History Main / BeggingTheQuestion

6th Feb '17 7:09:24 PM MitchellProductions
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See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premises; compare ValuesDissonance. See also TautologicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.

to:

See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premises; compare ValuesDissonance. See also TautologicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.
justified as good.
1st Dec '16 10:30:20 PM AnotherDuck
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* In the days of Website/{{Usenet}}, in a football forum, one poster postulated that you need a great coach to win a Super Bowl. He then defined a "great coach" as one who had won a Super Bowl.

[[AC:{{Real Life}}]]
* A number of bad religious and political arguments work this way. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment We're not going to give any examples]], except for the common one of "my interpretation of X is the only valid interpretation", which is proven by interpreting X in the interpretation's favour.

to:

* In the days of Website/{{Usenet}}, in a football forum, one poster postulated that you need a great coach to win a Super Bowl. He then defined a "great coach" as one who had won a Super Bowl.

[[AC:{{Real Life}}]]
* A number of bad religious and political arguments work this way. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment We're not going to give any examples]], except for the common one of "my interpretation of X is the only valid interpretation", which is proven by interpreting X in the interpretation's favour.
Bowl.
15th Sep '16 3:34:26 AM Hylarn
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17th Jul '16 9:01:33 PM ZanderSchubert
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* In the days of Website/{{Usenet}}, in a football forum, one poster postulated that you need a great coach to win a Super Bowl. He then defined a "great coach" as one who had won a Super Bowl.

to:

* In the days of Website/{{Usenet}}, in a football forum, one poster postulated that you need a great coach to win a Super Bowl. He then defined a "great coach" as one who had won a Super Bowl.Bowl.

[[AC:{{Real Life}}]]
* A number of bad religious and political arguments work this way. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment We're not going to give any examples]], except for the common one of "my interpretation of X is the only valid interpretation", which is proven by interpreting X in the interpretation's favour.
14th May '16 10:38:46 AM Fireblood
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"Begging the question" is often used to mean "leading inevitably to the question" (similar to how something can be said to "invite criticism" or someone can be "asking for a smack") in popular media, though this usage is a common BerserkButton for academics aware of the original use noted above (It doesn't help that the academic meaning is not only horribly counter-intuitive[[note]]There's neither any question nor any begging involved[[/note]], but also a mistranslation; as stated above, the original Latin means something more like "arguing the source"). Nevertheless, to avoid confusion, this fallacy is sometimes referred to by its Latin name, ''petitio principii'' in more formal settings.

See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premise; compare ValuesDissonance. See also TautologicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.

to:

"Begging the question" is often used to mean "leading inevitably to the question" (similar to how something can be said to "invite criticism" or someone can be "asking for a smack") in popular media, though this usage is a common BerserkButton for academics aware of the original use noted above (It (it doesn't help that the academic meaning is not only horribly counter-intuitive[[note]]There's neither any question nor any begging involved[[/note]], but also a mistranslation; as stated above, the original Latin means something more like "arguing the source"). Nevertheless, to avoid confusion, this fallacy is sometimes referred to by its Latin name, ''petitio principii'' in more formal settings.

See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premise; premises; compare ValuesDissonance. See also TautologicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.
13th May '16 11:54:46 PM hamza678
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See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premise; compare ValuesDissonance. See also TautalogicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.

to:

See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premise; compare ValuesDissonance. See also TautalogicalTemplar, TautologicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.
13th May '16 11:54:37 PM hamza678
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See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premise; compare ValuesDissonance.

to:

See also NoTrueScotsman. If both parties accuse each other of begging the question, then it's a philosophical impasse -- no one can agree on a common set of premise; compare ValuesDissonance.
ValuesDissonance. See also TautalogicalTemplar, who believes that since they are good, everything they do is justified.
4th May '16 1:17:39 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'', accepting the red text as only speaking the truth requires you believe both that Beatrice is being honest and that the red text speaks only the truth when statements like "The red text speaks only the truth!" come up. [[spoiler: Well, at least that's the case until we see Battler attempt to use the red to say something that turns out to be untrue.]] That said, it does happen to be true: Anything said in red is at worst misleading.

to:

* In ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'', ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'', accepting the red text as only speaking the truth requires you believe both that Beatrice is being honest and that the red text speaks only the truth when statements like "The red text speaks only the truth!" come up. [[spoiler: Well, at least that's the case until we see Battler attempt to use the red to say something that turns out to be untrue.]] That said, it does happen to be true: Anything said in red is at worst misleading.
30th Apr '16 10:52:16 AM Josef5678
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* In UminekoNoNakuKoroNi, accepting the red text as only speaking the truth requires you believe both that Beatrice is being honest and that the red text speaks only the truth when statements like "The red text speaks only the truth!" come up. [[spoiler: Well, at least that's the case until we see Battler attempt to use the red to say something that turns out to be untrue.]] That said, it does happen to be true: Anything said in red is at worst misleading.

to:

* In UminekoNoNakuKoroNi, ''VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi'', accepting the red text as only speaking the truth requires you believe both that Beatrice is being honest and that the red text speaks only the truth when statements like "The red text speaks only the truth!" come up. [[spoiler: Well, at least that's the case until we see Battler attempt to use the red to say something that turns out to be untrue.]] That said, it does happen to be true: Anything said in red is at worst misleading.
30th Apr '16 9:19:58 AM PhantomCobra
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Added DiffLines:

* In UminekoNoNakuKoroNi, accepting the red text as only speaking the truth requires you believe both that Beatrice is being honest and that the red text speaks only the truth when statements like "The red text speaks only the truth!" come up. [[spoiler: Well, at least that's the case until we see Battler attempt to use the red to say something that turns out to be untrue.]] That said, it does happen to be true: Anything said in red is at worst misleading.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BeggingTheQuestion