating the highly religious Kieran. When she and all the girls on her GenerationShip, the Empyrean, are kidnapped by their sister ship, she distrusts their zealous captain, Pastor Anne Mather. Later, when she sees the same tendencies in Kieran, [[spoiler: who [[spoiler:who has taken over the Empyrean after the death of the captain]], she automatically distrusts him and all his followers.



** Modern ''Series/DoctorWho'' has used this and its opposite, but an example of the trope being played straight would be [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter "The Doctor's Daughter"]], where the soldiers' "creation myth" turns out to be [[spoiler: only a week old, due to the nature of their clone-based reproduction and the atrocious death rate of the war]].

to:

** Modern ''Series/DoctorWho'' has used this and its opposite, but an example of the trope being played straight would be [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter "The Doctor's Daughter"]], where the soldiers' "creation myth" turns out to be [[spoiler: only [[spoiler:only a week old, due to the nature of their clone-based reproduction and the atrocious death rate of the war]].



* In ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', one of the questlines which splits from setting up the Water Filtration Plant involves [[spoiler: a religious zealot who secretly plants a chemical into the plant which, while harmless to humans, is incredibly toxic to several of the alien species living in New LA. She then proceeds to give out the antidote to the aliens who agree to convert to her faith, claiming it to be holy water from her faith's god. The player must assist a Ma-non who is extremely skeptical of religion as a whole (and constantly lets you know that) as he attempts to debunk the scam. Later on it's revealed that the "god" the zealot had seen was in fact a shapeshifting alien who took advantage of her faith to get her to poison the residents of New LA.]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', one of the questlines which splits from setting up the Water Filtration Plant involves [[spoiler: a [[spoiler:a religious zealot who secretly plants a chemical into the plant which, while harmless to humans, is incredibly toxic to several of the alien species living in New LA. She then proceeds to give out the antidote to the aliens who agree to convert to her faith, claiming it to be holy water from her faith's god. The player must assist a Ma-non who is extremely skeptical of religion as a whole (and constantly lets you know that) as he attempts to debunk the scam. Later on it's revealed that the "god" the zealot had seen was in fact a shapeshifting alien who took advantage of her faith to get her to poison the residents of New LA.]]
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