History Main / BattleInTheRain

25th Jun '17 6:53:26 PM JamesShade
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* A rarity in UsefulNotes/{{Motorsports}}, but it has happened. More likely in road-course dependent series vs. oval dependent ones. In circumstances where rain might presents, such series usually require teams to bring other specialized rain gear (like windshield wipers and signal lights on their rear bumpers).
** The IMSA [=WeatherTech=] Sports Car Championship sees these from time to time, most notably in their 2015 events at Watkins Glen and Road Atlanta. The monsoon-like conditions at the latter actually caused the unusual situation of the overall win being taken by a ''non-Prototype'' vehicle, in this case the Porsche factory team in GT Le Mans.[[note]]normally, the speed advantage of the Prototypes means that the leaders in the other classes finish several laps behind them under dry conditions, especially at endurance events like Road Atlanta (which runs ten hours and is offically dubbed ''Petit Le Mans'' in reference to the famous 24 hour race in France); but in monsoon conditions, the superior speed and horsepower actually proved a disadvantage because it took away from their traction, which meant that even at half-throttle the cars were threatening to spin out, while the lower classes, especially GTLM, were able to use more of their available power because they had better traction in the rain[[/note]]
** UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} mostly averts this by force, because the physics of oval tracks make it impossible to design an effective rain tire that won't explode from air pressure build-up after a few laps. However, there have been a few examples:

to:

* A rarity in UsefulNotes/{{Motorsports}}, but it has happened. More likely in road-course dependent series vs. oval dependent ones. In circumstances where rain might presents, such series usually require teams to bring other specialized rain gear (like windshield wipers and signal lights on their rear bumpers).
** The IMSA [=WeatherTech=] Sports Car Championship sees these from time to time, most notably in their 2015 events at Watkins Glen and Road Atlanta. The monsoon-like conditions at the latter actually caused the unusual situation of the overall win being taken by a ''non-Prototype'' vehicle, in this case the Porsche factory team in GT Le Mans.[[note]]normally, the speed advantage of the Prototypes means that the leaders in the other classes finish several laps behind them under dry conditions, especially at endurance events like Road Atlanta (which runs ten hours and is offically dubbed ''Petit Le Mans'' in reference to the famous 24 hour race in France); but in monsoon conditions, the superior speed and horsepower actually proved a disadvantage because it took away from their traction, which meant that even at half-throttle the cars were threatening to spin out, while the lower classes, especially GTLM, were able to use more of their available power because they had better traction in the rain[[/note]]
** UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} mostly averts this by force, because the physics of oval tracks make it impossible to design an effective rain tire that won't explode from air pressure build-up after a few laps. However, there have been a few examples:



*** In 2014 at Road America, rain fell partway through the race but stopped before the end, which combined with a late caution that extended the race past scheduled distance resulted in the unusual condition of drivers being on wet or dry tires depending on whether they stopped on that final caution. The win eventually went to series regular Brendan Gaughan, who'd stayed out on rain tires during that caution and had spun several times during the dry portion of the race; second went to road ringer Alex Tagliani, who had pitted after running out of fuel but took dry tires and expertly manuevered around the few remaining wet patches to wind up mere tenths behind Gaughan by the checkered flag.
*** 2016 saw monsoon-like conditions at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course event, which led to utter chaos - excluding the handful of start-and-parks who weren't on track long enough to really do anything, practically everyone spun ''at least'' once, and several multi-car crashes broke out on restarts in the incredibly treacherous conditions. The win eventually went to Justin Marks, a skilled road racer whose lack of oval talent had prevented him from gaining full-time employment in any level of the sport.[[note]]although at the time, he was contesting a substantial part-time schedule including numerous ovals for Chip Ganassi[[/note]]

to:

*** In 2014 at Road America, rain fell partway through the race but stopped before the end, which combined with a late caution that extended the race past scheduled distance resulted in the unusual condition of drivers being on wet or dry tires depending on whether they stopped on that final caution. The win eventually went to series regular Brendan Gaughan, who'd stayed out on rain tires during that caution and had spun several times during the dry portion of the race; second went to road ringer Alex Tagliani, who had pitted after running out of fuel but took dry tires and expertly manuevered around the few remaining wet patches to wind up mere tenths behind Gaughan by the checkered flag.
*** 2016 saw monsoon-like conditions at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course event, which led to utter chaos - excluding the handful of start-and-parks who weren't on track long enough to really do anything, practically everyone spun ''at least'' once, and several multi-car crashes broke out on restarts in the incredibly treacherous conditions. The win eventually went to Justin Marks, a skilled road racer whose lack of oval talent had prevented him from gaining full-time employment in any level of the sport.[[note]]although at the time, he was contesting a substantial part-time schedule including numerous ovals for Chip Ganassi[[/note]]Ganassi[[/note]]
*** The 2014 instance led to Goodyear designing workable sets of rain tires for the Cup Series for their two road courses, Sonoma and Watkins Glen, which were first delivered in 2015. However, the Cup Series has continued to avert this due to the events at these tracks since the introduction of the tires being contested under near cloudless conditions (in contrast to the tendency of oval circuits in the same time period to draw rain like magnets).
25th Jun '17 6:49:01 PM JamesShade
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* A rarity in UsefulNotes/{{Motorsports}}, but it has happened. More likely in road-course dependent series vs. oval dependent ones. In circumstances where rain might presents, such series usually require teams to bring other specialized rain gear (like windshield wipers and signal lights on their rear bumpers).
** The IMSA [=WeatherTech=] Sports Car Championship sees these from time to time, most notably in their 2015 events at Watkins Glen and Road Atlanta. The monsoon-like conditions at the latter actually caused the unusual situation of the overall win being taken by a ''non-Prototype'' vehicle, in this case the Porsche factory team in GT Le Mans.[[note]]normally, the speed advantage of the Prototypes means that the leaders in the other classes finish several laps behind them under dry conditions, especially at endurance events like Road Atlanta (which runs ten hours and is offically dubbed ''Petit Le Mans'' in reference to the famous 24 hour race in France); but in monsoon conditions, the superior speed and horsepower actually proved a disadvantage because it took away from their traction, which meant that even at half-throttle the cars were threatening to spin out, while the lower classes, especially GTLM, were able to use more of their available power because they had better traction in the rain[[/note]]
** UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} mostly averts this by force, because the physics of oval tracks make it impossible to design an effective rain tire that won't explode from air pressure build-up after a few laps. However, there have been a few examples:

to:

* A rarity in UsefulNotes/{{Motorsports}}, but it has happened. More likely in road-course dependent series vs. oval dependent ones. In circumstances where rain might presents, such series usually require teams to bring other specialized rain gear (like windshield wipers and signal lights on their rear bumpers).
** The IMSA [=WeatherTech=] Sports Car Championship sees these from time to time, most notably in their 2015 events at Watkins Glen and Road Atlanta. The monsoon-like conditions at the latter actually caused the unusual situation of the overall win being taken by a ''non-Prototype'' vehicle, in this case the Porsche factory team in GT Le Mans.[[note]]normally, the speed advantage of the Prototypes means that the leaders in the other classes finish several laps behind them under dry conditions, especially at endurance events like Road Atlanta (which runs ten hours and is offically dubbed ''Petit Le Mans'' in reference to the famous 24 hour race in France); but in monsoon conditions, the superior speed and horsepower actually proved a disadvantage because it took away from their traction, which meant that even at half-throttle the cars were threatening to spin out, while the lower classes, especially GTLM, were able to use more of their available power because they had better traction in the rain[[/note]]
** UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} mostly averts this by force, because the physics of oval tracks make it impossible to design an effective rain tire that won't explode from air pressure build-up after a few laps. However, there have been a few examples:



->*** At Montreal in 2008, they were able to use them for part of the race before the conditions became so severe that sight was hindered past the limits of safety, which forced that race to be called, with victory going to road ringer Ron Fellows.
->*** In 2014 at Road America, rain fell partway through the race but stopped before the end, which combined with a late caution that extended the race past scheduled distance resulted in the unusual condition of drivers being on wet or dry tires depending on whether they stopped on that final caution. The win eventually went to series regular Brendan Gaughan, who'd stayed out on rain tires during that caution and had spun several times during the dry portion of the race; second went to road ringer Alex Tagliani, who had pitted after running out of fuel but took dry tires and expertly manuevered around the few remaining wet patches to wind up mere tenths behind Gaughan by the checkered flag.
->*** 2016 saw monsoon-like conditions at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course event, which led to utter chaos - excluding the handful of start-and-parks who weren't on track long enough to really do anything, practically everyone spun ''at least'' once, and several multi-car crashes broke out on restarts in the incredibly treacherous conditions. The win eventually went to Justin Marks, a skilled road racer whose lack of oval talent had prevented him from gaining full-time employment in any level of the sport.[[note]]although at the time, he was contesting a substantial part-time schedule including numerous ovals for Chip Ganassi[[/note]]

to:

->*** *** At Montreal in 2008, they were able to use them for part of the race before the conditions became so severe that sight was hindered past the limits of safety, which forced that race to be called, with victory going to road ringer Ron Fellows.
->*** *** In 2014 at Road America, rain fell partway through the race but stopped before the end, which combined with a late caution that extended the race past scheduled distance resulted in the unusual condition of drivers being on wet or dry tires depending on whether they stopped on that final caution. caution. The win eventually went to series regular Brendan Gaughan, who'd stayed out on rain tires during that caution and had spun several times during the dry portion of the race; second went to road ringer Alex Tagliani, who had pitted after running out of fuel but took dry tires and expertly manuevered around the few remaining wet patches to wind up mere tenths behind Gaughan by the checkered flag.
->*** *** 2016 saw monsoon-like conditions at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course event, which led to utter chaos - excluding the handful of start-and-parks who weren't on track long enough to really do anything, practically everyone spun ''at least'' once, and several multi-car crashes broke out on restarts in the incredibly treacherous conditions. conditions. The win eventually went to Justin Marks, a skilled road racer whose lack of oval talent had prevented him from gaining full-time employment in any level of the sport.[[note]]although at the time, he was contesting a substantial part-time schedule including numerous ovals for Chip Ganassi[[/note]]
25th Jun '17 6:48:31 PM JamesShade
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* A rarity in UsefulNotes/{{Motorsports}}, but it has happened. More likely in road-course dependent series vs. oval dependent ones. In circumstances where rain might presents, such series usually require teams to bring other specialized rain gear (like windshield wipers and signal lights on their rear bumpers).
** The IMSA [=WeatherTech=] Sports Car Championship sees these from time to time, most notably in their 2015 events at Watkins Glen and Road Atlanta. The monsoon-like conditions at the latter actually caused the unusual situation of the overall win being taken by a ''non-Prototype'' vehicle, in this case the Porsche factory team in GT Le Mans.[[note]]normally, the speed advantage of the Prototypes means that the leaders in the other classes finish several laps behind them under dry conditions, especially at endurance events like Road Atlanta (which runs ten hours and is offically dubbed ''Petit Le Mans'' in reference to the famous 24 hour race in France); but in monsoon conditions, the superior speed and horsepower actually proved a disadvantage because it took away from their traction, which meant that even at half-throttle the cars were threatening to spin out, while the lower classes, especially GTLM, were able to use more of their available power because they had better traction in the rain[[/note]]
** UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} mostly averts this by force, because the physics of oval tracks make it impossible to design an effective rain tire that won't explode from air pressure build-up after a few laps. However, there have been a few examples:
*** The Xfinity series has had them for their handful of road courses in the mid-2000s, and has gotten to use them a few times:
->*** At Montreal in 2008, they were able to use them for part of the race before the conditions became so severe that sight was hindered past the limits of safety, which forced that race to be called, with victory going to road ringer Ron Fellows.
->*** In 2014 at Road America, rain fell partway through the race but stopped before the end, which combined with a late caution that extended the race past scheduled distance resulted in the unusual condition of drivers being on wet or dry tires depending on whether they stopped on that final caution. The win eventually went to series regular Brendan Gaughan, who'd stayed out on rain tires during that caution and had spun several times during the dry portion of the race; second went to road ringer Alex Tagliani, who had pitted after running out of fuel but took dry tires and expertly manuevered around the few remaining wet patches to wind up mere tenths behind Gaughan by the checkered flag.
->*** 2016 saw monsoon-like conditions at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course event, which led to utter chaos - excluding the handful of start-and-parks who weren't on track long enough to really do anything, practically everyone spun ''at least'' once, and several multi-car crashes broke out on restarts in the incredibly treacherous conditions. The win eventually went to Justin Marks, a skilled road racer whose lack of oval talent had prevented him from gaining full-time employment in any level of the sport.[[note]]although at the time, he was contesting a substantial part-time schedule including numerous ovals for Chip Ganassi[[/note]]
24th Jun '17 6:40:30 AM jamespolk
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* The Battle of Shrewsbury in Creator/OrsonWelles' ''Film/ChimesAtMidnight''.

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* While ''Seven Samurai'' is undoubtedly the TropeMaker, this trope is at least as old as Creator/OrsonWelles film ''Film/JourneyIntoFear'', where the final shootout takes place in the pouring rain as Haki, Graham, Muller, and Banat chase each other around the ledges of the building.
* More Orson Welles:
The Battle of Shrewsbury in Creator/OrsonWelles' ''Film/ChimesAtMidnight''.''Film/ChimesAtMidnight''. Immensely influential in portraying a medieval battle as a muddy, chaotic affair.
20th Jun '17 12:42:11 PM Abodos
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* Extreme overkill example: The final battle in ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' takes place while ''the entire ocean'' is raining down around you.

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
**
Extreme overkill example: The final battle in ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'' takes place while [[spoiler:while ''the entire ocean'' is raining down around you.]]


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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'' has the battle against Mecha-Wiggler take place while it's raining in New Donk City.
16th Jun '17 2:01:22 AM Doug86
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* Batman fights the Red Hood on a rooftop in one of Gotham's perpetual rainstorms in ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' #641.

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* Batman fights the Red Hood on a rooftop in one of Gotham's perpetual rainstorms in ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' #641.



* In ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', the battle between Comicbook/{{Batman}} and Comicbook/{{Superman}} takes place in the rain.

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* In ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', the battle between Comicbook/{{Batman}} Franchise/{{Batman}} and Comicbook/{{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} takes place in the rain.
11th Jun '17 9:19:59 PM sampacm
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* In the ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' TV special the History of Trunks, Future Gohan's final showdown with androids #17 and #18 takes place in the rain.

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* In the ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' TV special the History of Trunks, Future Gohan's final showdown with androids #17 and #18 takes place in the rain. [[spoiler:Gohan is killed, which triggers Trunks' Super Saiyan transformation.]]
10th Jun '17 11:22:02 PM Kirayoshi
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* Will Eisner loved this trope and would frequently have ''ComicBook/TheSpirit'' duking it out with the Octopus in the rain. Creator/ECComics editor Harvey Kurtzman coined the phrase "Eisenspritz" to describe the perpetual rains that tend to accompany the Spirit's battles.
6th Jun '17 3:53:47 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* Played for laughs in ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing''. In one quest, you have to influence the outcome of a war between the hippies and the frat boys. If you [[GuideDangit manipulate the battle correctly,]] you can force a confrontation between TheMan, the frat boys' leader, and [[Film/TheBigLebowski The Big Wisniewski]], leader of the hippies. In the dialogue that follows, The Man GenreSavvy remarks that the weather isn't quite right for a final stand-off, and Wisniewski will have a Hippie Shaman summon a rain storm.

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* Played for laughs in ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing''. In one quest, you have to influence the outcome of a war between the hippies and the frat boys. If you [[GuideDangit manipulate the battle correctly,]] you can force a confrontation between TheMan, the frat boys' leader, and [[Film/TheBigLebowski The Big Wisniewski]], leader of the hippies. In the dialogue that follows, The Man GenreSavvy remarks that the weather isn't quite right for a final stand-off, and Wisniewski will have a Hippie Shaman summon a rain storm.
24th Apr '17 4:02:14 PM Hjortron18
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* Pictured above, the final showdown between Neo and Agent Smith at the climax of ''Film/TheMatrixRevolutions''. (Of course, that was because Smith made it rain. Smith loves the rain.) By the way, very few people know that this is an homage to the [[KoreanMovies South Korean Movie]]
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowhere_to_Hide_(1999_film) 'Nowhere to Hide'(1999)]]'s finale, where the cop and the murderer fights in the rain.

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* Pictured above, the final showdown between Neo and Agent Smith at the climax of ''Film/TheMatrixRevolutions''. (Of course, that was because Smith made it rain. Smith loves the rain.) By the way, very few people know that this is an homage to the [[KoreanMovies South Korean Movie]]
[http://en.
Movie]] ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowhere_to_Hide_(1999_film) 'Nowhere Nowhere to Hide'(1999)]]'s Hide (1999)]]'''s finale, where the cop and the murderer fights in the rain.


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* Film/{{Thor}} has a spectacular mud fight in the rain against a likewise brawny S.H.I.E.L.D. agent.
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